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Full text of "Journal of the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy"

U. S. PATENT OFFICE. 



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GENERAL INDEX 

TO THE 

American Journal of Pharmacy, 



FROM ITS COMMENCEMENT, 
December, 1823, to November, 1870, inclusive. 

COMPILED BY 

HANS M. WILDER. 



Before using the Index, consult the Author's Note and Explanations. 



Owing to the length of time required in preparing this Index, two volumes, 
dited by Prof. Maisch, have been published since December, 1870, and are not in- 
luded in this work. 



PHILADELPHIA: 
MERRTHEW & SON, PRINTERS 
No. 135 North Third Street. 
1873. 



HISTORICAL NOTICE • 

OF 'I'HE 

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHARMACY. 



The idea of publishing a General Index to the American Journal of Pharmacy 
•was entertained for several years before an opportunity occurred to carry it into 
effect. In 1850, AUred" B. Taylor, a member of the Publishing Committee, prepared 
the manuscript copy of an Index to the first twenty volumes, which was printed and 
issued with the Journal of that year, and proved a valuable aid to the readers ; but 
the twenty-two volumes since issued are much larger, and include an amount of 
matter nearly double that contained in the first twenty. In the autumn of 1870, 
Mr. Hans M. Wilder made a voluntary offer to index the Journal on a plan of his own- 
that would render it very complete. He supposed it would occupy his leisure time for 
several months, but on the acceptance of his service by the Committee, he soon 
found, by actual trial, that the task was far greater than he had expected. With a 
perseverance worthy of great commendation, Mr. Wilder finally completed his MS. 
in September, 1872, and soon afterwards it was put in the hands of the printer. This 
index includes references to all the articles and items in the original four pre- 
liminary numbers published in 1825, 1826 and 1827, and in the succeeding /or/?/- 
two regular volumes in three distinct series, commencing in April, 1829, and ending 
in November, 1870. but does not include the volumes of 1871 — 72, edited by Prof. 
Maisch. 

In glancing back over the period covered by the publication of this Journal, and 
noting the difficulties through which it has passed, there is just cause for congratu- 
lation that after many vicissitudes it is now firmly established as a representative 
Journal of Pharmacy, circulating freely in America and well known in Europe. The 
amount of valuable information pertaining to our profession included in its pages is 
large, and can only be appreciated by an examination of this Index, which is so well 
arranged by the autlior as to enable any one having a reasonable clue to the subject 
sought, to find it without difficulty. It will be particularly useful to investigators 
and compilers in chemistry, pharmacy, materia medica, therapeutics, etc., as the 
■Journal commences with the introduction of enlightened pharmacy into the United 
States, and continues uninterruptedly to the present time. 

Besides the numerous original articles embraced in its pages, a selection of the 
best papers from foreign journals will be found, the whole constituting a history of 
the development and progress of pharmacy in Europe and the United States. The 
Index of Authors has been carried out in a way to greatly aid the reader who often 
•can remember the author's name without being able to recall the subject, or title of 



iv 



HISTORICAL NOTICE. 



his papers. Mr. Wilder's prefatory note will explain the peculiarities of, and manner 
of nsingf, the Index to best advantage. 

The original Committee of Publication, under whose auspices the four preliminarj 
numbers of the Journal of the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy were issued, were Dr- 
Samuel Jackson, Henry Troth, Solomon Temple, Ellis H. Yaruall and Daniel B. Smithy 
-who all contributed to the pages. To the latter especially belongs the credit of 
having given a high tone to these early numbers, and having contributed many 
valuable papers to the earlier volumes of the regular series while Chairman of the 
Publishing Committee, and who yet lives to recognize the abundant fruition of 
his disinterested labors. In 1829, the Committee was re-organized, consisting of 
Daniel B. Smith. Chas. Ellis, S. P. Griffitts and Dr. George B. Wood, with Dr. Benja- 
min Ellis as the editor. Dr. Ellis, who succeeded Dr. S. Jackson as Professor of 
Materia Medica in the College, had contributed articles and editorial aid in getting 
out the preliminary numbers. Under his able and earnest exertion^, the '-Journal 
of the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy" assumed a solid and well-adjusted form, 
and became the vehicle of several valuable contributions. 

On t'be decease of Or. Ellis in April, 1833, at the commenc-^raent of the third vol- 
ume. Dr. Robert Egglesfield Griffith was appoiu^ed editor, and continued the super- 
vision of the work until October, 1836, near the close of the eighth volume, when, oa 
being elected a member of the Faculty of the University of M iryland, he resigned 
his Professorship in our College, and the Editorship, and was succeeded by Dr. Jo- 
seph Carson, in both positions. In 1835, during Dr. Griffith's incumbency, the Pub- 
lishing Committee was re-organized by the addition of Dr. Bache, Elias Durand, W. 
Hodgson, Jr., Jos. Scattergood John C. Allen and Dillwyn Parrish, the name of 
the Journal changed to its present title, The American Journal of Pharmacy, and a 
new series commenced. Dr. Griffith's efforts, during his service, added greatly to 
the character of the Journal, which had commenced to attract notice abroad. Dr. 
Carson continued in the editorial chair from November, 1836, to July, 1850, during 
which long period he labored diligently, both by original contributions and transla- 
tions from the French journals, to advance its character as a scientific serial, espe- 
cially in the direction of the Materia Medica. Dr. Carson associated with himself, 
as co-editor. Dr. Robert Bridges from 1839 to 1845, and afterwards, in 1848, William 
Procter, Jr., was associated until 1850, having previously catered several years as a 
member of the Committee. In 1839, Joseph Scattergood resigned from the Com- 
mittee. In 1842, the names of Ambrose Smith, William Procter, Jr., Augustine Du- 
hamel and William R. Fisher were substituted for those of D. B, Smith, J. C. Allen^ 
W. Hodgson, Jr., and Dillwyn Parrish, who withdrew from the service. In 1845, 
Drs Wood and Bache and Elias Duran i retired from the Committee, and Thomas. 
P James was aided, reducing the Committee to six members, including the editor. 
Ift 1846, Dr. Bridges was added. In 18 48, the committee elected were D. B. Smith, 
Dr. Bridges, Charles Ellis, Ambrose Smith, Dr. Carson and W. Procter, Jr. In 1849, 
Charles Ellis, Dr. Robert Bridges, Edward Parrish, D. B. Smith, Dr. Carson and W. 
Procter, Jr. In 185 \ C. Ellis, Dr. Carson, Dr. Bridges, W. Procter, Jr., E. Parrish 
and A. B. Taylor. 

During the editorship of Dr. Carson, several circumstances transpired to improve 
its scientific character. The invitation to the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy 
from the Official Committee to participate in the revision of the United States Phar- 
macopoeia in 1840, gave an impetus to Pharmacy in Philadelphia which resulted in 
the establishment of the Pharmaceutical meetings of the College, from which flowed 
a steady stream of original contributions for several years. Then the publication 
of the PhaTmaceutical Journal and the Chemical Gazette, in 1841 and 2, in London, 



HISTORICAL NOTICE. 



V 



^iftorded new aud very valuable aid in the papers on various subjects, which their 
pages ottered. Besides, several earnest workers had wrought in its favor, and none 
more earnestly aud effectively than the late Augustiue Duhamel, who first brought 
the method of percolation practically before the xVmericaa pharmacists, and intro- 
duced many other items of French pharmacy. 

Up to this time the financial affairs of the Committee had struggled on under the 
management of its treasurer, Charles Ellis, usually leaving a small balance in favor 
of the Committee. During the twenty- five years of its existence to this time, the 
highest annual payment for editorial service was $100. 

On the retirement of Dr. Carson in July, 1850, the editorial chair was taken by 
William Procter, Jr., who continued its occupant until April, 1871, a period of over 
twenty years. 

In 1831, the Committee consisted of Charles Ellis, Dr. Bridges, Edward Parrish, 
Alfred B. Taylor and the editor; and there appears to have been no change in the 
Committee until 1861, when the name of John M. Maisch replaced that of Dr. Bridges, 
and this Committee remained unchanged until 1870, when Thomas S. Wiegand re- 
placed Edward Parrish. 

A new feature in the Jaurnil, introduced by the assistant editor in 1848, was the 
editorial department, which enabled the Eiitors to bring forward various matters in 
an informal way, make suggestions, comments, etc. The size of the number was 
then increased to 96 pages, and by bringing five numbers out in the year 1847, the 
20th volume was made to commence with the year 1848. In 1852 the Committee 
decided to make the Journal issue bi-monthly instead of quarterlj- ; to increase 
the length and width of the page, and to introduce a distinct advertising sheet. 
The price was increased to three dollars, whilst the matter was nearly doubled. 
It was also determined to begin a new series, owing to the change in size. In 
this fjrm the Journal continued to the end of 1870 (18 volumes). The advan- 
tages arising from these changes, especially that of frequency of issue, soon be- 
came apparent in the increase of subscriptions and greater interest in the work by 
writers and investigators. Efforts had also been made to make it better known 
abroad, and the results were favorable. The American Pharmaceutical' Association 
commenced its existence with this series, and for several years the minutes of the 
proceedings of the Association, and most of the papers, were published in this Jour- 
nal, almost verbatim— although no official connection existed. The influence of the 
Association on the Journal was favorable, and it went on improving until the un- 
fortunate period of the civil v/ar, wiea the great loss of subscribers incident to the 
stopping of the Southern mail, caused heavy losses to the Committee, and this, with 
the great rise in the price of paper and wages, rendered it necessary to reduce largely 
the number printed after 1863 until the close of the war, and to reduce the number 
of pages in each number from 96 to 8 J, in 186 4. Notwithstanding the depressing 
influence on all scientific Journals caused by the war, aud the failure of miny con- 
tributors to continue their literary aid in its suppor :, causing much additional labor, 
the Editor and Committee persevered through the dark days, and in 1865 found a 
reaction setting in briskly, which has continued to the present time. 

In 1869, owing to the want of gjod management in collecting the subscriptions, 
the finances of the Committee became again depressed, and although the Treasurer 
soon w.ii enabled, by proper exertions, to get a balance in favor of the Committee, 
it became apparent that a batter plan was needed for the conduction of the business 
of the Journal. 

In September, 1870, the Editor called the attention of the College to the subject, 
suggested the propriety of having a business editor (like the Pharmaceutical Journal), 



vi 



HISTORICAL NOTICE. 



to manage the advertisements, accounts and distribution of the Journal, with his 
office at the College building, and asked for a committee of business men to co-ope- 
rate with the Publishing Committee in carrying it out. This request was acceded 
to, and James T. Shinn, Robert Shoemaker and Charles Bullock were appointed- 
After several meetings, the joint Committee reported to a special meeting of the Col- 
lege on the 5th of December, 1870, when it was resolved that the business pertain- 
ing to the Journal should be transacted at the College Hall ; that the Joarnal should 
be published monthly, and that a business editor should be appointed to attend to 
the advertisements, accounts and distribution of the Journal. 

At the stated meeting of the College, December 27th, the Editor, who for some 
time had intended to retire, offered his resignation of the editorship, to take effect 
on the 1st of April, 1871, promising to aid in getting the new order of things in ope- 
ration, and to edit the monthly numbers until that time, so that his successor could 
be elected at the annual meeting in March. The College also referred the nomina- 
tion of the Editor to a special committee. The Publishing Committee having appoint- 
ed Mr. Henry H. WoUe as business Editor, that officer entered so diligently into his 
business, that at the annual meeting the Committee was able to make a favorable 
financial report, and to state that the three numbers of the new fourth series had 
been issued. At this meeting, Charles Ellis, who had served on the Publishing 
Committee for about forty years, and most of that time as its Treasurer, and often 
when difficulties beset its path, now declined a re-election. During this long 
period, besides giving his services as Treasurer gratuitously, the accounts had 
been kept, the Journal distributed, the collections made, and the stock stored by his 
establishment at a trifling cost to the College — an instance of long, disinterested 
service rarely met with in the annals of journalism. The Special Committee brought 
lorward the name of Prof. John M. Maisch as a candidate for the editorship, who 
was duly elected, and the following members as the Publishing Committee, viz : 
William Procter, Jr., John M. Maisch, Charles Bullock, Alfred B. Taylor and Thomas 
S. Wiegand. At the first meeting of this Committee it was determined to have a 
regular organization of Chairman, Treasurer and Secretary; to meet monthly, to pay 
all bills by Orders on the Treasurer, signed by Chairman and Secretary, and to keep 
out of debt. Mr. Bullock was elected Treasurer and Mr. Wiegand, Secretary; and, 
as the annual reports have shown, the aff'airs of the Journal have prospered greatly 
under this management, and its circulation has largely increased. 



William Procter, Jr., ] 
John M. Maisch, ji n- -l- 

Charles Bullock, ^ Pi^bhshmg^ 

Jambs T. Shinn,* 
Thomas S. Wiegand. 



Committee. 



Aj)i'il, 1873. 

* Elected March, 1k72. 



NOTE BY THE AUTHOR. 



In making this Index for the readers of the American Journal of Pharmacy, the 
Compiler desires to say that he has spared no expenditure of time and labor to get 
it accurate in its language and correct in its figures of reference to volumes and 
pages. To simplify the Index, the Volumes of the three series are numbered con- 
tinuously .from one to forty-two in Roman numerals, whilst the pages are in Arabic 
figures; thus, XI. 2S2," means the eleventh volume from the beginning, or the 
fifth volume of the second series, page 262. To prevent all difficulty as to the 
meaning of these numbers, the following table has been drawn up, premising that 
the reference to articles in the four preliminary numbers published between 1825 
and 1828 are indicated by the abbreviation Prel. No. 



Volume. 






Volume, ! 


Volume. 








Volume 


I, April, 1829— Jan 


1830 






XXII, Jan. 1850. 


2d Ser 


, XVI. 


11, " 
III, " 


18:30— " 


1831 






XXIII, 




1851. 




XVII. 


1831— " 


1832 






XXIV, 




1852. 




XVIII. 


IV. 




1833 






XXV, 




1853. 


3d Ser., I. 


V, •' 


1833— " 


183 4 






xxvr, 




1854. 




II. 


VI, 


1831— " 


1835 






XXVII, 




1855. 




III. 


vri, 


183.5— " 


1836 


2d Series, L 




XXVIII, 




1856. 




IV. 


VIII, " 


1836— 


1837 


II. 




XXIX, 




1857. 




V. 


IX, " 


1837— '• 


1838 


III. 




XXX, 




1858. 




vt. 


X, " 


183?— " 


1839 


rv. 




XXXf, 




1859. 




VII. 


xr, " 


J 830— " 


1840 


V. 




XXXII, 




1860. 




VIII. 


XII, " 


1840— " 


1841 


VI. 




XXXIIl. 




1801. 




IX. 


xrii, " 


1841— " 


1842 


VII. 




XXXIV, 




1862. 




X. 


X[V, " 


1842— " 


1843 


VIII. 




XXXV, 




1863. 




XI. 


XV, " 


18-43- " 


18X4 


IX. 




XXXVI, 




1864. 




XII. 


XVI, " 


1844— " 


1845 


X. 




XXXVII, 




1865. 




XIIL 


XVII, " 


IS45— " 


1846 


XI. 




XXXVIII, 




1866. 




XIV. 


XVIII, " 


184(3— " 


1847 


XII. 




XXXIX, 




1867. 




XV. 


XIX, " 


1847— Nov 


1847 


Xlll. 




XL, 




18G8. 




XVI. 


XX, Jan. 


1848 




XIV. 




XLl. 




1869. 




XVII. 


XXI, " 


1849 




XV. 




XLII, 




1870. 




XVIIL 



It will assist the reader to be aware that each salt will be found undor the Latin 
name of its base; general properties under the English name of base ; and pre- 
parations under the Latin name of their class; thus, Oxalate of Iron will be found 
under '■^Ferrum^'' and not under '■'■Iron.^'' On the other hand, any general property 
of iron will be found under ^'■Iron.'' Compound Tincture of Cinchona will be found 
under '■•Tlnctura^' and not under Cinchonn'" or ^'■Compound." Everything relating to 
mercurial ointment will be found under " Unguentum Hydrargyri," and no where 
else, neither under " Ointment," " Mercury " nor •■ Hydrargyrum." 

The abbreviatioJi W. k B." means U. H. Dispensatory Edit., 1869, of Wood k 



Vlll 



NOTE BY THE AUTHOR. 



Bache, and ''^ Parrish" means Parrish's Practical Pharnlac3^ Edit. 1867, references 
to these two works having V)een made, when possible, to save trouble. 

The internal arrangement of the separate articles containing several references is 
alphabetical, and to assist the eje the leading word or chief point in each reference 
is in italics. When there are several authors of the same name, they are arranged 
in the alphabetical order of their first nurae. 

In preparing the Index, I have kept always in mind the following rules: — 

1. Completeness. 

2. To put together what belongs together. 

3. All synonyms likely to occur to the American pharmacist. 

4. Accuracy as to volume and page. 

In concluding this notice, the Author hopes he has accomplished his task to the 
satisfaction of the CoUeg?, and to the advantage of all who may use the Index. 

HANS M. WILDER. 

Philadelphia, April 13</i, 1873. 



INDEX. 



ABELMOSOHUS esculentus. See Hibis- 
cus. 

ABIES BALSAMEA, Guibourt, xii, 132 — in 
Michigan, Stearns, xxxi, 28. 

CANADENSIS, Ellis, ii, 18 — in Michi- 
gan, Stearns, xxxi, 28 — Tannin, 
amount in bark. Bowman, xli, 194. 
Compare Hemlock. 

— — EXCELSA, Guibourt, xii, 126, 134 — 
coniferin in cambial juice, Hartig, xlii, 
220— m-m, Hanbury, xxii, 260. 

- — — LARix. See Larix. 

■ nigra, in Michigan, Stearns, xxxi, 28. 

■ pbctinata, Guibourt, xii, 126 — coni- 
ferin in cambial juice, Hartig, xlii, 
220. 

>— — TAxiFOLiA, Guibourt, xii, 126, 129. 
— ' — Compare Fir. 

ABIETIT, composition, Kochleder, xli, 
419. 

ABORIGINES, chemical arts. Green, v, 
94 — metals known, Green, v, 182 — 
pottery, Green, v, 302. 

ABORTION, prevented (Viburnum pruni- 
folium), Phares, xxxix, 259 — in cows 
(ergot of Indian corn, W. & B., 1624) 

xxxiii, 412. 

ABSINTHE, physiological effects, xl, 356. 

ABSINTHIN, preparation and composi- 
tion, Luck, xxiii, 358, xxxv, 542. 

ABSINTHIUM (Wormwood), influence of 
drying, Schoonbroodt, xli, 321 — per- 
colation with water [packing), Sou- 
beiran, viii, 225 — tasteless (charcoal), 
Weppen, xviii, 203. 

ABSORBING power of liquids (for gases), 
Berzelius ; Saussure, xxxi, 116. 

power of roots of plants, Jessen, 

xxxiv, 155. 

ACACIA (the gum). See Gum Arabic. 
— — Arabica, acclimatization in Algeria, 

xxxvii, 337 — yields Babul Bark, xxiii, 

276. 



ACACIA catechu. See Catechu. 

cochleocarpa, yields Cortex adstrin- 

gens brasiliensis, xiii, 152. 

concinna, yields lac, xxxix, 379. 

DORAToxYLON (Spcarwood), Austra- 
lia, its use, xxxv, 450. 

FARNESiANA, in perfumery, Piesse, 

xxvi, 277. 

JUREMA, yields Cortex adstringens 

brasiliensis, xii, 224 — gum angico, 
xvii, 81. 

LEUcoPHLoeA, yields gum bassorah, 

vi, 149. 

MELANOXYLON (Blackwood), Austra- 
lia, its use, XXXV, 450. 

MOLLissiMA (Wattle), Australia, its 

use, xxxv, 450. 

NiLOTiCA, acclimatization in Algeria, 

xxxvii, 337. 

ODORATISSIMA, Xxix, 77. 

siRissA, yields gum Dirisani, xxix, 

79. 

SOPHORA, Tasmania, yields a kind of 

Chocolate, xxxv, 450. 

suNDBA, xxix, 77. 

VEREK, acclimatization in Algeria, 

xxxvii, 337 — yields gum Senegal, v, 

348. 

viRGiNALis, yields Cortex adstrin- 
gens brasiliensis, xiii, 152. 

Compare Mimosa. 

ACADEMY op Natural Sciences, Phila- 
delphia, building fund, xxxviii, 191 — 
soiree of biological and microscopi- 
cal section, xlii, 378. 

OP Sciences, National, incorpora- 
tion, xxxv, 379. 

ACANTHOLIMON libanoticum, xli, 434. 

ACARUS ERUDiTus (bookworm), xxix, 
182. 

ACCURACY, chemical, Crookes, xli, 133, 
ACER RUBRUM, yields blue color, vi, 73. 
ACETAL, composition, xlii, 455. 



[2] 



6 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



ACETIN, properties, Berthelot, xxv, 359. 

ACETONE (Pyroacetic Spirit), behavior 
to Lieben's iodoform test, Hager, xlii, 
399 — to nitric acid, Koene, xvii, 262 
— composition.^ Dumas ; Kane ; Liebig, 
X, 203 — conversion into methylic alco- 
hol, Friedel, xxxi, 172 — derivatives^ 
Dumas; Kane; Liebig; Peligot, x, 
202 — distinction from methylic alco- 
hol, Scanlau (W. & B., 1589), xxii, 
355 — manufacture from acetates. Bell, 
xxiii, 54; Liebig, x, 203; Matteucci, 
iii, 308 ; from citric acid, Liebig, xxxii, 
265 — yield from metallic acetates, ta- 
ble, Thomson, xxiii, 55 — in gout and 
rheumatism, Hastings, xix, 66. 

PENTABROME, compositioo, xxxvii, 28. 

ACETUM. See Vinegar ; Acidum aceti- 

CUM. 

allii, D. B. Smith, Prel. No. 50. 

AROMATiouM, Ph.Helvet. (65), xxxix, 

530. See Vinegar, aromatic. 
CANTHARiDis (contaius no canthari- 

din). Redwood, xiii, 309, 311— Met- 

tauer's formula, xxvi, 67. 
coLCHici, drops and minims, Durand, 

i, 169— Ph. Dublin (26), iii, 331 ; (50) 

xxiii, 17— Ph. Helvet. (65), xxxix, 530. 

DESTILLATUM. See AciDUM ACETICDM 

DiLUTUM. Ph. U S. (20), iii, 77 ; (30) 
iii, 76. 

DIGITALIS, Ph Helvet. (65), xxxix, 530. 

iPECACUANHyE, Johusou, xxxiil, 139. 

LOBELi.E, Procter, jr., xiv, 109 — Ph. 

U. S. (60), remarks, Procter, jr., 
xxxvi, 210. 

OPii, drops and minims, Durand, i, 

formula, original, v, 260 — Ph. 
U. S. (20), (W. & B., 913, note), Prel. 
No. 54— improved, Ellis (W. & B., 
913), xi, 202; Evans, Prel. No. 53; 
Grahame, xxx, 527 ; Hartshorne, Prel. 
No. 58— Ph. U. S. (60), remarks, Tay- 
lor, XXXV, 409; Ph. Dublin (26), iii, 
333 ; Ph. Gallica (37), x, 2dO— poison- 
ing. See Mistakes. 

SEDATivuM, Horne, viii, 81. 

RUBi iD^i, Ph. Helvet. (65), xxxix, 

530. 

SANGUiNARi^, Ph. U. S. (60), remarks, 

Procter, jr., xxxvi, 210, 

sciLL^, drops and minims, Durand, 

169 — Ph. U. S. (60), remarks, Proc- 
ter, jr. (W. & B., 914) xxxvi, 298— 
Ph. Helvet. (65), xxxix, 530. 

ACETYLS, PEROXIDE, Brodie, xxxiii, 113. 

ACETYLENE, by incomplete combustion, 
Berthelot, xxxviii, 263. 

ACHILLEA MILLEFOLIUM, Tannin amount, 
Bowman, xli, 194 — in uterine hemor- 
rhage, Coates, xxvii, 319. 

ACHILLEATES, Zanon, xix, 58. 

ACHILLEIN, Zanon, xix, 57. 

ACHRAS SAPOTA, fruit, Carson, viii, 280. 



ACIDS, general remarks. See after Acid- 

ZIZIPHOTANNIC. 

ACID (Acidum). 

ACETIC. See AcETUM, Vinegar — ac- 
tion on resins and gum resins, Sace, 
xlii, 243 — capillary power, Franken* 
heim, xxxv, 248 — coloring matter,, 
Wittstein, xxxiii, 408 — drops and min- 
ims, Bernouilly, xxxi, 441; Durand, 
i, 169 — estimation, Gladstone (distil 
into carbonate of baryta), xxvii, 47 j. 
Otto (defends use of alkalies), xxix, 
441 ; Tissandier (titrated caustic 
soda, xlii, 273 — manufacture and pro- 
duction, from the acetates, in Glas- 
gow, xiii, 213 ; Jac. Bell., xxiii, 262 j 
Christl.,Voelckel (with muriatic acid), 
xxvi, 48 ; Grimme (American turpen- 
tine), xxxiii, 113; Kuhlman (baryta 
salts), xxxi, 141 ; Rogers (alcohol and 
chromic acid), xviii, 297; Stenhouse 
(seaweed), xxiii, 277 ; Ph. U. S. (30), 
iii, 79; Ph. Helvet. (65), xxxix, 210; 
Ph. Dublin (50), xxiii, 9 ; Ph. Lond. 
(24), Prel. No. 17; by synthesis, 
Wanklyn, xxxii, 445 ; extempore, iv, 
204 — mineral acida detected, Tissan- 
dier, xlii, 274 — phosphate of lime in, 
Bruckner, xlii, 389 — pure, prepara- 
tion, Reichenbach, xxvi, 235 — test for 
purity (W. B., 21), Lightfoot, xxxiv, 
185 — in wines, Bechamp ; Pasteur, 
xxxv, 471 — in perfumery, Piesse, xxvii, 
79. 

ANHYDROUS, Gcrhardt, xxiv, 371. 

CRYSTALLIZED, Sc^iUe^ Auger, 

V, 40 ; Tillmann, xxxv, 128. 

DILUTUM. See ACETUM DESTILLA- 
TUM. I>ro;?s and minims, Durand, i, 169; 
Proctor, xxxv, 248 — preparation, Ph. 
U. S. (30), iii, 79 ; Ph. Helvet., xxxix, 
210— strength of. Ph. U. S. (50), 
Maisch, xxx, 306. 

GLACiALE,dropsandminims, Du- 
rand, i, 169 — preparation, Jac. Bell., 
xxiii, 265; Ph. Dublin (50), xxiii, 9. 

ACHiLLEic, Zanon, xix, 57. 

ACONiTic (Delphinium consolida, "W. 

& B., 349), Wicke, xxvii, 152. 

ACRYLIC, from glyceric acid, Beil- 

stein, xxxv, 31. 

ABsciNic (Parrish, 667), Rochleder,, 

xxxv, 290, note. 

AESCULic. See Acid, esculic. 

ALOETic, Braconnot = carbazotic 

acid, i, 158 — blue coloring property,, 
Barreswill, xv, 318. See Acid, car- 
bazotic. 

AMYGDALic, compositiou, Liebig, 

Woehler, x, 192 — observations, Proc- 
ter, jr., X, 191. 

ANACARDic, composition, Staedeler 

(Parrish, 596), xx, 139 — preparation, 
Staedeler (Parrish, 599), xx, 137. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



ACID ANBMONic (Ranunculus sceleratus), 
Erdmaun, xxxi, 440. 

ANGELicic, from Peucedanine, Wag- 
ner, xxvii, 167 — conversion into vale- 
rianic acid, Ascher, xlii, 467. 

ANiLic, Dumas = indigotic, ix, 263. 

ANTHEMic, Pattoue (W. & B., 120, 

note), xxxi, 471. 

ANTHRANiLic, Fritschc, xxxiii, 46. 

ANTiMONic, decolorizing power, Fil- 

hol, xxiv, 239. 

ANTIRRHINIC, Moriu, TXXV, 295 (W. & 

B., 351). 

ANTYRRHiNic, Walz (from Linaria), 

XXXV, 295. 

APOPHYLLIC, XXxiv, 521. 

ARACHiNic (Parrish, 548), xli, 465. 

ARSENIC, behavior to alkaline poly- 
sulphides, Schiff, xxxiii, 265 — prepa- 
ration (chlorine and arsenious acid), 
Girardin, xxxviii, 62 — solubility in gly- 
cerin, Adolphus, xxxix, 150; Klever, 
xlii, 222 — mgar^ a rose-color, iii, 174. 

ARSENIOUS. Compare Arsenic. Ac- 
cidents prevented, Millmann, xii, 18 — 
antidote^ see Arsenic — contains anti- 
mony^ Streng, xxxiii, 407 — behavior to 
alkaline polysulphides, Schiff, xxxiii, 
265 — to charcoal, Graham, iii, 15 i — 
capacity for bases, Bloxam, xxxiv, 440 
— eschar^ color, vii, 2Q2— potassium, 
iodide, compound, Harms, xxvii, 270 
— poisoning, see Arsenic; mistakes, 
fatal — powdering, effect, Dorvault, xxv, 
80 — properties, Durand and Mitchell, 
iv, 108 — as substitute for quinia, Tur- 
ner, xxxiii, 556 — reaction, limit (on 
several reagents), Hastings, xiii, 202 ; 
Reinsch, xi, 217 ; Lassaigne, xii, 284 
— reduction, Berzelius and others, xii, 
283— solubility in glycerin, Adolphus, 
xxxix, 150; Cap, xxxiii, 570; Hills, 
xxiii, 161; Klever, xlii, 222 — water, 
Bucholz ; Fisher; Durand and Mit- 
chell; Guibourt; Klaproth, iv. 111, 

112 diminished by fatty bodies, 

Blondlot (W. & B., 31), xxxii, 220— 
subliming temperature, Guy, xl, 246 — 
tests, see Arsenic. 

ASPARTic, action of nitrous oxide 

(malic acid), Piria, xxii, 245 — from 
bimalate of ammonia, Dessaignes, 

xxii, 245 in beet-root molasses, 

Schreibler, xxxviii, 506. 

ASPERTANNic (Asperula odorata), 

xxv, 243. 

ATROPic, formation and composition, 

Kraut, xxxvi, 232 ; Pfeiffer, xxxvi, 
229 — observations, F.F. Mayer, xxxvi, 
229, note, 234 

auric. See Aurum, oxide. 

AZOLEiNic, xvii, 265. 

BASSic (Bassia longifolia), Hardwick, 

xxvii, 143. 



I ACID BENic, Walter, xix, 78. 

I BBNzo-ciNNAMic, Kolbe and Laute- 

mann, xxxiv, 257, note. 

BENZOIC, action of iron at high tem- 
perature, d'Arcet, x, 176 — of ozone, 
Gorup-Besanez, xxxvi, 167 — adulte- 
ration (sugar), Hodgson, jr., ix. 19 — 
conversion into hippuric acid. Booth 
and Boye, xvii, 6 — distinction from 
cinuamic acid, Hanbury, xxix, 479 ; 
from hippuric acid, Ure, xiii, 340 — 
exists in Benzoin partly free, partly 
formed by heating, Loewe, xlii, 369, 
A06—form.ation from glue and chromic 
acid, Schlieper, xix, 30 ; from kinic 
acid, Lautemann, xxxv, 246 — found in 
extract of elecampane, Roettscher, 
XV, 157 ; Liquidambar styraciflua, 
Hodgson, jr. (W. & B., 1549), vi, 190 
— preparation from benzoin, wet way, 
Bley and Diesel (modification of 
Scheele), xviii, 239; Wcehler (alcohol 
and muriatic acid), xvi, 157 — by ben- 
zole, de la Rue and Miiller, xxx, 442, 
note — by sublimation, Mohr (W. B., 

917) , xii, 173; Maisch (change of 
bibulous paper, W. & B., 917), xxxii, 
204; Rump (modified apparatus), xli, 
21; Ph. Dublin (50), xxiii, 9; Ph. 
Lond. (24), Prel. No. 18— by super- 
heated steam, Scharling (W. & B., 

918) , xxiv, 236 — from naphthalin, Cas- 
telhaz, Ott, xl, 118, xli, 552 — from 
phtalic acid, Depoully, xxxvii, 270 — 
from tolu, styraXjPeru balsam. Brown, 
V, 113 ; Kopp (W. & B., 157), xx, 118 
— from urine, Procter, jr., xxvii, 23 — 
pure (sublime benzoin with sulphuric 
acid), Loewe, xlii, 408 — purification, 
Righini, vii, 258 — solubility, Storer, 
xxxv, 190 — in chloroform, Lepage, 
xxiv, 148 — in glycerin, Adolphus, 
xxxix, 150; Klever, xlii, 222 — in wa- 
ter (of acid from various sources). 
Otto, xxxv, 29 — tests for purity, Tich- 
borne, xxxvii, 264. 

ANHYDROUS, Gerhardt, xxiv, 376. 

BiNiTROPHENic (azymotic properties), 

Hirsh, xli, 466. 

BiSMUTHic, Deichmann and Boedeker, 

xxxv, 31, 144. 

BORACic, behavior to tartaric acid, H. 

Rose, xxxi, 24^1— discovery, 1776, iii, 
121— formation, BoUey, xxi, 174 — 
found in plants, Wittstein and Apoi- 
ger, xxx, 159 ; sea-water (California), 
Veatch, xxxii, 330 ; at Iquique (Ecu- 
dor), xxv, 276 — history, manufactory, 
etc., Pereira, xiv, 336 — solubility in 
glycerin, Adolphus, xxxix, 150; Kle- 
ver, xlii, 222 — turmeric paper, action 
on, Vogel, jr , xxxi, 242. 

LAGOONS of Tuscany, Bowring, 

xii, 40. 



8 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



ACID, BORACic SPRINGS of Tuscany, xli, 556. 

BROMOSALICYLIC, xiv, 211. 

BUTYRIC, preparation^ Bensch (sugar, 

tartaric acid, chalk, W. & B., 1516), 
xix, 205 ; Pelouze and Gelis, xix, 205 ; 
AndersoQ (from mother liquor of 
crude acetate of soda), xxxix, 82 — 
separation from valerianic acid, Lie- 
big, xxii, 179. 

BUTYRO-ACETIC, XXxiv, 257. 

BROMic, Loewig, ii, 96. 

BRUNOLic (from coal tar), xxxiii, 41. 

CAFFEic, composition, Hlasiwetz, 

xxxviii, 504 — yields kinone (W. & B., 
178), Stenhouse, xxix. 376. 

CAFFEO -TANNIC, Composition ^ xxiii, 355 

— is glucoside, Hlasiwetz, xxxviii, 504, 

xxxix, found in Caffea arabica, 
Chiococca racemosa, Rochleder, xxv, 
243 ; in Ilex paraguayensis, Rochle- 
leder, xxi, 70. 

CAHINCIC (CAINCIC), XXV, 242, 245 — 

properties, ii, 84 — preparation, Fran- 
gois, Caventou, iii, 166. 

CALCiTRAPic, Colignon, xxvii, 266. 

CAMPHORIC, Liebig, iv, 348. 

CANTHARiDic, Massiug and Dragen- 

dorff, xlii, 240. 

CARBAZOTic (picRic), ttction oTi opium, 

Muller, xi, 88 — behavior to bichromate 
potassa test, Jenkins, xxxiii, 528 — as 
coloring, iii, 45 — composition, Dumas, 
ix, 266— detection in beer, Lassaigne 
(not affected by charcoal), xxv, 525 ; 
Pohl (wool), xxviii, 525 — in dialyser^ 
Graham, xxxiv, 315 — in crude fuchsin, 
Goppelsroeder, xxxv, 179 — preparation 
from indigo, Hodgson, jr., vi, 187; 
from willow bark, Stenhouse, xxxiv, 
254 — properties, medicinal and physi- 
ological, Calvert, Moffat (W. & B., 
1486), xxix, 118; physical, i, 157; 
poisonous, Spring, xxvii, 316 — substi- 
tute for guinia, Bell (W. & B., 1486), 
xxvii, 17. See Acid, aloetic. 

CARBOLIC (PHENic). Compare Crea- 

sote. Action in arresting decomposi- 
tion, Crookes, xxxix, 225; no action 
on chemical ferments, Crookes, xxxix, 
226 — on reptiles, Fayrer, xli, 414 — 
mode of action, Lemaire, (on the skin, 
etc.), xxxv, 555 — adulteration detect- 
ed, Crookes, xxxix, 231 — adulterant 
of oil of cloves, Hager, xlii, 520 — 
■antidote to virulent poisons, Tessin, 
xli, 415 — antiseptic, Calvert, xxvii, 
18; Crookes, xxxviii, 435 — applica- 
tion, Squibb, xli, 259, 353 ; Calvert, 
xxxiv, 159; Ashby, (filing, boring 
metals), xxxiv, 525 — cohesion figure, 
Toralinson, xxxvi, 252 — constitution, 
Williamson, xxvii, 54— crystallized, 
(due to Napthalin), Parisel, xl, 32 ; 
preparation, (distil with anhydroug 



sulphate of copper), Bickerdike, xl, 
125; distinction from creosote; see 
CRKASOTE — history, Squibb, xli, 259 ; 
iodine compound (see Boulton's solu- 
tion), Bullock, xl, 329 — itch, remedy, 
Lemaire, xxxiii, bbO— manufacture, 
(from benzole), Calvert, xxxix, 463 ; 
(from coal oils), Laurent ; Boboeuf ; 
Mansfield, xxxix, 462 ; Lemaire, xxxv, 
552 ; (from coal tar), Koene, viii, 173 
— as poison, Pinkham, xli, 126; pro- 
perties, Lemaire, xxxv, 552 ; Runge, 

vii, 252; Calvert, xxxix, 461 — purifi- 
cation, Muller, xxxviii, 18 — solutions, 
Squibb, xli, 358 — strychnia, separa- 
tion, Bert, xxxix, 180 — by synthesis, 
Berthelot, xxxv, 552 — yield from coal 
tar, Koene, (W. & B 333), viii, 173. 

CARBONIC, relative absorption by dif- 
ferent kinds of charcoal. Smith, xxxv, 
563; Stenhouse, xxix, 156 — by alco- 
hol, ether, syrup and water, Saus- 
sure, xxxi, 116 — absorption and as- 
similation by plants, Boussingault, 
xxxvii, 394 — action of the soil upon, 
van den Broek, xxxiii, 464 — cold pro- 
duced by liquified, Thilorier, viii, 60 
— decomposed by sunlight. Draper, xvi, 
91 — not decomposed by red hot me- 
talic copper, Lauteman, xxxii, 448 — 
deodorized, Stenhouse, xxx, 260 — esti- 
mation of free acid in water, Petten- 
kofer, xxxiii, 406 — in carbonates, 
(heat wiih powdered quartz). Rose, 
xxxv, 355 — generator and regulator, 
Ullgren, xli, 297 — liquid and solidi- 
fied, properties, Bailey, x, 313 ; Fara- 
day, xvii, 20 ; Gore, xxxiii, 328 ; Loir 
and Drion, xxxiii, 529; Mitchell, x, 
310; Thilorier, viii, 59 — liquefaction 
apparatus, Mitchell and Bridges, xv, 
70 — preparation, (steam over heated 
chalk), Meschelynck and Lionnet, 

xxxii, 564 — pressure at different tem- 
perature, Mitchell, x, 310; Thilorier, 

viii, 59 ; x, 310 — specific gravity at dif- 
ferent temperature, Mitchell and Thi- 
lorier, viii, 60; x, 309 — solidification, 
simple apparatus. Loir and Drion, 

xxxiii, 529 — therapeutic effects and ap- 
plications, W. R. Fisher, x, 173; 
Herpin and Boussingault, xxviii, 69. 

CARMiNic, composition, Schiitzenber- 

ger, xxx, 261 — is a glucoside, Hlasiwetz 
and Grabowsky, xxxviii, 504 — for 
assaying alumina, Luckow, xxxvii, 
227. 

CAROLACTTC, (in hog gall), Strecker, 

xxxv, 35. 

CARYOPHYLLic, Calvi ; Chiozza, xxix, 

47. 

cATECHDic, Delffs, XX, 141 ; Neu- 

bauer. (W & B., 235, note; Parrish, 
611), xxviii, 326. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



9 



ACID CATECHU-TANNic, Neubauer, xxviii, 
32G. 

CATHARTIC, Dragendorff and Kubly, 

xxxviii, 374 ; Groves, xli, 72. 

CATHARTOGENIC, GfOVeS, xli, 72. 

CHELiDONic, Probst, (W. & B,, 1491), 

xxxiii, 9 — and its salts, Wilde, xxxvii, 
27. 

CHELiDONiNic, Composition, Zwenger, 

xxxiii, 10 — preparation, (obtained 
succinic acid), Walz, xxxiv, 328. 

CHiNOVATANNic, (Portlandia grandi- 

flora), Horn, xxv, 243, 244, 247. 

CHLORALURic, Schiel, xxxii, 443. 

CHLORIC, Diehl, xl, 103. 

CHLORO-ACETic and DQethylamia 

yields sarkosina, Volhard, xxxv, 33. 

CBLORO-BBNZOIC, Kopp, XX, 119. 

CHLORO-CINNAMIC, Kopp, XX, 119. 

CHLOROCYANic, spccific gravity, Du- 
mas, X, 343. 

CHLOROHYDRARGYROUS, Tully, XXV, 

92. 

CHLOROHYDRIC. See ACID, MURIATIC. 

CHLORiODic, existence denied, Thomp- 
son, ix, 49- 

CHLORONiTRic, Kocne, xvii , 2 08, note. 

CHL0R0NITR0U8, Gay-Lussac, xxi, 36. 

CHLOROPHENissic, Hoffmann, xvii, 

157. 

CALOROPHENDSsic, Hoffmann, xvii, 

157. 

CHLOROPROTEic, Mulder, xx, 130. 

CHLOROSALICYLIC, xiv, 211. 

CHLOROSULPHURIC, XVii, 266. 

CHLOROUS, action upon organic sub- 
stances, Schiel, xxxii, 443, 

CHLORoxALic, (trichloracetic), Du- 
mas, iii, 88 ; xlii, 78. 

CHROMIC, action on essential oils at a 

distance, Plummer, (W. & B., 571, 
note), xxviii, 197 — bleaching proper- 
ty, Watt, sen., xx, 341 — as escharoiic, 
Heller, xxv, 183 — oxidation by, Fred- 
erking, xxxii, 47 — preparation, Bolley, 
(from bichromate), xviii, 199 ; Doe- 
bereiner and Kuhlmann, (with ba- 
ryta), xxxi, \ 4:2 —recover 1/ from fat- 
bleaching solutions, Watt, sen., xx, 
341 — test, (ethereal solution of binox- 
ide of hydrogen), Storer, xxxiii, 114. 

CHLORoxi-CARBONic, Dumas, xii, 49. 

CHRYSAMMic, preparation from apo- 

retin, de la Rue and Muller, xxx, 449. 

CHRYSOLBPiNic, Schuuk, xvii, 157. 

CHRYSoPHANic, composition, Graebe 

and Liebermann ; Rochleder, xlii, 
355 — preparation from Parmelia pa- 
rietina and from rhubarb, Rochleder, 
xxviii, 525. 

CHYA8IC, SULPHURETTED, PorSCtt, ( = 

sulphocyanic acid?) iv, 323. 
ciNCHO-CKROTic, (at Loudon exhibi- 
tion, 1862), xxxiv, 569. 



ACID ciNCHO-TANNic, (Ciuchona scrobi- 
culata), xxv, 244, 247. 

ciNNAMic, conversion into oil of bitter 

almonds, Simon, xiv, 266 — distinction 
from benzoic acid, Hanbury, xxix, 
479 — found in benzoin, Aschoff, (W. 
& B., 166), xxxiv, 34 — Liquidambar 
styraciflua, Hanbury, xxix, 418— pre- 
paration from tolu balsam. Heaver, 
(W. & B., 158), XV, 77; Kopp, xx, 
118. 

ciTRACONic, from lactic acid, Engel- 

hardt, xxii, 72. 

CITRIC, acetone^ from, Liebig, xxxii, 

265 — action on cotton and fiax, Cal- 
vert, xxvii, 83 — adulterations, (tar- 
taric, oxalic acids), ii, 165 — behaviour 
to ozone, Gorup-Besanez, xxxvi, 167 
detection, H. Rose, viii, 86 — of tartaric 
acid, (potassa), xxxii, 564; (hydra- 
ted sesquioxide of iron, W. & B., 38), 
xxxiv, 507 — glucose and tartaric acid 
compound, Berthelot, xxx, 154 — man- 
ufacture and preparation, xxiii, 345, 
(W. & B., 37) — (juice heated previous 
to adding chalk), xvii, 124 — Kuhl- 
mann, (with baryta salts), xxxi, 141 
— Perret (recommends saturating the 
juice in Italy with magnesia), xxxviii, 
252 — Price (formation of a soluble 
citrate), xxvi, 321 — Row, (defecation 
attended to previous to saturating), 

xxxviii, 169 — Silvestri, (from Cypho- 
mandra betacea), xlii, 511 — Tilloy, 
(from gooseberries), ii, 81 — poisonous 
quality, Procter, jr., xxxii, 573 — 
properties, Tichborne, xxxvii, 265 — 
salts, constitution, Graham, x, 348 — 
solubility in glycerin, Adolphus, 

xxxix, 150 — with tartaric acid, see 
ACID, ciTRO-TARTARic — test for purity 
Durand, v. 111; Tichborne, xxxvii 
265. 

ARTIFICIAL, probability, Ri- 

gault, xxxii, 336. 

CITRO-TARTARlC, PhipSOn, XXXV, 174. 

COBALTIC, Winckler, xxxvii, 228. 

cocA-TANNic, Niemann, xxxiii, 126. 

coDEic, Robinet, i, 12. 

coNiic, (Cicuta maculata), Young, 

xxvii, 293. 

coPAivic, (a natural product of the 

juice), Procter, jr., xxii, 296. 

coPALic, Schivler, xxxii, 448. 

CRiTHMic, H^irouart, xxxviii, 301. 

CROTONic, Schlippe, xxx, 410. 

cuBEBic, Schmidt, xlii, 225. 

CYANHYDRIC, SCe ACID, HYDROCYANIC. 

CYANIC, preparation, Serullas, i, 233 

— salts, constitution, Graham, x, 348. 

CYANURic, constitution of salts, Gra- 
ham, X, 348. 

CYCLOPic, (Cyclopia Vogelii), Church, 

xlii, 460. 



10 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



ACID DiCHLORO-ACETic, as escharotic, Ur- 
ner, xli, 19. 

DIGITALBIQUB, (W. & B., 351), KOS- 

mann, xxxv, 295. 

DiGATALic, (Parrish, 596, 599), Mo- 

riii, xvii, 181 . 

DiGiTALiNic, Kosmann, (W. & B., 

351), xxxiii, 171, xxx, 295. 

DiGiTALOic, Walz, xxxv, 295. 

ELAiDic, Boudet, vi, 84. 

BLAiODic, (castor oil), Bussy and Le- 

canu, Prel. No. 79. 

ELLAGic, preparation, (gallic and ar- 
senic acids), Loewe, xli, 141. 

BMULSic, Thomson and Richardson, 

x, 353. 

BQDISETIC, xxvii, 153. 

ERGOTic, (W. & B., 369, note), Wen- 

zell, xxxvi, 200. 

ERGOTOLEic, Baker, xxiv, 103. 

ERYTHROziziPHic, Latour, xxx, 404. 

BSCDHC, (from saponin of horse- 
chestnut), Fremy, vii, 150; compare 
APHRODAESCiN, See XXXV, 290, note. 

-EUONic, (in Euonymus), Wenzell, 

xxxiv, 387. 

FATTY, behaviour to ozone, Gorup- 

Besanez, xxxvi, 167 — candle manufac- 
ture, Price, XXV, 62 ; and soaps, Mege 
Mourier, xxxvi, 434 — light, source of, 
Cambacerfes, xxv, 364 — preparation by 
superheated steam, Tilghraan, xxvii, 
121 — test, (rosanilin), Jacobsen, xl, 
' 336. 

FERULic, (assafoetida), xxxviii, 504, 

FLUO-BORic, liquefaction, Faraday, 

xvii, 20. 

FLUO-siLicic, liquefaction, Faraday, 

xvii, 20 — limit as test for baryta, 
Hastings, xiii, 203. See acid, hydro- 

FLUOSILICIC. 

FORMIC, formation, from hydrocyanic 

acid, Pelouze, v, 43 — from cyanide of 
barium, Wagner, xxxiii, 403 — found 
inBombyx processionaria, and in net- 
tles, Gorup-Besanez, xxii, 181 — myco- 
genin, relation to, Jodin, xxxviii, 331 
— preparation, from glycerin and ox- 
alic acid, Berlhelot, xxviii, 557; Fell, 
xxx, 219; Lorin, xxxvii. 469 — from 
sugar and chromic acid, Rogers, xviii, 
289 — from sugar and peroxide of 
manganese, Doebereiner, (Parrish, 
594), vi, 171. 

FORMIC, ANHYDROUS, Licbig, vii, 263; 

xxx, 220. 

FORMO-BBNZoiLic, Woehler, xxi, 79; 

Tilden, xxxvii, 145. 

FULMiNic, constitution of salts, Gra- 
ham, X, 348. 

FUMARic, (of Winckler), identical with 

paramalic acid,t(of Pelouze), Demar- 
cay, viii, 58 — preparation, Winckler, 
(Parrish, 594), viii, 58. 



ACID GALiTANNic, (galium), xxv, 244. 
GALLACTiNic, Boedecker and Struck- 

mann, xxxi, 572. 
GALLHUMic, (W. & B., 921), Mahla, 

xxxii, 79. 

GALLIC, action on iron and alumina 

mordants, Calvert, xxvii, 82 — beha- 
viour to bichromate potassa test, Jen- 
kins, xxxiii, 528 — to fused chlorate 
of potassa, Boettger, xxx, 70 — consti- 
tution, Robiquet, (W. & B.,920), xxvii, 
51 — of salts, Graham, x, 348 — conver- 
sion into gallhumic acid, (W. & B., 
921), Mahla, xxxii, 79 — estimation^ 
volumetric, Mittentzwey, xxxvi, 315 
— fermentation, Robiquet, xxiv, 379 — 
preparation, from galls, Dcebereiner, 
vi, 82, viii, 86— Mueller, xviii, 237— 
Steer, xxix, 336— Stuart, v, 11— Ph. 
Dublin, (50), xxiii, 10 — from Chinese 
galls, Wittstein, (W. & B., 921), xxv, 
258; Stenhouse, (W. & B., 403, note), 
xxxiv, 253 — from tannin, Wetherill, 
(W. & B., 920), XX, 112; Rochleder, 
xxix, 464 — properties, Tichborne, 
xxxvii, 267 — pyrogallic acid, different, 
Braconnot, iii, 268 — solubility in gly- 
cerin. Weaver, xxix, 82 — therapeutical 
uae in menorrhagy, Simpson, xv, 319 — 
in nightsweats of phthisis, xxvi, 470. 

GAMBOGic, composition, Buchner and 

Johnston, xv, 130, 132 — use in paint- 
ing, Scoffern, xxiv, 80. 

GAULTHERic, Proctcr, jr., XV, 249. 

GELSBMiNic, Wormlcy, xlii, 2. 

GiNGKOic, Schwartzenbach, xxxiii, 

503. 

GLYCERIC, conversion into acrylic 

acid, Beilstein, xxxv, 31. 

GUAiAcic, preparation, Righini, (vola- 
tile oil and peroxide manganese), 
viii, 170; de la Rue and Muller, (with 
benzole), xxx, 442, note. 

GUMMic, (W. & B., 10, note), Fremy, 

xxxii, 367. 

HELiANTHic, Kromaycr and Ludwig, 

xxxii, 135. 

HEMiBANic, (from narcotia), Ander- 
son, xxxiv, 521. 

HENNO-TANNic, Abd-cl-Asiz, (W&B., 

1546), xxxv, 178. 

HiPPURic, (uRO-BENZoic), bchaviour to 

ozone, Gorup-Besanez, xxxvi, 167 — 
distinction from benzoic acid, lire, xiii, 
337, 340— /ow«i/ only in urine of her- 
bivorous animals, Cap and Henry, xii, 
152 — from benzoic acid. Booth and 
Boye, xvii, 6 — preparation, Boutin, vi, 
261 — purification, Loewe, (with zinc), 
xxviii, 172; Bensch, (with charcoal), 
xviii, 320 — quantity secreted when at 
rest, and at work, Roussin, xxviii, 475 
— solubility in chloroform, Lepage, 
xxiv, 148. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 11 



ACID HTDRiODic, decomposed h J sulphurous 
acid, Saladin, iv, 40 — glycerin, reac- 
tion, Erlearaeyer, xxxiv, 332 — lique- 
faction, Faraday, xvii, 20; Karap, viii, 
261 — preparation, (iodide of starch 
and sulphuretted hydrogen), i, 77 — 
Buchanan, (tartaric acid and iodide 
of potassium), (W.&B., 922), ix, 175, 
xxvii, 410 — Dunn, (modification of 
Buchanan, preserving by hyposul- 
phite of soda), xli, 41 — Guyot, (iodine 
and oil of turpentine), ix, 79 — Mene, 
(iodine, bypophosphite of lime or 
sulphite of soda), xxi, 368 — Winck- 
ler, (sulphuretted hydrogen through 
iodine in bisulphide of carbon), xl, 
276, xli, 240— Ph. U. S., 60, remarks, 
Procter, jr., xxxvi, 210. 

HYDROBROMic, Uqupfaction, Faraday, 

xvii, 20 — preparation, Loewig, (bro- 
mine, phosphorus, water), ii, 97; 
Mene, (bromine and bypophosphite 
of lime, or sulphite of soda), xxi, 368. 

HYDROBROMOUS, LcBwig, ii, 97. 

HYDROCHLORIC. See ACID, MURIATIC. 

■ HYDROCYANIC, (and dilutum), adulte- 
ration, Christison, x, 120 — antidotes, 
Preyer, (sulphate of atropia hypoder- 
mically), xli, 141— T. & H. Smith, 
(proto-persulphate of iron and alka- 
line carbonate), xix, 223, xxxviii, 12, 
16; remarks to the foregoing, Proc- 
ter, jr., xxxviii, 12 — antidote to strych- 
nia, Reid, xxxi, 92 — conversion into 
ammonia and formic acid, Pelouze, v, 
43 — death kind of, Hayn, xv, 237 — 
'decomposition, by muriatic acid, Bert- 
hold, xxxY, 31 — by sunlight, (W. & 
B., 925), Bussy and Buignet, xxxvi, 
313 — detection, in blood, Schoenbein, 
(oxygenated water), xli, 465 — in case 
of poisoning, Witting, (distil with 
•4ilcohol), xvii, 77 — after three weeks, 
Brame, (W. & B., 929), xxvii, 536— 
in minute quantities, Henry, (forma- 
tion of cyanide of silver), ix, 236; 
Schoenbein, (guaiac- or iodized starch 
paper with sulphate of copper, (W. & 
B., 429), xli, 174,421; xlii, 322; re- 
tnarks on Schoenbeiu's test, Greiner, 
xlii, 322, see tests — drops and minims, 
Bernouilly, xxxi, 441; Durand, i, 169 
— employment, Donovan, xlii, 345 — 
tstimation, Buignet; Ferrein, (ammo- 
nio-sulphate of copper, W. & B., 
1296), XXX, 541 — Liebig, (normal sil- 
ver solution), xxiii, 253 — Pile, (Lie- 
big, slightly modified), xxxiv, 130 — 
Roberton, (Fordos and Gelis iodine 
test, W. & B. 9,26), xxv, bb\— explosive 
compound, Alsop, xiv, 326 — fermenta- 
tion prevented by it, Jones, xvii, 161 
—formation, in the body from amygda- 
lin and emulsin, Koelliker and Muller, 



xix, 464 — in preparation of spiritus 
setheris nitrosi, (W. & B., 1345), Bas- 
tick, xvi, 41; Dalpaiz, xvi, 115 — by 
action of carbonate ©f potassa on 
tincture of hyoscyaraus, Pluramer, 
xxv, 513 — gelatine and chromic acid, 
Schlieffer, xix, -9 — tobacco smoke, 
Vogel, jr., and Reischauer, (W. & B., 
820), xxxi, 76 — found in seeds of co- 
paiba, vii, 173 — coal tar, xxxiii, 41 — 
in Ipomaea dissecta, Nicholson, v, 173 
— in Jatropha Manihot, vii, 135 — 
keeping, difficulty of, Jac. Bell, xiii, 
351 — muriatic acid detected, Geo- 
ghehan, (W. &. B., 925), viii, 82 
— name, (objection to Scheele's, as 
a distinction), Donovan, xlii, 346 — 
poison, mode of action, Meyer, xviii, 
234 — for plants, v, 262 — poisoning: 

ii, 83, xxii, 358, xxiii, 381, xlii, 283, 
see mistakes. 

PREPARATION, in general, Griffith, 

iv, 11 — Bussy and Buignet, (recommend 
Gea Pessina process), xxxvi, 313 — 
Caillot, (modification of Vanquelin, 
substituting alcohol for part of the 
water) iv, 20 — Clark, (tartaric acid 
and cyanide of potassium, water, (W. 
& B., 924), iii, 309, iv, 22— remarks 
on Clark's process, Robiquet iv, 23 — 
Diehl, (recommends Wittstein's pro- 
cess,) xxxix, 141 — Everitt, (cyanide of 
silver, diluted muriatic acid. Ph. U.S. 
60), vii, 160 — (?ay-Z/W5sac, (cyanide of 
mercury, muriatic acid, W. & B., 924), 
iv, 18 — remarks on Gay-Lussac's pro- 
cess, Bussy and Buignet, xxxvi, 314 

— Gea Pessina, (ferrocyanide of potas- 
sium, sulphuric acid, water), iii, 266, 
iv, 20, ix, 239, note — remarks, Bussy 
and Buignet, xxxvi, 313 — Henry, (re- 
commends Gea Pessina 'process), 

iii, 266 — Ittner, (ferrocyanide of po- 
tassium, sulphuric acid, water, distil 
into alcohol), iv, 22 — Keller, (ferro- 
cyanide of potassium, sulphuric acid, 
alcohol), iv, 22 — Laming, (modifica- 
tion of Clarke's process, W. & B., 924), 
iii, 356 — Liebig, (cyanide of potassi- 
um, sulphuric acid, water), xiv, 297 
— remarks by Woebler, xviii, 274, note 
— Robiquet, (modification of Gay-Lus- 
sac,) iv, 19 — Scheele, (prussian blue, 
red oxide of mercury, iron scales, 
sulphuric acid, water), iv, 17, xlii, 
346 — (substituted in Paris by 1 Gay- 
Lussac's acid and 40 water), iv, 20 — 
Stewart, (Gay-Lussac's acid diluted 
with water and alcohol), xii, 32 — 
Tilloy, (identical with Caillot), iv, 85 

— Trautwein, (cyanide of potassium, 
sulphuric, acid, water), iv, 21 — van 
Mons, (cyanide of mercury, iron scales, 
sulphuric acid, water), iv, 20 — Vau- 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



HYDROCYANIC [continued^) 
guelin, (cyanide of mercury, sulphuret- 
ted hydrogen, water, W. & B., 924), 
iv, 20 — Wittstein, (ferrocyanide of 
potassium, sulphuric, acid, alcohol, 
water), xxxix, 141 — reactions in his 
process, (W.-& B., 923), xxviii, 368— 
Wcehler, (cyanide of potassium, sul- 
phuric acid, water, W. & B., 925), 
xviii, 2*74— Ph. U. S. (30), (Vauque- 
lin's process), iii, 79— Ph. U. S. (40), 
(process of Ph. U. S. (60),), details 
and hints, Procter, jr., xix, 259 — Ph. 
Dublin, (50j, (ferrocyanide of potas- 
sium, diluted sulphuric acid), xxiii, 
10— Ph. Gallica, (37), (Gay-Lussac's 
process, diluting, W. & B., 924), x, 
293— Ph. Helvetica, (65), (ferrocya- 
nide of potassium, sulphuric acid, 
distil into alcohol), xxxix, 210. 

PRESERVATioN, (muriatic acid), 

Barry; Everitt,(W. & B., 926), vii, 167 
— (calcined sulphate of zinc), Schutz, 
i, 235 — reaction, limit of, (iron, cop- 
per, silver, salts), Henry, ix, 238 — 
specific gravity^ ii, 157 — strength^ bring- 
ing to standard, Procter,jr., xix, 260 — 
tests^ Austin, (converting the cyanide 
of silver into ferrocyanide of potas- 
sium), xviii, 238 — Barry, (expose so- 
lution of nitrate of silver to the va- 
por), vii, 264 — Liebig, (formation of 
sulpho-cyanide of ammonium, W. & 
B., 929), xix, 142— see detection- 
whales, capturing. Christison, xxxiii, 
379. 

HYDROCYANIC, ANHYDROUS, Gay-LuS- 

sac, iv, 18; Trautwein, iv, 21 ; Vau- 
quelin, iv, 20; Wf£hler, xviii, 274. 

HYDROFERROCYANic, preparation, 
Kuhlmann, (with baryta salts), xxxi, 
143— Liebig, (ferrocyanide of potas- 
sium, fuming muriatic acid), xxvi, 80. 

HYDROFLUORIC, Dcxtcr, xxxviii, 446. 

HYDROFLuosiLicic, preparation, De- 
ville, xxxiv, 2z3. See acid, fluosil- 

ICIC. 

hydro-oleic, Fr^my, viii, 342. 
HYDRO-STEARic, Fremy, viii, 342. « 
hydro-sulphocyanic. See acid, sul- 

PHO-CYANIC. 

HYDROsuLPHURic. See hydrogen, 
sulphuretted. 

hydrosulphurous, Schiitzenberger, 
xlii, 243. 

HYPERiODic, Ammermuller and Mag- 
nus, vi, 349. 

HYPERMANGANIC. See ACID, PERMAN- 
GANIC. 

HYPOCARBONic, Gay-Lussac, =ioxalic, 
iv, 86. 

HTPOCHLORONiTRic, Gaj-Luss., xxi, 35. 
HYPOG^ic, xli, 465. 

HYPOMARGARILIC, Xvii, 265. 



ACID HYPONiTRic, action on organic sub- 
stances, Koene, xvii, 257 — constitution^, 
Koene, xvii, 268 — as an oxidising^ 
agent, Koene, xvii, 209 — Millon, xvii^ 
209. 

HYPOPHOSPHO-MESiTYLic, Eane,x, 208. 

HYPOPHOSPHOROus, Proctcr, jr., (W. & 

B., 1532), xxx, 121. 

HYPOSULPHUROus, preparation, Lang- 

lois, xii, 240 — Fliickiger, xxxvi, 24. 

iGASURic, Caldwell, xxix, 296. 

iNDiGOTic, Dumas, ix, 265. 

IODIC, action on alkaloids, Brett, xxvii,, 

57 ; Serullas, ii, 301 — and muriatic 
acid, behaviour to ammonia, Andre, 
viii, 214 — decomposed by sulphocyanio 
acid, Thompson, ix, 49 — preparation^ 
by means of euchlorine, Davy, iv^ 
340 — from iodine and nitric acid, vii, 
174; Connell, iv, 340 — from iodine 
and nitrous acid, Serullas, iv, 262 — ^ 
from chloride of iodine, Grosourdy,, 
V, 347 ; Liebig, iv, 334; Serullas, iv^ 
336; Thompson, ix, 49. 

lODO-ACETic, Perkin and Duppa,, 

xxxii, 223. 

lODO-SALICYLIC, xiv, 211. 

lODOUs, Sementini, vii, 255. 

iPECACUANHic, composition, xxv, 243. 

— preparation, properties, composi- 
tion, Willick, xxiii, 353. 

isocETic, (from oil of purging nut),, 

Bonis, xxvii, 143. 

jALAPiNOLic, Mayer, xxxi, 379 — ■ 

XXXV, 542. 

KiNic, behaviour to bichromate of po- 

tassa test, Jenkins, xxxiii, 528 — cow- 
position^ xxiii, 355; Baup, v, 345 — 
conversion into hippuric acid, Laute- 
mann, W. & B., 293), xxxv, 246 — 
detection, (W. & B., 293, note), Sten- 
house, xvii, IbQ— found in leaves of 
Vaccinium myrtillus, Zwenger, xxxiii,^ 
128 — preparation, Zwenger, xxxiii,, 
128 — reduction to benzoic acid, Laute- 
mann, xxxv, 246. 

KINOVATANNIC, SCe ACID, CHINOVA- 

TANNIC. 

KiNOic, (W. & B., 497), Hennig, xxv^ 

544. 

KiNovic, behaviour to bichromate of 

potassa test, Jenkins, xxxiii, 528 — . 
composition, xxv, 247 ; Hlasiwetz and 
Gilen, (W. & B., 294), xxxii, 143— 
found'm ergota, Winckler, xxiv, 172 — 
in tormentilla, Rembold, xl, 311 — 
properties, Hlasiwetz and Gilen, xxxii,. 
143; Rochleder, xxv, 24.1— test, (W» 
& B., 293), Winckler, xxv, 343— thera- 
peutics, in diarrhoea, de Vrij, xxxvi^ 
426, xxxvii, 253. 

LACTIC, aldehyd from, Engelhardt,^ 

xxii, 72 — behaviour to electrolysis,, 
Kolbe, xxxii, 448; to Lieben's iodo- 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



' LACTIC [Continued). 

form test, Hager, xlii, 399; to per- 
chloride of phosphorus, Bruning, 
XXX, 424 — conversion into alanin, 
Kolbe, xxxii, 447; into propionic 
acid, Lauteraana, xxxii, 447 — distilla- 
iion products, Engelhardt, xxii, 70 — 
formation^ from malt, Fr^ray and Bout- 
ron-Charlard, xii, 231 — from cane 
sugar, Blucher, xvii, 1G6 — from milk 
sugar, Wackenroder, xix, "11— found 
in Dulcamara and in grape vine, Witt- 
stein, xxix, 311, XXX, 127 — in urine 
of man and carnivores, Cap and Hen- 
ry, xii, 152 — gum (produced by fer- 
mentation,) preparation and compo- 
sition, (W. & B., 39), Bruning, xxx, 
424 — preparation^ Benscb, xix, 203 — 
Berzelius, iv, 345 — Cap and Henry, 
xii, 153— Lautemann, (W. & B., 40), 
xxxii, 448— Louradour, (W. & B., 39), 
xii, 120— Mitscherlich, vi, 83— Pe- 
louze and Gay-Lussac, (from beet- 
juice), viii, 169 — saturating povrer, 
Bruning, xxx, 423. 

, LEMONADE, Magcudie, vii, 263. 

, PASTILLES Magendie, vii, 263. 

^ , ANHYDROUS, Engelhardt, xxii, 70. 

LACTucic, (W. & B., 506, note), Lud- 

vrig, XX, 62. 

LAEVO-CAMPHORic, (from Matricaria 

parthenium), Chautard, xxvi, 167. 

LARixiNic, (W & B., 831, note), Sten- 

house, xxxiv, 555, 559. 

LAURic, (in myrtle wax), Moore, (W. 

& B., 242), xxxiv, 342. 

LiNOLEic, Mulder, xl, 259. 

LiNOXic, Mulder, xl, 259. 

LOBELic, Procter, jr., xiii, v. 

MALIC, aldehyd from, Liebig, xxxii, 

265 — conversion into succinic acid, 
Schmitt, xxxii, 449; Engelhardt; 
Walz, xxxiv, 328 — formation^ by ac- 
tion of nitric acid on asparagin and 
aspartic acid, Piria, xxii, 245 — pre- 
paration, Liebig, vi, 176 — Tromms- 
dorff, (from berries of Rhus coriaria, 
W. & B., 711, note, Procter's pro- 
cess), vii, 148 — relation to tartaric 
acid, Liebig, xxxii, 347 — yield from 
Lactuca sativa and virosa, Koehnke, 
xvii, 37. 

, ARTIFICIAL, (oxalhydric), Gue- 

rin, V, 169 — is isomeric tartaric acid, 

Erdraann, ix, 350. 
MANGANIC, is permanganic acid, Phip- 

son, xxxii, 320. 
MARGARiTic, (in castor oil), Bussy 

and Lecanu, Prel. No. 79. 

MARGARYLIC, Xvii, 265. 

MECHOic, Couerbe, v, 56. 

MECONic, constitution of salts, Gra- 
ham, X, 348. 
MBDULLic, Eylerts, xxxii, 561. 



ACID MELANic, Piria, xi, 148. 

MELASSic, Joy, xlii, 415. 

MENisPERMic, docs uot cxist, Casasc- 

ca, Prel. No. 64 — preparation, Pelle- 

tier and Couerbe, vi, 331. 
METAGALLic, (W. & B., 921), Mahla, 

xxxii, 79. 

METAGUMMIC, (W. & B., 10, UOte)^ 

Fremy, xxxii, 266. Compare cerasin. 

METAMARGARic, Fremy, viii, 342. 

METAMECONic, coustitutiou of salts, 

Graham, x, 348. 

METAPECTic, Fremy, xxi, 152, 

' METAPBCTiNic, Fremy, xxi, 151. 

METAPHOSPHORIC, Graham, xxxix^ 

389. 

MOHiTLic, Thomas, xxxviii, 3 02. 

MORiNGic, (from oil ben), Walter, 

xix, 78. * 

uvcic, fermentation products, (identi- 
cal with those from citric acid,) lli- 
gault, xxxii, 336 — salts, constitution 
of, Graham, x, 348 — yield, table, from 
different kinds of gums, Guerin, iv, 
165 — from gum and sugar of milk, 
Guerin, v, 170. 

MURIATIC, absorption of gas by differ- 
ent kinds of charcoal, Stenhouse, 
xxix, 156 — arsenic not contained in 
American acid, Maisch, xxxvi, 235 — 
in other acids, Dupasquier, xiii, 348 
— composition of commercial acid. Sa- 
vory, XX, 316 — detection, of arsenic, 
Hager (protochloride of tin), xlii, 400, 
Maisch (Fresenius and Babo's meth- 
od), xxxvi, 235 — of sulphurous acid, 
Bussy and Boutron-Charlard (ba- 
rytes), vii, 223; Chevreul (sulphate 
of copper), vii, 223; Gay-Lussac (red 
sulphate of manganese), vii, 223; 
Girardin (protochloride of tin, W. & 
B., 43), vii, 224, xiii, 107 — as disin- 
fectant, Crookes, xxxviii, 427 — drops 
and minims, Durand, i, 169 — eschar, 
color of, vii, 262 — estimation, Las- 
saigne, xiii, 108 — explosion, xxxi, 479 
— impurities (chloride of lead), Vogel, 
xvii, 222 — (sulphurous acid, W. & B.,, 

43) , Savory, xx, 315 — (oxides of sul- 
phur), Squibb, xii, 50 — preparation, 
Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix, 210 — 
Tilghman (chlorides of strontium or 
barium and superheated steam), xx, 
192 — purification, Duflos (distil over 
sulphate of iron), xviii, 79 — Glenard, 
(sulphuretted hydrogen), xxxv, 254 
— Hoffmann (distil with addition of 
sulphuric acid), xii, 420 — Hoffmann's 
method is unreliable, Fresenius, xlii, 
322 — freed from arsenic, Bettendorflf, 
(protochloride of tin), xlii, 219 — 
Reinsch (metallic copper, W. & B., 

44) , xxxiii, 408 — Wittstein (mercury^ 
W. & B., 44), xxxiii, 408 — specific gra- 



14 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



MURIATIC {Continued). 

vity of gas, Davy; Thomson, x, 342 — 
test for purity, Lassaigne, xiii, 106. 

, DiLUTUM, Ph. U. S. (60), re- 
marks, Procter, jr., xxxvi, 211 — Tay- 
lor, XXXV, 409 — drops in drachm, 
Bernouilly, xxxi, 441. 

MYRiciNic, Haml3right, xxxv, 199. 

' MYRiSTic, Playfair, xiii, 221. 

MYRONic, Winkler (from horserad- 
ish), xxii, 44 — Wittstein (from black 
mustard), xli, 417. See Potass, myron. 

MYRRHic, Ruickoldt, xvii, 176. 

NAPHTHALic, preparation, (napthalin 

and permanganate of potash), Cloez 
and Guignet, xxxi, 81 ; Vohl, xli, 552. 

NAucLEic, (of Bernelot — Moens), is 

identical with kinovic acid, de Vrij, 
xxxvi, 427. 

NICOTIC, Barral, xviii, 157. 

• NioBic, (reacts on turmeric paper 
like boracic acid), H. Rose, xxxi, 242. 

NITRIC, action on alcohol, Golding 

Bird (W. & B., 1343), x, 354— on re- 
sins and gum resins, Sace, xiii, 243 — 
on chlorates, bromates and iodates of 
potassa and soda, Penny, xiii, 225 — 
arsenic not contained in American 
acid, Maisch, xxxvi, 235 — concentra- 
tion, (distil with sulphuric acid), Pe- 
louze, xiii, 261; Millon, xix, 24 — con- 
version into ammonia by nascent hy- 
drogen, Kuhlraann, xix, 74 — detection 
of arsenic, Maisch — of iodine (W. & 
B., 49), Stein, xxxi, 170 — drops and 
minims, Durand, i, 169 — Egyptians, 
acquaintance with, Herapath, xxvi, 62, 
— eschar, color of, vii, 262 — estimation, 
Fresenius, (permanganate of potash), 
xxxiii, 112 — Gladstone (baryta), xxvii, 
47 — Gossart (protosulphate of iron), 
xix, 123 — Rieckher (Marsh's appara- 
tus), xxxvi, 107 — Rose (heat nitrates 
with powdered quartz), xxxv, 355 — 
found in rainwater, Barral, xxv, 83 — 
iodine contained in, John, xxviii, 508 
— oxidation, by, theory, Millon, xvii, 
209— preparation, (A. D. 1700), Bates, 
xxxviii, 354 — (from ammonia), Kuhl- 
mann, xix, 73 — (nitrate of soda and 
chloride of manganese, W. & B., 47), 
Kuhlmann, jr., xxxv, 72 — (proportion 
of sulphuric acid and nitrate of pot- 
ash), Mitscherlich, iii, 137— Ph. Hel- 
Tetica (65), xxxix, 210 — purification, 
{1. bichromate of potassa; 2. dry car- 
bonic acid), Millon, xv, 117 — (frac- 
tional distillation, W. & B., 48), Bar- 
reswill, xvii, 156 — reaction, limit (with 
goldleaf and muriatic acid), Hastings, 
xiii, 202 — recovery from manufacture 
of oxalic acid, Jullion, xxiv, 245 — 
McDougall and Rawson, xxiv, 247 — 
stains removed, xxxiii, 111 — strength 



tested (carbonate of lime), ii, 157 — 
tests, Bailey (cyano-hydrargyrate of 
iodide of potassium), ix, 179 — Braun, 
(sulphate of anilin), xl,334 — Couerbe, 
in sulphuric acid (narcotia, W. & B., 
618), viii, 174 — Desbassyus (proto- 
sulphate of iron,) xi, 259 — Kersten, in 
water (brucia), xxxv, 550, xxxvi, 83 
— Stein (protoxide of lead and proto- 
sulphate of iron), xxxiii, 1 1 1. 

, ANHYDROUS, Dcville (W. & B., 

49), xxi, 268. 

, DILUTUM, drops and minims, 

Durand i, 169— Ph. U. S. (60), re- 
marks, Procter, jr., xxxvi, 211; Tay- 
lor, xxxv, 409. 

, FUMINC, Brunner, xxvi, 418. 

NITROBENZOIC, Kopp, XX, 119. 

NITROCINNAMIC, Kopp, XX, 119, XXXiv, 

186. 

NiTRO-MURiATic, Constitution, Baudri- 

mont, xvii, 208, note — Gay-Lussac 
(W. & B., 931), xxi, 34— Koene, xvii, 
201, 207, 251— eschar, color, vii, 262 
— preparation, D. B. Smith, iii, 287 — 
Ph. Dublin (26), iii, 325— Ph. U. S. 
(60), remarks, Procter, jr., xxxvi, 211; 
Taylor, xxxv, 410. 

NITRO-NAPHTHALINIC, Xvii, 261. 

NiTRO-PHENESSic, Laurcnt, xvii, 157. 

NiTRo-PHBNissic, Laurent, xvii, 157. 

NiTBO-PiCRic. See Acid carbazotic. 

NITRO-SULPHURIC (W. & B., 1565), 

Pelouze, viii, 11. 

NITROUS, volumetric estimation, Feld- 

haus, xxxiii, 216. 

NiTROVERATRic, Mcrck, xxxiii, 115. 

NiTRoxANTHic, MuUcr, xi, 88. See 

Acid carbazotic. 

OENANTHic, Fischcr, xxxii', 312. 

oleic, distilled without decomposi- 
tion, Bolley and Bergmann, xxxviii, 
507 — purification, xxix, 184. 

, brominated, Lfcfort, xxvi, 316. 

, CHLORINATED, Lefort, xxvi, 316. 

OPHELic (from chiretta), Hoehn, xiii, 

531. 

OPiANic, xxxiv, 521 ; Woehler (W. & 

B., 618), xvi, 136, 141. 
OPIANOSULPHUROUS, Woehler, xvi, 138, 

141. 

osMic, causes amblyopia, Noyes, 

xxxix, 62. 

oxALHYDRic, Guerin (W. & B., 1572), 

V, 343 (169? xi, 63?). 

OXALIC, action on blood, etc., Letheby, 

xviii, 319--on cotton and flax, Cal- 
vert, xxvii, 83 — on salts. Slater, xxviii, 
34:5— adulteration (sulphate of mag- 
nesia and phospha'e of lime), Robi- 
quet, vi, 265 — (cream of tartar), Hodg- 
son, jr., X, 27 — behavior to ozone, Go- 
rup-Besanez, xxxvi, 167 — decomposi- 
tion in diluted aqueous solutions, Bi- 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



15 



OXALIC (Contimied). 
zio, xlii, 318 — by light, Seekamp, 
xxxiv, 416— for madon, by action of 
nitric acid on stearopten of oil of 
monarda, Bonsall, xxv, 201 — on oil 
of amber, Plummer, xxiv, 36 — from 
oil of valerian, exposed to the air, 

Trommsdorff, i. 134 manufacture. 

Dale (sawdust, W. & B., 1572), xxxiii, 
483, XXXV, 359— Nyren (starch, W. & 
B., 157 2), xxiv, 242 — Robiquet (starch 
and nitric acid), vii, 348— Thompson 
(sugar, W. & B , 1572), xxi, 64— Tur- 
ner (uric acid and peroxide of lead, 
xxiv, 244 — nature, Gay-Lussac, iv, 86 
— solubility in glycerin, Adolphus, 
xxxix, 150 ; Klever, xlii, 222— sublim- 
ing temperature, Guy, xl, 247 — volati- 
lity (can be sublimed like benzoic 
acid). Turner, iii, 139 — yield (from 
sugar, W & B., 1572), Thompson, 
xxi, 64 — different yield by action of 
potassa and of soda, Possoz, xxx, 551. 

ANHYDR0us,Erdmann,xxxiii,114. 

oxAMic, Balard, xiv, 136, 
oxi-ACETic (in rancid fat), Saladin, 
iv, 252. 

— OXYCHLORONITRIC, XVii, 203. 

oxYNiTROsuLPHURic, xvii, 267. 
oxYPHENic, Buchner, preparation, 
etc., xxviii, 343 — name altered to py- 
rocatechine, Stenhouse, xxxiv, 559. 
oxYPiCRic, XX, 121, note. 
OXYSULPHDRIC, xvii, 203. 
oxYSYLVic, Hess, XV, 36. 
PALMic, Boudet, vi, 84. 
PALMITIC (from mafurra tallow), Pi- 
mentel and Bouis, xxviii, 163. 
PAPAVERic (from fl'owers of Papaver 
rhoeas), Meier, xviii, 213. 
PARAPECTic, Fremy, xxi, 152. 

PARATARTARIC See AciD RACEMIC. 

PARATARTROMETHYLic, (xu^riu Varry, 
viii, 329. 

PARATARTROViNic, Gu^riu Varry, viii, 
328. 

PARiLLiNic, Batka, vi, 173. See Pa- 
RiGLiNE, Salsbparine, Smilacin (all 
identical with parillinic acid), Pog- 
giale, vii, 36. 

PBCTic, preparation (from currant- 
juice), Simonin (W. & B , 220), vii, 

63 — from gentian, Bussy, viii, 351 — 
properties, Fremy, xxi, 152. 

PECTOLACTiNic, Boedeckcr & Struck- 
mann, xxxi, 572. 

PECTOSic, Fremy, xxi, 152. 

PELARGONic, xxxviii, 168. 

PERCHLORIC, action on salts of pot- 
assa, Serullas, iv, 86 — crystallized, Se- 
rullas, iv, 83 — hydrates, Roscoe, xxxiv, 

64 — preparation, Bullock, xxxvii, 19; 
Nativelle, xiv, 312; Roscoe (fluosili- 
cic acid), xxxiv, 64. 1 



ACID PBRCHROMic, preparation, Barreswill, 
XX, 54 — properties, Aschoff, xxxiii, 
316. 

PERMANGANIC, existence denied, Phip- 

son, xxxii, 320 — asserted, Aschoff, 
xxxiii, 315, 557 — preparation, Aschoff, 
xxxiii, 558 ; Terrell, xxxiv, 408. 

PERSULPHOMESiTYLic, Kane, X, 206. 

PHENic. See Acid carbolic. 

PHENYLic. See Acid carbolic 

PHOCENic (in berries of Viburnum 

opulus), Chevreul, xviii, 55 — identi- 
cal with valerianic acid, Dumas ; 
Monro, xviii, 55 ; Berthelot, xxvii, 375. 

PHOSPHATic, Liebig, viii, 333. 

PHOsPHOMESiTYLic, Kane, X, 206, 208. 

PHOSPHOMOLYBDic (Parrish , 626) , Sou- 

nenschein, xxxv, 64 — not recom- 
mended as test for alkaloids, Mayer, 
xxxv, 33 — priority as test for alka- 
loids, de Vrij, xxxiii, 312. 

PHOSPHORIC, crystallized, composition 

(existence of two hydrates proved), 
Peligot, xiii, 86, xxxix, 389 — commer- 
cial, remarks, Parkinson, xxxvi, 534 — 
estimation, volumetric (nitrate of ura- 
nium), Boedeker, xxxiii, 404 — explo- 
sion in preparation (large dish recom- 
mended), Eisner, xxxiv, 187 — found 
in rain-water, Barral, xxxiii, 343 — 
preparation, apparatus (for burning 
phosphorus), Brunner, viii, 262 ; 
Wackenroder (from calcined bones), 
xiv, 121— pure, Gregory (subjects to 
proper heat), xvii, 178 — Neustadtl 
(from phosphate of baryta), xxxiii, 
476 — freed from arsenic, Werbrunn 
(by muriatic acid, W. & B , 53), 
xxxii, 223 — reaction, limit (acetate of 
lead, lime water, chloride of bary- 
um), Hastings, xiii, 202 — separation 
from spsquioxides of iron and alu- 
mina, Mayer, xxxiii, 114 — test in soil, 
Stewart (molybdate of ammonia), 
xxvii, 428. 

, ANHYDROUS, Volatility, Laute- 

mann, xxxii, 448. 

, DiLUTUM, preparation, Andrews 

(dispenses with the retort), xxx, 525 
— Diehl (prefers a tubulated retort), 
xxxix, 138 — Groves (from red phos- 
phorus), xxx, 358 — Maisch (from gla- 
cial acid. Ph. U. S [60]), xxxiii, 385 
— Ph. U. S. (60), remarks, Procter, 
jr., xxxvi, 211 ; Taylor, xxxv, 410. 
Compare Acid phosphoric. 

, GLACiALB, commercial (W. & 

B., 52), Maisch, xxxii, 193. Com- 
pare Acid phosphoric. 

phosphorous, estimation, Scherer 

(modification of Mitscherlich's appa- 
ratus), xxxii, 461— is not poisonous, 
Groves, xxx, 359 — test, Woehler (ap- 
paratus similar to Marsh's), xv, 78. 



16 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



ACID PHOTosANTONic, Sestini, xxxvi, 527. 
PHTHALic, converted into benzoic 

acid, DepouU}", xxxvii, 270. 

PICRIC. See Acid carbazotic. 

piMELiNic, Sacc, xviii, 76. 

piNic, properties, H. Rose, viii, 49 — 

preparation, IJnverdorben (W. & B., 

699), ii, 81. 
piPERic, Babo and Keller, xxx, 138, 

xxxiii, 218. 

piPERiNic, Fittig and Mielck, xli, 427. 

piPiTZAHOic, Rio de la Loza, xxviii, 

242. 

piPiTZAHOEiNic, Weld, xxx, 446, 

POLYGALic, depositfrom tincture sene- 
ga, Procter, jr., xvi, 71 — preparation, 
properties and use, Procter, xvii, 248, 
250, xxxii, 150; Quevenne, xvii, 248. 
Compare senegin. 

poLYGALiNic, Peschier, i, 156. 

PROPIONIC, (from lactic acid), Laute- 

mann, xxxii, 447 — (from mother- 
liquor of acetate of soda), Anderson, 
xxxix. 82 — in spoiled wine, Nickles, 
(W. & B., 859), xxxiv, 507. 

PROPYLic, (from cod liver oil), Winck- 

ler, xxiv, 344. 

PRUssic. See acid, hy^drocyanic. 

pteleic, Kane, x, 211. 

PYROACETic. See acid, pyrolig- 

NEOUS. 

pyrocitric, Liebig, xxxii, 265. 

PY'ROGALLic, different from gallic acid, 

Braconnot, iii, 268 — found in pyro- 
ligneous acid, Pettenkofer, xxvi, 80, 
xxvii, 53 — name altered to pyrogal- 
line, Stenhouse, xxxiv, 559 poi- 
sonous, Personne, xlii, 175 — prepa- 
ration, Gruneberg, (by sublimation 
of gallic acid, W. & B., 1590), xxvi, 
362 — Liebig (heated in current of 
carbonic acid), xxix, 338 — de Luynes 
and Espandieu (boiling with water 
in Papin's digester), xxxviii, 22, xxxiv, 
559. 

PYROKiNic, Pelletier and Caventou, 

ii, 229. 

PYROLiGNBOus, assay, Tissandier, xlii, 

273 — contains pyrogallic acid, Petten- 
kofer, xxvi, 80, xxvii, 53 — detection of 
mineral acids, Tissandier, xlii, 274. 

PYROMECONic, constitutiou of salts, 

Graham, x, 348. 

PYROPECTic, Fremy, xxi, 152. 

PYROPHosPHORic, compositiou, Glad- 
stone, xxxix, 419 — chemical liistory, 
Maisch, xxxix, 388. 

QUERCETic, colors, Hlasiwctz, xxxii, 

222 — composition and properties, 
Hlasiwetz, xxxii, 443. 

QUINIC. See ACID, kinic. 

RACEMic, exists naturally, Pasteur, 

XXV, 250 — constitution, Pasteur (W. & 
B., 62), xxvi, 55 — constitution of 



salts, Graham, x, 348 — preparation^ 
xxiii, 341. 

, ARTIFICIAL, Pasteur, xxvi, 55, 

- RACBMO-CAMPHORic, Chautard, xxvi^ 
167. 

- RHABARBARIC, XXii, 50. 

- RHEUMic, (of Henderson), identical 
with oxalic acid, Lassaigne, i, 147. 

- RHODEORETiNic, Mayer, xxv, 354. 

- RHOEADic, Meier, xviii, 212. 

- RiciNic, Bussy and Lecanu, Prel. No. 
79. 

- RiciNOLEic, composition, Saalmuller; 
Svanberg and Kolmodin, xxiv, 103 — 
preparation and properties, Svanberg 
and Kolmodin, xxi, 240. 

- RiOLOzic. See acid, pipitzahoic. 

- ROBiNic, Reinsch, xviii, 239. 
■ RocELLic, Heeren, iv, 347. 

- ROSOLic, xxxiii, 41. 

- RUBERY'THRIC, XXV, 243. 

- RUBICHLORIC, XXV, 242, 247. 

- RUBITANNIC, XXV, 244, 247. 

- RUPiGALLic, Robiquet, viii, 170. 

- RUFO-ciNCHOTANNic, Maisch, xxxiii,, 
195. 

- SACCHARIC. See acid, oxalhydric — 
Pelouze, xi, 63. 

- salicy'LIC, xiv, 211 — behaviour to ses- 
qui-oxide of iron, DoUfuss, xxvi, 65 — 
composition, Piria, xi, 147 — prepara- 
tion, Piria (from salicin and potassa), 
xi, 145 — Procter, jr. (oil of gaulthe- 
ria), xxvi 59. note, 66, note — by 
synthesis, Kolbe and Lautemann,, 
xxxii, 220, 446. 

- SALiCYLOUS, xiv, 211 — Procter, jr., 
xxvi, 59, note — behaviour to sesqui- 
oxide of iron, Dolfuss, xxvi, 65 — in 
Spiraea ulmaria, Buchner, xxvi, 59 — 
reduced to saligenin, Reioike and 
Beilstein, xxxvi, 110. 

- sALMONic, (coloring matter of sal- 
mon flesh), Valenciennes and Fremy^ 
xxviii, 348, 

- SANGUiNARiNic, Ncwbold, xxxviii^ 
497. 

- scAMMONic, preparation and compo- 
sition, Keller, xxx, 257; Spirgatis,, 
xxxi, 378, xxxiii, 431. 

- scAMMONOLic, preparation and com- 
position, Keller, xxx, 257 ; Spirgatis^ 
xxxi, 379; xxxiii, 432. 

- SEBACic, behaviour to permanganate 
of potassa, Cloez and Guignet, xxxi, 
81 — properties and composition, Car- 
let, XXV, 552. 

- SELENic, action on alcohol, Fabian, 
XXXV, 68. 

- SILICIC, solubility in ammonia, Pri- 
bram, xl, 31. 

- siLvic. See acid, sylvic. 

- SMiLASPERic, (W. & B.,439), Garden, 
XV, 299. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



17 



ACID STANNIC, decolorizing power, Filhol, 
xxiv, 239 — reacts on turmeric paper 
as boracic acid, H. Rose, xxxi, 242, 

STEARIC, acetylene by incomplete 

combustion, Berthelot, xxxviii, 264 — 
detection in wax, see wax — compare 

STEARIN. 

STiLLisTEARic, (from Chinese wax), 

Borck, xxvii, 143. 

STRYCHNic, Rousseau, xvii, 237. 

SUBERIC, Beatson (on cork of a bottle 

containing decomposed gun-cotton,) 

XXV, 19. 

SUCCINIC, adulteration, (tartaric acid, 

bisulphate potassa, etc.), Gaulthier, 
vii, 348 — behaviour to electrolysis, 
Kolbe, xxxii, 448 — to ozone, Gorup- 
Besanez, xxxvi, 167 — found in Cheli- 
donium majus, Engelhardt; in Papa- 
ver soraniferura, W alz; in Teucrium 
scorodon, Walz, xxxiv, 328, 329 — in 
alcoholic fermentation and in wine, 
Pasteur, xxxii, 62 — preparation, from 
malic and tartaric acids, Schmitt, 
xxxii, 449 ; Walz, xxxiv, 329 — from 
malate of lime, Kohl, xxviii, 351; 
Liebig, xxi, 349, xxii, 55 — from resi- 
due of distillation of spiritus setheris 
nitrosi, Reich, xxiii, 185 — -yield from 
Lactuca sativa and virosa, Koehnke, 
xvii, 37. 

, MEDICINAL, Kohl, xxviii, 354. 

SULPH-HYDRIC. See HYDROGEN, SUL- 

PHURRETTED. 

suLPH-iNDiLic, Dumas, ix, 265. 

suLPH-OLEic, Fremy, viii, 342. 

SULPHO-BENZYLIC, XXXiii, 133. 

suLPH-OPiANic, Woehler, xvi, 139, 

149. 

— — suLPHO-CAPRYLic, Bouis, xxvi, 451. 
suLPHO-CARBOLic, preparation, etc., 

Guy, xlii, 209; Menzner, xlii, 133; 

Procter, jr., xlii, 131 — double salts, 

Sansom, xli, 444, (see Guy, xlii, 209; 

Procter, jr., xlii, 131). 

suLPHOCBTic, Dumas, vii, 337. 

SULPHO-CYANic, distinction from me- 

conic acid, Everitt, xi, 262 — found in 

commercial ammonia, Mazade, xxv, 

461 — in mustard seed, Pelouze, ii, 340. 
suLPHO-GLYCERic, properties, Bouis, 

xxvii, 144 — Fremy , viii, 342 — Pelouze, 

ix, 352 — Stevens, xxv, 289. 

suLPHO-MARGARic, Fremy, viii, 342. 

suLPHO-MESiTYLic, Kane, X, 206. 

suLPHO-METHYLic, Dumas and Peli- 

got, vii, 69. 
suLPHO-PHENic, of Laurent, =acid, 

sulpho-carbolic, xlii, 131. 

SULPHO-PURPURic, Dumas, ix, 265. 

suLPHO-siNAPic, (Henry and Garot), 

believed by Pelouze to be sulpho- 

cyanic acid, ii, 340. 
suLPHO-STEARic, Frcmy, viii, 342. 



ACID suLPHO-suLPHURic, Persoz, xii, 243. 

suLPHO-viNic, compare oil of wine. 

SULPHURIC, action on copper of cold, 

concentrated acid, Barruel vi, 127 — 
on lead, Calvert and Johnson, xxxv, 
358 — on resins and gum resins, Sace, 
xlii, 243 — adulteration, (sulphates of 
soda and of magnesia), Fleischer, 
xlii, 217 — arsenic contained in Eng- 
lish acid, Wackenroder, xii, 236 — not 
in American acid, Maisch, xxxvi, 235 
— detection, (protochloride of tin), 
Hager, xlii, 400 — freed from, Buch- 
ner (muriatic acid gas, W. & B., 57), 

xxvii, 417 — Dupasquier (sulphuret of 
barium), xvii, 180 — Frederking (finds 
Loewe's method, with chloride of so- 
dium, unreliable), xxxii, 88 — capillary 
power, Frankenheim,xxxv,248-concen- 
tration (in enamelled cast iron pots), 
Roder, xxii, 375 — apparatus (a tower 
filled with pumice stone), Costello, 
xli, 560 — constitution (acts like a sim- 
ple body), Persoz, xii, 243 — crystal- 
lized, Barruel, vi, 261 — crystals in 
lead chamber (nature and proper- 
ties), Dana, vi, 144 — de la Provostaye, 
xiii, 82 — drops and minims, Durand, 
i, 169 — distillation, bumping avoided, 
Lembert (quartzite, sulphate of soda), 
XX, 28 — Nees (bed of ashes), xxxii, 88 — 
Vorwerk (buried in sand), xxix, 167, 
(see boiling), — eschar, color of, vii, 262 
—formation (from oxygenated essential 
oils and sulphurous acid), Kuhlmann, 

xxviii, 136 — theory, Baudriraont, xvii, 
289; Dana, vi, 144; Gaultier, vi, 60; 
Koene, xvii, 289— Peligot, xvii, 289. 

MANUFACTURE, description of lead 

chambers. Bridges, xi, 108 — by means 
of electricity And ozone (W. & B , 54), 
Bell, xxv, 255 — from iron, sulphuret- 
ted, Kopp, xxviii, 122, 125 — in Man- 
chester, xxxiii, 482 — iron pyrites, Bar- 
ruel, XV, 78 — lime, sulphate, Cari-Mon- 
trand (by means of dry muriatic acid 
gas), xxvi, 551 — Reinsch (by means 
of carbonate of ammonia), xlii, 469 
— Tilghman (by superheated steam), 
XX, 190 — from sulphur and nitre, in 
Glasgow, xiii, 207 — sulphur and ni- 
tro-sulphuric acid, Tennant, xxxi, 
111. 

, monohydrated, Playfair, xxxiii, 

175 — nitric acid, detection, Couerbe 
(narcotin, W. & B., 618), viii, 174— 
(not reliable, Jacquelin, xiv, 311) — 
Braun (sulphate of aniliu), xl, 334 — 
nitric acid, separated, Jacquelin (sul- 
phur and chlorine), xiv, 311 — Pelouze 
(sulphate of ammonia), xiv, 311, xxv, 
462, xxxv, 39, note — Skey (by char- 
coal), xxxix, 66 — oxygen manufac- 
tured from it, Deville and Debray, 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



SULPHURIC [Continued). 
xxxiii, 146 — poisoning^ xxix, 17 — puri- 
fication^ see Arsenic and Nitric acid, 
above— Ph. U. S. (30), iii, 70— Ph. 
Brit. (64), remarks, Redwood, xxxvi, 
447 — Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix, 210— 
reaction^ limit (various reagents), Has- 
tings, xiii, 202, 204 — solvent for sul- 
phates of lime, baryta, lead and stron- 
tia, Struve, xlii, 319 — sources of sul- 
phur in manufacture, Mactear, xl, 431 
— tesis^ ii, 157 — minute quantities, 
Wormley (Veratria), xxxix, 479 — Ve- 
ratria test masked by organic matter. 
King, xl, 107 — therapeutic^ combined 
with alum in painters' colic, Gendrin, 
iv, 258. 

, ANHYDROUS, preparation, Bar- 

reswil (W. & B., 58), xx, 313 ; Osann, 
xxxi, 439 ; Prelier, xx. 111 — proper- 
ties, Aime, viii, 242. 
, AROMATicuM, Original formula, 

xiii, 174 — drops and minims, Durand, 
i, 169— Ph. U. S. (60), remarks, Tay- 
lor, XXXV, 410 — improved, Jamieson 
(substitutes essential oils), xxxix, 201 
—Ph. Brit. (64), remarks, Attfield, 
xli, 249. See Elixir vitrioli myn- 

SICHTI. 

, DiLUTUM, drops and minims, 

Bernouilly, xxxi, 441 ; Durand, i, 169 
—Ph. U. S. (30), iii, 80— Ph. U. S. 
(60), remarks, Procter, jr., xxxvi, 211 
— Taylor, xxxv, 410 — Ph. Helvetica 
(65), xxxix, 210. 

, DRY. See , ANHYDROUS. 

, FUMING, contaminated with sul- 
phurous acid, Dupasquier, xiv, 236 — 
manufacture, Prelier, xx. 111. 

, NORDHAUSEN. See , FUMING. 

SULPHUROUS, action on hydriodic acid, 
Saladin, iv, 40 — as antiseptic^ Crookes, 
xxxviii, 433 — coW-produced, Loir and 
Orion, xxxiii, 224 — decomposed by sun- 
light, Loew, xlii, 352 — liquefaction and 
solidification, Faraday, xvii, 20 ; Mit- 
chell, X, 308 — preparation^ Anthon 
(sulphuric acid and sulphur), xxxi, 
353 — Calvert (large scale, W. & B., 
937), XXX, 37 5 — Stolba (sulphur and 
anhydrous protosulphate of iron), 
xl, 313 — Tilghman (sulphate of lime 
and superheated steam), xx, 190 — Ph. 
U. S. (60), remarks, Procter, jr., 
xxxvi, 211 — as reagent (for quantita- 
tive determination of iodine), Duflos, 

xiv, 87 — soluhility in benzine, ether, 
chloroform, Sestini, xli, 329 — specific 
gravity, Davy; Thomson, x, 343 — 
strength^ Umney, xli, 241, 245 — in 
sugar manufacture, Reynoso, xxxv, 
432 — tests^ Boedeker (sulphate of zinc 
and nitroprusside of sodium), xxxiii, 
404 Reinsch (metallic copper), 



xxxiv, 358 — Schiff (protonitrate of 
mercury), xxxiv, 36 — therapeutics, in 
consumption, Dewar, xxxviii, 469 — 
uses, Dewar, xxxviii, 467. 

, ANHYDROUS, Hquid as solvent^ 

Sestini, xli, 328. 

suMBULic, Reinsch, xxiii, 225. 

SYLvic, composition, Liebig, xvii^ 

175; H. Rose, viii, 49; Trommsdorflf^ 
xvii, 175 — preparation, Unverdorben 
(W. & B., 699), ii, 82. 

TAMPicic, Spirgatis, xlii, 514. 

TAMPicoLic, Spirgatis, xlii, 514. 

TANNIC, action on alkaloids, Henry 

(W. & B., 940), vii, 42, 226— on iron 
and alumina mordants, Calvert, xxvii^ 
82 — on nitrate of silver in pills, Cop- 
ney, xxvii, 413 — as alkaloimeter, Henry, 
vii, 42, 227 — behavior to animal char- 
coal, Weppen, xviii, 204 — for chil- 
blains, Berthold, xxviii, 180 — constitu- 
tion (is gallic acid and glucose, W. <fe 
B., 941), Strecker, xxvii, 49 — denied 
by Robiquet (W. & B., 941), xxvii, 51 
— of salts, Graham, x, 348 — co7iver~ 
sion into gallic acid, Wetherill (W. &, 
B , 920), XX, 112- Calvert (in tanning 
extracts), xxviii, 455; Rochleder, 
xxix, 464 — decolorized (animal char- 
coal, W. & B., 939), Kummel, xxviii, 
114 — in dialyser, Graham, xxxiv, 315 
— estimation by glue, xxxix, 415 ; Mul- 
ler, xxxi, 427, xxxiii, 164, xli, 193 — 
by absorption, oxygen, Mittentzwey, 
xxxvi, 315 — by tartar emetic, Ger- 
landt, xxxv, 519 — by ammonio-sul- 
phate of copper. Marriage, xxxiv, 427 
— and ether compound, Bolley, xxxiii, 
219, 337; Luboldt, xxxii, 322; Par- 
rish (Maisch's priority vindicated), 
xxxiii, 207 — fermentation prevented by 
carbolic acid, Calvert, xxxiv, 161 — 
grape seed, yield of tannic acid, Wag- 
ner, xxxiv, 89 — iodine rendered solu- 
ble in water, Debanque, xxiv, 171 — 
antidote to mushrooms, Chausarel, 
xxvii, 535 — odor removed (benzole, 
W. & B., 939), Procter, jr., xxxvii, 53 
— in plants, occurrence in woodj^, Pet- 
tenkofer, xxvii, 53 ; Paul, xxix, 554 
— preparation with ether, Beral (the- 
ory, W. & B., 939), xii, 232; Duval, 
xiii, 171 — with ether and alcohol, Ro- 
ther, xlii, 403 ; Sandrock, xxv, 446 — 
Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix, 315 — with 
benzole, Williams, xxvi, 342 — from' 
myrobalans, Hennig, xlii, 318 — puri- 
fication, Heintz, xl, 396 — solubility in 
alcohol. Cap and Garot, xxvii, 159 — 
in chloroform, Lepage, xxiv, 148 — in 
ether (Mohr vs. Pelouze, Parrish, 
613), Bolley, xxxiii, 337 — in glycerin, 
Adolphus, xxxix, 150; Cap and Ga- 
rot, xxvii, 159, 160; Klever, xlii, 222 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



19 



~ TANNIC [Continued). 
— ia water, Cap and Garot, xxvii, 159 
— substitute for quinine, Leriche, 
XXXV, 512 — varieties of, Stenhouse, 
xxxiv,252 — yield from various sources. 
Bowman, xli, 193: Muller, xxxi, 427 
— from galls, Marriage, xxxiv, 431. 

- TANNO-ARSENic, Gastinel, XXXV, 335. 

- TANTALic, reacts on turmeric paper 
as boracic acid. Rose, xxxi, 242. 

- TARTARIC, action on cotton and flax, 
Calvert, xxvii, 83 — adulteration (alum, 
etc.),vii, 11, xxxi, 511 — arsenic in, W?ic- 
kenroder, xii, 236 — behavior to boracic 
acid, Rose, xxxi, 241— to fused chlorate 
of potassa, Boettger, xxx, 69 — to sac- 
charine matters (forms compounds), 
Berthelot, xxx, 154 — cit7nc acid, com- 
pound, Phipson, XXXV, 174 — distinc- 
tion (W. & B., 38), xxxiv, 507 — com- 
pound witli glucose and citric acid, 
Berthelot, xxx, 154 — compounds, Sou- 
beiran and Capitaine, xii, 33 — consti- 
tution, Liebig, xxxii, 265 — of its salts, 
Graham, x, 348 — conversion into suc- 
cinic acid, Schmitt, xxxii, 449 ; Walz, 
xxxiv, 329 — detection in cold solutions, 
Rose, viii, 86 — estimation, Martenson 
(as tartrate of lime), xli, 335 — Schnis- 
ter, in mother liquors (with potassa 
and citric acid), xxxv, 73 — malic acid, 
relation, Liebig, xxxii, 347 — manu- 
facture, small scale (cream of tartar 
and sulphuric acid), iv, 16 — large 
scale (cream of tariar, chalk, sul- 
phate of lime, W. & B., 60), xxiii, 
338 — boiling temperature necessary, 
xvii, 124 — Firmin (with chalk and 
oxalic acid), xxvi, 329 — Gatty (with 
carbonic acid), xxvi, 336 — Kuhlmann 
(with baryta salts), xxxi, 140 — Price 
(with ammonia, W. & B., 61), xxvi, 
324 — Waltl (with sulphate of alu- 
mina), xxvii, 418 — from Catawba wine, 
Wayne, xl, 75 — from marc of grapes, 
Inette and Ponteves, xl, 331 — Ph. U. 
S. (30), iii, 72— Ph. Lond. (24), Prel. 
No. 24 — powdering, loss, Covell, xxxix, 
116 — preservation, Maisch, xxxix, 52 — 
reaction, limit, Hastings, xiii, 203 — 
combination with saccharine matters, 
Berthelot, xxx, 154 — sugar, relation, 
Bouchardat, xxi, 348 — solubility in 
glycerin, Adolphus, xxxix, 150. 

, ARTIFICIAL, Liebig, (W. k B., 

61, Parriah, 591,) xxxii, 88, 345. 

^ , INACTIVE, (W. & B. 62,) Pas- 
teur, xxvi, 57. 

, MODIFIED, Braconnot, iv, 259, 

(metatartaric ?) 

- TARTRO-CITRIC, PhipSOU, XXXV, 174. 

- TARTRO-MBTHYLio, Gu^riu, viii, 329. 

- TARTRo-viNic, Gu^rin, viii, 328. 

- TERBBIC, XX, 121. 



ACID THBBOLACTic, Smith, xxxvii, 466. 

TiGLiNic, Geuther, xlii, 318. 

TITANIC, reacts on turmeric paper as 

boracic acid. Rose, xxxi, 242. 
TOLUYLic (from Benzoin), Kolbe & 

Lautemann, xxxiii, 220, 378. 
TOxicoDENDRic, Maisch, xxxviii, 4. 

TRICHLOROACETIC, SCe ACID CHLOROX- 

ALIC. 

ULMic, Kane, x, 209. 

URIC, behavior to bichromate of po- 
tassa test, Jenkins, xxxiii, 528, — to 
chlorous acid, Schiel, xxxii, 443, — to 
ozone, Gorup-Besanez, xxxvi, 166, 
— -found in excrement of birds and 
reptiles, Cap & Henry, xii, 152, — 
fresh cantharides, Robiquet, xiii, 318, 
— preparation from guano, Bensch, 
xix, 80, — from pigeon excrements,. 
Arppe, xxvi, 88. 

URO-BENzoic, (Berzelius,)=ACiD, Hip- 

PURic, vi, 261. 

uvic, see acid, racemic. 

VALERIANIC, formation, from angelic 

acid, Ascher, xlii, 467, — preparation^ 
from caseine, Liebig, xviii, 129, — from 
oil of fusel, Crew, (Ph. U. S., 60,) 
xxxii, 109, — Gruneberg, xxvi, 164, — 
Ph. U. S. (60), remarks, Procter, jr., 
xxxvi, 212, — from oil of valerian, — - 
Trommsdorff, (W. & B. 848, 943), vi, 
351, — from the root: Lefort (with 
sulphuric acid and bichromate of po- 
tassa,) xviii, 243, — remarks on Le- 
fort's method, Procter, jr., xviii, 244, 
— Procter, jr., (with caustic potassa,) 
xvii, 2, — Rabourdin (with sulphuric 
acid, W. & B. 848), xvii, 4, 254— (As- 
choff does not approve of the addi- 
tion of sulphuric acid), xix, 283 — T. 
& H. Smith (carbonate of soda, W & 
B., 848), xvii, 252— Wittstein (ex- 
hausts by distillation without addi- 
tion of sulphuric acid), xvii, 194 — 
separation from butyric acid, Liebig, 
xxii. 179 — specific gravity, Musgiller, 
xli, 33. 

, ANHYDROUS, Chiozza (W. & B., 

943,) XXV, 360. 
, ARTIFICIAL (is isomeric but not 

identical with the natural), Stal- 

mann, xli, 302. 
VANILLIC, (Stokkeby), = vanillin, 

(Gobley,) xxxviii, 376. 

VERATRic, Merck, xxxiii, 115. 

viBURNic, (Kramer) = valerianic 

ACID, Monro, xviii, 214, note. 

viRiDic (in Caflfeaarabica), xxv, 242. 

vulpinic, yields alphatoluylic acid, 

Moeller & Strecker, xxxiii, 378. 

xanthopbnic, Woehler, xvi, 138. 

xanthosantalic, Plummer, xxvii, 

115. 

xanthotannic, Ferrein, xxxi, 352. 



20 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



ACID ziziPHic, Latour, xxx, 404. 

ziziPHOTANNic, Latour, XXX, 404. 

ACIDS, basin for keeping (stone reser- 
voirs lined with sulphate of baryta), 
Kalisch, xxxiv, 367. 

estimation in salts, Langer and Wawni- 

kiewicz, xxxiii, 405 — poisoning with 
concentrated acids, Chevalier, xiii, 
129 — principles^ Pelouze, vi, 261 — su- 
gar, action of diluted acids on, Mala- 
guti, vii, 350 — test, liquor, (petals of 
Dahlia), Marsh, xii, 238. 

ORGANIC, constitution, Gerhardt, xxiv, 

375. 

VEGETABLE, action upou calomel, 

Bauwens, xxviii, 529 — are oxides of 
compound radicals, Johnson, vi, 33. 

ACIPENSER STELLATUS furnishes best 
isinglass, D. B. Smith, iii, 19. 

ACOLYCTINA (acolytina) from Aconi- 
tum lycoctonum, Fliickiger, xlii, 235; 
Hiibschmann, xxxviii, 376. 

ACONELLA, identical with narcotia, 
Jellet, xxxvi, 341 ; Smith, xxxvi, 179 
— preparation, properties, etc., T. and 
H. Smith (W. & B. 65 note), xxxvi, 
173 — rotary, power, Jellet, xxxvi, 341. 

ACONITIA, action, Hottot, xxxvi, 311— 
behavior to bichromate of potassatest, 
Jenkins, xxxiii, 528 — iodides of cad- 
mium and potassium, Marme, xli, 18 
— potassium, iodohydrargyrate, May- 
er (W. & B., 1542), XXXV, 21, 23— 
pentachloride of antimony and phos- 
phoric acid, Schulze, xxxii, 138, 256 
— to perchloric acid. Bullock, xxxvii, 
21 — sulphuric acid, Guy, xxxiii, 526 
— tannic and gallic acids, Henry, vii, 
228 — composition, Planta, xxiii, 39 — 
German versus English, Merck, xl, 
564 — Hiibschmann, xli, 314 — prepa- 
ration, Groves, xxxviii, 518 — Henry, 
, vii, 234— Hesse, vi, 321— Hottot (W. 
& B., 945, note), xxxvi, 309— Liegeois 
and Hottot, xxxvi, 59; xxxviii, 519 — 
Procter, Jr., xxxiii, 100 — TurnbuU, 
vii, 143, xxxviii, 516— Ph. U. S. (60) 
remarks, Procter, Jr , xxxvi, 298 
— properties, Fluckiger, xlii, 235, 397 
— Planta, xxiii, 39 — Pseudaconitia, dif- 
ference, Merck, xl, 564 — Hiibschmann, 
xli, 314 — solubility in chloroform, 
Schlimper, xxxii, 160 — subliming tem- 
perature, Guy,xl, 247 — Helwig, xxxvii, 
29, xxxix, 539 — toxicologically and 
pharmacodynamically considered, 
Praag, (W. & B., 946), xxviii, 117. 

ACONITUM, action, relative, of different 
parts, Schroff, xxvii, 445 — its alka- 
loids, Fliickiger, xlii, 233, 397— as 
local anodyne, xxvi, 281 — culture at 
Mitcham, Bell, xxiii, 36 — influence of 
drying, Schoonbroodt, xli, 320 — as em- 
menagogue, West, viii, 263 — percola- 



tion with water, packing, Soubeiran, 
viii, 225 — physiological action of, 
Schroff, xxvii, 446 — preparations, 
Soubeiran (heat avoided), vi, 32 — 
poisoning, xii, 173 — root for horse- 
radish, xxvi, 87, xxviii, 219 — in acute 
rheumatism, Lombard, vii, 171 — root, 
European and American, relative ac- 
tivity, Procter, Jr.,, xxxvi, 5 — powder- 
ing, precaution, Procter, Jr., (W. & 
B., 1384), xxxiii, 103 — uaZwe, relation, 
of different species, xxxii, 225. 

DECORUM ; BXALTATDM ; xxiii, 37. 

LYCOCTONUM, alkaloids, Hiibschmann, 

xxxviii, 376— Fliickiger, xlii, 233— 
contains no aconitia, Fliickiger, xlii, 

235, 397. 

NAPELLUS, contains no volatile, acrid 

body. Groves, xxxviii, 515 — see aco- 

NITUM. 

PALMATIPIDUM ; STCERCKIANUM, 

xxiii, 37. 

ACORUS ASiATicus, V, 265 (calamus). 
CALAMUS, see Calamus. 

GRAMINEUS, V, 266. 

INDICUS ; LEGITIMUS, V, 265, 

(Calamus.) 
ACRACONITIA, (Ludwig)=English aco- 
nitia = pseudaconitia, Fliickiger, xlii, 

236, 398. 

ACROLEIN, preparation, Hiibner & Geu- 
ther, xxxii, 449 — properties, Stevens, 
XXV, 290. 

ASjTMK racemosa, see Cimicifuga race- 

MOSA. 

spiOATA, description (difference from 

Helleborus niger), Walpers, xxiv, 228. 

ADANSONIA digitata, fruit (specimen 
at College), xv, 235 — its use, vii, 187 
— bark, as substitute for cinchona, 
Duchassaing (W. & B., 1453), xx, 328. 

ADDRESS, British Association, Hooker, 
xl, 558. 

Dr. Coates, xxxii, 378, 468. 

Jefferson College (chemical theory) 

Bache, xxxii, 385. 

American Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion, see Pharmacy. 

Philadelphia and other Colleges of 

Pharmacy, see Pharmacy. 

ADELHEID Spring, Heilbronn, analysis, 
Pettenkofer, xxxi, 460 — account, Al- 
bright, xxxi, 458. 

ADEPS. See Lard, Fat, Grease. 

MYRiSTiCiE, fusing and congealing 

point, Wimmel, xli, 23, 431 — prepara- 
tion (with bisulphide of carbon, W. 
& B., 556, note), Lepage, xxviii, 446 
— yield, Riekher, xxxvi, 111. 

ADIANTHUS capillus veneris. See As- 
pidium. 

ADONIS vernalis, Walpers, xxiv, 228. 
ADROIDE^, dehiscence of pollen. Aid- 
ridge, xiii, 216. 



1 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 21 



ADULTERATIONS. See under respec- 
tive headings. 

—2 — , XX, 200 ; Mahla, xl, 54*7 ; Maisch, 
xxvi, 210 — at U. S. Army Labora- 
tory, Philadelphia, Maisch, xxxvi, 
100— act of Congress, xx, 349— 
facts solicited, xxx, 381 — law, xx, 
292— report, Dr. Edwards, xx, 203, 
xxi, 153 — of Secretary of Treasury, 
xxi, 153 — of committee American 
Pharmaceutical Association, xxviii, 
126, xxxi, 502 — of committee Amer. 
Medical Association, xxiii, 18 — cir- 
cular from New Fork College of Phar- 
macy, xix, 305. 

, drugs rejected, xxi, 159, 382, xxv, 76, 

495. 

in England, xxviii, 29. 

detected, Procter, xxiii, 3, 106 — by 

microscope, xxv, 45. See Drugs. 
-M. See E. 

JSCIDIUM MENTHiE, xxiii, 241. 

MARMELOS, yields gum, xxix, 77. 
^PYORNIS MAXiMus, xl, 276. 
^ROLUPUS L^vis, plant of Armenian 

cochineal, ix, 82. 
-ERUGO. See CupRi ACETAS. 
.^SOHYNOMENE asperata ;— paludosa, 

supposed source of rice paper, xxii, 

156. 

-ESCIGENIN, Rochleder, xxxv, 290, note ; 
xli, 419. 

^SOULIN, behavior to bichromate of pot- 
assa test, Jenkins, xxxiii, 528 — nitric 
acid; sulphuric acid, Guy, xxxiii. 526 
— \VL Hymenudictyon excelsum, Brough- 
ton, xl, 353. 

-^SOULUS HIPPOCASTANUM, Crystals (ox- 
alate of lime), Fluckiger, xxxvii, 32 — 
fecula,xxix, 180— fibre, twist of, Braun, 
xxviii, 67—027 for gout (W. & B., 
1454), Genevoix, xxxi, 23 1 — quercitrin, 
Rochleder, xxxii, 222, 444 — as tonic, 
Griffith, V, 288. 

vESTIVATION of cinchonas, Don, xi, 247. 

-ETHALONE, Piria, xxiv, 241. 

.^THER (ether), different kinds, D. B. 
Smith, iv, 114 — compound ethers, Ber- 
thelot, xxvi, 121, 122 — decomposition 
of compound, Berthelot, xxvi, 124 — 
formation of ethers (wood charcoal), 
Moride, xxix, 46. 

(sulphuric ether), absorbing power 

for carbonic acid, Saussure, xxxi, 116 
— accident in distillation, Adrian, xlii, 
512 — acetylene formed by incomplete 
combustion, Berthelot, xxxviii, 263 — 
action on galls, Bridges, xiv, 40 — on 
iodide of lead, and on iodide of pot- 
assium, Vogel xiii, 197 — on resins 
and gum-resins, Sace, xlii, 243 — alco- 
hol, estimation, Borsarelli (W. & B,, 
5^51), xii, 249 — freed from (by chro- 
mic acid), Lieben, xlii, 177 — behavior 

[3 



atlow temperatures, Mitchell, x,309 — 
AZeac^m^ principle, its nature, Schoen- 

bein, xvii, 153 capillary power, 

Frankenheim, xxxv, 248 — versus chlo- 
roform, Seguin, xxxix, 221 — coZ(/ pro- 
duced. Loir and Orion, xxxiii, 224 — 
in deafness, xxxii, 557 — decomposition 
by burning in asbestos lamp, Boett- 
ger, X, 240 — drops and minims, Ber- 
nouilly, xxxi, 441; Durand, i, 169; 
Proctor, xxxv, 248 — estimation, Reg- 
nault and Adrian, xxxvi, 528 — forma- 
tion by chloride of zinc (supports 
Mohr's theory), Buchner, xxiv, 82— 
by fermentation, Leuchs, xxxiv, 45 — 
gelatinization (W. k B., 954), Gri- 
mault, xxvii, 517 — methylic ether, de- 
tection (permanganate of potash), 
Young, xxxviii, 59 — in mixtures (with 
spermaceti), Hodgson, jr., iv, 12; 
Coates, iv, 202 — monument, xl, 474 — 
preparation, in Berlin, iii, 146 — by 
steam, Squibb, xxviii, 385 — pure, at 
one operation, Soubeiran, xxviii, 390 
— Liebig (sulphoviaate of potash), 
viii, 216— Ph. U. S. (60), remarks^ 
Procter, jr., xxxvi, 298 — Ph. Dublin 
(50), xxiii, 11— Ph. Helvetica (65), 
xxxix, 211 — properties, D. B.Smith, 
iv, 119 — of ether from alcohol, con- 
taining methylic spirits, McFarlane, 
xxviii, 150 — in syrups, see Syrup of 
ether — theory, Graham (W. &B., 953), 
xxiii, 267— Hennel (W. & B., 953), ii, 73 
— Kuhlmann (assumption of katalysis 
not necessary), xiii, 47 — Liebig, viii, 
215 — for purity (copaiva), vi, 262 
— (baryta), Berthelot, xxxv, 538 — va- 
pors, igniting point, Hutton, xli, 252 
— water, detected (oil of turpentine), 
Gorgue, xxiv, 261 — estimation (io- 
dine), Maisch, xxxii, 524. 

, CAPSULES, Clertan, xxvi, 80. 

, portior, Ph. U. S. (60), re- 
marks, Procter, jr., xxxvi, 299. 

, Morton's claim of priority, 

xxv, 189. 

- acetic, constitution, Planiava, ii, 82 — 
decomposition by burning in asbestos 
lamp, Boettger, x, 243 — drops in 
drachm, Beruouilly, xxxi, 441 — pre- 
paration, Berthelot (acetic acid and 
alcohol), xxvi, 123 — Liebig (acetate 
of lead), vi, 265 — Seville Auger (ace- 
tate of soda), V, 42 — Ph. Helvetica 
(65), (acetate of soda), xxxix, 211 — 
jmre, Liebig (phospbovinic acid and 
acetate of potassa), viii, 216 — purifi- 
cation, Rump, xxviii, 400 — properties^ 
D. B. Smith, iv, 119 — physiological 
properties, Turnbull, xxvii, 31 — sepa-- 
ration, Engelhardt, xxxiii, 411. 

- aceticus perratus, Klaprothi. See 

TiNCTURA FERRI ACETICI AJTHERKA. 



j 



22 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN N^ME OF BASE ; 



-ETHER AMYLOPALMiTic, Berthelot, xxvi, 
123. 

BENZOIC, preparation, Berthelot, 

xxTi, 122, 123— properties, D. B. 
Smith, iv, 120. 

BiCHLOiiicus. See ^ — —chloric. 

BISULPHATE, Serullas, i, 230. 

BROMic, D. B. Smith, iv, 118 — physi- 
ological properties, Turnbull, xxvii, 
31. 

BROMOHYDRIC. See HYDBOBROMIC. 

BUTYRIC, Berthelot, xxvi, 122, 123. 

CANTHAB-iDAL, Oettinger, xxii, 227. 

CAPRYLO-ACETIC, Botlis, XXVI, 416. 

CAPBYLO-HYDRIODIC, Bouis, XXvi, 416. 

CAPRYLO-MURIATIC, Bouis, XXvi, 416. 

CARBONIC, xii, 50. 

CHL0RATU8. See CHLORIC. 

CHLORIC, cojnmercial, Procter, jr., xxxi, 

553 — cojuposiiion, Despretz, Dumas, 
Morin, iv, 350 — constitution^ Schloss- 
berger, xxxiv, 44, note — mixture^ Mor- 

son, XX, 101 preparation^ Hager, 

xxxiv, 44, note — properties^ D. B. 
Smith, iv, 116. Compare Chloroform. 

CHLORINATED CHLORHYDRIC (W. & B., 

1494), Mialhe and Flourens, xxiii, 
220. 

CHLOROXYCARBONic, Personne, xli, 

207. 

CITRIC, Malaguti, ix, 88 ; Smith iv, 

120. 

ETHYLO-PALMiTic, Bcrthelot, xxvi, 

123. 

FORMIC, preparation, Doebereiner, vi, 

172 — properties. Smith, iv, 120. 

FRUIT. See different heads under 

Oleum. 

HYDRic, D. B. Smith, iv, 115. 

HYDRiODic, cc^/on of aluminium, glu- 
cinium, iron, magnesium, tin, Ca- 
hours, XXXV, 106 — inhalation^ Huette 
(W. & B., 1529), xxiii, l5Q—physiolo- 
gical properties, Turnbull, xxvii, 31 — 
preparation Cap, (with phosphorus), 

xxiii, 157 — Lautemann, xxxii, 321 — 
Serullas (W. & B., 1529), iii, 178— de 
Vrij (iodide of potassium, muriatic 
acid gas, alcohol, W. & B., 1529), 
xxxi, 170. Compare iodic. 

HYDROBROMic, as anftistheiic, Robin, 

xxiv, 173 — preparation, Serullas, ii, 
187. 

HYDROCHLORIC. See MURIATIC. 

— HYDROCHLORIC, PERCHLORURETTED. 

See Carbon bichloride. 

hydrocyanic, properties, Pelouze 

(W. & B., 1530), vi, 354— physiologi- 
cal properties, Turnbull, xxvii, 31. 

hydroselenic, Loewig, viii, 320. 

hydrosulphuric. Loewig, viii, 319. 

hyponitro-acetic, Hare, xii, 117. 

HYPONITROUS, Hare, xii, 115, xiv, 132. 

Compare nitrous. 



^THER iodic, D.B.Smith, iv, 118. Com- 
pare HYDRIODIC. 

lODURETTED (ethereal solution of io- 
dine), Fisher, i, 92. 

isocETic, Bouis, xxvii, 143. 

KiNic, preparation, Manetti, xxvii, 83. 

— properties, Henry & Plisson, ii, 229 
D. B. Smith, iv, 120. 

lactic, Lepage, xvi, 52. 

malic, D. B. Smith, iv, 120. 

mesitic, Kane, x, 205. 

, BISULPHATE, Kauc, X, 206. 

, phosphate, Kane, x, 206. 

, sulphate, Kane x, 206. 

methylic, acetylene formed by incom- 
plete combustion. Berthelot, xxxviii^ 
263 — composition^ Kane, x, 206 — detec- 
tion, Young (pernanganate of potas- 
sa), xxxviii, 59, 

methyl-ethylic, Richardson, xlii^ 

333. 

methyl-hydrochloric, Kuhlmann^ 

xiii, 45. 

methylo-palmitic, Berthelot, xxvi,, 

123. 

methylo-sebacic, Carlet, xxv, 553. 

methyloxalic. Fell, xxx, 219. 

methyloxamic, Fell, xxx, 219 

muriatic, acetylene formed by in- 
complete combustion, Berthelot, 
xxxviii, 263 — properties, D. B. Smithy 
iv, 118. 

nitric, anaesthetic effects, Simpson,, 

XX, 246 — preparation from urea, Lea, 
xxxiv, 69 — Lossen, xli, 419 — Millon, 
XV, 279. 

nitro-benzoic, Kopp, XX, 119. 

nitro-cinnamic, Kopp, XX, 119. 

nitrous, action upon iodide of potas- 
sium (W. & B., 1299), Juncadella, 
xxxi, 438 — apparatus for preparation. 
Hare, ix, 27 — decomposition by burn- 
ing in asbestos lamp, Battger, x, 241 
— preparation, Hare, ix, 27 — Lea (with 
protosalphate of iron), xxxiv, 71 — 
Piette, viii, 260 — properties, D. B. 
Smith, iv, 119— compare hypo- 
nitrous. 

opianic, Woehler, xvi, 137. 

oxalic, D. B. Smith, iv, 119. 

ozoNic, Richardson, xli, 156. 

palmitic, Berthelot, xxvi, 122. 

pelargonic, preparation, xxxviii, 168 

—Wagner (W. & B., 1516), xxv, 320. 

perchloric. Hare and Boye, xiii, 32. 

piPERic, v. Babo and Keller, xxx, 140. 

PYRO-ACETic. See acetone. 

QuiNic, See , kinic. 

scAMMONOLic, Spirgatis, xxxiii, 432, 

SEBACic, Carlet, xxv, 553. 

SELENIC. See , HYDROSELENIC. 

STEARIC, Berthelot, xxvi, 123. 

suLPHo-CYANic, D. B. Smith, iv, 118. 

SULPHURIC. See ^ther. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



23 



^ETHER SULPHUROUS, observations, Hare, 
ix, 148 — preparation, Ebelmen and 
Bouquet, xv^ii, 185. 

TANNIC, Bolley (Parrish, 613), xxxiii, 

219, 338 — Parrish (Maisch's claim 
vindicated), xxxiii, 207. 

TARTARIC, D. B. Smith, iv, 120. 

THiALic, Zeise, viii, 258. 

.ETHIOPS, ANTiMONiALis. See Hydrar- 
gyrum SULPHURATO-STIBIATUM. 

MINERALIS. See HYDRARGYRUM SUL- 

PHURATUM NIGRUM. 

OF PLATINUM, (spongy platinum), 

Doebereiner, vii, 321. 
JE— See E— 

AFFINITY, CHEMICAL, modification, Glad- 
stone, xxvii, 326. 

AGARICUS, (agaric), campestris, anges- 
thetic principle, Herapath, xxvii, 464, 

of olive tree, Delille, vi, 261. 

WHITE. See Boletus laricis. 

see Boletus. 

AGATES, in California, xxxviii, 566. 
AGATHOTES chirayta. See Chirbtta. 
AGAVE AMERICANA, yields gum maguey, 

Guibourt, xxxviii, 503 — pulp of leaves 

as rubefacient, xl, 334. 
AGLAIA ODORATA, for scenting tea, xxvii, 

531. 

AGNUS scYTHicus (Penghawar djambi, 
xxix, 61. 

AGONIA (Plumerialancifolia), Peckoldt, 
xlii, 470. 

AGRIMONIA EUPATORiA, yield of tannin, 
Bowman, xli, 194. 

AGR0STEMM4 githago, xxi, 347. 

AGROSTEMMINB, Schulze, xxi, 347. 

AILANTHUS glandulosa, analysis^ Lilly, 
jr., xxxiii, 504 — Payen, xxxi, 229 — 
silkworm^ feeds on leaves, Guerin, 
xxxi, 185 — as vermifuge^ Hetet (W. & 
B., 1456), xxxi, 229. 

compare varnish, japan. 

AILURUS FULGENS, (musk deer), descrip- 
tion, Campbell, x, 148. 

AIR, atmospreric, analysis. See eudiome- 
TK.Y — compressed^ therapeutical use, 
Tabarie, xiii, 81 — in Mont Cenis tun- 
nel, XXX, 181 — exhausting^ see vac- 
uum — filtered^ properties, Schroeder 
and Dusch, xxvi, 376 — Tyndall, xlii, 
359 — contains no iodine^ Lohmeyer, 
xxv, 520 — lamp,' inflammable air, 
Volta, xxxiv, 148 — organic matter es- 
timated, see sbpometer — sleep^ quan- 
tity of air necessary, Husson, xxxv, 
426. 

ALABASTER tahlets, (toilet), composi- 
tion, Chandler, xlii, 368. 

ALANIN, (from lactic acidj, Kolbe, xxxii, 
447 — behaviour to alloxan, Strecker, 
xxxv, 35. 

ALBUMEN, as antidote to arsenic, Schra- 
dcr, xxvii, 533 — hehamour to metallic 



salts, Lassaigne, xii, 170, 352 — to 
ozone, Gorup-Besanez, xxxvi, 168 — 
to proto-deutonitrate of mercury, 
Lassaigne, iv, 175 — decolorizing ^o^QV 
(calcined with potash, W. & B., 212), 
Bussy, i, 238 — estimation (ferrocya- 
nidc of potassium, Parrish, 521), 
Boedeker, xxxii, 444 — nature (its glo- 
bules are vegetable seeds), Turpin, 
XV, 317 — solubility in glycerin, Gros- 
Renaud, xxxiii. Ill—corrosive subli- 
mate^ compound with ( W. & B., 1155), 
Lassaigne, viii, 347. 

IODIZED, (as occasional substitute for 

cod liver oil), Renault, xxvi, 85. 

ALBUMINATES, Lassaigne, xii, 170, 352. 

OF IRON AND SODA. See FERRI ET 

soda; albumin as and syrupus perri, 
etc. 

ALBUMINE lODEE, Renault, xxvi, 85. 
ALCA — See alka — 
ALCOHOL, absorbing power for carbonic 
acid, nitrogen, oxygen, Saussure, 

xxxi, 116 — acetijicaiion, Serullas, iii, 
263 — action on resins and gum resins, 
Sace, xlii, 242 — behaviour to chlorine 
in direct sunlight, Streit and Franz, 
xlii, 466 — to chlorous acid, Schiel, 

xxxii, 443 — to heat in presence of 
acids and bases, Kuhlmann, xiii, 42, 
(see xxxvii, 100) — to nitric acid (W. 
& B., 1343), Golding Bird, x, 354— to 
selenic acid, Fabian, xxxv, 68 — to 
phosphoric acid (anhydrous), Kuhl- 
mann, xiii, 46 — to sulphuric acid, 
Hennel (W. & B., 953), ii, 73— Kuhl- 
mann ; Lose; Marchand; Mitscher- 
lich, xxxvii, 100— Serullas, i, 227 — 
to anhydrous acid, Kuhlmann, xiii, 
46 — at low temperature, see conge- 
lation — capillary power, Franken- 
heim, xxxv, 248 — congelation, Des- 
pretz, xxiii, 86 — Faraday, xvii, 22 — 
Mitchell, X, 308 — decomposition by 
burning in asbestos lamp, Boettger,x, 
239 — density, see per centage and spe- 
cific gravity — deodorization (permanga- 
nate of potash), V, 85 — Atwood, xxvii, 
379 — Markoe, xli, 38, see purification 
— detection in minute quantities, Car- 
stanjin (formation of cacodyl), xxxvii, 
334 — Lieben (iodine and caustic 
soda), xlii, 176 — Strauch (platinum 
black), xxvi, 525 — Thomson (chro- 
mic acid), xxvi, 525 — in dialyser, 
Graham, xxxiv, 315 — drops and min- 
ims, Bernouilly, xxxi, 441 — Durand, 
i, 169 — economical use, Procter, jr., 
xxxvi, 1, 405 — Squibb, xxxvi, 405, 
xxxviii, 109, xl, 1 — found in goose- 
berries, Wright, X, 330 — from, aspho- 
del, xxvii, 376 — colchicum bulbs, 
Comar, xxviii, 219 — glucose (comes 
not within the lax law), xlii, 414 — 



24 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



ALCOHOL {Continued.) 

lichens, Stenberg, xli, 17 — defiant 
gas, Hennel, ii, 80; Berthelot, xxvii, 
258; Marx, xxviii, 184 — Scilla, xxvii, 
376 — Sorbus aucuparia, ii, 253 — wood 
(see spiRiTUS pyroxilicus) — as fuel 
compared to wood-spirits, BoUey, 

xxvii, 264— /wseZ 0^7, freed from, see pu- 
RiPiCATiON — origin ascertained (etlier 
and water), xl, 443 — Moluar (potassa), 
XXX, 273 — per centage, Beaslej, xiv, 321 
— Fownes, XX, 108— D.B. Smith, Prel. 
No. 15, 33, ii, 15: — physiological ac- 
tion, Bouchardat and Saudras, xx, 
241 — Lallemand, Diiroy, Perrin, xxxii, 
296, xxxiii, 432 — production in U. S.. 
Stearns, xxxiii, 66 — purification, Bre- 
ton (through pumice stone and olive 
oil), xxxi, 372 — Doebereiner (char- 
coal and diluted alcohol), xvi, 233 — 
Hensmans (caustic potassa, or soda), 
iii, 179 — Scanlan (fractional distilla- 
tion), vii, 346 — Schseffer (charcoal, 
sand, etc.), xxvi, 536 — Witting (chlo- 
rinated lime), Prel. No. 80 — rectifica- 
tion, Burgess, (gelatine), xl, 557 — 
Soubeiran (W. & B., 73, carbonate 
of potassa, chloride of calcium, quick- 
lime), xi, 290 — Squibb (apparatus), 
XXX, 1 — sale, compare tax — license, 
discussion, xxxvii, 440 — Procter, jr., 
xxxv,187; xlii,183 — (compare liquor, 
sale) — specific gravity, Baumhauer, 
xxxii, 349 — Mead, xxviii, 209 — Sharp, 

xxviii, 210; see per centage — govern- 
ment standard, xxviii, 393 — strength of 
commercial. Buck, xxviii, 391 — test, 
(anhydrous chloride of cobalt), 
Winckler, xxxvi, 536 — synthetical, 
Hennel, ii, 80 — Berthelot, xxvii, 258 
— Marx, xxviii, 184 — tax, compare sale, 
discussion (American Pharmaceutical 
Association), xxxvii, 440 — memorial 
to Congress, xl, 284 — from glucose 
not liable to tax, xlii, 414 — test for 
purity, Berthelot, (baryta), xxxv, 538 
Kent, xxvi, 417 — use, when mixed 
with wood spirit, McFarlane, xxviii, 
150 — vapor, igniting point, Hutton, 
xli, 254 — water, detection (benzine), 
Gorgue, xxiv, 261. 

ABSOLUTE, preparation, Christison, 

(quicklime), xi, 304 — Fequeux, (car- 
bonate of potassa and quicklime), 
xxviii, 120 — Soemmering (bladder), 
i, 68, vii, 348 — (did not succeed with 
Christison, xi, 304) — Soubeiran (car- 
bonate of potassa, chloride of calcium, 
quicklime, W. & B., 73), xi, 290— Ph. 
Dublin (50), xxiii, 15 — Ph. Helvetica 
(65) xxxix, 211 — test, (anhydrous sul- 
phate of copper), Casoria, xix, 319 
— (anhydrous chloride of cobalt), 
Winckler, xxxvi, 536. 



ALCOHOL AMMONiATED, Ph. U. S. (30), 
iii, 327. 

AMYLic (fusel oil), activc and inac- 
tive, Pasteur (W. & B., 78), xxviii, 
155 — analysis of amylic alcohol from 
Indian corn and from rye, Wetberill, 
XXV, 417 — behavior io chlorinated lime, 
Gerhard, xxxv, 31 — to chloride of 
zinc, Duroy, xxix, 412 — to chlorous 
acid, Schiel, xxxii, 443 — constitution, 
Cahours, ix, 263 — crude and pure, 
Kent (W. & B., 78), xxiv, 353— con- 
tains propylic alcohol, Trommsdorff, 
xli, 21 — properties, Doebereiner, xvi, 
233 — Duroy, xxix, AO^— purification, 
Duroy (fractional distillation over 
chloride of calcium), xxix, 410 — 
Hirsch (table salt, Parrish, 544), xxxiv, 
139, 328— Ph. Dublin (50), xxiii, 17— 
vapor, igniting poi it, Hutton, xli, 254. 

ANHYDROUS. See alcohol, absolute. 

ARSENiuRETTED, for preserving ob- 
jects of natural history, Leprieur, 
xxxiv, 245. 

BUTYRIC, Wurtz, XXV, 272. 

caprylic. Bonis, xxvi, 414. 

DILUTUS, drops and minims, Bernou- 

illy, xxxi, 441— Durand, i, 169. 

garancine (odoriferous principle), 

xl, 450. 

mesitic. See Acetone. 

METHYLATED, vapor, igniting point, 

Hutton, xli, 254. 

METHYLIC. See SPIRITUS PY^ROXILICUS. 

PHENIC. See ACIDUM carbolicum. 

propylic, behavior to Lieben's iodo- 
form test, Hager, xlii, 399. 

sulphuris. See Carbon bisulphide. 

WOOD. See Spiritus pyroxilicus. 

ALCOHOLOMETERS official, Mead, 
xxviii, 209 — Sharp, xxviii, 211 — (on 
Richter and Tralles), Pile, xxviii, 316, 
remarks, Procter, Jr.. xxviii, 319, 
note — Twaddle (superior to Beaum^ 
and Beck), Bolley, xxvii, 345. See 
Hydrometers. 

ALCOOL. See Spiritus. 

ALCOOLATE de vanille. Ph. Batavia 
(1805). xiii, 194. 

ALCOOLATURE of juice of belladonna 

digitalis HYOSCYAMUS TABACUM, 

iii, 91. 

ALDEHYD, contained in brandy, wine, vin- 
egar, Lahens, xxvii, iii — fovanilin green, 
preparation, xxxvii, 342 — preparation, 
from alcohol and chromic acid, Rogers, 
xviii, 292 — from ammoniacal bases 
and permanganate of potassa, Car- 
stanjin, xxxvi, 460 — from casein, 
Gugelberger, xix, 153 — from garan- 
cin, xl, 450 — from glue, Gugelber- 
ger, xix, 153 — from lactic acid, Engel- 
hardt, xxii, 72 — from malic acid, Lie- 
big, xxxii, 265 — test in spiritus sethe- 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



25 



ALDEHYD {Continued.) 

ris Ditrosi, Golding Bird (W & B., 

1343), X, 355. 

MBSiTic, Kane, x. 206, 210. 

RESIN (W. & B., 14), Golding Bird, x, 

355. 

ALDER, AMERICAN. See Alnus serrulata. 

BLACK. See Prinos verticillatus. 

EUROPEAN. See Alnus glutinosa. 

ALE, strychnia in, Graham and Hoffmann, 
XXV, 1T2. 

ALECTOROLOPHUS hirsutus, contains 
rhinanthin, Ludwig, xlii, 403. 

ALETRIS FARiNOSA, emetic, ix, 286 — tonic, 
y, 291 

ALEURITES triloba, account of oil, 
Cooke (W. & B , 14V5), xxxiii, 62— 
substitute for castor oil, O'Rorke, 
XXX, 397. 

ALGAROBIA glandulosa yields mezquite 
gum, xxvii, 17. 

ALGAROTH'S powder, crystallized, Ma- 
lagutti(W. &B., 1587),viii, 176— pre- 
paration, Baudrimont, xxviii, 464. 

. See Antimonium oxidatum 

NITRO-MURIATICUM. 

ALHAGI MAURORUM (yields Persian man- 
na), Carson, ix, 199. 

ALIZARIN, artificial, (from naphthalin), 
Roussin, xxxiii, 377, 558. 

ALKALIES, action on ferro- and ferrid- 
cjanide of iron, Skey, xxxix, 176 — on 
sugar, Bouchardat, viii, 109 — in weak 
solution on some metals, Vogel, xi, 
81 — tests, Boettger (alkanin paper), 
xlii, 217— (Coleus Verscheffelti), xlii, 
511 — Marsh (petals of dahlia), xii, 238 
— trade of Great Britain, xxxv, 181. 

ALKALIMETRY (oxalic acid), Price, xxvii, 
29. See potassa and soda, estimation. 

ALKALINE drinks, Bouchardat, xv, 145. 

LIQUIDS, basin for (stone reservoir 

lined with native sulphate of baryta), 
Kalisch, xxxiv, 367. 

ALKALINE metals, crystallization (by 
galvanic action), Becquerel, iv, 348. 

ALKALOIDS, ammonia already formed, 
Berzelius, xxxii, 269 — Johnson, vi, 
33 — Wurtz, xxxii, 269 — antidote to 
poisonous (chlorine, bromine, io- 
dine), Donn^, ii, 83 — behavior to al- 
kaline carbonates in presence of 
tartaric acid, Opperman, xvii, 297 
— to nascent hydrogen, Rochleder, 
xxxix, 319— to iodine (W. & B , 470 
note), Fairthorne, xxviii, 212 — to re- 
agents, Fresenius, xxxviii, 447, 546, 
xxxix, 27 — to tannic acid, Henry, vii, 
42, 226 ; see tests — constitution (Liebig's 
nitrogen law not exact), Regnault, 
xi, 218 — detection, Flan din, xix, 294, 
xxv, 448 — Guy, xxxiii, 51 7— Stas ( Par- 
rish 627, W. & B., 1233, note), xxv, 
49 — Uslar and Erdmann (Parrish, 



627), xxxiv, 354, see tests — dialysis, 
Grandeau, xxxvi, 414 — discovery sug- 
gested, Ayer, xxv, 407 — estimation, 
iodohydrargyrate of potassium (W. 
& B., 1541), Mayer, xxxv, 20; 
Groves, xxxvi, 535 ; (remarks on 
GroA^es) Mayer, xxxvii, 5 ; Valser, 

xxxvi, 438 — phosphomolybdic acid, 
Mayer, xxxv, 63 — estimation in fatty 
oils, Bastick, xxix, 146 — extraction, 
Cobb, xxiii, 242 — Henry (tannic acid), 
vii, 232 — Lebourdais (charcoal, W. & 
B., 1035), xxi, 87— Williams (benzole), 
xxvi, 337 — from extracts, Mayer, 

xxxvii, 16 — isomeric, Williams, xxxii, 
178 — physiological action modified by 
iodide of methyl, Brown, Frazer, xl, 
440 — preparation, see extraction — solu- 
bility in chloroform (W. & B., 960, 
note), Schlimpert, xxxii, 160 — in olive 
oil, Pettenkofer (W. & B., 590, note), 
xxxii, 185 — Attfield (by oleic acid), 
xxxv, 249 — sublimation, Guy, xxxix, 
432, 538, xl, 241— Helwig, xxxvii, 29. 

TESTS, Brett (iodic acid), xxvii, 57 

— Eboli (chromate of potassa and sul- 
phuric acid), xxix,369 — fforsley (nitro- 
prusside of sodium), xxxiv, 433 — Jen- 
kins (bichromate of potassa and sul- 
phuric acid), xxxiii, 527 — Guy (heat, 
cold and hot sulphuric acid ; sulphu- 
ric acid and permanganate of potassa; 
nitric acid) xxxiii, 517 — Marw^ (iodide 
of cadmium and potassium), xii, 18 — 
Jfoye7-(iodohydrargyrate of potassium, 
W.& B., 1541), XKXY, 20— Schulze (penta- 
chloride of antimonj' in phosphoric 
acid, Parrish, 625), xxxii, 137, 235 — 
Sonnenschein (phosphomolybdic acid, 
Parrish, 623), xxx, 550 — not recom- 
mended by Mayer, xxxv, 64, see de- 
tection and behavior. 

YIELD from extracts, Jandous, xxxvii, 

30. 

ARTIFICIAL, xxii, 158 — Wurtz, xxxii, 

268. 

CHLORATES, Scrullas, ii, 304. 

lODATES, Serullas, ii, 301. 

ALKALOIMETER (Tannin), Henry, ^"^^^^^^^ 

ALKEKENGI. See Physalis alkekengi. 
ALLIOLE (from coal tar), Mansfield, xxi, 
48. 

ALLIUM SATIVUM, antipathy of snakes, 

Landerer, xxxiii, 223 — preservation, 

(alcohol), Sharp, xxxvii, 137. 

HYBRID, Thomas, xxxii, 535. 

ALLOXAN, as oxidizing agent, Strecker, 

xxxv, 35 — and hydrogen form allox- 

antine, xxxv, 35. 
ALLOY, fusible. Wood's, xxxiv, 219 — Lip- 

owitz, xxxiii, 356. 
ALLOYS. See respective metals. 
ALLSPICE. See Pimento. 



26 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



ALLYL compounds (from glycerin and 
oxalic acid), ToUens and Henninger, 
xli, 302. 

ALMADEN mines (Spain), xxvii, 335. 

, new (California), xxxiv, 410 ; 

Bartlett, xxvii, 336 ; Hart, xxv, 456 ; 
Lyman, xxi, 44; Ruschenberger, 
xxviii, 97 ; Silliman, jr., xxxvi, 516. 

ALMONDS, BITTER, and preparations, ac- 
tion on aromatic substances (W. & B., 
109), Maher xviii, 209 — behavior to 
ether and alcohol, Robiquet and Bou- 
tron-Charlard, iv, 70. 

, SWEET, behavior to proto-deuto ni- 
trate of mercury, Lassaigne, iv, 175. 

BALLS. See Balls. 

BEAN, poisoning, Landerer, xxviii, 

321. 

MEAL, Piesse, xxviii, 80. 

soap. See Soap. 

ALNUS, GLUTiNOSA, tannin, properties, 
Dreykorn and Reichardt, xlii, 403 — 
Stenhouse (W. & B., 1458), xxxiv, 
255. 

SERRULATA, yield of tannin. Bow- 
man, xli, 194. 

ALOE, from Aden, xxv, 230. 

ANALYSIS (W. & B., 87), Robiquet, 

xix, 48. 

Arabian, xxiv^l78. 

Barbadoes (more active than soco- 

trine, W. & B., 85), Giles, xxxiii, 137. 

BITTER. See Acid, carbazotic. 

BLACK, xxv, 230. 

CABALLINE, Iv, 49. 

CYPRIAN, xxiv, 178. 

for ENTRY, percentage, xxv, 302. 

HEPATiCA, true, Guibourt, ix, 48 — 

Pereira (W. & B., 85, note), xxiv, 234. 

PERFOLiATA, sourcc of hepatic aloe, 

Ainslie, iv, 48. 

PURIFICATA, Ph. U. S. (60), remarks, 

Procter, jr., xxxvi, 300. 

socoTRiNA, Guibourt, iv, 47 — Pereira 

(W. & B., 85, note), xxiv, 234— Well- 
sted (W. & B., 83), xiii, powder, 
adulterated, Procter, jr., xxv, 99 — 
(biscuits), xxxi, 51 1 — loss in powder- 
ing, Covell, xxxix, 116; Redwood, 
xxi, 31. 

, LIQUID, Pereira (W. & B., 84), 

xxiv, 231. 

from Sandwich Islands, xxvii, 240. 

spiCATA, source of socotrine aloes, 

Ainslie, iv, 49. 
SOLUTION in liquor potassfe, xxxvii, 

305. 

TASTELESS (animal charcoal), Wep- 

pen, xviii, 203 — (fluid extract of gly- 
cyrrhiza), Harrop, xli, 118. 

WOOD, vi. 199. 

ALOETINE preparation (W. k B., 87, 
note), Robiquet, xix, 48, xxviii, 543, 
545. 



I ALOEXYLUM agallochum, source of, 
aloes wood, vi, 200. 
ALOIN, behavior to nitric acid, and to sul- 
phuric acid (cold and hot), Guy, 
xxxiii, 526 — composition, Stenhouse, 
xxiii, 227, xxxvi, 315— preparation, 
Groves (W. & B., 88, note), xxix, 142 
Pereira, xxiv, 232 — Stenhouse (W. & 
B., 87), xxiii, 226. 
ALOYSIA ciTRi-ODORA, xxvi, 559. 
ALPHA-CLNCHONIA, solubility. Schwa- 
be, xxxiii, 174. 
ALPHA-QUINIA, solubility, Schwabe, 

xxxiii, 174. 
ALPINIA allughas, xv, 19 — source of 
grains of paradise, Burmann, xv, 99. 

CALCARATA, XV, 19. 

cardamomum, V, 332, 334. See Cae- 

DAMOMUM. 

GALANGA, V, 324, XV, 19. See Ga- 

LANGA. 

GRANUM PARADISI, XV, 19. See GRAINS 

OF PARADISE. 
NUTANS, SERICEA, XV, 19. 

ALSTONIA THE^FORMis, used as tea in 
Colombia, iv, 251. 

ALSTROEMERIA edulis, lightu, 

peregrina, tomentosa, Car- 
son, xxxii, 290, 291. 
ALTH^A OFFICINALIS, root, analysis of 
mucilage, Guerin, iv, 163 — decoction, 
yellow color, Selle, xxxiii, 317 — beha- 
vior to glycerin. Cap and Garot, xxvii, 
160. 

PAPER (W. & B., 90, note), Aiken, 

xxxi, 367. 

ALTINGIA EXCELSA, source of Asiatic 

styrax, v, 260. 
ALUM ROOT. See Heuchera. 

slate, from decay of fuci, Forch- 

hammer, xxvi, 440. 
ALUMEN (alum) ammonio-ferric. See 

Ferri et ammonia sulphas. 
with ammonia, iron, lithia, magne- 
sia, manganese, potassa, soda, xxvi, 
160. 

behavior to ferroso-ferric oxide, Scho- 

ber, xlii, 402 — insoluble in brandy, 
Procter, jr., xxv, 213 — Chinese, Mc- 

Gowan, xxviii, 469, xxxi, 69 in 

painters' colic, with sulphuric acid, 
Gendrin, iv, 258 — as emetic, Meigs, 
xxvi, 564 — estimation of alumina (chlo- 
ride of barium and potassa) xxxiii, 
316 — manufacture at Cape Sable, Ma- 
ryland, Durand, v, 12 — in Glasgow, 
Thomson, xiii, 210 — solubility in gly- 
cerin, Adolphus, xxxix, 150; Klever, 
xlii, 222 — temperature reduced by so- 
lution, Rudorff, xli, 426. 

chrome. See Chrome alum. 

exsiccatum. Ph. U. S. (60), remarks 

(W. k B., 970), Maisch, xxxii, 16— 
Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix, 211. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 27 



ALUMEN IRON. See Ferri et ammonite 
SULPHAS, Iron alum. 

manganese. See Mangansee alum. 

springs, Bath^ analysis, Hayes, xxv, 

266 — Rockbridge^ analysis, Hayes (W. 
& B., 132), xxv, 266— of Virginia^ Pol- 
lard, xxv, 265. 

USTUM. See exsiccatum. 

ALUMINA, behavior to antimoniate of pot- 
assa, Wackenroder, xvi, 40 — proposed 
in cold cream^ Bonnamy, xxxviii, 86 — 
decolorizing power, Filhol, xxiv, 239 ; 
Meae, xxx, 150 — estimation (by car- 
minic acid), Luckow, xxxvii, 276 — in 
alum (by chloride of barium and pot- 
assa), xxxiii, 316 — occurrence in 
plants^ Salm-Horstmar, xx, 158 — use 
in analysis of plants, Rochleder, xxx, 
153 — preparation from cryolite, Ellis, 
xl, 72 ; Simes, xl, 195 — proposed in 
soapSj Bonnamy xxxviii, 85 — solubility 
in ammonia, Hanaman, xxxvi, 108 — 
proposed in tooth-powder, Bonnamy, 
xxxviii, 86. 

BBNZOATED, SOlutioU (W. & B., 97l), 

Mentel, xxix, 128. Compare Aqua 
Pagliari and Hemostatics. 

and Bromine, Loevvig, ii, 177. 

hypochlorite, as disinfectant, Orioli. 

xxxiii, 80. 

oxalate, as substitute for animal 

charcoal in sugar manufacture, Mi- 
alhe, xviii, 219. 

phosphate, in nux vomica, Maisch, 

xxxii, 524. 

sulphate, preparation (W. & B., 

970), Huria and Brunei, xxv, 45 — use 
in manufacture of tartaric acid, 
Waltl, xxvii, 418. 

tannate (W. & B., 1609), Procter, 

jr., xxv, 25. 

ALUMINIUM, action on iodides of ethyl 
and methyl, Cahours, xxxv, 106 — ano- 
maliesj and its place in classification 
of metals, Tissier, xxix, 343 — crystal- 
line compounds with metals, Michel, 

xxxiii, 220 — manufacture, history, 
Taylor, xxix, 120; Deville, xxvii, 414 
— (continuous apparatus), xxviii, 
417; Knowles, xxx, 426; Petitjean, 
xxx, 425 ; Rose (from kryoiith), 
xxviii, 237 — nitrate of potassa, no ac- 
tion, Monier, xxix, 122 — properties, 
Deville, xxvii, 319 — as substitute for 
silver, Regnaalt, xxviii, 220 — ivire- 
drawing, Garapon, xxxiv, 457 — ivork- 
ing in xxxiii, 552. 

ammonio-iodide, Reade, xxx, 58. 

and bromine, Loewig, ii, 177. 

bronze. Strange, xxxv, 241. 

chloride, as antiseptic, Gamgee, 

xlii, 566 — preparation, Thenard, Gay- 
Lussac, Deville (chlorine and alu- 
mina), xxviii, 422 — Gamgee (sulphate 



of alumina and chloride of calcium), 

xlii, 556. 

IODIDE, Weber, xxx, 54. 

and IRON alloy, Calvert, xxviii, 174. 

and mercury. Chandler, xxxix, 148. 

and metals, crystalline compounds, 

Michel, xxxiii, 220. 
and nitrogen, Briegleb and Geuther, 

xxxv, 33. 

ALYSSUM montanum, in Lebanon, xli, 
434. 

AMADIN (soluble fecula), Guibourt, ii, 
49. 

AMALGAM, malleable (with cadmium), 
xxxiii, 128. 

for stopping teeth, Rogers (gold and 

silver amalgam), xxii, 262. 

sodium. See Sodium amalgam. 

AMANDINE, Piesse, xxviii, 78. 

AMANITIN, Letellier, xxv, 274. 

AMARILLA de munna (Cinchona), ii, 238. 

AMARYLLIDACE^E, dehiscence of pol- 
len, Aldridge, xiii, 216. 

AMBER (Succinum), behavior to acetic 
acid, ammonia, benzol, Sace, xlii, 
242— to camphor, Planche (W. & B., 
195, note), x, 214 — to coal-naphtha, 
nitric acid, boiled linseed oil, oil 
turpentine, Sace, xlii, 242 — to potash, 
Reich, XX, 160 — sulphuric acid, boil- 
ing water, Sace, xlii, 242 — copal, dis- 
tinction, Draper, xxxiv, 445 — true 
origin Alessi, vi, 340 — and properties, 
Simmonds, xxix, 377 — production in 
the Baltic, xl, 369 — solubility in chlo- 
roform, Lepage, xxiv, 147 — soluble 
by heating to 700° F., Violette, xxxix, 
181 — expeditious solution, Dakin, v, 
260 — white and opaque, Recluz, xii, 
148. 

AMBER varnish. See Varnish, amber. 

AMBERGRIS, origin, Baudrimont (from 
intestines), vi, 240 — Blainville (se- 
creted like musk), vi, 241 — Caventou 
and Pelletier (from gall bladder), vi, 
241 — Payne (from intestines), xv, 295 
Virey (indigested cuttlefish), vi, 240 
— Webster (putrid cuttlefish a simi- 
lar odor), vii, 170 — use m perfumery, 
Piesse, xxvii, 74 — sale in Boston (750 
pounds), xxxi, 183. 

AMBRA GRisEA. See ambergris. 

AMBREINE, vi, 241. 

AMBROSIA, Ring's, analysis, Chandler, 
xlii, 364. 

AMBROSINE (fossil resin from South 
Carolina), Sheppard, xlii, 374. 

AMBROTYPE, Cutting, xxvii, 548. 

AMBULANCE, U. S. Hospital, at Exhibi- 
tion, Paris, xxxix, 466. 

AMELANCHIER vulgaris contains am- 
ygdalin, Wicke, xxiv, 42, xxv, 275. 

AMIANTHUS, substitute for lint, Du- 
mont, xxvii, 317. 



28 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OP BASE; 



AMIDES (amidets), theory, Dumas, xii, 
45. 

AMIDIN, Gu^rin (W. & B., 112), xi, 271. 

IODIDE, Lassaigne, x, 336. 

SOLUBLE, Gueiin, xi, 272. 

TEGUMENTARY, Gu^rin, xi, 272. 

AMIDOGEN, Dumas, xii, 45. 

AMIDON. See starch. 

AMIDONE (pure starch), Payen and Per- 

soz, xi, 269. 
AMIDULIN (soluble starch), Schulze, 

xxi, 81. 

AMMONIA. See aqua ammonia. 

and AMMONIUM bases, Bache, xxxii, 

389. 

absorption by dififerent kinds of char- 
coal. Smith, XXXV, 563 — Stenhouse, 
xxix, 156 — action on a mixture of hy- 
driodic and muriatic acids, Andr^, 
viii, 214 — on compound of oil of 
gaultheria and chlorine, Procter, jr., 
xiv, 219 — on permanganate of po- 
tassa, Cloez and Guignet, xxxi, 151 
— on phloridzin, xiii, 231 — on resins 
and gum resins, Sace, xlii, 242 — as 
antiseptic, Richardson, xxxiv, 458 — 
behaviour to iodohydrargyrate of po- 
tassium, Mayer, xxxvii, 211 — to sul- 
phur, Fliickiger, xxxvi, 23 — cold pro- 
duced. Loir and Orion, xxxiii, 224 — 
compounds, researches, Kane, xii, 97 
— conversion, when in contact with 
other bodies, Liebig, xiii, 231 — into 
nitric acid, Kuhlmann, xix, 73 — crys- 
tallization, Faraday, xviii, 22 — in dia- 
lyser, Graham, xxxiv, 315 — dry, gen- 
eration, Vogel, jr., xxviii, 149 — ex- 
tracted from watery solution by clay. 
Way, xxviii, 48 — formation, by con- 
version of hydrocyanic acid and the 
cyanides, Pelouze, v, 43 — in decom- 
position of water (by phosphorus, ar- 
senic, antimony), Personne, xxxvi, 
324 — during oxidation of protosul- 
phate of iron, Sarzeau, ix, 262 — 
evolved from mushrooms, Borscow, 
xii, 558. 

MANUFACTURE, from ammoniacal solu- 
tions, Newton, xxvi, 134 — bones, xxvi, 
34 — gas (purifying mixture), Hills; 
Laming, xxvi, 226 — gas-liguor. Lam- 
ing, xxvi, 137 — Lawson, xxvii, 362 — 
Ledson,xxvi, 129 — Watson, xxvi, 130 
— guano, Yourg, xxvi, 35 — nitric acid, 
(by nascent hydrogen), Kuhlmann, 
xix, 74 — oxides of nitrogen^ Crane and 
Jullieo, xxvi, 227 — peat, Drew and 
Stocken, xxvi, 38 — Hills ; Reece, 
xxvi, 37 — schist, Hompesch, xxvi, 38 
soot, xxvi, 34 — urine, xxvi, 37 — water 
and atmospheric air, Schoenbtin, 
XXXV, 38, 

^ — metallic ox'des, combinations, Ram- 
melsberg, xiii^ 85 — soluble in ammo- 



nia, Pearson, xxx, 163 — in perfumery,. 
Piesse, xxvii, 18— poisoning, xxix, 319' 
— reaction, limit (copper, magnesia^ 
test-paper), Hastings, xiii, 203, 204 — 
specific gravity, Berzelius, Davy, Thom- 
son, X, 342 — Jolly, xxxiii, 403 — suU 
phocyanic acid found in commercial,. 
Mazade, xxv, 461 — tests: Bohlig, (cor- 
rosive sublimate and carbonate of po- 
tassa), xl, 394 — Nessler (deutoiodide 
of mercury, iodide of potassium and 
potassa), xl, 394 — Rehsteiner, re- 
marks on the foregoing tests, xl, 394 
— tests for purity, ii, 157 — use in 
manufacture of farinaceous matter^ 
Nash, xvi, 315. 
ACETATE. See Liquor ammonia ace-- 

TATIS. 

ACHiLLEATE, Zauou, xix, 59. 

ALDEHYD, MESiTic, Kane, X, 211. 

BENZOATE, Ph. Britauuica (64), (W» 

& B., 972), xxxvi, 381. 

BiBENZOATE, Maisch, xxxii, 206. 

BICARBONATE, (iu gas pipcs), Schrot- 

ter, xxxix, 87 — use as antacid, Proc- 
ter, jr., xii, 294. 

BiNOXALATE, Balard, xiv, 135. 

BisuLPHis, Polli, xxxiv, 447. 

and BROMINE, Loewig, ii, 104. 

CARBONATE, constitution of commer- 
cial, Scanlan (W. & B., 100), x, 349. 

, MANUFACTURE, Bell, xxxviii^ 

133 — from residue of ammonia-alum,. 
xxxviii, 136 — ammonia and carbonic 
acid. Laming, xxvi, 133, xxxviii, 134 — 
ammonia-sulphate. Laming, xxxviii,, 
135 — bones, xxvi, 35 — gas-liquor, Lam- 
ing, xxvi, 225^ — guano, Hills, xxvi, 37, 
xxxviii, 134 — Turner xxxviii, 133 — ^ 
nitric oxides. Crane and JuUien,. 
xxxviii, 135 — peat, Hills, xxxviii, 134 
— urine^ Holmes, xxxviii, 133. 

, pure (from solution in ammo- 
nia). Smith, i, 161 — solubility in gly- 
cerin, Adolphus, xxxix, 150 — Klever, 
xlii, 222 — in serpent bites, Payne,, 
xxxi, 184 — temperature reduced by 
solution, Rudorff, xii, 426 — test for 
purity, Procter, jr., xxiii, 317. 

CATHARTATE, Groves, xli, 73. 

CHOLiNATE, in cod liver oil, xxi, 144<v 

ERYTHROSATE, Garod, xxii, 245. 

PELLiNATE, in cod Hvcr oil, xxi, 144. 

FORMiATE, Pelouze, V, 46. 

GUNPOWDER, Jouglet, xlii, 432. 

HYDRIODATE. See AMMONIUM, IODIDE*. 

HYDROCHLORATB. See MURI- 

RIATE. 

HYPOPHOSPHITE, (W. & B., 1532),. 

Procter, jr., xxx, 120. 
HYPOSULPHITE, preparation and pro- 
perties, Fliickiger, xxxvi, 24 — re- 
marks, Maisch, xxxvi, 27, note — use^ 
Polli, xxxiv, 447. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 2^ 



AMMONIA lODiTE, (ammonia and iodous 
acid), Sementini, vii, 256. 

is^THiONATB, (by heating yields tau- 
rine), Strecker, xxvii, 21. 

MOLYBDATB, Brunner, xxxi, 348. 

MURIATE, in quantitative analysis, 

Rose, xxi, 82 — decomposition by boil- 
ing, Fittig, xxxvi, iii — by subliming, 
Pebal, xxxv, 33 — cold produced by 
solution, Hanamann, xxxvi, 104; Ru- 
dorfF, xli, 426. 

, MANUFACTURE Combined with 

that of glue and phosphorus, Gentele, 
XXX, 49 — from bittern^ Astley. xxvi, 
J 33 — bones^ xxvi, 35 — gas (purifying 
mixture), Croll, xxvi, 131 — Hills, 
xxvi, 138 — gas-liquor, Philippi, xxvi, 
136 — Spence, xxvi, 229 — guano^ Turn- 
er, xxvi, 36— Ph. Helvetica (65), 
xxxix, 211. 

, paramorphism with chloride of 

potassium, Maisch, xxxii, 522 — pow- 
dering (granulation recommended, 
W. & B., 103), Procter, jr., xiii, 189— 
loss, i, 138 — purification, Brewer, 
Wurtz, (separation of iron by chlorine 
and ammonia), xxv, 142 — solubility 
in glycerin, Adolphus, xxxix, 150 — 
Klever, xlii, 222. 

■ NITRATE, action of different degrees 

of heat, xl, 408 — cold produced by 
solution, Hanamann, xxxvi, 104 — 
RudorfT, xli, 426. 

NiTROSULPHATE, preparation, Pclouzc, 

(W. & B., 1565), viii, ii — in typhoid 
fever (W. & B , 1565), Magendie, vii, 
352. 

OXALATE, attacks glass -vessels, Em- 

merling, xli, 428 — limit as reagent for 
lime, Hastings, xiii, 203 — subliming 
temperature, Guy, xl, 249. 

oxAMATE, Balard, xiv, 137. 

PHOSPHATE, Ph. Britannica (64), re- 
marks, Procter, jr., xxxvi, 381 — in 
gout (W. & B., 974), Buckler, xviii, 10 
preparation, Ellis, xviii, 14. 

PHOSPHOMOLYBDATB, Spiess and Eg- 

gertz, xxxiii, 112 — Nutzinger, xxviii, 
369. 

• piPERATE, V. Babo and Keller, xxx, 

140. 

PURPURATB. See MUREXIDE. 

RESiNATE, Andre, viii, 209. 

SBBAMATE, Carlct, XXV, 554. 

' SILICATE, existence denied, Liebig, 

xxviii, 48. 

SULPHATE, cold produced, Hanamann, 

xxxvi, 104— RudorfiF, xli, 426. 

, manufacture: hom bones, xw'i, 

34 — liquor of cess-pools, Margueritte 
and others, xxxvii, 229 — waste of 
co^e-ovens, Wilson, xxvi, 230 — gas 
(purifying mixture), Croll, xxvi, 131 
— gas-liquor, Johnson, xxvi, 137 — La- 



ming, xxvi, 231 — Michiels, xxvi, 229 
Philippi, xxvi, 136 — Richardson, 
xxvi, 228 — Spence, xxvi, 229— Wat- 
son, xxvi, 137 — waste nitrogen pro- 
ducts of vitriol chambers, Williams,, 

xxxi, 430. 

, solubility, Vogel, xxxiii, 406. 

suLPHis, Polli, xxxiv, 447. 

SULPHO-CARBOLATE, Sausom, xli, 445. 

TANNATE, Smcdt, xxxvi, 17. 

TUNGSTATE, (firc-proofing fabrics), 

Versmann and Oppenheim, xxxiii, 

541. 

URATE, medical use, Bauer (W. & B., 

1618), xxv, 274. 

VALERIANATE, preparation: from va- 
lerianic acid, Aschoff, xix, 284; Crew, 

xxxii, 109; Laboureur, xxix, 366 — 
from fusel oil, Procter, jr., xxix, 27 — 
Ph. U.S. (60), remarks, Procter, jr., 
xxxvi, 300. 

XANTHOSANTALATE, Plummer, xxvii, 

.117. 

AMMONIACUM, (gum resio), behaviour 
to camphor (W. & B., 195, note), 
Planche, x, 214 — entry, per centage 
required, xxv, 302 — in mixtures (with 
water only), Hodgson, jr., iv, 13 — 
origin (Dorema ammoniacum), Don, 
iii, 162 — (Diserneston gummiferum, 
Jaubert and Spach, synonym with 
Don's Dorema), Richard, xv, 263 — 
purification (with water and alcohol), 
Mouchon, vii, 49 — (with water and 
oil of turpentine), Laraoth, xvi, 297 — 
and powdered (with magnesia). Proc- 
tor, xxxv, 356 — solubility in glycerin, 
Cap and Garot, xxvii, 160 — solution, 
in liquor potassae, xxxvii, 305. 

AMMONIO-ioDiDBS of metals, Reade, xxx, 
57. 

AMMONIUM. See Ammonia. 

and ANTiMONiUM, IODIDE, Schacffer,, 

xxxii, 559. 

BROMIDE, in epilepsy, Close, xxxviii, 

323. 

and BROMINE, Lcewig, ii, 104. 

CHLORATUM. See Ammonia, muriate. 

CHLORATUM FERRATUM. ScC FeRRI ET" 

AMMONII CHLORIDUM. 

CHLORIDE. See Ammonia, muriate. 

iodide, /ownc? in Silesian coal, Bussy,, 

xxvi, 440 — preparation: Babcock (Ja- 
cobson's process, see below), xxxix, 2 1 
— Ellis (iodide of iron and carbonate 
of ammonia), vii, 283 — Ouyot (hy- 
driodic acid, from oil turpentine and 
iodine, and ammonia), ix, 80 — Ja- 
cobson (iodide of potassium and sul- 
phate of ammonia, W. & B., 1537), 
xxxvi, 240 — Pile (iodide of potassium 
and bitartrate of ammonia), xxxiv, 
390 — Spencer (iodine and sulphide of 
ammonium, W. & B., 1537), xxv, 134 — 



30 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



AMMONIUM {Continued.) 

Thomson (in atmosphere of sulphur- 
retted hydrogen), xxxiii, 346. 

IODIDE and METALS, Reade, xxx, 57. 

• IRON, Meidinger, xxxiv, 332. 

MURiATicuM. See Ammonia, muriate. 

, MARTiATUM. See Ferri et am- 

MONII CHLORIDUM. 

PLATiNO-CHLORiDE, Crookes, xxxvi, 

144. 

■ SALiciDE, Piria, xi, 43. 

SULPHOCYANIDB, cold produccd, 

Clowes, xxxviii, 270 — Reissig, xxxvi, 
112 — RudorfF, xli, 426 — preparation, 
Liebig (sulphide of ammonium and 
hydrocyanic acid), xix, 143 — Sticht 
(sulphocyanide of potassium and sul- 
phate of ammonia), xl, 32 — Wood 
(bisulphide of carbon, ammonia and 
methylated alcohol), xxxviii, 62. 

AMOMUM, ANGUSTiFOLiuM, V, 335, XV, 96, 
xix, 132. See Grains of Paradise. 

cardamomum, v. 332. 

CLUSii, xix, 135. 

CURCUMA, V, 328. 

granum paradisi, v. 335 ; xv, 19, 96. 

lampujum, V, 329. See Zerumbet. 

latifolium, V, 329. See Zedoaria. 

macrospermum, xix, 135. 

madagascariense, V, 335, xv, 96, xix, 

132. See Grains of Paradise. 

maximum, (Java Cardamoms), xv, 98. 

racemosum, V, 332. 

REPENS, V, 332, 334, XV, 19. 

sylvestre, V, 331. See Zerumbet. 

zedoaria, V, 329. 

zerumbet, V, 329, 331. 

different species at exhibition, Lon- 
don, 1862, Hanbury, xxxiv, 549. 

AMONA MYRiSTiCA, vii, 192. 

AMORPHA FRUTicosA, yields blue color, 
vi, 72. 

AMPELODESMOS tenax, analysis of er- 
got, Lallemand, xxxvii, 335. 

AMPELOPSIS quinquefolia, in dropsy, 
(W. & B., 1460), McCall, xxx, 128. 

AMPaiDEsALTS,theory,Hare,xv,101,201. 

AMYGDALA. See Almonds. 

,AMYGDALIN, behavior to acids, Wcehler, 
xxi, 78 — to emulsin, Procter, jr., x, 
193 — to nitric acid, Robiquet and 
Boutron, iv, 136 — to bichromate po- 
tassa test, Jenkins, xxxiii, 528 — to 
hot sulphuric acid, Guy, xxxiii, 526 
— composition^ Henry and Plisson, iv, 
86, 138— Liebig and Wcehler, x, 190 
— conversion into hydrocyanic acid, 
within the body, Koelliker and Muller, 
xxix, 464 — in dialyser, Graham, xxxiv, 
315 — found in peach leaves, Crous- 
seilles, iii, 216 — several species of 
Amygdaleae, Procter, jr., x, 188, 195; 
Wicke, xxiv, 41 — in shrubby Spi- 
raceae, Wicke, xxvi. 60 — other plants. 



Wicke, (W. & B., 109, note), xxiv, 40, 
XXV, 275 — preparation and properties: 
Robiquet and Boutron, ii, 168, iv, 85, 
135 — trom peach kernels, Garrigues, 
(W. & B., 109, note), xxvii, 226. 

AMYGDALUS granatensis ; guian- 

ENSis (souari nuts), xxxvi, 294. 

PERSiCA, as cathartic, v, 206. See 

Peach. 

AMYL, (amylaceous matter), Kiitzing, 
XXV, 38. 

ACETATE, physiological properties, 

Turnbull, xxvii, 31. 

HYDRIDE See Amyl, hydruret. 

hydruret, Frankland; Smith, (W. 

& B., 1460), xxix, 417. 

iodide, physiological properties, 

Turnbull, xxvii, 31. 

nitrite, physiological properties, 

(W. & B., 1460), Richardson, xxxvi, 
266 — in suffocation, angina pectoris, 
and syncope, Guthrie, xlii, 468. 

SOLANIA, Moitessier, xxix, 330. 

AMYLENE, acetylene formed by incom- 
plete combustion, Berthelot, xxxviii, 
263 — behaviour to potassium and po- 
tassa, Duroy, xxix, 415 — cAZorme found 
in, (W. &'B., 1460), Schauenstein, 
xxx, 169 — composition, Cahore, xl, 260 
— condemned by the Academy of Medi- 
cine, Paris, xxx, 40 — drops in drachm, 
Bernouilly, xxxi,441 — preparation, Ba- 
lard (chloride of zinc) xxix, 243 — 
Cahore (with anhydrous phosphoric 
acid), xi, 260 — Duroy (chloride of 
zinc), xxix, 411 — properties, Duroy, 
xxix, 416— Snow (W. & B., 1460), 
xxix, 2 AQ— purification, Duroy, (distil 
at a certain temperature), xxix, 416. 
See Valerene. 

AMYLOGEN (soluble starch), Fluckiger, 
XXXV, 82. 

AMYLOL. Doebereiner, xvi, 234. 

AMYLSOLANIA. See under Amyl. 

AMYLUM. See Starch ; maranta, etc. 

AMYRIS AGALLOCHA (yields elemi from 
Bengal), Guibourt, iv, 84 

ELEMIFERA, XVi, 232. 

GiLEADENSis, (yields Balsam of Mec- 
ca), iv, 236. 

HETEROPHYLLA, (yields aracouchiui 

balsam), xvi, 150. 

juRiBALi, febrifuge, ii, 151, See Ju- 

ribali. 

KATAF, (myrrh), i, 236. 

OPOBALSAMUM, (yields Balsam of Mec- 

ca.) iv, 230. 

ANACAHUITE wood, account, Maisch, 
xxxiii, 107 — analysis, xxxiv, 34 — 
Buchner, xxxiii, 321 — Muller, xxxiv, 
327 — Ziurek, xxxiii, 321— origin 
(Cordia Boisnieri), Hanbury, xxxv, 
86 — contains oxalate of lime, Buch- 
ner, xxxiii, 321. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 81 



ANACARDIUM occidentalr, (Cashew 
nut), analysis of nut-shell, Cadet, viii, 
104— of the fruit, Staedeler (W. & B., 
1461), XX, 134 — of resin, Mattes, iv, 
171 — properties of juice of nut, Worth- 
ington, XV, 69 - wine of cashew, Ham- 
ilton, xviii, 134. 

ANESTHESIA, discovery, xxxii, 477— 
bichloride of carbon, Simpson, 
xxxviii, 171 — methyl-ethylic ether, 
Richardson, xlii, 333. 

DENTAL, (aconite-chloroform-mor- 
phia), Teft, xxxi, 480. 

LOCAL, by atomized fluids, Proc- 
ter, jr., xxxviii, 289. 

NATURAL, (Livingstone and the lion), 

XXX, 461. 

ANAESTHETIC group, xlii, 450. 

ANAGALLIS arvensis, analysis, Heintz- 
elmann, xxxi, 299 — in hydrophobia, 
xxxi, 299 — volatile oil, Heintzelmann, 
xxxi, 303. 

ANALYSIS, inorganic, Demarcay (use of 
insoluble salts), vii, 73 — Ebelman 
(ascertain directly the quantity of 
oxygen absorbed), xi, 39 — Fresenius 
(solubility of precipitates), xix, 50. 

of COLORS, Goppelsroeder (by capil- 
larity), XXXV, 179. 

ETHICAL, Parrish, xxx, 25, 

— — MECHANICAL, Lassaigne, xxx, 402. 

MEDICAL, Tichborne, xxxvii, 264. 

ORGANIC, Johnson (general observa 

tions), vi, 30 — Persoz (sulphate of 
mercury for oxide of copper), x, 43 — 
Squibb (copper-wire cloth for oxide 
of copper, or copper-turnings), xxviii, 
394. 

of PLANTS, Rochleder (use of salts of 

alumina), xxx, 153 — treatise, xxxiii, 
81, 177, 273, 369, 465, 561. 

SPECTRUM, Bunsen and Kirchhoff, 

xxxiii, 224. 

See under respective headings. 

ANAMIRTA cocculus ; racemosa, 

viii, 20. See Cocculus. 
ANATOMICAL specimens preserved. See 
!^ Preservation. 
ANDA GOMESii, description and its oil, 

Smith (W. & B., 1567), iv, 25. 
ANDES, atmospheric pressure at the base, 

Herndon, xxvi, 74, 
ANDROGRAPHIS paniculata, xlii, 530. 
ANDROPOGON, caricosus, xxiv, 53, 377. 

nardus (supposed calamus of the 

ancients), v, 267. 
parancuia (spikenard of the an- 
cients), Blane, vi, 21. 
ANEMONE LUDOViciANA, analysis, Miller, 

xxxiv, 300. 

ANEMONIN, in Ranunculus sceleratus, 
Erdmann, xxxi, 440 — behaviour lo 
bichromate potassa test, Jenkins, 
xxxiii, 528. 



ANEMOPSIS calipornica (yerba mansa). 
xxxix, 205. 

ANGELICA sylvestris, xxxvi, 290. 

ANGELINA, Peckoldt (identical with 
Ruge's Rhatanin), Gintl, xli, 300. 

ANGOPHORA. lanceolata xxix, 226. 

ANGOSTURA, account, Hancock, i, 26, 
ii, 50 — adulteration detected (W. & 
B, 118), ii, 157; Genest, jr., xii, 241 
— description, Hancock, i, 26, ii, 56 — 
volatile oil, analysis, Herzog (W. & 
B., 117), xxx, 421 — See Galipea 
officinalis. 

cuspare, ii, 56. 

false distinction from true ( W &. B., 

118), ii, 157; Genest, jr., xii, 241 — 
identical with bark of strychnos nux 
vomica, O'Shaugbnessy (W. & B., 
118), X, 144. 

ANGRECUM pragrans, properties, Grif- 
fith, viii, 194 — as tea, Jackson, 
xxxviii, 441. 

ANILEIN (anilin — violet, mauve) — 
dyeing, Perkins, xxxiii, 251 — prepa- 
ration, Perkins, xxxiii, 250 — solubili- 
ty in glycerin, Gros-Renaud, xxxiii, 
111. See Mauve. 

ANILIN colors. See different names — 
(Fuchsin, Rosanilin, Mauve, Aza- 
lein, etc.) 

, Calvert, xxx, 268 — Kopp, xxxiii 

39, 129, 245. 

manufacture : Depouilli/,xxxyui, 

542 — Depouilly and Lauth (chlori- 
nated lime), xxxiii, 255 — Girard and 
Delaire (arsenic), xxxiii, 254 — Hoff- 
mann (bichloride of carbon), xxxiii, 
252 — Oerber, Keller (nitrate of mer- 
cury), xxxiii, 253 — Renard and Franc 
chloride of tin), xxxiii, 250, 251 — 
Schlumberger (nitrate of mercury), 
xxxiii, 254 — poiioning, Crookes, xli, 
14. 

behavior to bichloride of carbon. 

Hoffmann, xxxiii, 252 — to iodohy- 
drargyrate of potassa and nitrate 
of silver, Mayer, xxxvii, 2 1 1 — to per- 
manganate of potash, Cloez and Guig- 
net, xxxi, 81, 151 — derivatives, Hoff- 
mann, XXXV, 342, 346, 347— found in 
certain fungi, Phipson, xxxv, 59 — 
poisonous, xxxiv, 448. 

preparation, from coal tar, Hoffmann 

(W. & B., 1462), xxxiii, 130— Kopp 
(W. &B,, 1498), xxxiii, 129— cyanide 
of barium, Wagner, xxxiii, 404 — indigo, 
Hoffmann; Unverdorben, xxxiii, 46 — 
isatin, xxxiii, 46 — nitrobenzole, by ar- 
senite of potassa or soda, Woehler, 
xxxiii, 246 — by ferrous acetate, B6- 
champs, xxvii, 450, xxxiii, 135; Kopp, 
xxxiii, 245, Procter, jr., xxxiv, 296 — 
by glucose and potassa, Vohl, xxxv, 
546 — by nftscent hydrogen, xxxiii, 135 



32 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OP BASE; 



ANILIN {Continued.) 

— by sulphide of ammonium, Zinin, 

xxxiii, 46, 134. 

properties^ xxxiii, 24G — physiological 

properties (W. & B., 1463), Letheby, 
XXXV, 534 — tests^ (galvanic, W. & B., 
1463), Letheby, xxxv, 537— test for 
cotion and linen, Boettger, xxxviii, 86. 

BLACK, for indelible ink, Jacobson, 

xxxix, 319, xl, 335. 

GREEN, xxxvii, 342. 

INK, Fuchs, xl, 332. 

PURPLE. See Mauvb, anilein. 

SULPHATE, preparation^ Procter, jr., 

(W. & B , 1463), xxxiv, 'im— medical 
properties (W. & B., 1463), TurnbuU, 

xxxiv, 62 — test for nitric acid, Braun, 
xl, 341. 

VARNISH, xxxvi, 214. 

VIOLET. See ANILEIN ; MAUVE. 

ANIMAL HEAT, source, Frankland, xxxix, 
32. 

substances preserved. See Preser- 
vation. 

ANIME, account, Simmond's, xxix, 142 — 
action of camphor, Planche (W. & B., 
195, note), x, 214— of the English 
market = Tree copal. Kirk, xli, 443. 
See Vateria indica. 

ANISOLE, XV, 242. 

ANISTOME GLACiALis, xxviii, 74. 

ANISUM, loss in powdering. Redwood, 
xxi, 31 — contaminated with fruit of 
conium, xxxiii, 408. 

ANNONA GLABRA ; squamosa, pre- 

sented to the Philadelphia College of 
Pharmacy, xv, 314. 

ANNOTTA (Annatto, orleana), adultera- 
tion, Laird, xl, 555 — Redwood, xxviii, 
54 — manufacture, Peckoldt, xxxi, 354 
— Redwood, xxviii. 54. See Bixa 
orellana. 

ANODYNUM specificum Paracelsi=Ace- 
TUM opii made with sour oranges and 
quinces. Prel. No. 53, 

ANOXIDIC constituents. Rose, xxiii, 365. 

ANTHELMINTICS: emulsion (oil of tur- 
pentine, copaiba, etc.), v, 259 — garlic 
and rue, Landerer, xxv, 32 — Kousso 
xxiii, 183— wercMT-iaZ ointment, Broad- 
dus, xl, 82 — musenna bark, Pruner- 
bey, xxiv, 169 — oleo-resinajilicis, Chris- 
tison, xxvi, 303 — pumpkin seeds, In- 
galls, xxxvi, 428 — and male fern. De- 
bout, xxxviii, 255 — Kpigelia, vi, 260 — 
tartar emetic, Palmer, xlii, 505 — tea 
(sabina, spigelia, etc ), Griffith, iv, 7. 
See Bacobotrys picta. 

ANTHBMIN (W. & B., 120, note), Pattone, 
xxxi, 470. 

ANTHEMIS cotula. See Cotula. 

NOBiLis, volatile acid supposed iden- 
tical with valerianic acid, Schendler, 
xvii, 317 — adulteration, Trimbal, xxxi, 



416 — cultivation in Mitcham (W. & B.^ 
121, note), Bell, xxiii, 26 — and trade 
in Southern Germany, xl, 250 — as- 
emetic, iv, 283 — in serious suppura- 
tions, Ozanam, xxx, 238. 

ANTHOKININ (from Linaria vulgaris),. 
Riegel, xxxv, 296. 

ANTHOXANTHUM muricatum (Vetivert),, 
in perfumf^ry, Piesse, xxvii, 373. 

ANTHRACEIN, xxxiii, 41. 

ANTHRACITE, absorbing power for am- 
monia, Bridges, xvi, 71. 

ANTHRAKOKALI (W. & B., 1464), Pol- 
ya, xiv, 285. 

SULPHURETTED ( W. & B., 1464), Polya,, 

xiv, 285. 

ANTHRENES museorum, attacks soft parts 
of cantharides, Farines, Prel. No. 74, 

ANTIARIN, composition (W. & B., 1617), 
xxxv, 474. 

ANTIARIS ToxiCARiA, i, 114. See Upas. 

ANTIDOTES. See different headings. 

ANTIDYNE (substitute for Granville's, 
lotion), Mellor, xxv, 91. 

ANTIMONIUM (metal), adhesion to mer- 
cury, Guyton de Morveau, vi, 306 — 
antidotes (nut galls), Caventou, ii, 
83 — (proto-persulphate of iron and 
alkaline carbonates), T. & H. Smith, 
xxxviii, 14, 16 — remarks, Procter, jr., 
xxxviii, 12 — distinction from arsenic,. 
DragecdorfF (caustic potassa), xxxix, 
12/5 — Marsh (his apparatus, and 
Hume's amraoniacal nitrate of silver 
test), xi, 351, xiv, 104 — found in ar- 
senious acid, Streng, xxxiii, 407 — be- 
havior to weak alkaline solutions, Vo- 
gel, xi, 81 — to fused chlorate of po- 
tassa, Boettger, xxx, 10— properties, 
Capitaine, xi, 305— purification, Le- 
fort (nitric acid, W & B., 121), xxviii, 
64 — Liebig (carbonate of soda), xxviii, 
65 — Woehler (nitrate of potassa),. 
xxviii, 64. 

and ammonium, iodide, Schseffer,, 

xxxii, 559-. 
and BARIUM, iodide, Schaeflfer, xxxii, 

559. 

and Bromine, Loewig, ii, 179. 

BUTTER. See Liquor antimonii ter- 

CHLORIBI. 

CHLORIDE. See Liquor antimonii. 

tbrchloridi. 
and ciNCHONiA tartrate, Hesse,, 

xxxv, 57. 

diaphoreticum (Biantimoniate of 

potassa (W. & B., 1510), Figuier, xi, 
297— Ph. Gallica (37), xi, 297, note. 
Compare Potassa, antimoniate. 

cerated glass, D. B. Smith, PreL 

No. 65. 

iodide (W.& B., 1538),Copney, xxix,, 

244. 

lactate, Lepage, xvi, 55. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER 



THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



33 



ANTIMONIUM oxidatum nitro-muriati- 
CUM, Ph. Dublin (26), iii, 327. See 
Alqaroth's powder, 

OXIDE, adulteration, Hodgson, jr., ix, 

19 — subliming temperature, Guy, xl, 
249— Ph. U. S. (60) remarks, Proc- 
ter, jr , xxxvi, 300. 

oxychloride. See Alqaroth's pow- 
der. 

oxYSULPHURETUM, Ph. U. S. (60) re- 
marks, Procter, jr., xxxvi, 300. See 
Kermes mineral. 

and POTASSIUM, iodide, Schteffer, 

xxxii, 559. 

and POTASSA, tartrate. See Tartar 

EMETIC. 

and Sodium, iodide, SchaefiFer, xxxii, 

559. 

sulphuret (crude antimony), adul- 
teration^ Smith, Prel. No. 52 — Mahla, 
xl, 649 — arsenic contained in, Rey- 
nolds, XXXV, 507 — detection, ii, 242 — 
behavior to fused chlorate of potassa, 
Bcettger, xxx, 71 — decolorizing power, 
Filhol, xxiv, 239 — found in New 
Brunswick, Bailey, xxxv, 167 — irori 
detected, ii, 243 — lead detected, ii, 
242 — loss in powderhig^ i, 138. 

sulphuretum pr^cipitatum (golden 

sulphur), decomposition by light, In- 
genohl ; Wackenroder, xvi, 237 — pre- 
paration^ Durand, (recommends Henry 
* and Guibourt's process), v, 32 — Mus- 
culus (by percolation), viii, 196 — Ph 
U. S. (60) remarks, Procter, jr., xxxvi, 
300— Ph.Borussica (46), xxxii, 267— 
Ph. Britannica (64), xxxvi, 381 — Ph. 
Dublin (50), xxiii, 15— Ph. Helvetica 
(65), xxxix, 315. 

teroxide, medical action (W. & B., 

1309), Osborne, xxvii, 126. 

vegetable = EUPATORIUM PERPOLIA- 

tum, vi, i. 

VERMILLION. See Cinnabar. 

viTRUM. See Antimonium, cerated 

glass. 

ANTIRRACRTN, Walz, xxxv, 295. 

ANTIRRESIN, Walz, xxxv, 295. 

ANTIRRIN, Walz, xxxv, 295. 

ANTIRROSMIN, Walz, xxxv, 295. 

ANTISEPTICS, Crookes,xxxviii,43l— dis- 
tinction from disinfectants, Crookes, 
xxxviii, 361, see Acid carbolic ; Alum- 
inium, chloride ; Calx, bisulphite. 

ANTS, of Texas, Buckley, xxxiii, 221. 

OIL. See Oleum, ants. 

SPIRITS. See Spiritus pormicarum, 

APERIENT, mettauer's (modified, see 
Parrish, 126), xxiv, 174. 

moxon's, White, xv, 316=:Moxon's 

effervescent magnesia simplified (see 
Parrish, 408), ix, 292, xx, 24. 

APHROD^SCIN, Rochleder, xxxv, 290, 
note. 



APIIN, Braconnot = pectin of parsley 
seed, Joret and HomoUe, xxviii, 45, 
xxxv, 84. 

APIOL, as emmenagogue,J oret and Homolle, 

xxxv, 86 — preparation (W. & B., 641), 
Joret and Homolle, xxviii, 45, xxxv, 
83 — substitute for guinia, Joret and 
Homolle, xxviii, 43, xxxv, 85 — in 
nightsweats of phthisis, xxxv, 86, 

mixture, Procter, jr., xxxv, 85, note. 

APIUM petroselinum. See Petroseli- 
num. 

APOCYNIN (in Apocynum cannabinum), 
Griscom, v, 136. 

APOCYNUM andros.*:mifolium as emetic, 
iv, 283 — description and properties 
(W. & B., 125), Zollikoffer, v, 253. 

cannabinum, as antiperiodic (W. & 

B., 126), Cauthorn, xxx, 126— de- 
scription and analysis, Griscom, v, 
126. 

pubescens, V, 127. 

APOMORPHIA, composition, xli, 449, xlii, 
396 — preparation and properties, 
Matthiessen and Wright, xli, 449. 

APORETIN, behavior to nitric acid. War- 
ren and Muller, xxx, 448 — deposited 
from Tinctura rhei, xxx, 368. 

APOTHECARY, etymology and use, Don- 
ovan, xl, 172. 

APOTHECARIES' company, xiii, 322. 

APPARATUS. See wood-cuts and under 
different heads. 

pharmaceutical steam, Chevallier, 

vi, 160 — Loewig, xx, 352 — Nichols, 
xxxi, 223 — Viennese, vi, 160. 

APPLETREE root-bark, analysis, Roch- 
leder, xxxix, 415. 

APPLES, ripening accelerated by means 
of wool ; retarded by cotton, Ranch, 

xxxvi, 65. 

MAD, xxi, 267. 

SODOM, xxi, 267. 

APRICOT. See Armenia vulgaris. 
AQUA (water). See Water. 

absinthii (wormwood), best by 

steam, Soubeiran, viii, 217, 220. 

AciDi carbonici. See Aqua carbon- 

atis sod^ — Water, soda. 

AMMONiiE. Compare Ammonia— 

drops and minims, Bernouilly, xxxi, 
441 — Durand, i, 169 — Proctor, xxxv, 
248 — poisoning, see mistakes — prepara^ 
tion, Bizio, iii, 173— Ph. U. S. (30), 
iii, 81— Ph. U. S. (60), remarks, Proc- 
ter, jr., xxxvi, 300 — specific gravity 
table, Otto, xxix, 444. 

, PORTis, Ph U. S. (60) caution 

in handling, Procter, jr., xxx, 466 — 
Ph. Dublin (50), xxiii, 14. 

amygdala amar^, note on. Bell, xiii, 

349— assay, Duregazzi, (iodine), xxxii, 
319 — Pile, xxxiv, 13^ — distinction 
from aqua laurocerasi, Aschoff (sul- 



34 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE) 



AQUA AMYGDALA AMAK^ [Continued.) 

phate of quinia), xvii, 79 — Weber 
(ammonia, Parrish, 117), xvii, 79 — 
preparation^ Hiibner, xlii, 239 — Pet- 
teukofer, xxxiv, 333 — Schlagdenhauf- 
fen, xxxvi, 158 — Soubeiran (best by 
naked fire), viii, 217, 221 — from^^«c// 
kernels., Hubner, xlii, 240. 

CONCENTKATA, Ph. Helvetica (65). 

xxxix, 531. 

ANisi, assay, Duregazzi (iodine), 

xxxii, 319 — deposit examined, Gith- 
ens, xxxiii, 206— best distilled bv 
steam, Soubeiran, viii, 217, 220. 

ANTiCHOLEiiicA, Meyer, xxxviii, 44, 

note. 

ARMORAci^ (horse-radish), best dis- 
tilled by naked fire, Soubeiran, viii. 
219, 221. 

ARTEMISIA (mugwort), best distilled 

by steam, Soubeiran, viii, 218, 220. 

AURANTii FLORUM (orauge-flower), 

adulterated with water of the leaves, 
(detected by nitric or sulphuric acid, 
Parrish, 116), Gobley, xxxviii, 301 — 
remarks on Gobley, Procter, jr., 
xxxviii, 302 — assay, Duregazzi (io- 
dine), xxxii, 319 — distinction of differ- 
ent commercial waters (from flov/er, 
oil, leaf, by sulphuric acid), Leguay, 
XXV, 83— best distilled by steam, Sou- 
beiran, viii, 219, 220— Ph. Helvetica, 
(65), xxxix, 531. 

BORAGiNis (borage), best distilled by 

steam, Soubeiran, viii, 218,220. 

CALcis. See Liquor calcis. 

CAMPHORS, Ph. U. S. (60), Markoe, 

xxxviii, 166— Ph. Helvetica (65), 

xxxix, 531. 

CARBOXATIS SODJE ACIUULA, Ph. 

Dublin (26), iii, 326. See Water, 

SODA. 

CARDui KENEDiCTi (blesscd thistle), 

best distilled by steam, Soubeiran, 
viii, 218, 220. 

CERASORUM, Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix, 

531. 

CHAMOMiLL^, assay, Duregazzi (io- 
dine), xxxii, 319. 

CHLORiNii, behavior to animal char- 
coal, Graham, iii, 153 — extempore 
(chlorate of potassa and muriatic 
acid), xlii, 207 — preparation: Riekher, 
(bichromate of potassa and muriatic 
acid), apparatus, xlii, 218 — Riegel 
and Waltz (chloride of sodium, man- 
ganese, etc.), xvii, 238 — Stieren (re- 
marks on Ph. Dublin (50), and Ph. 
Edinburgh (41),) xxix, 221— Ph. U. 
S. (60), remarks, Procter, jr., xxxvi, 
301— Ph. Dublin (26), iii, 337— Ph. 
Dublin (50), recommended by Stie- 
ren, xxix, 221 — Ph. Edinburgh (chlo- 
ride of sodium and red lead), (41), I 



objected to by Stieren, xxix, 221 — 
Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix, 211 — pro- 
per strength, Riegel and Waltz (W, &, 
B., 1003), xvii, 2'i^—test (indigo solu- 
tion), xvii, 238 — for chlorous acid 
(calomel), Riegel and Waltz, xvii,, 
238. 

- ciNNAMOMi. assay, Duregazzi (iodine),, 

xxxii, 319— Ph. U. S. (30), iii, 82— 
Ph. U. S. (60), remarks, Procter, jr.,, 
xxxvi, 301— Ph. London (24), Prel. 
No. 21. 

- COCHLEAR]^] (scurvy grass), best by- 
naked fire, Soubeiran, viii, 218, 221. 

- ( opAiB^ (W. & B., 326), Langlebert,, 

xxxiii, 413. 

- OREAsoTi, Buchner, vi, 313. 

- cvANi (blue bottle), best by steam, 
Soubeiran, viii, 218, 220. 

- DESTiLLATA, contaminated with tiUy 
Flach (W. & B , 990), xxxi, 253— 
drops and minims, Bernouilly, xxxi,. 
441 ; Durand, i, 169 — extempore [meMtd. 
ice), Mayer, xxxii, 172 ; Robinet,. 
xxxv, 69. 

- EMPYREUMATioA (saturate pyroligne- 
ous acid with chalk, and distil), vi^ 
68. 

- FffiNicuLi, assay, Duregazzi (iodine)^ 

xxxii, 319 — best from dried seeds, and 
by steam, Soubeiran, viii, 218, 220^ 
221. 

- PRAGARi^ (strawberry), Martin, 
xxvii, 313. 

- GENTiAXiB, Leconte, ix, 343. 

- n^MOSTATicA, Pagliari (W. & B., 166^ 
note), XXV, 272, xxxvi, 375, note — 
improved (tincture of benzoin instead 
of benzoin), Meyer, xxxix, 220. See 

HyEMOSTATK'A ; StYPTICA. 

- HEDEOM^, Ph. London (24), Prel. No.. 
21. 

- HEDER^ TERRESTRis (ground ivy), 
best from dried herb, and by steam, 
Soubeiran, viii, 219, 220, 221. 

- HUNGABicA (Gray's supplement), xx^ 
25 ; Piesse, xxvi, 554. 

- HYssopi, best by steam, Soubeiran, 
viii, 218, 220. 

- ixuL^] (elecampane), best by steam, 
Soubeiran, viii, 218, 220. 

- JUXiPERi, assay, Duregazzi, xxxii, 
319 — best by steam, Soubeiran, viii, 
218, 220. 

- LACTUCJE (lettuce), best by naked 
fire, Soubeiran, viii, 219, 221. 

- LAUROCEBASi, assoy, Duregazzi, xxxii,^ 
319 — extempore (volatile oil). Draper, 

xxxiii, 445; Faury, ix, 212 ; Pile 
(Parrish, 117), xxxiv, 132 — distinc- 
tion from aqua amygdalse ajnarse, which 
see — poisonous action does not depend 
on hydrocyanic acid, Goeppert, xxxiii, 
446, note — preparation, Deschamps 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER 



THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 35 



LAUROCERASi [Continued.) 

(recommends addition of sulphuric 

acid, W. & B., 1005), xx, 228— Ph. 

Helvetica (65), xxxix, 530 — unstabi- 

liij/j see extempore. 
LAVANDULiB, assaj, Duregazzi (io- 
dine) xxxii, 319 — best by steam, Sou- 

beiran, viii, 219, 220. 
MELiLOTi, best from dried herb and 

by steam, Soubeiran, viii, 219, 220. 
MELiss^/E (balm), assay^ Duregazzi, 

xxxii, 319 — best hj steam, Soubeiran, 

viii, 219, 220. 
MENTH/E PiPERiTvE, assaT/, Durcgazzi, 

xxxii, 319— Ph. London (24), Prel. 

No. 21. 

MENTHA viRiDis, ossciy, Durcgazzi, 

xxxii, 319— Ph. London (24), Prel. 
No. 21. 

NASTURTii (cress), best by naked fire, 

Soubeiran, viii, 218, 221. 
NICOTIAN-^ (Rademacher), Unzicker, 

xl, 251. 

• OXYGENATA, Duprcy, XXXV, 156 — Oz- 

anam, xxxv, 46— Richardson, xxxvii, 
472. Compare Hydrogen, peroxide. 

PAGLiARi. See Aqua h^mostatica. 

PERSIC^ (peach), leaf (amount of hy- 
drocyanic acid, W. & B., 1579), Tel- 
lenberg, Koenig, xxiv, 172 — kerriel, 
Hiibner, xlii, 240. 

PETROSELiNi (parsley), assay, Dure- 
gazzi (iodine), xxxii, 319 — stearopten 
analyzed, Wandsleben, xxxiv, 330. 

picis (tar), prepared with hot water, 

Lefort, xli, 18. 

■ REGIME. See Acid, nitromuriatic. 

ROSiE, assay, Duregazzi (iodine),' 

xxxii, 319 — preparation, best by steam, 
Soubeiran, viii, 220 — Moothus, does 
not reject the calyx (W. & B., 1007, 
note), xxxvi, 114 — in India, Jackson, 
xii, 252. Compare Oleum ros^e. 

Ros^, ARTIFICIAL, Wagner (W. & B., 

1007, note), xxx, 566. 

RUBi iD^i (raspberry), Ph. Helvetica, 

(65), xxxix, 531. 

RUT^, assay, Duregazzi, xxxii, 319. 

SALViiE (sage), assay, Duregazzi, 

xxxii, 319 — best by steam, Soubeiran, 
viii, 220. 

SAMBUci (elder flower), assay, Dure- 
gazzi, xxxii, 319 — best from dried 
flowers and by steam, Soubeiran, viii, 
220, 221. 

siNAPis (mustard), Hensler (with 

alcohol and water), xvii, 80 — best by 
naked fire, Soubeiran, viii, 219, 221. 

ST. jOHANNiS, xxxiii, 116. 

TANACETi (tansy), best by steam, 

Soubeiran, viii, 220, 

TiiYMi, best by steam, Soubeiran, 

viii, 220. 

TiLiiE (linden), best from dried flow- 



ers, and by steam, Soubeiran, viii, 
220, 221. 

VALERIANA, assay ^ Duregazzi (iodine), 

xxxii, 319 — best by steam, Soubeiran, 
viii, 220. 

AQUiE DESTiLLATiK. See Waters, dis- 
tilled. 

medicate. See Waters, medicated. 

AQUARIA and Mrs. Power, xxx, 181. 

for leeches. See Leeches. 

AQUILARIA agallocha ; — ovata ; se- 
cundaria, sources of aloes wood, vi, 
200. 

AQUILEGrIA vulgaris, yields blue co- 
lor, vi, 72. 

ARABIN, composition and properties, 
Guerin (W. & B., 9, note), iv, 159, 160 
— yield of raucic acid (by nitric acid), 
Gu6rin, iv, 165. 

ferro-tartbate, Procter, jr., xxiv, 

93. 

ARACHIS HYPOGAEA, analysis of nut, 

Fliickiger, xli, 464. 

oil. See Oleum arachis. 

ARACOUCHINl, balsam, xvi, 150. 
ARALIA cochleata; cor data; edulis ; fru- 

ticosa; hispida ; nudicaulis; pinnata; 

quinquefolia ; racemosa. xxxvi, 291. 
SPiNOSA, source of Southern prickly 

ash, Bridges, xxxvii, 134. 
ARAPABACA (Spigelia anthelmia?), as 

anthelmintic, vi, 260. 
ARARIBA RUBRA, its alkaloid, Rieth, 

xxxiv, 395. 
ARBOR alba mIiNOR (cajuput), i, 197, iv, 

139. 

LACTARiA, viii, 103. Compare Ga- 

lactodendron. 
ARBUTIN, Kawalier (W. & B., 846), xxv,. 

68. 

ARBUTUS uvA uRsi. See Uva ursi. 
ARCHANGELICA peregrini; Gmelinii, 

xxxvi, 290. 
ARCH^OTHERIUM, xxv, 362. 
ARCHIPAN resin, xxix, 142. 
ARCTIUM LAPPA. See Lappa. 
ARCTOPUS ECHiNATus, xxiii, 376. 
ARCTOSTAPHYLOS uva ursi. See Uva 

URSI. 

ARCTUVIN, Kawalier (W. & B., 846), 
xxv, 68. 

ARECA CATECHU. See Catechu. 

pane lacqu;e (plant of ancient 

Egypt), V, 143. 

ARENGA saccharipera, sugar-plant of 
the future, de Vrij, xxxvii, 153. 

AREOMETER. See Alcoholometer. 

ARGEMONE mexicana, as emetic, iv, 277. 

ARGENTAN, xlii, 358. 

ARGENTUM (silver), general properties. 
See Silver. 

acetate, yield of acetic acid, Thom- 
son, xxiii, 263. 

and ammonium, IODIDE, Reade, xxx, 57. 



36 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



ARGENTUM arseniate, decomposed by 
oxalic acid, Slater, xxviii, 345. 

and BROMINE, Loewig, ii, 184. 

CARMiNATE, Luckow, xxxvii, 277. 

CHELiDONATE, Wilde, xxxvii, 27. 

CHLORIDE, behavior in ammoniacal 

solution to animal charcoal, Graham, 
iii, 152 — discolored, preparation, Che- 
vallier, iii, 178 — reduction: ammonio- 
subchloride of copper, Millon and 
Commaille, xxxv, 528 — copper wire, 
Lienau (W. & B., 1009, note), xxxiv, 
368 — glucose^ Boettger, xxx, 537 ; Joy, 
xlii, 416 — hydrogen^ temperature, Miil- 
ler, xli, 335 — quicklime and charcoal, 
V, 264 — resin, Mohr, vii, 173 — zinc, 
from ammoniacal solution, Grseger, 
xl, 268, 311 — zinc or cast iron pot, 
V, 264. 

CROTONATE, Schlippe, xxx, 411. 

CYANIDE, poisoning, xxx, 275, see 

MISTAKES — preparation, Duhamel, xii, 

186. 

DiGiTALATE, Moriu, xvii, 184. 

IODIDE, produces no discoloration of 

the skin (W. & B., 1538,) Patterson, 

xiv, 330. 

lODO-NiTRATE, Hofmaun, xxxi, 456. 

MELANATE, Piria, xi, 148. 

■ NITRATE, CRYSTALLIZED, behavior in 

ammoniacal solution to animal char- 
coal, Graham, iii, 151 — to ferroso- 
ferric oxide, Schober, xlii, 402 — 
known to ancient Egyptians, Hera- 
path, xxvi, 62 — causes headache in 
hairdye, viii, 351 — preparation o{ pure, 
Greiner (with sulphate of soda and 
nitrate of baryta), xxxii, 223 — Gui- 
bourt (washing crystals with concen- 
trated nitric acid), iii, 356 — Schoerer 
(by proper heating), xxx, 401 — Ph. 
U. S. (60), remarks, Procter, jr., 
xxxvi, 301 — Ph. Helvetica (65),xxxix, 
211 — compare Argentum, Chloride, 
Reduction — reaction limit (arsenious 
acid), Hastings, xiii, 203 — and taimin 
in pills, Copney, xxvii, 413 — solubility 
in glycerin, Adolphus, xxxix, 150 — 
test for organic matter in water, iii, 
91. 

■ , fused, adulteration (only 10 

per cent, silver), xxxi, 510 — with 
nitrate of potassa, Hodgson, jr., x, 26; 
Duhamel, x, 278 — detectioa: (tr.'at 
with muriatic acid), i, 221; Squibb 
(calcine with paper, and taste), xxxi, 
49 ; Smith (slight moditication of 
Squibb's test), xxxi, 240 — with nitrate 
of lead, Thomson, xi, 169 — discolora- 
tion due only to organic matter and 
not to light, Scanlan (W. & B., 1052) 
X, 351 — color of eschar, vii, 262 — 
must not be kept in flaxseed, Dulong, 
i, 74 — pointed (grind on a hot silver 



dollar), XX, 352 — preparation of pure, 
Bradenburgh (by proper degree of 
heat), V, 264 — tough (with chloride of 
iron), Squibb, xxxiii, 415. 

, , chlorinated, Squibb, 

(addition of muriatic acid, W. & B , 
1012, note), xxxi, 51 — Smith (with 
dry chloride of silver, W. & B , 1012, 
note), xxxi, 238 — Rittenhouse (pre- 
fers Smith's method), xxxi, 477. 

, , with SODA, Brun, xxx, 

404. 

oxamate, Balard, xiv, 137. 

OXIDE, adulteration (with carbonate 

of silver), Barland, xxv, 348 — 6eAa- 
viour carbolic acid ; amorphous 
phosphorus ; sulphur; to tannin ; 
Boettger, xxxvi, 343 — incompatible 
with glucose, xxx, 405 — parts easily 
with its oxygen, Boettger, xxxvi, 342 
— preparation, Duhamel, xiv, 100 — 
Ph. Britannica (64), xxxvi, 381 — Ph. 
Dublin (50) xxiii, 14 — temperature of 
reduction by hydrogen, MuUer, xli, 
335. 

palmitate, becomes electric by fric- 
tion, Moore, xxiv, 345, note. 

phosphate, decomposed by oxalic 

acid. Slater, xxviii, 345. 

salicylate, Piria, xi, 147. 

and SODA, nitrate. Rose, xxx, 425. 

and SODA, hyposulphite, Delioux 

(W. & B., 1532), xxv, 367. 

ARGOL. See Tartar, crude. 

ARGYR^SCETIN, Rochleder, xxxv, 290, 
note. 

ARGYRiESCIN, Rochleder, xxxv, 290, 
note. 

ARIBINA, Rieth, preparation (Parrish, 

662), xxxiv, 395. 
ARIOA BARK, xxii, 41 — its alkaloid, Pel- 

leteir and Coriol, ii, 69. 
ARIOINA, preparation and properties, 

Pelletier and Coriol, ii, 69 — Gregory, 

xxix, 93. 

cinchonia and quinia may be con- 
sidered as three grades of oxidation 
of a peculiar base, Pelletier, v, 259 — 
from cinchona ovata, Pavon, xxxviii, 
417. 

ARIDIUM, Ullgreen, xxiii, 176. 
ARIOLUS GALBULA, coloring matter of 

feathers, Bogdonow, xxx, 168. 
ARISTOLOCHIA, anguicida, xviii, 44. 
CLEMATiTis, i, 270 — as insecticide in 

Crimea, xxxvi, 66. 

COLOMBIANA ; GRANDIFLORA; ED- 

tidotes to snakebites, xlii, 454. 

HASTATA, i, 264, xiv, 118. 

HiBSUTA, i, 264 — description. Bridges, 

xiv, 120. 

LONGA, i, 271. 

ODORATissiMA, xviii, 44. 

PiSTOLOCHIA, i, 270. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



37 



ILRISTOLOCHIA keticulata, analysis 
(W.&B., 115), Wiegand, xvi, 16— de- 
scription, Wiegand, xvi, 10 — Bridges 
xiv, 118. ' 

KOTUNDA, i, 2*71. 

SAGITTATA, i, 264. 

SERPENT ARIA. tSCB SeRPENTARIA. 

siPHO, i, 271. 

TOMENTOSA, i, 264, xiv, 118. 

TRiLOBATA, i, 271, xviii, 44. 

ARKANSAS hot springs, analysis, xli, 27. 

ARMENIACA vulgaris, kernels contain 
araygdalin, Procter, jr., x, 196. 

ARMERIA MARiTiMA contains iodine, 
Vcelcker, xxvi, 439 

ARMORACIA yields myronic acid, Winck- 
ler [W. & B., 138), xxii, 44. 

-ARNICA MONTANA, FLOWERS, analysis, 
Walz, xxxiii, 452 — alkaloid, Peretti's 
shown to be a mixture, Hesse, xxxviii, 
472 — adulteration with Senecio doro- 
nica, xxxiv, 395 — adulterant of saf- 
fron, Bentley, xxxviii, 226 — percola- 
tion with water, packing, Soubeiran, 
viii, 225 — poiso7wii/, Schumann, xlii, 
321. 

LEAVES, analysis, Walz, xxxiii, 450 — 

adulterated wiih Astrantia major, 
ZoelfFel, xxv, 276. 

ARNICINA, composition, Walz (gluco- 
side), xxxiii, 452 — preparation and 
properties, Bastick (W. & B., 139, 
note), xxiii, 278 — Cobb (Lebourdais' 
process), xxiii, 243 — Lebourdais, 
(charcoal process, W. & B., 1035), 
xxi, 90 — Walz, xxxiii, 451. 

AROMATICS, extraction and preserva- 
tion (glycerin, W. & B., 994), Tich- 
borne, xxxvi, 529, xxxvii, 47 — Enz( 
(glycerin and chloroform), xlii, 320. 
-ARROWROOT, adulter ation,^ cornstarch 
detected (muriatic acid), Albers, 
xxxvi, 422— potatoe starch, x, 277 — 
detection (muriatic acid), Albers, 
xxxvi, 422, xxxviii, 377— Scbarling. 
(W. & B., 537), XV, 76— Virey (water), 
i, l'^— culture in Brazil, Eberhard, xli, 
301— in Florida, xxviii, 469— Geor- 
gia, xxviii, 469 — microscopically ex- 
amined, Raspail, xi, 22, 27— his con- 
clusions denied, Carson, xiv, 26 — 
mustiness removed, Procter, jr. (W. & 
B., 537), xiii, 1^1— properties, Gui- 
bourt, ii, 47 — proposed substituted by 
potato starch, Raspail, v, 2,4:^—t".sts 
for different varieties, Wa'sh, v, 348. 

from Florida (Zamia integrifolia, 

W. & B , 536), Carson, xiv, 22. 

from Otaheiti (Tacca pinnatifida 

and oceanica), v, 173, ix, 305. 

from Portland, Groves (W- ^ R-) 

142) xxv, 558. 

from Talcahuano, South America, 

( Alstro3meria), Carson, xxxii, ^"9 

[4] 



see Maranta. 

ARSENIC, (metallic), behavior to fused 
chlorate of potassa, Boettger, xxx, 70 
— properties, Durand and Mitchell, iv, 
108 — purification (boiled with solution 
of bichromate of potassa), xlii, 524 — 
purum, Ph. Dublin, (50) xxiii, 13 — 
subliming temperature, Guy, xl, 249. 

(and arsenious acid). 

antidotes: albumen and calcined 

magnesia, relative value, Schrader, 
xxvii, 533 — iron, acetate, xvii, 55, 118 
— hydrated peroxide. Blondel, vii, 350 
— Bunsen and Berthold, x, 178 — Che- 
vallier, xiii, 336 — Fischer, xii, 1 — 
Orfila, xiii, 331 — see Ferrum oxidum 
saccharated oxide, Koehler, 
xli, 420 — proto-persulphaie, T. and 
H. Smith, xxxviii, 15, 16 — (remarks, 
Procter, jr., xxxviii, 12) — magnesia, 
Bussy (W. & B., 30), xviii, 179— ^o- 
bacco, P]merson, viii, 346. 

antimony, distinction, see Antimony 

— in gray blotting and filtering paper, 
Vohl, xxviii, 220 — in earth of cemete- 
ries, Flandin and Danger; Orfila, 
xiii, 326, 327— OUivier, xvi, 328. 

DETECTION AND TESTS : iu general, 

Duhamel, xii, 279 — Berzelius, xii, 286 
—Blondlot (W. & B., 32), xxx, 125— 
Braconnot, xiii, 149 — Figuier, xii, 293 
— Hume (ammonio-nitrate of silver), 
xi, 352, xiv, 104 — Letheby, xviii, 220 
Lippert (examination of crust on cop- 
per), xxxiii, Marsh ( W. & B., 33), 
viii, 307, xii, 288 — observations and 
improvements of Marsh: Berzelius. 
X, 108— Davy (W. & B., 34), xxix, 172 
— Flandin and Danger, xiii, 326 — 
Liebig and Mohr (W. & B., 34), x, 57 

— Morton, xiv, 154 — Oiling, xxxii, 
351— Orfila, xii, 291, 295— xiii, 327, 
etc. — Simon, x, 217 — Thompson and 
Vogel, X, 108 — Wackenroder, (dis- 
tinction of spots), XXV, 60, see hydro- 
gen, ANTIMONIURETTED, and ARSENIU- 

retted — Odling, xxxii, 351 — Reinsch 
(W. & B., 34), XV, 269, xxxiv, 350— 
remarks on Reinsch's method, Hors- 
ley, xxxii, 185 — Tavftlier, vii, 71 — in 
soup, Rogers, Andrews, Fisher, vi, 94 

— in urine, Flandin, Danger, Orfila, 
xiii, 335 — estimation, Banieker (nitrate 
of uranium), xxxiii, 404 — Lenssen 
(as amraonio-arseniare of magnesia), 
xxxiii, 1 14 — danger of injections to the 
dissector, xvii,314 — m paper -hangings, 
Taylor, xxx, 275 — poisonous effects^ 
Wittstein and Fabian, xxxiii, 314 — 
dangerous character denied, Abel, xxx, 
343 — not absorbed by plants, Herber- 
ger. xix, 79 — poisoning (emetics and 
hydrated oxide of iron), Deville,xi, 171 
— see antidotes, mistakes — by external 



38 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



AUSEmC (Continued) 

use, Kuchler, ix, — b}^ arsenical 
subnitrate of bismuth, Kogers, xxx, 
413 — by phosphuretted oil, from ar- 
seniferous phosphorus, Woehler, xvii, 
238— Kirkpatrick case, xxx, 464 — tox- 
icological report, France, xiii, 326 — 
medicinal prfparations, Haselden, xxix, 
345 — sale, regulation, in England, 
xxiii, 379 — see Poison — toxicological 
considerations, Caunce, vi, 90. 

See Acid, arsenious. 

EATERS in Stjria, Heisch, xxxii, 435 

Maclagan, xxxvii, 350. 

and BROMINE, Lojwig, ii, 179. 

COPPER colors, detection, Puscher 

(ammonia), xlii, 2 1 7. 

— — HYDRIDE, solid, Blondlot, XXXV, 521 
— Wiederhold, xxxvi, 112. 

IODIDE, preparation^ Duhamel (extem- 
pore), xii, 187 — Fish (moist way, 
then fused), xiii, 97 — Plisson (moist 
way), xii, 186 — medicinal value, Has- 
elden, xxix, 346. 

lODO-HYDRAGYRATE, Landercr, xxxiii, 

411. 

suLPHURET, as depilatory^ Boudet, 

xxiii, 74 — chicken spoisonec?, xxix, 112 
— reduction, Berzelius; Simon, x, 219. 

ARSENDIMETHYL (Cacodyl), Cahours, 
XXXV, 307, etc. 

MONOMETHYL, Cahours, xxxv, 307, 

etc. 

TRIMETHYL, Cahours, xxxv, 307, etc. 

ARSENIMETHYLIUM, xxxv, 10. 

IODIDE, Cahours, xxxv, 307. 

ARTEMISIA absinthium. See Absin- 
thium 

JUDAICA, iii, 174. 

VULGARIS (mugwort), yield of oxalic 

acid by potassa, Persoz, xxx, 552. 

ARTESIAN wells in the desert (Sahara), 
xxx, 83. 

ARTHANTE adunca (variety of matico), 
Bentley, xxxvi, 118. See Matico. 

ARTHONIA (lichen on gray cinchona), 
xi, 252. 

ARTIFICIAL. See under different head- 
ings. 

ARTOCARPUS incisa (Jacca nuts), xxxvi, 
293. 

integripolia, xxxvi, 292. 

JACA ; Polyphbma, xxxvi, 293, 

note. 

ARUM americanum (Symplocarpus foeti- 

dus), viii, i. 
cordifolium, heat developed when 

flowering, Hubert, vi, 266. 
BSCULENTUM, mcdical propertieSjXxvii, 

235. 

■ MACULATUM, analysis of root, Enz, 

(W. & B., 141), xxxi, 351. 

TRiPHYLLCM,asemetic,iv,277 — analy- 
sis, Jones (W. & B., 142), xv, 81, 88.1 



ARUMARI. bitter bark, v, 149. 

ASAF(ETIDA. See Assafcetida. 

ASAGUJ3A officinalis ; tenuifo- 

LiA, xxxviii, 499. 

ASARABACCA. See Asarum. 

ASARINA, xiii, 179 — behavior to bichro- 
mate potassa test, Jenkins, xxxiii, 
528. 

ASARITE, xiii, 179, 180. 

ASARUM canadense, analysis^ Rushton 
(W. & B., 143), X, 181, i^Q— American 
and European, difference in chemical 
constitution, Procter, jr., xiii, 177 — 
as emetic, iv, 278. 

carolinianum, X, 182. 

EUROPIUM, analysis^ FeneuUe ; Grae- 

ger ; Lassaigne (W. & B., 1466), xiii^ 
179 — and American^ difference in. 
chemical constitution, Procter, jr.,. 
xiii, 177 — camphor^ xiii, 180 — ot7, xiii, 
180. 

LATIFOLIUM, X, 162. 

viRGiNicuM as adulterant of Serpen- 

taria, i, 265. 
ASBESTOS lamp. See Lamp, asbestos. 
as substitute for lint, Dumont, xxviij. 

317. 

paper, xxxiv, 226. 

ASCARICIDA anthelmintica, ix, 32. 
ASCLEPIAS CONTRAYBRVA (sourcc of 

mechoacan root), Guibourt, xxxviii, 

501. 

cuRAssAvicA (bastard ipecacuanha), 

Hamilton, xix, 19. 

iNCARNATA, as cmetic, iv, 283. 

gigantea, fruits presented to Phila- 
delphia College, xvi, 310. See Mu- 

DAR. 

MORiNDA, fruits presented to Phila- 
delphia College, xvi, 310. 

NiVEA, Hamilton, xix, 23. 

obtusifolia, as emetic, iv, 283. 

psEUDOSARSA = Hemidesmus indicus,. 

XV, 298. 

SYRiACA, as emetic, iv, 283 — as wad- 
ding, xxxiii, 320. 

TiNGENS, yields blue color, vi, 73. 

TUBEROSA, analysis (W. & B., 144),, 

Rhoads, xxxiii, 492 — medical action, 
Pawling, xxxiii, 494. 

vERTiciLLATA, antidotc to snake bites, 

Harris (W. & B., 1467), xxvii, 452. 

ASH. See Fraxinus excelsior. 

ASHES, analysis, Erdmann ; Rose ; Strec- 
ker, xxiii, 365 — Stafful ; Wackenro- 
der, xxiii, 366. 

ASPARA(ilN, behavior to nitrous oxide 
gas, Piria, xxii, 245 — to heat; and to 
sulphuric acid with permanganate of 
potassa, Guy, xxxiii, b2Q— conversion 
into succinate of ammonia, Piria,. 
xvii, 61— found in extract of bella- 
donna, Biltz, vii, 345 — in root of Ro- 
binia pseudacacia, Hlasiwetz, xxvii 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER 



THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 39 



ASPARAGIN [Continued). 

528 — in vetch, Piria, xvii, 65. 

ASPARAGUS berries, analysis, Reinsch, 
xlii, 370 — seeds as substitute for cof- 
fee, Liebig, xxvi, 564 — the whole plant 
as diuretic, Jeaffreson (W. &B., Ii68), 
xxvii, 557. 

ASPARAMIDB in hops, Leroy, xiii, 69. 

ASPERULA ODORATA, analysis, Rochle- 
der, XXV, 242. 

ASPHALTUM, account, Simmonds, xxix, 
466 — composition, xxxiv, 539. 

ASPHALTENE, Boussingault, ix, 84. 

ASPHODEL, source of alcohol, Dumas, 
xxvii, 377. 

ASPHYXIA ready method, Marshall Hall, 
xxix, 399. 

ASPIDIN, Pavesi, xxxiv, 35. 

ASPIDIUM CAPiLLUS VENERIS contains io- 
dine, Righini, xxvi, 439. 

FiLix MAS. See FiLix. 

ASPLENIUM TRiCHOMANES, contains io- 
dine, Righini, xxvi, 439. 

ASSAFCETIDA accoww^, Polak, xxxix, 351 
— Royle, xviii, 267 — action upon the 
heart, Lombard, ix, 261 — adulteration, 
Heathcote, xxviii, 518 — Cooke, xxxvi, 
366 — Shaer, xl, 392 — analysis, Hlasi- 
veetz, xxiii, 130 — behavior to camphor, 
Planche (W. & B., 195, note), x, 214— 
coZ/ec^tow in A ffghanistan, Cooke, xxxvi, 
366 — entitled to entry (percentage), 
XXV, 302 — products by distilling with 
hydrate of lime, Reinsch, xix, 75 — in 
mixtures, Hodgson, jr. (with water 
only), iv, 13 — purification (with alco- 
hol, strained and evaporated), Moore, 
xl, 387 — Proctor (with magnesia, W. 
& B., 147, note), xxxv, 356 — solution 
in liquor potdssa, xxxvii, 305. 

ASSAY BALANCE, Dubois, xxxv, 421. 

ASSOCIATION, ALUMNI. See Pharmacy, 
Pennsylvania. 

American medical, meeting at New 

Orleans, xli, 375, 376 — versus the 
colleges of Dentistry and of Pharma- 
cy, XXV, 89- 

American pharmaceutical. See 

Pharmacy, United States. 

British, meeting at Manchester, 

xxxiii, 481. 

ASTERIAS rubeus contains iodine, xxvi, 
440. 

ASTHMA, seeds of Bignonia catalpa, Au- 
tomarchi, vi, 352 — conium, Landerer, 
XXV, 32 — ferrocyanide of potassium, 
xxiii. 84 — stramonium, Sigmond, x, 
266. ' 

paper. See Paper, antiasthmatic. 

ASTRAGALUS species, formation of tra- 

gaeanth, von xMohl, xxxi, 161, 243. 

See Tragacanth. 

lanatus, xli, 434. 

strobilipebus, xxii, 153. 



ASTRANTIA major, Walpers (root as 
adulterant of Helleborus niger), xxiv,, 
228. 

ATBEROSPERMA (um) moschata (urn) — 
sassafras tree, medicinal properties, 
xxviii, 73, xxxv, 452 — analysis of 
bark, Zeyer (W. & B., 1468), xxxiv, 
165 

ATHEROSPERMIA, Zeyer (Parrish, 641) 

xxxiv, 166, xxxv, 45 5. 
ATLANTIC, pressure at the bottom, xxxv, 

468. 

ATOMIZING of fluids, Procter, jr., xxxviii,. 

289. Compare Inhalation. 
ATROPA belladonna. See Belladonna. 
ATRACTYLIS gummifera yields pseudo- 
mastix, xxxiii, 61 — yields viscine, 
Macaire, vi, 125. 
ATROPIA, antidote, calabar beans, xxxvii^ 
302— morphia, Mitchell and others, 
xxxvii, 389 ; Down, xlii, 440 — opium, 
Budd, xl, 521, see Belladonna — be- 
havior to bichromate potassa test,. 
Jenkins, xxxiii, 528 — to chromate 
potassa test, Eboli, xxix, 369 — iodides- 
of cadmium and potassium, Marme, 
xli, 18 — to iodohydrargyrate of po- 
tassium, Mayer (W. & B., 1342), xxxv, 
21, 23 — to pentachloride of antimony 
n phosphoric acid, Schulze, xxxii, 
i38, 235 — to sulphuric acid, Gulielmo, 
xxxvi, 112 — to hot sulphuric acid,. 
Guy, xxxiii, 526 — to tannic and gal- 
lic acids, Henry, vii, 228 — yields ben- 
zoic acid by action of chromic acid, 
Pfeiffer (Parrish, 656), xxxiv, 33, 
xxxvi, 228 — splits into atropic acid 
and tropia, Kraut (W. & B., 1019), 
xxxvi, 231 — Pfeiffer, xxxvi, 229 — com- 
position, Liebig, vi,317 — constitution,., 
Planta, xxiii, 37 — poisoning (Bower's, 
case), xli, 84, 185 — (Geneva), xli, 136. 

preparation. Ph. Britannica, (64), 

xxxvi, 381 — Bouchardat (with Lugol's 
solution) xxii, 89 — Brandes (distil, 
leaves with caustic lime) vi, 83 — 
Henry (tannin process), vii, 234 — 
Luxton (with ammonia, W. & B., 1018,. 
note), xxvii, 155— ifem(W. & B., 1018, 
note), vi, 314 — Procter, jr. (W. & B., 
1017). xxxii, 526 — Rabourdin (chloro- 
form, W. & B., 1018, note), xxiii, 159 
— Williams (benzole), xxvi, 341 — Ph. 
U. S. (60) remarks, Procter, jr., xxxvi, 
301— Ph. Britan. (64) xxxvi, 381. 
properties, Planta, xxiii, 37 — harm- 
less to rabbits, Bouchardat, xxii, 89 — 
Ogle, xl, 83 — solubility in alcohol. Cap 
and Garot, xxvii, 159 — in chloro- 
form, Lepage, xxiv, 148 ; Pettenko- 
fer, xxxi, 232 ; Schlimpert, xxxii, 160 
— in glycerin, Adolphus, xxxix, 150; 
Cap and Garot, xxvii, 159 ; Klever,. 
xlii, 222 — in olive oil. Cap and Garotj 



40 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



ATROPIA [Continued). i 
xxvii, 159; Pettenkofer, xxxii, 185 — 
in water, Cap and Garot, xxvii, 159 ; 
Tichborne, xxxiii, 65, note — snblima- 
iion, Helwig, xxxvii, 29, xxxix, 539 — 
subliming temperature, Guy, xl, 247 
— substitute proposed, Procter, jr. (extr. 
belladonna, precipitated by acetate of 
lead, etc.), xix, 9G — iests^ see behavior 
— l/ield from extract of belladonna, 
from leaves, various authors, xxxvii, 
30, and note — from root, Procter, jr., 
xxxvii, 30. 

PAPER, Streatfieldj Xxxv, 175. 

OLBATE, Atttield, XXXV, 250 — Hermite, 

xxvii, 73. 

■ SULPHATE ofTj/iWoie to hydrocyanic acid, 

(hypoderraically), Preyer, xli, 141 
— assay^ and behavior to iodohydrar- 
gyrate of potassium (W. & B., 1542), 
Mayer, xxxv, 23, 24 — preparation: 
neuter, Maitre, ( W. & B , 1020), xxviii, 
360— crystallized, Laneau, (W. & B., 
1021), xxx^, 315— Ph. U. S. (60), re- 
marks, Procter, jr. xxxvi, 302 — solu- 
bility in glycerin, Adolphus, xxxix, 
150— Klever, xlii, 222— in toothache, 
Percy, xli, 127, 203. 

VALERIANATE, Composition, Callmann, 

xxxi, 150 — medicinal properties, Mi- 
chea, xxvi, 81 — pre'paration and pro- 
perties, Miette, xxx, 262. 

ATTAR OP ROSES. See Oleum ros/E. 

ATTRACTION, capillary, nature of, Dra- 
per, vi, 245, 292 — (different theories : 
Boyle, 246; Clairaut, 247, etc., 309; 
Dulrochet, 248, 304, 309 ; Hauy, 247 ; 
Laplace, 247 ; Newton, 246; Young, 
247). 

AURANTIUM. Compare Orange. 
AURANTIIN, Cogswell, xxvi, 553. 
AURINS paste (impure picric acid), xli, 
110. 

AURO-NATEIUM chloratum=auei et 

SODII CHLORIDUM. 

AURUM (gold). Compare Gold. 

ammonio- IODIDE, Rcade, xx, 68, xxx, 

57. 

and BROMINE, Loewig, ii, 185. 

CHLORIDE, behavior to alkaline poly- 
sulphides, Schiff, xxxiii, 265 — prepa- 
ration^ Duharael, xiii, 103 — Leval, red 



and yellow, xvi, 173 — temperature of 
reduction by hydrogen, Miiller, xli, 

335 — test (tin filings). Witting, sen., 
xxxiii, 316. 

CYANIDE, preparation, Desfosses, xv, 

316— Figuier (W. & B., 1522), vii, 81. 

OXIDE, preparation : Cottereau (with 

magnesia, (W. & B., 1521) vii, 110— 
Christien (carbonate of potash), viii, 
110— Figuier (chloride of barium, 
(W. & B., 1522), XX, 102— Pelletier 
(magnesia), xx, 102. 

and sodium, chloride, v, 172 — Ph. 

Helvetica (65), xxxix, 312. 

sulphide, temperature of reduction 

by hydrogen, Muller, xli, 335. 

AUSTRALIA, acclimatization of animals, 
xxxv, 273 — its climate, Gould, xxii, 

336 — its medicinal plants, Muller, 
xxviii, 72 — products in Exhibition, 
1862, Bedford, xxxv, 449. 

AUTUMN on the Thames, xxxii, 563. 
AVA. See Kawa. 

AVENTURIN, artificial, Fremy and Cle- 

mandot, xix, 110. 
AVENA sativa. See Oat. 
AVOIRA ELAi's (source of Palm oil), 

xxvii, 345. 
AXIN RESIN, xxix, 142. 
AXUNGIA. See Adeps, Lard, etc. 
AYER, Cherry pectoral, composition, 

xxvi, 282. 

AZADIRACHTA indica. See Melia aze- 
darach. 

AZADIRIN (from Melia azedarach), Pid- 

dington, vii, 182. 
AZALEA pontica (source of honey of 

Trebizond), vi, 351. 
AZALEINE (anilin color), Gerber and 

Keller, xxxiii, 253. 
AZEDARACA amgena ; dbleteria, 

vii, 177. See Melia azedarach. 
AZOCAEBYLS, Loewig, xxv, 380. 
AZuLITE naphthaleisiqub, Laurent, xvii, 

264. 

AZOLITMINE, xvii, 41, note. 
AZOXYBENZOLE, xxxiii, 134. 
AZOPHENYLAMIN, composition, xxxiii, 
249. 

AZOTE See Nitrogen. 
AZULENE, Piesse, xxxvi, 88. 



BABUL BARK (Acacia arabica), xxiii, 
272. 

BACOBOTRYS picta, vermifuge from 

Abyssinia, xxvii, 474, 
BiECKEA utilis, as tea, xxviii, 74. 
BAKING powder. See Powder, baking. 
BALANCE, assay, Dubois, xxxv, 421. 



Compare Weighing machine. 
BALANITES eoyptiaca (myrobalans of 

ancient Egypts), v, 139. 
BALATA (juice of SapotaMuelleri), Sper- 

lich, xlii, 178. 
BALLS, ALMOND,— camphor, Piesse, xxviii, 

86. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



41 



BALM, Hagan's magnolia, composition, 

Chandler, xlii, 367. 
thousand flowers, composition. 

Chandler, xlii, 366. 
white lilies, Hoadley, composition, 

Chandler, xlii, 367. 
See Balsamum. 

BALSAM COAST of Gruatemala, Dorat, 

xxxvi, 148. 
BALSAMITO (tincture of fruit of rayros- 

permum sonsonate W. & B., 156), 

Pereira, xxiii, 139. 
BALSAMODENDRON myrrha, source of 

myrrh, Ehrenberg, i, 236, v, 140, 

xvii, 171. See Myrrha. 
BALSAMUM (sALSAJf, balm). 
ARACoucHiNi (from Amyris hetero- 

phylla), xvi, 150. 
Canada ( of fir), account., Gui- 

bourt, xii, 126, 137 — adulteration 

(chios turpentine), Hodgson, jr., ix, 

18 — collection.^ Stearns, xxxi, 29. 
CARPATHicuM. See Balsam of 

Riga. 

COMMANDER OF PBRMES, Ph. GalHca, 

(26), Prel. No. 102. See Balsam, 

Turlington. 

COPAIBA. See Copaiba. 

FIR. See Balsam, Canada. 

of FLOWERS, Piesse, xxviii, 178. 

of GiLEAD. See Balsam op Mecca. 

GURJUN. See Oleum, wood. 

of HASCHiciN, Laneau, xxviii, 363. 

of HONEY, Vi, 61. 

LiBANi. See Balsam of Riga. 

MECCA, analysis. Troramsdorff (no 

benzoic acid), ii, 339 — Bonastro (bur- 
serine), iv, 229, 234. 

of NEROLY, Piesse, xxviii, 179. 

adulteration (castor oil), de- 
tected by sulphuric acid, Schwabe, 
xlii, 404; by distillation and bisul- 
phite of soda (W. & B , 156), Wag- 
ner, XXX, 570 — (copaiva), detected by 
sulphuric acid, Schwabe, xlii, 404 — 
analysis.. Kraut, xlii, 236 — in catholic 
churches^ Hanbury, xxxiii, 262 — collec- 
tion, Dorat (W. & B., 155),xxxii, 302 ; 
and Hanbury, xxxvi, 146 — drops in 
drachm, Bernouilly, xxxi, 441 — papal 
bull, xxxiii, 263 — injwcr/wraery, Piesse, 
xxvi, 276 — source, Carson and Do- 
rat, xxxii, 296 — Hanbury, xxxii, 411 
— Pereira, xxiii, 137 — test (by taste). 
Bakes and Jenks, xxxix, 7. 

new kind, behaves differently, 

Hager, xlii, 219. 

PERU trees, cultivation in Ceylon, 

Jamaica, Trinidad, xxxvii, 152. See 
Myrospermum and myroxylon. 

Powell's pectoral, White, xv, 316. 

Riga, from Pinus sjlvestris, Keller, 

xlii, 467. 

STYPTIC, Warren, xxvi, 246. 



SULPHURIS ANISATUM, Robiquet, XXV, 

211. See Oleum sulphuratum. 
TOLU, analysis, Kopp, xx, 117 — beha- 
vior to camphor, Planche (W. & B., 
195, note), x, 214 — to impure nitric 
acid (yields oxalic acid), xx, 121, 
note — collection, Weir, xxxvi, 449 — in 
mixtures, Githens, xxxiii, 205 — in per- 
fumery, Piesse, xxvi, 276, 556 — solu- 
bility in chloroform, Lepage, xxiv, 
147. 

resins, a and /? Kopp, xx, 119, 

120. 

from Columbia, Bonastro, vi, 

177. 

. See Myrospermum and Myrox- 
ylon. 

tranquillans. See Baume tran- 

quille. 

Turlington (W. & B., 1387, note), v, 

28, xi, 72 — percolation recommended,. 

Duhamel, xiv, 99 — original formula, 

V, 23, note. 
WHITE, Dorat, xxxvi, 147 ; Pereira, 

xxiii, 138. 

BAMBOO, cuticle, amount of silica in 

ashes, xxxv, 164. 
BANK-NOTE engraving and ink, Carney, 

XXX, 186. 

BANKSIA abyssinica = Brayera antbel- 
mintica, xxii, 319. 

BAOBAB. See Adansonia digitata. 

BAPTISIA tinctoria (wild indigo), ana- 
lysis, Smedley, xxxiv, 31 — blue color, 
vi, 72 — as cathartic, v, 206 — as emetic^ 
iv, 279. 

BARBADOES nut, oil. See Oleum, cur- 

CAS PURGANS. 

BARBAREA vulgaris, xli 437. 

BARDANA. See Lappa. 

BARIUM preparation, Crookes, xxxv, 61. 

and antimonium, iodide, Schaeffer, 

xxxii, 559. 

and bromine. Loewig ii, 174. 

chloride, poisoning, Wolf, xxiii, 381 

— preparation, Kuhlmann, xxxi, 138 — 
reaction, limit (for [. hosphoric and sul- 
phuric acids), Hastings, xiii, 202 — 
solubility in alcohol, Fresenius, xix,. 
513 — glycerin, Adolphus, xxxix, 150 ; 
Klever, xlii, 222. 

cyanide, its uses (preparations of 

hydrocyanic acid, formic acid, anilin, 
ethylamin), Wagner, xxxiii, 403. 

IODIDE, preparation, Henry (iodide 

of iron and carbonate of baryta), i, 
202 ; (sulphuret of barium and tinc- 
ture of iodine, W. & B., 1538), vi, 

263 Tichborne (from witherite)^ 

xxix, 556. 

PEROXIDE (hydrated), preparation, 

Brodie, xxxvii, 185; Liebig and 
Woehler, v, 87, xxxvii, 185. 

SAHCiDE, Piria, xi, 143. 



42 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



BARIUM siLico-PLUORiDE (solubility in 

water), Fresenius, xix, 51. 
. See Baryta. 

BARKS, different, yield of tannin, Muller, 
xxxi, 429. 

PRESERVATION, Enz, xxxii, 556. 

. See under their different names. 

BARK (Cinchona). Compare Cinchona. 

general character, properties, etc. 

See Cinchona. 

Arica, Weddell, xxii, 41 — its alka- 
loid, Pelletier and Coriol, ii, 69. See 
Bark, Cusco. 

ASH, xi, 255, xxii,' 41 — character and 

history, Pereira, xi, 319 — yield of cin- 
chonia, Michaelis, xi, 320 — of quinia, 
Gcebel and Kirst, xi, 254, 320; Mi- 
chaelis, xi, 320. See Bark, Jaen. 

, DARK, Pereira, xi, 320. See 

Bark, Loxa, false. 

Atacamez, xiii, 50. 

BicoLORED, xi, 330. See Cinchona 

BICOLORATA. 

Bogota, yield of cinchonia and qui- 
nia, Delondre, xxvii, 90 ; Procter, jr., 
XXV, 308. See Bark, Carthagena, 

FUSAGASUGA, COQUETTA. 

Bolivia, Howard, xxxviii, 419 — 

trade, etc., Weddell, xxvi, 539. 

Brazilian, Carson, xvii, 84. 

BROWN, Pereira, xi, 256, 258 — char- 
acter and history, Pereira, xi, 326 — 
yield of cinchonia and qninia, Goebel 
and Kirst, xi, 254, 327 ; iVlichaelis, xi, 
327. See Bark, Huamalies. 

Calisaya, analysis^ Pelletier and Ca- 

ventou, xi, 323 — assay, Buchner, xxiv, 
42 — character and history, etc., De- 
londre, vii, 326 ; Guibourt, ix, 23 ; 
Pereira, xi, 257, 321 ; Weddell, xxii, 
41, 97 ; Wood, iii, 32, 110, 112— mono- 
poly, xxiv, 45 — structure, xxvi, 184 — 
yield of cinchonia, Delondre, xxvii, 90 
— of quinia, Delondre, xxvii, 90 ; Goe- 
bel and Kirst, xi, 323 ; Guillermond, 
xxxvi, 16, 17 ; Michaelis, xi, 323. See 
Bark, yellow. 

' flat, Wood, iii, 111 — liyht, Proc- 
ter, jr, xix, 182; Weddell, xxii, 40, 
41 — quilled, Wood, iii, 110 — rolled, 
Delondre and Bouchardat, xxvi, 50 — 
tabla, Procter, jr , xix, 179. 

, pseudo, Pereira, xxvi, 184, 

Carabaya, yield of cinchonia, De- 
londre, xxvii, 90— of quinia, Delon- 
dre, xxvii, 90; Guillermond, xxxvi, 
16. 

Caribbean, Pereira, xi, 330. 

— — Carthagena, analysis, Pelletier and 
Caventou, xi, 328 — assay, Buchner, 
xxiv, 43, 45 — character and history, 
Delondre and Bouchardat, xxvi, 51 ; 
Pereira, xi, 327 ; Wood, iii, 33, 105, 
107 — yield of cinchonia and quinia, 



Gcebel and Kirst, xi, 254, 329 ; Delon- 
dre, xxvii, 90 ; Guillermond, xxxvi, 
17. See Bark, brown. 

, brown, Wood, iii, 117; Wed- 
dell, xxii, 41 ; Pereira, xxvi, 185 — 
fibrous, Pereira, xi, 254, 255, 328, 329 ; 
Weddell, xxii, 42 — hard, Pereira, xi, 
254, 255, 328, 329 ; Weddell, xxii, 41, 
42 — ligneous, see hard — pitaya, Per- 
eira, xxvi, 185 — red, Wood, iii, 118; 
Weddell, xxii, 41 — spongy, Wood, iii, 
118; WeddelJ, xxii, 41 — woody, see 
hard—yellow, Wood, iii, 33, 114, ll7 ; 
Weddell, xxii, 42. 

CINNAMON, Weddell, xxii, 41. 

coated, Pereira; Bergen, xi, 250. 

Columbian, description, Delondre 

and Bouchardat, xxvi, 51. 

Coquetta, Pereira, xxvi, 185. See 

Bark, Bogota. 

cracky, Pereira; Bergen, xi, 251. 

crown, Weddell, xxii, 40 — charac- 
ter, etc., Howard, xxxviii, 423 ; Per- 
eira, xi, 257, 314; Wood, iii, 107. 
See Bark, Loxa. 

, ashy, rediscovered, Ernst, 

xlii, 449 — bastard, Pereira, xi, 255 — 
leopard, Pereira, xi, 315 — rusty, Per- 
eira, xi, 315, xxxviii, 425 — silver, Per- 
eira, xi, 315. See Bark, Loxa. 

Cusco (Arica bark), Weddell, xxii, 

41 — character, Pereira, xi, 329 — yield 
of quinia Delondre, xxvii, 90; Guil- 
lermond, xxxvi, 16, 17. 

Ecuador, yield of quinia, Guiller- 
mond, xxxvi, 17. 

false. Pereira, xi, 254, 255, 330. 

, from India, is Hymenodycton 

excelsum, contains aesculin, Brough- 
ton, xl, 350. 

ferruginous, Wood, iii, 109. 

FLAT, Pereira; Bergen, xi, 253. 

furrowed, Pereira; Bergen, xi, 251. 

FusAGASuGA, yield of quinia, How- 
ard and Hindsley, xxvi, 185. See 
Bark, Bogota. 

GENUINE, xi, 256. 

gray, character, etc., Pereira, xi, 257 

3J7; W^ood, iii, 37, 107 — source, De 
Candolle, ii, 295 — yield of cinchonia, 
Goebel and Kirst, xi, 254, 318; Mi- 
chaelis ; von Santeu, xi, 318 — of qui- 
nia, Delondre, xxvii, 90; Guiller- 
mond, xxxvi, 17; Michaelis, xi, 318. 
See Bark, Huanuco ; L)ma. 

Guayaquil, yield of quinia, Guiller- 
mond, xxxvi, 17. 

GuANuco. See Bark, Huanuco. 

hairy, Wood, iii, 37. 

Havannah, Wood, iii, 109; Pereira, 

xi, 327. 

Huamalies, Weddell, xxii, 41 — assay, 

Buchner, xxiv, 44 — character, etc., 
Pereira, xi, 326 — yield of cinchonia 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 43 



BARK HuAMALiES [Continued). 

and quinia, Goebel and Kirst, xi, 254, 
327 ; MichaeliSj xi, 327. See Bark, 

BKOWN. 

• , FERRUGINOUS ; , WHITE, 

Weddell, xxii, 41. 

HuANUCO, Weddell, xxii, 40 — assay, 

Buchner, xxiv, 44 — behavior to rea- 
gents, Bergen, Prel, No. 91 — charac- 
ter, etc., Pereira, xi, 257, 317 ; Wood, 
iii, 108 — contains lignoine, Reichel ; 
Hesse, xxxiii, 171 — yield of cincho- 
nia, Delondre, xxvii, 90 ; Goebel and 
Kirst, xi, 254, 318 ; Michaelis ; v. San- 
ten, xi, 318 — of quinia, Delondre, 
xxvii, 90; Guillermond, xxxvi, 17; 
Michaelis, xi, 318. See Bark, gray; 
Lima. 

Jaen, character., etc., Pereira, xi, 319 

— yield of c'mchomA, Delondre, xxvii, 
90 — of quinia, Delondre, xxvii, 90; 
Guillermond, xxxvi, 17. See Bark, 

ASH. 

, red; , WHITE, Weddell, 

xxii, 40, 41. 

Java, royal, analysis, Jobst and Gun- 
ning, xlii, 401. 

KNOTTY, Pereira; Bergen, xi, 251. 

Lagos, yield of quinia, Guillermond, 

xxxvi, 17. 

Lima, Weddell, xxii, 40 — character, 

etc., Pereira, xi, 317; Wood, iii, 37, 

108. See Bark, gray; Huanuco. 

LOXA, Weddell, xxii, 40 — analysis, 

Bucholz,xi, 317 — character, etc., How- 
ard, xxxviii, 423 — Pereira, xi, 314 — 
Wood, iii, 35, 107, yield of cin- 

chonia, Delondre, xxvii, 90 ; Goebel, 
xi, 254 — of quinia, Delondre, xxvii, 
90; Goebel, xi, 254; Guillermond, 
xxxvi, 17; v. Santen, xi, 317. See 
Bark, Crown. 

, ash^ Weddell, xxii, 41 — Crown, 

see Bark, Crow¥(— gray (yield of al- 
kaloids), Karsten, xxx, 534 — pale, 
Wood, iii, 33— red, Weddell, xxii, 40 
— white, Pereira, xi, 327 ; Weddell, 
xxii, 40 — yellow, Weddell, xxii, 40. 

, FALSE, character, Pereira, xi, 

320 — yield of cinchonia and quinia, 
Goebel, xi, 254. See Bark, Ash, 
dark. 

, PSEUDO. See Bark, Loxa, 

FALSE. 

Maracaibo, yield of quinia, Guiller- 
mond, xxxvi, 17 — contain quinoidia, 
Winckl-'r, xxiii, 384. 

MULBERRY, Wood, iii, 34. 

New Granada, See Cinchona. 

ORANGE (red and YELLOW), Wcddcl, 

xxii, 41 — character, etc, Delondre and 
Bouchardat, xxvi, 52, 53 ; Pereira, 
xi, 322 ;, Wood, iii, 28,31, 101— source, 
De Candolle, ii, 295 — yield of cincho- 



nia, Delondre, xxvii, 90 — of quinia, 
Delondre. xxvii, 90 ; Guillermond, 
xxxvi, 17. 

PAHUDiANA = Java bark, xlii, 402. 

PALE, Pereira, xi, 255, 257, 314, 317 

—Wood, iii, 27, 32, 34, 106, 113. 

Payta. See Bark, white, Payta. 

PiTAYA, Pereira, xi, 330 ; Weddell, 

xxii, 40 — report on, Howard, xxxvi, 
1 514 — Cross, xxxvii, 473 — contains no 
alkaloid, Bull, xxiii, 168 — pitayna. 
found, Folchi and Peretti, vii, 332 — 
yield of cinchonia, Delondre, xxvii, 
90 — of quinia, Delondre, xxvii, 90; 
Guillermond, xxxvi, 17. 

CoNDAMiNEA, yield of cinchonia 

and quinia, Guibourt, xxv^i, 185. 

FALSE, Weddell, xxii, 42. 

PiTAYON, Weddell, xxii, 42. 

PiTON, De Candolle, ii, 292 — Pereira, 

xi, 330. See Bark, Sta. Lucia. 

QUILLED, Pereira; Bergen, xi, 253. 

RED, Weddell, xxii, 40 — analysis, Pel- 

letier and Caventou, xi, 325 — behav- 
ior to reagents, Anthon, ix, 129 — Ber- 
gen, Prel. No. 89 — character, etc., De- 
londre and Bouchardat, xxvi, 53 — 
Pereira, xi, 323, 329— Wood, iii, 105, 
source, De Candolle, ii, 237, 295 
— Howard, xxix, 33 — yield of Cin- 
chonia, Delondre, xxvii, 90 ; Goebel 
and Kirst, xi, 254, 326 ; Michaelis ; v. 
Santen, xi, 326 — of quinia, Delondre, 
xxvii, 90 ; Goebel and Kirst, xi, 254, 
326; Guillermond, xxxvi, 17; Mi- 
chaelis ; v. Santen, xi, 326. 

REGiA. See Cinchona regia ; Bark, 

YELLOW. 

RUSTY, Weddell; xxii, 41. 

Santa Fe, Wood, iii, 32, 115. 

Santa Lucia, De Candolle, ii, 292. 

Santa Martha, Wood, iii, 118; 

SILVER, xxii, 40. See Bark, gray ; 

Huanuco. 

sucupiBA, Scherzer, xxxv, 127. 

SURINAM, Pereira. xi, 330. 

UNCOATED, Pereira ; Bergen, xi, 250. 

URiTusiNGA, Pereira, xi, 316 — Wood, 

iii, 28, 31, 108. 

VELVET, Wood, iii, 32. 

WARTY, Pereira; Bergen, xi, 251. 

white, Weddell, xxii, 41 — character, 

etc., Pereira, xi, 256, 327 — Wood, iii, 
36, 116, 117 — sourcp, De Candolle, ii, 
239 — yield of cinchonia, Delondre, 
xxvii, 90 — of quinia, Delondre, xxvii, 
90; Guillermond, xxxvi, 17. 

Payta, analysis, Hesse, xlii, 470. 

WRINKLED, Pereira; Bergen, xi, 251. 

YELLOW, Weddell, xxii, 41 — assay, 

Buchner, xxiv, 43 — behavior to re- 
agents, Anthon, ix, 130, 131 — charac- 
ter, etc., Delondre, vii, 327 — Pereira 
xi, 257, 320, 327— Wood, iii, 27, 32 



44 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



BARK, YELLOW [Continued). 

105, 110, 112, 116 — monopoly, xxiy^ 45 
— Weddell, xxvi, 539 — source, De Can- 
dolle, ii, -238, 295— Weddell, xxii, 97. 
See Bark, Calisaya. 

. of C'uenca, De Candolle, ii, 

239; Weddell, xxii, 41— fiat, Pereira, 
xi, 321 — quilled, Pereira, xi, 321; 
royal, Pereira, xi, 320 ; Weddell, xxii, 
41. 

YuAXDCO. See Bark, Huanuco. 

ESSENTIAL SALT, Ellis (cold Water ex- 
tract, W. & B., 1091), xiv, 106. 

BARKS, Peruvian. See Bark, Cinchona 
and Cinchona. 

all the other, see under their differ-' 

ent names. 

BARLEY, amount of starch, Dragendorfif, 
XXXV, 139 — microfcopical e: amination 
of starch, Raspail, xi, 25,28 — reaction 
with tincture of guaiacum, xxiii, 185. 

• of ancient Egypts, v, 142. 

BAROSMA. See BucHu. 

BARRESWIL'S solution, xxvii, 72. 

BARYOSMA Tongo (Tonka bean plant), 
vii, 118. 

BARYTA. Compare Barium. 

caustic, preparation, Riegel, xviii, 319 

—cryst'tllized, preparation, Mohr (W. 
& B., 158), xxix, 129— Muratori, viii. 
87 — qaaniity of water of crystalliza- 
tion, Phillips, vii, 158 — detection in 
lime and limestone, Andrews, vi, 81 
— Engelbach, xxxv, 33 — found in. oats 
and straw, Salm-Horstmar, xxxiii, 
406 — industrial application, Kuhl- 
mann, xxxi, 135 — reaction limit (of 
sulphate of soda and fluosilicic acid), 
Hastings, xiii, 'IQ'i — salts, behavior to 
antimoniate of potash, Wackenroder, 
xvi, 37 — distinction from salts of 
strontia, Moretti, Prel. No. 32. 

AMYGDALATE, Liebig and Woehler, x, 

192. 

and BROMINE, Loewig, ii, 175. 

carbonate, solubility in water, Frese- 

nius, xix, 51 — test for purity, Procter, 

jr., xxiii, 320. 
CHLORATE, preparation, Wittstcin, xvii, 

200— solution, Diehl, jr., xl, 104. 
CHROMATE, decomposed by oxalic 

acid. Slater, xxviii, 345. 
DiGiTALATE, Morin, xvii, 183. 

FORMIATE, Fell, XXX, 221. 

HYPO-PHOSPHO-MESITYLATE, Kane, X, 

208. 

MURIATE. See Barium, chloride. 

oxAMATE, Balard, xiv, 136. 

PBRSULPHOMESiTYLATE, Kane, X, 208. 

SULPHATE, decolorizing power, Filhol, 

xxiv, 239 — manufacture, Pelouze, xxxi, 
Abl-solubility'm sulphuric acid, Struve, 
xlii, 219. 

SULPHO-CAPRYLATE, Bouls, XXvi, 415. 



suLPHO-CARBOLATE, Hoffmann, xlii,, 

133. 

SULPHO-MESITYLATE, Kane, X, 208. 

TARTRATE, Vogcl, jr., and Reischauei\. 

xxxii, 45. 

BASSIA LONGiPOLiii., use of flowers, Han- 
bury, xxxii, 421. 

Parkia, as cosmetic, xxvii, 339. 

BASSORINE. Compare Cerasin. 

yield of mucic acid by nitric acid,, 

Guerin, iv, 165 — properties, etc., Gu6- 
rin, iv, 159 — Guibourt, vi, 48, 50. 

BATEMAN'S drops (W. & B., 1405, note),.. 
V, 26, xi, 70. 

BATH, Barege water, artificial, Paris. 
Hospitals, xiii, 105. 

SULPHUR, artificial, Paris Hospitals,. 

xiii, 105. 

— — water. See Water bath. 

BATTLEY, Liquor opii sedativus; Liquor 
cinchonse. See under Liquor. 

BAUHINEA RACEMOSA for paper-making,, 
xxvii, 42. 

BAUME ANODYNE is Baume tranquille 
made with glycerin. Bakes, xxxiv, 23., 

TRANQUILLE, Bakcs, xxxiv, 22. 

BAY-RUM, source, Maisch (W. & B., 802),. 

xxxiii, 289— oil. See Oleum myrci^., 

ACRIS. 

BDELLIUM, behaviorto camphor, Planche- 
(W. & B., 105), X, 214— source, v,350.. 
See Heudblotia apricana. 

BEANS, amount of starch, Dragendorff,, 
XXXV, 139. 

Calabar. See Calabar beans ; Phy~ 

SOSTIGMA. 

ordeal. See Calabar beans ; Phy- 

SOSTIGMA ; Cebbera Tanghin. 

BEAR'S GREASE. See Grease, bear. 

BE AUME: hydrometeris unreliable, Smith ,^ 
ii, 286 — improved, Smith, Prel. No.] 0. 
Compare Alcoholometer. 

BEAUTIFIER, Phalon's Floral, composi- 
tion, Chandler, xlii, 366. 

BEBEERINA Pelosina, Wiggers; Bux~ 
ina, Fliickiger, xlii, 316 — behavior 
to bichromate of potassa test, 
Jenkins, xxxiii, 528 — preparation,. 
xMcLagan & Tilley (W. & B., 560),xix„ 
113— Planta (W. & B., 560), xxiii, 
377 — properties and composition, Mc- 
Lagan and Gamgee, xli, 453 — McLa- 
gan and Tilley, xix, 115. 

sulphate, preparation. Ph. Britan- 

nica (64), xxxvi, 381 — properties, Ro- 
die, viii, 200. 

PURE, Williams (benzole), xxvi, 43U 

BEBEERU TREE. See Nectandra Ro- 

DI^I, 

BEDFORD SPRINGS. See Water, Bed-, 
ford. 

BEES, ansesthetics, Beauvois, xxvii, 376.. 
464 — in California, xxxviii, 566 — - 
favorite plants, xl, 531 — remedy fa 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



BEES {Continued). 

sting, Guraprecht, xxv, 213 — why do 
they work in the dark, Scheibler, 

xxxvi, 319 — Tomlinson (disproves 
Scheibler's opinion), xxxviii, 239. 

BEE-BREAD as diuretic, Whitmire, 
xxxviii, 56. 

BEESWAX. See Wax, yellow. 

BEECH, charcoal, absorption of ammo- 
nin, Smith, xxxv, 563. 

BEEF-MARROW. See Ox-marrow. 

TEA, Fortnum and Mason's, concen- 
trated, remarks, Brady, xxxviii, 77. 

, Pancoast, preparation, xxxix, 

468. 

BEER, adulteration (molasses and buck- 
bean leaves), Chevallier, xvi, 287 — 
decomposition prevented (flexible dia- 
phragm). Bourne, xxxix, 237 — use of 
glucose, xlii, 414 — picric acid detected, 
Koehler,xli,369 — Lassaigne (not acted 
upon by animal charcoal, nor by ace- 
tate of lead), xxv, 525 — Pohl (dyeing 
of wool), xxviii, 525 — preparation from 
boxwood, iv, 351 — from extract and 
oil of hops, Redtenbacher, xvi, 154 — 
tlrychnia detected, Giaham and Hoff- 
mann, xxv, 172. 

PLANT, California, Procter, jr., xxxii, 

409. 

Jews'. See Beer tar ; Vinum picis. 

Tab, Duhamel, xvi, 281 — Crew (sub- 
stitute), xxvii, 13. See Vinum picis. 

BEET-ROOT, contains rubidium^ Grandeau, 
xxxiv,* 440 — -use of its salts in the 
manufacture of saltpetre, Schwartz, 
xxxiv, 508 — sugar. See Sugar, beet- 
root. See Betain. 

BEHEN, root, Hanbury, xxxiv, 549. 

BE-LAHE, bark, Guibourt, x, 47. 

BELLADONNA, berries, poisoning, 

xxxvii, 75. 

leaves, activity before and after 

flowering. Warren, xxxviii, 47 — effect 
of soil and cultivation, Warren, 

xxxviii, 52 — American and European 
comparative value, Jones, xxiv, 108 
— antidote (iodine), Rioya, xxvii, 534. 
(See under Atropia) — as antigalactic, 
Storraent, xli, 29 — yield of atropia, 
xxxvii, 30 — behavior to caustic alka- 
lies (decomposition of active princi- 
ple, W. & B., 163), Garrod, xxx, 127, 
228, 545 — commercial, contaminated, 
Maisch (W. & B., 162), xxxiv, 123— 
crystals (oxalate of lime), xxxvii, 32 
— spontaneous decomposition, Gille, 
xxvii, 453 — ^juice dialysed, Attfield, 
xxxvi, 530, xxxvii, 207 — influence of 
drying, Schoonbroodt, xli, 320 — per- 
colation with water, packing, Soubei- 
ran, viii, 225 — poisoning, xxix, 318 — 
(Quinby vs. Eckstein), xxxi, 187. See 
mistakes. 



ROOT, yield of atropia, Procter, jr.,. 

xxxvii, 30— poiso7iing. See mistakes. 
BELLADONNIA, preparation, etc., Liibe- 

kind (W. & B.. 162), xiii, 127— re- 
marks, on Liibekind's process, Mayer, 
xxxvi, 235. 

BELLIS perennis, analysis of flowers^ 
Eng., xlii, 320. 

BELUGA, iii, 19. 

BENNE SEED, cultivation, Hagner, vi, 58. 

BENZAMIDE (from oil of wild cherry), 
Procter, jr., ix, 303. 

BENZIDAM,of Zinin ( = anilin), xxxiii, 46,. 
xxxv, 100, note. 

BENZIDINE, Hoffmann, xxxv, 543. 

BENZINE (commercial, so-called; Eupioa 
naphtha), account and properties^, 
xxxiii, 367 — as insecticide (W. & B., 
1472), xxxvi, 421 — action on resins 
and gum resins, Sace, xlii, 243 — dan- 
gerous in varnishes, xxxiv, 185. 

compare Benzole. 

BENZOATES, solubility in water, Otto,, 
xxxv, 29. 

BENZOGEN, Dumas, xi, 136. 

BENZOHELICINE, Piria, xxiv, 241, xxviii,. 
260. 

BENZOICINE, Berthfclot, xxv, 359. 

BENZOIN, benzoic acid, pre-existence, 
Lfjewe, xlii, 369, 406 — yield. Brown,, 
V, 113 — acids (cinnamic, toluylic), 
Kolbe and Lautermann (W. & B., 
166), xxxiii, 320, 378, xxxiv, 256 — 
acid, cinnamic, Aschoff, xxxiv, 257 — • 
behavior to camphor, Planche (W. & 
B., 195), X, 214 — to nitric acid (yields 
oxalic acid), xx, 121, note — entitled 
to entry (per centage), xxv, 302 — in 
perfumery, Piesse, xxvi, 277 — solubility- 
in chloroform, Lepage, xxiv, 147. 

BENZOLE (true benzine), acetylene by in- 
complete combustion, Berthelot, 

xxxviii, 263 — action of nitric acid, 
Kcene, xvii, 262 — use in preparation 
of alkaloids, Williams, xxvi, 337 — 
ansesthetic effects, Mansfield, xxi, 330 ; 
Simpson, xx, 246 — preparation, d'Ar- 
cet (from benzoic acid), x, 176, 177 — 
Church (from coal naphtha, W. & B., 
1471), xxxii, 144 — Kopp, xxxiii, 131 
— Mansfield (coal naphtha, W. & B., 
1471), xxi, 332 — properties, Kopp, 
xxxiii, 131 — Mansfield, xxi, 329 — 
purification, Calvert (sulphuric acid, 
W. & B., 1471), xxvii, 58— Kopp (by 
freezing, W. & B , 1471), xxxvi, 368 
— test for true, Hoffmann, xxxiii, 132 — 
vapor, igniting point, Hutton, xli, 252. 

compare Benzine. 

protoxide, Koene, xvii, 263. 

series in Canadian petroleum, Schor- 

lemmer, xxxvii, 311. 
BENZOLINE (from oil of bitter almonds)^ 

Fownes, xvii, 239. 



46 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



BENZOYLS, PEROXIDE, Brodie, xxxiii, 
113. 

BERBERIDACE^, proximate principles, 
Mayer, xxxv, 97. 

BERBERINA, behavior to bichromate po- 
tassa test, Jenkins, xxxiii, 528 — to 
iodides of cadmium and potassium, 
Marm6, xli, 18 — composition, Buchner, 
V i, 330 — Dyson Perrins ; Fleitmann ; 
Gerhardt, xxxv, 461— /ownrf in Ber- 
beris, Calumba (W. & B., 191), Boed- 
eker, xx, 322, xxxv, 457 — Ccelocline 
polycarpa, Stenhouse, xxxv, 457 — 
Coptis teeta, Perrins, xxxv, 458 — 
Coscinium fenestratum, Perrins, 
xxxv, 457 — Jeffersoniadiphylla, xxxv, 
S9 — Hydrastis canadensis, Mahla, 

xxxiv, 141 — Menispermum canadense, 
Maisch, xxxv, 301 — Oabig bark, 
Mayer, xxxvii, 178 — Podophyllum, 
Mayer, xxxv, 98 — Ptelea trifoliata, 
Speer, xxxix, 337 — Xanthorriza apii- 
folia, Perrins (W. & B., 863), xxxv, 
457 — Xanthoxylura clava Herculis 
(W. & B., 864), xxxv, ^b^— prepara- 
tion^ Buchner and Herberger (from 
Berberis), iii, 173, vii, 328 — Hodgson, 
jr. (from Podophyllum, W. & B., 665), 
iii, 273 — Procter, jr. (from Hydrastis, 
W. & B., 168), xxxvi, \0— salts, Henry, 
xxxiii, 257 — Perrins, xxxv, 459 — 
source, Perrins, xxxv, 456 — test 
(iodine), Perrins, xxxv, 463. 

compare Hydrastia, XAiNTHOPiCRiTE, 

BICHROMATE, Perrius, xxxv, 462. 

binoxalate; bisuccinate ; 

BiTARTRATE, Henry, xxxiii, 258. 
CHLOROAURATE, Henry, xxxiii, 257 ; 

Perrins, xxxv 461. 

FORMIATE, Fell, xxx, 221. 

HYDRiODATE, Henry, xxxiii, 257 ; 

Perrins, xxxv, 463. 
hydrobromate, Henry, xxxiii, 257; 

Perrins, xxxv, 463. 
HYDROCHLORATE, Henry, xxxiii, 258. 

Compare Hydrastine. 

HYDROFERROCYANATE ; HYDRO- 

ferridcyanate, Henry, xxxiii, 257. 

nitrate, Perrins, xxxv, 463. 

piCRATE, Henry, xxxiii, 258. 

and SILVER, hyposulphite, Perrins, 

xxxv, 462. 

BERBERIS VULGARIS, analysis of root, 
Buchner and Herberger, iii, 173. 

BERBINA, of Berzelius (= Vinetina of 
Wacker, Oxyacanthin), xxxiii, 455, 
note. 

BERRIES, Fish. See Cocculus indicus. 

PERSIAN, account, xxxii, 465. 

BERTHOLIMETRY (Indigo test for chlor- 
ine), xix, 276. 

BERTHOLLETIA excelsa, xx, 157. 

BESTQCHEFF'S tincture. SeeTmcTURA, 
Bkstucheff, 



BETA VULGARIS. See Beet-root. 
BETA-CHININ. See Beta-quinia. 
BETA-CINCHONIA, identical with cia- 

chonia (Parrish, 647); Hesse, xxxv, 

54 — preparation, properties, salts (W. 

& B., 292, note), Schwabe, xxxiii, 

173, 417. 

acetate ; hydrochlorate; 

hydriodate ; hydrocyanate ; • 

hydrosulphocyanate ; iodosulphate; 

nitrate ; oxalate ; 

phosphate; sulphate; tar- 

Irate, Schwabe, xxxiii, 174, 420, 

BETA-QUINIA, solubility, Schwabe, 

xxxiii, 174 — identical with Conchinin 
(Hesse, xli, 421). 

BETA-QUINIDIA=Conchinin xli, 421. 
BETAIN, Scheibler, xli, 559. 
BETULA alnus, twist of fibres, Braun, 
xxviii, 67. 

LENTA BARK, coutaius principles ana- 
logous to amygdalin and emulsin, Proc- 
ter, jr., XV, 241 — yields oil of gaulthe- 
ria, iii, 199 — yield of silica, Wilhelmi, 

xxxv, 164 — yield of tannin, Bowman, 
xli, 194. 

LEAVES, amount of silica, Hen- 

rici, xxxv, 164. 
BHANG (Cannabis), xxvii, 360. 
BHESA-BOLL (Sast Indian myrrh), xxv, 

151, note. 

BIBROMOCINCHONIA, Gregory, xxix, 93. 
BIBROMUVERATROL, Merck, xxxiii, 115. 
BICHLOROCINCHONIA, Gregory, xxix, 
92. 

BICARBONATES, alkaline action on al- 
kaloids in presence of tartaric acid, 
Oppermann, xvii, 297. 

BICHATIA VESICULOSA, vi, 44. 

BIGNONIA CATALPA. See Catalpa. 

CHiCA, xvi, 149. 

• COPAIA, as emetic, iv, 284. 

ECHiNATA, fruit presented to Phila- 
delphia College, XV, 314. 

LEucoxYLON (falsc guaiacum wood), 

vii, 259. 

KiTiDUM (= Gelseminum sempervi- 

reos), xxvii, 197. 
TOMENTOSA, its lamp-black used in 

preparation of Indian ink, vi, 175. 
BILE (ox-gall), analysis, Noel, xxxiv, 506 

— behavior to ozone, Gorup-Besanez, 

xxxvi, 168 — tests, Noel (nitric acid), 

xxxiv, 506 — Pettenkofer (sulphuric 
acid and sugar), xvii, 114, xxi, 149 — 
remarks on Pettenkofer's test, Grif- 
fith, xvii, 117. 

Hog, constituents, Strecker, xxxv, 

35. 

Snake, antidote for snake-bites, 

Higgius, xlii, 453, 
BILIRUBIN, test for chloroform, Staede- 

ler, xl, 290. 
BINITROBEiVZOLE, xxxiii, 248. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 47 



BINITROVERATROL, Merck, xxxiii, 115. 

'BINOXYSTRYCHNIA (W. & B., 1356, 
note), Schutzenberger, xxxi, 134. 

BIRCH. See Betula lenta. 

BIRD'S NESTS, i, 151. 

BISCUITS, CHARCOAL, Warren, xxx, 125. 

MEAT, Gail Borden (W. & B., 1554), 

XXV, 225, 228. 

PURGATIVE, Fabre, xxxi, 414. 

VERMIFUGE, Fabre, xxxi, 414. 

.BISMUTH, adhesion to mercury, Guyton, 
vi, 306 — freed from arsenic^ Bird He- 
rapath (caustic potassa and soda, W. 
& B., 1026), XXXV, 145— St. Pierre 
(zinc, W. & B., 1025), xxxiii, 173— 
behavior to weak alkaline solutions, 
Vogel, xi, 81 — to fused chlorate of 
potassa, Boettger, xxx, 70— freed from 
copper (nitre does not remove all 
traces), Wood, xli, 165 — crystalliza- 
tion^ Quesneville, iv, 84 — expansion on 
becoming solid, and its prevention, 
Marx, vi, 84 — estimation (as sulphide), 
Loewe, xxxii, 44 — fusibility^ Riems- 
dyk, xli, 424 — pure, Redwood, xl, 404 ; 
Wood, xli, 167 — slatistics, xxxviii, 87 
— thallium detected, Bird Herapath, 
XXXV, 147 — separation of tin, Woeh- 
ler, xxxix, 440 — volatility, Riemsdyk, 
xli, 424. 

and AMMONIA, CITRATE, Bartlctt (W. 

& B., 1028, note), xxxvii, 1— Tich- 
borne (W. & B., 1028, note), xxxvi, 
161. Compare Liquor bismuthi. 

and BROMINE, Lcewig, ii, 179. 

CARBONATE. See SUBCARBONATE. 

CITRATE, Bartlett (W. & B., 1028, 

note), xxxvii, 2 — Gardner, xli, 220. 

CHROMATE, dccomposed by oxalic 

acid. Slater, xxviii, 345. 

NITRATE. See , SUBNITRA.TE. 

OXIDES, separation from oxides of 

lead, Liebig, iv, 259. 

POWDER (skin), composition. Chand- 
ler, xlii, 369. 

SUBCARBONATE, Hanuon, xxix, 403 — 

Ph. U. S. (60), remarks, Procter, jr., 
xxxvi, 302— Taylor, xxxv, 411. 

SUBNITRATE, adulteration (phosphate 

of lime), detection^ Hornsby, xli, 129 ; 
Howard and Son, xl, 543 ; Redwood, 
xl, 406, 543 ; Roussin, xl, 334, 407— 
contains arsenic, Rogers, xxx, 413 ; 
Morland, xxxii, 169 — behavior to al- 
kaline polysulphides, Schiff, xxxiii, 
265 — as disinfectant, Reiraslagh, xxxv, 
226 — preparation, Becharap and St. 
Pierre, xxxiii, 172 ; Nollenberger, xx, 
17— Ph. U. S. (60), remarks, Procter, 
jr., xxxvi, 302 — Taylor, xxxv, 411 — 
Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix, 312— Ph. 
London (24), Prel. No. 25. 

— , PEPSIN and COPAIBA, Ricord, 

xxxiii, 381. 



TANNATE (Parrish, 467), Cap, xxxii, 

246. 

VALERIANATE (W. & B., 1619), Bamcs, 

xxvi, 10. 

BISSA-BOL, gum resin from Aden, xxv, 
150. 

BISTORT. See Polygonum bistorta. 
BISULPHURET of carbon. See Carbon. 
BITTER DROPS. See Tinctura ignati^e 

AMARiE COMPOSITA. 

of ALOES. See Acid, carbazotic. 

of erythrin, Heeren, iv, 347. 

KiNOvic. See Kinovic bitter. 

Welter's. See Acid, carbazotic. 

EXTRACTS and charcoal, Griffith, viii, 

111. 

substances tasteless (chloroform), 

xxxvi, 313. 

TREE of Texas, Puteguat and Proc- 
ter, jr., xl, 1 5. 

BITTERA febrifuga. See Bytteria. 

BITUMENS, constitution, Boussingault, 
ix, 84. 

ELASTIC, composition, Johnson, xxxiv, 

539. 

SPRINGS in California, xxvii, 377. 

. Compare Asphalt. 

BIXA orellana, fruit presented to Phila- 
delphia College, xvi, 310. 

. Compare Annotta. 

BLACK ANiLiN. See Anilin, black. 

CURRANTS. See Currants, black. 

drop. See Acetum opii. 

dye for kid gloves, xxxvi, 379. 

LEAD. See Graphites. 

STAIN for wood, Karmarsch, xxvii, 429. 

BLANC. French, Piesse, xxviii, 272. 

LIQUID, Piesse, xxviii, 272 

DE PERLE, Piesse, xxviii, 272, 

BLAST at Holyhead, xxx, 277. 

BLASTING (gun-cotton soaked in solu- 
tion of chlorate of potassa), Cald- 
well, xxviii, 4. 

BLEACHING powder. See Calx, chlo- 
rinated. 

. See different headings. 

BLISTERS, camphorated, Deschamps, 
xlii, 511. 

BLISTERING cloth, Garoste, xx, 38. 

PAPER (cantharidin, Parrish, 758), 

xxxiii, 380. 

PREPARATION (bitumcu and powdered 

cantharides), Dupuy, xxvii, 499. 

TISSUE (with canlharidate of pot- 
assa), Delpech, xlii, 242. 

. See Vesicating. 

BLOOD, hydrocyanic acid detected, Schoen- 
bein (peroxide of hydrogen), xli, -i65 
— ashes, composition, xvii, 240 — chem- 
ico-legal analysis, Wittsteiii, xxix, 30 
— change by cod-liver oil and cocoa- 
nut oil, Thompson, xxvi, 421 — decol- 
orizing power (calcined with chalky 
potash; phosphate of lime), Bussy ; 



48 SALTS, SEE UNDER L/ 

BLOOD {Continued). 

(W. & B,, 212), i, 23%— difference be- 
tween that of mammals, birds and 
fishes, Duffield, xxxviii, 47 9 — yield of 
fibrin, Mayer, xxxix, 414 — contains 
fluorine, Nickles, xxix, 312 — specific 
odor by sulphuric acid, Matteucci, vi, 
265 — yield of prussiate of potassa, 
Smith, XX, 172 — quinia in blood, Lan- 
derer, xiv, 352 — recognition in medico- 
legal investigations, Dufifield, xxxviii, 
478 — test (upon linen or cotton), 
Wiehe, xxvi, 527^ — vegetable organ- 
isms, Richardson, xl, 394. 

Dragon's, account, Simmonds, xxix, 

465; Vaughan, xxv, 333— Ph. Edin- 
burgh (30), iii, 259— Wellstedt, xiii, 
84 — analysis,- Herberger (W. & B., 
1511), iii, 262 — behavior to camphor, 
Plaoche (W. & B., 195, note), x, 214 
— loss in powdering, Redwood, xxi, 31 
— solubility in chloroform, Lepage, 
xxiv, 147. 

of FOWLS (contains silicate of pot- 

assa or soda), Henneberg, xix, 153. 

HUMAN. See Blood. 

Salamander's ( = fuming nitric 

acid), xxxvii, 355. 

BLOOD SERUM, analysis of ashes, Leh- 
mann, xxxvii, 114. 

stains, optical properties of weak 

alkaline solutions, Guibourt, xxxiii, 
438 — distinguished from other stains 
(hypochlorous acid), Persoz, xix, 319 
— test (on cotton or linen), Wiehe, 
xxvi, 527. 

BLOOM OF ROSES, Piesse, xxviii, 272. 

YOUTH, Laird, composition, 

Chandler, xlii, 367. 

BLOWPIPE table, xxi, 107. 

BLUE, from buckwheat stalks, iv, 169 — 
from cotton-seed oil, Kuhlmann, 
xxxiv, 188 — from quercetic acid, 
Hlasiwetz, xxxii, 444 — from different 
plants, Dierbach, vi, 72 — from decom- 
posed oscellarias, Esenbeck, viii, 334. 

cobalt, Gaudin, vii, 47. 

PRUSSIAN. See Prussian blue. 

MASS. See PilultE hydrargyri. 

stone. See Cuprum, sulphate. 

BOERHAAVIA hirsuta ; scandens ; 

TUBEROSA, xvii, 82, 83. 

BOHEMERIA for paper-making, xxvii, 42. 

BOILERS, incrustation prevented, Hors- 
ley, xxii, 257. 

BOILING in glass vessels, bumping pre- 
vented: Edwards (silvering inside), 
xxvi, 354 — Miiller (a current of gas), 
xli, 422 — Redwood (silvering inside, 
W. & B., 890), XX, 329— Schumann 
(a bent glass tube), xli, 527 — Winkel- 
hofer (electric current), xli, 422, xlii, 
218 — Wittstein (glass rod or platinum 
wire), xxxi, 348. 



cVTIN NAME OF BASE; 

of mixtures of two, not miscible^ 

liquids, Magnus, x, 231. 
BOLE, ARMENIAN, analysis, Murdoch, xvi^ 
184. 

BOLETUS. Compare Agaricus ; lyco- 

PERDON. 

^NEus ; colopus (heat evolved), 

Smith, xlii, 524. 

cyanbscens, color due to acetate of 

anilin, Phi[)Son, xxxv, 60. 
LARicis, in nightsweats of consump- 
tion, Andral, vii, 87. 
LURiDUS, color due to acetate of ani- 
lin, Phipson, xxxv, 60. 

pachypus, heat evolved, Smith, xlii, 

524. 

BOLUS. See Bole. 

of cubebs, copaiva, turpentine ; 

Puche, xiii, 78. 
BOMBAX MALABRicuM yields boorago 

gum, xxix, 79. 
BOMBYX CYNTHIA (silk worm), imported 
into France, xxvii, 110 — account, 
Guerin, xxxi, 185 — importance, xxxv, 
472. Compare Silkworm. 
HEPTAPHYLLA, fruit presented to Phil- 
adelphia College, XV, 235. 
BONAPARTEA juncoidea for paper-ma- 
king, xxvii, 169. 
BONES, bleaching (exposed moist to the 
sun), xxxii, 180 — colored red, Keller- 
mann, xxix, 262 — analysis, Fremy, 
xxxvii, 256 — -fatty matter, use, Cal- 
vert, xxxvii, 258 — as manure, xxxiii, 
463 — mineral matter, Calvert, xxxvii, 
258 — solubility in water, Woehler, 
xxviii, 443 — superphosphate of decom- 
posed, Wicke, xxix, 80 ; Calvert, 
xxxvii, 260 — different uses, Calvert, 
xxxvii, 255. 
BONE-BLACK, manufacture, Calvert and 
others, xxxvii, 261 — revivification ^ 
Leplay and Cuisinier, (W. & B. 1035, 
note), xxxiv, 551, xxxvii, 263 — Pe- 
louze, (W. & B., 212), xxvii, 110— in 
sugar refining, Wallace, xl, 425. 

ARTIFICIAL (W. & B. 215, coal tar 

and lime), Stenhouse, xxix, 154 — 
(alumenized, (W. & B., 215), Sten- 
house, xxxvii, 262. 

See Charcoal, animal. 

BONPLANDIA tripoliata, on its identity 
with angostura bark tree, Hancock, 
i, 27, ii, 55 — with malambo bark, Bos- 
tock ; Hamilton, xix, 35, note. 
BOOKS. See Reviews. 
BOOKWORMS, xxix, 182. 
BOOKMARKERS, perfumed, Piesse, xxvii, 
467. 

BORAGO, yield of oxalic acid by potassa, 
Persoz, XXX, 552 — percolation with 
waiter, packing, Soubeiran, viii, 226. 
BORASSUS flabelliformis yields sugar* 
de Vrij, xxxvii, 153. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER 

BORAX, adulterations (phosphate of 
soda), and impurities, ii, '242, xxiv. 
271 — manvfacture^ from boracic acid^ 
Koehnke, xvii, 111 — Payen and Car- 
tier (W. & B., 785), iii' 121— Smith, 
iii, 119 — in England, xxxix, 339 — from 
native borate of lime, Grajger, xli, 549 
— solubility in glycerin, Adolphus, 
xxxix, 150 — Klever, xlii, 222 — in 
cracked tongue, Brinton. xxix, 313 — 
and tincture of myrrh, Haselden, 
xxxiii, 161 — different (linen, hair, 
teeih, tea), xxxviii, 565. 

Compare Boron. 

in California, Whitney, xxxviii, 235. 

LAKE in Napa valley, McGowan, 

xxxix, 155. 
BORNEENE, Gerhardt, xxxii, 141. 
BORON, three allotropic states (W. & B., 

787), Woehler and Deville, xxix, 339 

— evolution, Hare, v, 246. 
and POTASSA, tartrate, Soubeiran 

and Capitaine, xii, 36. See Potassa, 

borotartratb ; Tartarus borax- 

atus. 

EOSWELLIA serrata (yields Indian Oli- 
banum), xvi, 189. 

BOTANICAL gardens : Amsterdam ; 
Bern, Procter, jr., xl, 234, 232— Brit- 
ish Colonies, xxxvi, 32 7 — Brussels, 
Procter, jr , xl, 234 — Calcutta, de- 
stroyed, xxxviii, 165 — Dresden, Proc- 
ter, jr., xl, 233 — Edinburgh, Parrish, 
xxxi, 103; Procter, jr., xl, 237— Kew; 
Munich; Naples; Paris; Vienna; 
Zurich, Procter, jr., xl, 231, 23J, 233, 
235. 

INQUIRIES and desiderata, Hooker 

and Hanbury, xxxii, 49. 

PRESS, Peters, viii, 99. 

BOTANY in Canada, xli, 126. 

Chinese, xxix, 563. 

its study urged, xxv, 210 — in U. S., 

Procter, jr., xxxviii, 334, note — ob- 
ligatory, Procter, jr., xxxviii, 480. 

and pharmacy, Procter, jr., xl, 228; 

See Pharmacy, Pennsylvania. Phil- 
adelphia College. 

BOTRYOS. b'ee Chenopodium. 

BOTRYTIS INFESTANS, fungus of potato 
blight, xxvi, 75. 

BOTTLES gelatin capsules, Haselden, 
xxxviii, 248. 

cod liver oil, cleansed, Procter, jr., 

xl, 509. 

shop, effects of different colors on 

contents, Smith, xxxvi, 76— Hunt, 
xix, 144 — Dumey, xxxiii, 411. 

packing (with India rubber rings), 

xl, 83. 

BOULE de mars, xiv, 224. 

BOULLAY'S FILTER, observations, Dulia- 

mel, X, 1. See Percolation. 
BOULTON's solution, xl, 329. 



THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 49 

BOUNDOU (poison tree of the Gabonese), 
properties, Pecholier and St. Pierre, 
xxxix, 124. 

BOUQUE rS, Piesse, xxvii, d' amour, 177— 
Buckinyham palace, 178 — Caprice de la 
mode, 275 — de Caroline, 178 — des Del- 
ices, 118— Ess, 179 — Esterhazy, 179 — 
ficur d^ Italic, 181 — Jleun de val d'An- 
dorre, 177 — Flora, 181 — the Guards, 
18\— Jockey club, 181— (xxxix, 370) 
— Kcio gardens, 274 — Mar^chale, 275 — 
May flowers, 275 — Montpellier, 275 — 
all Nations, 275 — naval, 275 — Neptune, 
275 — Court nosegay, 178 — de la Reine, 
275 — Piesse posey,B'^Q bouquet royale — 
Rifle volunteers' garland, see Windsor 
Castle bouquet — du Roy, 275 — Rondele- 
tia, 275 — Royale, 276 — royal Osborne, 
215— Spri?ig flowers, 276 (xxxix, 370) 
—Suave, 216— Tulip {due van Thol), 
277 — Violette du bois, 2 77 — Windsor 
Castle, 211— Yacht club, 27 7. 

See Essences ; Esprits. 

BOVISTA GiGANTEA, growth of cells, xxv, 
74. 

BOXWOOD, substitute for hops, Dupetit 
Thouars, iv, 351. 

CHARCOAL, absorption of ammonia, 

carbonic acid, cyanogen, Smith, 
XXXV, 563. 

BRAHEE SUGAR. See Sugar, Brahee. 

BRAIN, behavior to sugar solution, 
Bouchardat, xvi, 226 — preserved (sul- 
phate of zinc). Falconet, xxiv, 170. 

BRAN, yield of oxalic acid by potassa, 
Persoz, XXX, 552. 

• utility in bread, Saucerotte, xxviii, 

565. 

BRANDY, adulteration, Chevallier, xvi, 
293, see origin — per centage of alco- 
hol, Duffield, xxxiv, 120— Pile (U. S., 
60), xxxviii, 324 — genuine contains 
aldehyde, Lahens, xxvii, 111 — analysis, 
Duffield, xxxiv, 118 — detection of cop- 
per, Boettger, xxvi, 86 — of oil of bit- 
ter almonds, Duffield, xxxiv, 121 — 
origin of adulterated, Molnar ; Duf- 
field, xxxiv, \20~- statistics, xli, 554 — 
strength, see alcohol — igniting point of 
vapor, Hutton, xli, 253. 

Catawba, Procter, jr., xxvi, 413 — 

Wayne, xxvii, 494 — Zimmermann, 
xxxi, 363. 

BRASS, behavior to weak alkaline solu- 
tions, Vogel, jr., xi, 82 — dull black 
color, Leykauf, xxvi, All— silvered, 
Boudier, xxxii, 224 — watered (Moire), 
V, 172. 

BRASSES, COAL. See Coal brasses. 
BRASSICA oleracba, yields blue color, 
vi, 73. 

BRAYERA anthelmintica. See Koo£S3. 
BRAZIL nut tree (Bertholletia excelsa), 
account, xx, 157. 



50 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



BREAD, adulteration^ Chevallier, xvi, 284 
— bran, utility, Saucerotte, xxviii, 565 
— for diabetic patients, Percy, xxi, 242 
— chemical substitute iov fermentation, 
Henry ; Whiting, xxvi, 42 — Thomson, 
xxTi, 43 — Sewell, xxvi, 44 — Jones, 
xxvi, 45 — Philadelphia bread an- 
alysed, Fischer and Tyson, vii, 107 — 
Wetherill, xxvii, 441 — whole meal 
bread, McCormac, xxxix, 173. 
• BREATH, F(ETiD, xxxiii, 570, xxxiv, 188, 

HUMAN (organic substances), in 

health and disease, Ransome, xlii, 
254. 

BREWSTOLINE, Dancer, xl, 370. 

BRINE (meat), utilization by dialysis, 
Whitelaw, xxxvi, 354, 372 — poisonous 
character, Reynal, xxviii, 534. 

(salt) from East Saginaw, analysis, 

Chilton, XXXV, 262. 

BRINES, contain iodine, xxvi, 441. 

BROMALHYDRAT, physiological effects, 
Steinauer, xlii, 526. 

BROMIDES, alkaline, preparation, Mayer 
(W. & B., 1297, note; Parrish, 337), 
xxxiv, 289, 294. 

preparation, Klein (Liebig's process 

for iodides), xxxvi, 111. 

BROMINE, absorption by vegetable char- 
coal, Schcenbein, xx, 243 — action on 
alkaloids, Blengini,, vi, 334 — antidote 
to alkaloids (when uncombined), 
Donn6, ii, 83 — American, Patrick, 
xviii, 95 — antidote, see foisoning — 
a^om?c weight, Liebig; Loewig, ii, 95 
— combinations, Loewig, ii, 89, 169 — 
distinction from iodine and chlorine 
(permanganate of potassa test unre- 
liable), McDonald, xli, 393 — estimation, 
Heine, xviii, 195 — Reimann, xxxiii, 
220 — found in gas liquor, Mene, xxvi, 
440 — in cod liver oil, de Jonghe, xxi, 
144 — in American and Canadian pot- 
ashes (due to salt), Procter, jr., xxv, 
67 — in Chili saltpetre, Griineberg, 
xxvi, 161 — manufacture, Bussy, ix, 234 
— Delaunay, Couturier and Villedieu, 
xviii, 226 — poisoning, antidote, Maisch 
(sulphuretted hydrogen), xxxix, 334, 
note — Duffield (steam vapor), xxxix, 
333 — is a simple body (demonstrated 
by the galvanic pile), de la Rive, ii, 
90 — solubility in bichloride of tin, 
Gerardin, xxxiii, 214 — chloroform, 
Lepage, xxiv, 147 — in glycerin, Adol- 
phus, xxxix, 150 — in liquid anhy- 
drous sulphurous acid, Sestini, xli, 
328 — specific gravity, Balard ; Loewig, 
ii, 94 — statistics, Chandler, xlii, 427 — 
tests, Bill (chloride of gold), xl, 272 
— Henry and Humbert (formation o1 
bromide of cyanogen), xxix, 449. 

CHLORIDES, Loewig, ii, 103, 104. 

HYDRATE, Loewig, ii, 95. 



HYDROCHLORATE, Loewig, ii, 104. 

SOLUTION, Loewig, ii, 95. 

, Smith (W. k B., 174), xxxv,. 

202. 

BROMOCINCHONIA, Gregory, xxix, 92. 
BROMOPICRIN, xlii, 449. 
BROMOSAMIDE, Piria, xi, 157. 
BRONZE, from Brazil wood and logwood, 

Denzer, xxvi, 420. 
POWDERS (green, orange, red, violet,, 

white, yellow), Koenig, xxx, 356. 
BRO>ZING, Weil, xxxviii, 176. 
BROUSSONETIA papyrifera for paper 

making, xxvii, 42. 

TiNCTORiA. See Fustic. 

BROWN color from quercitrin, Hlasiwetz^ 

xxxii, 444. 

BRUCEA ANTIDYSENTERICA ; FERBU— 

GiNEA, supposed identity with false 
Angostura bark tree, O'Shaugnessy, 
X, 144. 

BRUCIA, BEHAVIOR to bicarbonate of soda 
in presence of tartaric acid, Opper- 
mann, xvii, 299 — to bichromate potassa 
test, Jenkins, xxxiii, 528 — to chlorine^ 
Pelletier, x, 165 — to chlorine and am- 
monia, Andr6, viii, 213 — to iodides of 
cadmium and potassium, Marm6, xli, 
18 — to iodohydrar gyrate of potassium, 
Mayer {^N. & B., 1542), xxxv, 21, 23; 

xxxvi, 218 — to nitric acid, Guy, xxxiii, 
526; Laurent (formation of cacothe- 
line), xix, 237, XX, 115; Rosengarten, 
XX, 114 — to nascent oxygen, March- 
and, xvi, 201 — to pentachlortde of an- 
timony and phosphoric acid, Schulze, 
xxxii, 235 — to perchloric acid, Bul- 
lock, xxxvii, 21 — to hot sulphuric- 
acid ; and with permanganate of po- 
tassa, Guy, xxxiii, 526 — to tannin, 
Henry, vii, 2 28, 230 — to protochloride 
of tin, Andre, viii, 213 — to reagents, 
Fresenius, xxxviii, 549. See tests — 
composition, Regnault, xi, 219— -in di- 
alysis, Grandeau, xxxvi, 415 — found 
in woorari, Oberdoerffer, xxxii, 42 — 
oxidation, Schoenn, xlii, 521 — physio- 
logical action modified by iodide of 
methyl. Brown ; Frazer, xl, 442 — 
Stahlschmidt (W. & B., 1357, note), 
xxxii, 220 — preparation, Henry (tan- 
nin process), vii, 233 — Horsley (with- 
out alcohol, W. '& B.. 1352, note), 
xxviii, 553 — solubility in alcohol. Cap- 
and Garot, xxvii, 159 — in chloroform, 
Lepage, xxiv, 147 ; Pettenkofer, xxxi,. 
232; Schlimper, xxxii, 160— in gly- 
cerin, Adolphus, xxxix, 150; Klever, 
xlii, 222; Cap and Garot, xxvii, 159 
— in olive oil, Attfield, xxxv, 250 ; 
Cap and Garot, xxvii, 159; Petten- 
kofer, xxxii, 185 — in water. Cap and 
Garot, xxvii, 159 — sublimed, Helwig, 

xxxvii, 29, xxxix, 539— subliming- 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



51 



BRUCIA, BEHAVIOR [Continued). 

temperature, Guy, xl, 247 — test (pro- 
tochloride of tin), Andre, viii, 213 — 
Horsley (bichromate of potassa test), 
xxviii, 549, See behavior, 

BiTANNATE, Henry, vii, 231. 

CHLORATE, Scrullas, ii. 305. 

CHLORIDE, Pelletier, x, 165. 

FORMIATE, Fell, XXX, 220. 

lODATE, Serullas, ii, 302. 

BRYONIA ALBA, analysis of root, Walz, 
xxxi, 249 — influence of drying^ 
Schoonbroodt, xli, 322 — poisoning^ x, 
83. 

MECHOACANA NIGRICANS, Bauhin, is 

Jalap, ii, 23, v, 341, vi, 118. 

BRYONIN, preparation, etc., Mouchon 
(W. & B. 1478), xxviii, 166— Walz, 
xxxi, 249. 

BRYONITIN, Walz, xxxi, 249— existence 

denied, Cucuel, xxxiv, 333. 
BRYORETIN, Walz, xxxi, 251. 
BUBON GALBANUM, iii, 262, xv, 29. See 

Galbanum. 

6UMMIPERUM, XV, 29. See Galbanum. 

BUBULLV (from cow-dang), Morin, vi, 83. 
BUCCINUM UNDATUM, its eggs contain 

no iodine, Fyfe, Stratingh, Sarphati, 

xxvi, 440. 

BUCEU, adulteration, Maiscb, xxxvi, 101 
— analysis, Brandes, xxvi, 484 — Cadet 
(W. & B., 175), xxvi, 485— its phar- 
macy, Rittenhouse, xxvi, 484 — loss in 
powdering, Covell, xxxix, 116 — com- 
parative value (W. & B., 175), Bed- 
ford, xxxvi, 129. 

BUCKBEAN. See Menyanthes tripoliata. 

BUCKTHORN. See Rhamnus catharti- 
cus. 

BUCKWHEAT, blue color from stalks, iv, 
169, vi, 73 — as food, analysis, Pierre, 
xxx, 426. 

BUENA, sestivation, Don, xi, 247 — character, 
etc., DeCandoUe, ii, 240 — Wood, iii, 
24, 25, 27. 



' ACUMINATA, ii, 241. 

HEXANDRA, ii, 241, 290 ; vii, 334. 

obtusifolia, ii, 241. 

BUG hospital, India, xxxi, 84. 

BUGIKRA gymnorrhiza, supposed to 
yield monesia, xiii, 152. 

BUMPING of liquids. See Boiling in 
glass vessels. 

BUNDAROO (Hymenodycton excelsum)^, 
ii, 294. 

BURDOCK. See Lappa. 

BURNS, remedy, carbolic acid, Squibb, 
xli, 361 — coUodium, Liman, xxiii, 
182 — glycerin, Fuchs, xli, 418 — liquid- 
caoutchouc, xxviii, 182. See Lini- 
ment. 

BURSERA gummifera, supposed to yield 

Simaruba bark, viii, 21. 

. See Caranna. 

BURSERINA (in balsam mecca), Bonas- 

tre, iv, 234. 
BUTEA FRONDOSA yields kino, Cbristison, 

XXV, 241. 

BUTOMACE^, dehiscence of pollen, Al- 
dridge, xiii, 216. 

BUTTER, composition, Heintz, xxvi, 150 — 
estimation in milk, Marchand, xxviii, 
475 — fusing point, Wimmel,xli, 22,431 
— rancidity removed. Wild, xxvi, 120 
— as reagent for copper, Lancelot, 
xxxvi, 370. 

of CACAO. See Cacao-butter. 

KoKUM. See Kokum butter. 

of PARSLEY. See Parsley. 

BUTYLE (from coal-tar), xxxiii, 41. 

BUTYRIN, Pelouze, xxv, 358. 

BUTYRUM. See Butter. 

BUXIN (is Wiggers' Pelosina, Mclagan's- 
Bebeerina), Fliickiger, xiii, 316 — crys- 
tallized, Couerbe, vi, 177. 

BUXUS. See Boxwood. 

BYTTERA (ria) febrifuga, Gerardias,. 
xxix, 332. 

BYTTERINA, identical with quassit, Ge- 
rardias, xxix, 336. 



C. See K. 

CABBAGE juice, dialysed, Attfield, xxxvi, 
530, xxxvii, 208, 

CACAO (bean), analysis, Mitscherlieh 
(W. & B , 603), xxxiv, 509— Tuchen, 
xxxii, 544. See Theobroma cacao. 

butter, account, Duhamel, xiii, 16 — 

fusing point, Wimmel, xli, 23, 423 — 
neutral principle (stearin?), Boutin, 
vi, 352. 

, MEDICATED, Bringhurst, xxxix, 

348. 



CACHOU di Bologna, xxv, 366 ; Dorvault,. 

xviii, 158 ; Schmitz, xvi, 239. 

NUT. See Anacardium occidentale. 

CACODYL, xvii, 266 ; Cahours, xxxv, 307 

— behavior to chlorine, Baeyer, xxxv, 

310. 

CACOTHELINE, composition, Laurent; 
Rosengarten, xx, 116 formation,, 

xix, 237, XX, 115. 

CACOUCIA cocciNEA, account, Griffitbp, 

iv, 186, 
CACTUS iNDicus, xiii, 138. 



52 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



OADMIUM, behavior to weak alkaline so- 
lutions, Vogel, jr., xi, 81 — separation 
from copper^ Holfinann, xxxiii, 312 — 
estimation (as sulphide), Loewe, xxxii, 
44 — fusing aud volatilizing point, 
Brandes, Daniel, xxxiii, 149; Over- 
man, xxxiii, 149 ; Riemsdjk, xli, 424 ; 

Webster, xxxiii, 149 properties, 

Wood, xxxiii, 148 — subliming tempe- 
rature, Guy, xl, 249. 

ALLOTS, Wood, xxxiii, 150. 

SALTS, behavior to alkaline polysul- 

phides, Scbiff, xxxiii, 265. 

CARBONATE, poisouing, Soret, xxx, 

401. 

IODIDE, xxix, 83 — Garrod (W. & B., 

176), xxx, 79. 

LACTATE, Lepage, xvi, 54. 

and POTASSIUM, iodide (test for alka- 
loids), Marm6, xli, 18. 

SULPHATE (cadmium and sulphate of 

copper, W. & B., 1030), xxxiv, 240— 
Ph. U. S (60), remarks, Procter, jr., 
xxxvi, 303 — in eye-water, Fronmiiller 
(W. & B., 1030), xxiii, 274. 

suLPHURETjfor dj'eingsilk, Lassaigne, 

iii, 264. 

C^SALPINIA coRiARiA, viii, 106. 

€-^SlUM, notice, Bunsen and Kirchoif, 
xxxiii, 162, xxxiv, 68 — from mother- 
liquor of table salt, Boettger, xxxvi, 
108. 

bicarbonate ; carbonate ; 

chloride; hydrate; nitrate, 

Bunsen, xxxiv, 68. 

PLATiNO-CHLORiDE, solubility in wa- 
ter, Crookes, xxxvi, 144. 

SULPHATE, Bunsen, xxxiv, 68. 

GAFFP]A. See Coffee. 

CAFFEACEJi: constituents, Rochleder, 
XXV, 246. 

CAFFEIDINA (Parrish, 640), Strecker, 
xxxvi, 20, 34. 

CAFFEINA, compare Theina antidote 

to opium (W. & B., 181), Campbell, 
xxxii, 321 — behavior to bichromate 
potassa test, Jenkins, xxxiii, 528 — to 
nascent hydrogen, Rochleder, xxxix, 
319 — to pentachloride of antimony 
and phosphoric acid, Schulze, xxxii, 
138, 236— to sulphuric acid and per- 
manganate of potassa, Guy, xxxiii, 
526 — decomposition, Strecker, xxxv, 34 
— physiological action, Albers, xxvii, 
108 — preparation, Henr^' (tannin pro- 
cess), vii, 235 — Leuchsenring (by 
sublimation, W. & B., 178), xxvii, 225 
— Ph.Hannover. (by sublimation), XXV, 
472 — Puccetti (caustic lime and alco- 
hol), xxviii, 232 — Versmann (caustic 
lime and alcohol, W. & B., 178), xxiv, 
176, xxvii, 225, note — Vogel (ben- 
zole, W. & B., 178), xxx, 403— from 
Paraguay tea^ Stahlschmidt, xxxiv, 36 



— from theobromin, Strecker (Parrish, 
640), xxxiii, 406 — solubility in ben- 
zole, xlii, 432 — in chloroform, Ber- 
natzic, xl, 252; Schlimper, xxxii, 160 — 
test (iodide of potassium and mercury, 
W. & B , 179), Delffs, xxvii, 272— 
yield from coffee, Graham, etc., xxix, 
375 ; Robiquet and Boutron, ix, 232. 

ARSENiTE, Gastinel, xxxv, 335. 

CITRATE, Hannon, xxiii, 158. 

TANNATE, iu Guaraua, Dechasteles, 

xiii, 53. 

CAHINCA. See Kahinca. 

CAJEPUTENE (W. & B., 578), Schmidt, 
xxxiii, 545 (monohydratb, bihtdrate, 
bichloride). 

CAINCA. See Kahinca. 

CALABAR BEAN, account, Hanbury, xxxv, 
316 — its alkaloid, Mayer, xxxvii, 173 
— antidote to atropia, Kleinwachter, 

xxxvii, 302 experiments, Haigh, 

xxxvii, 174 poisoning (Liverpool 

case), xxxvi, 497. 

. See Physostigmia. 

CALADIUM piNNATiPiDUM, heat developed, 

vi, 266. 

CALAGIRAH (Vernonia anthelmintica), 
vermifuge of India, Virey, ix, 32. 

CALAGULA root, xxiv, 272. 

CALAMINE, a(fMZ^«ra//on, Brett, ix, 72; Mur- 
doch, xvi, 182; Thomson, xi, 169— 
analysis, Bringhurst (W. & B., 1483), 
xxix, 308 — test for purity, Procter, jr., 
xxiii, .020. 

CALAMUS, analysis, TrommsdorfF (W. & 
B., 182), V, 269— of the Ancients (Gen- 
tiana chirayta), Guibourt, xii, 23 — 
description, Griffith, v, 265 — prepara- 
tions, Maisch, xxxii, 112. 

CALCARIA. See Calx; Limb. 

CALCIUxM. Compare Calx; Lime. 

crystallized, Becquerel, iv, 348 ; 

Muratori, viii, 87. 

bromide, Mayer, xxxiv, 295. 

and BROMINE compounds, Lojwig, ii, 

175, 176. 

CHLORIDE, preserved dry in tinfoil, 

Baudrimont, xlii, 435 — reaction limit 
(for sulphuric acid), Hastings, xiii, 
202 — reduction of temperature by so- 
lution, Rudorff, xli, 426. 

CHLORIDE and carbonate of LIME, 

double salt, Fritsche, xxxiii, 407. 
FLUORIDE, decomposed by oxalic 

acid. Slater, xxviii, 345. 
IODIDE, Henry, i, 203 ; Mayer, xxxiv, 

294; Pidduck, xxx, 259. 
MANGANiTE, Wcldon ; Gorgrew, xli, 

541. 

PHOSPHIDE, Andrews, xxxi, 560 ; 

Smith, v, 94. 
SULPHIDE (sulphuret), crystallized, 

Riegel, xviii, 237 — for itch, Lutens, 

vii, 263 — Bourguignon (W. & B., 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



53 



CALCIUM, SULPHIDE [Continued). 

1607), xxix, 82 — preparation, Deherde 
(W. & B., 1607), vii, 263— Pricp, 
xxvi, 77 — Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix, 
313 — for grape disease, Price, xxvi, 76 
— solubility in glycerin, Adolphus, 
xxxix, 150; C?ip and Garot, xxvii, 
159 ; Klever, xlii, 222 — in water. Cap 
and Garot, xxvii, 159. 

CALCULI, URiNAHy, composition, Bastil- 
liat, xiii, 349. 

CALIFORNIA, climate, Bartlett, xxix, 177 
— indigenous medical plants, Simmons, 
xxvi, 481 — mammoth trees, xxvi, 470. 

CALISAYA compare Bark (Cinchona) ; 
Cinchona. 

alta, xxxviii, 422 ; amarilla, xxii, 

106 ; xxxviii, 4i2 ; anaranjada, 

xxii, 106 ; arollada, iii, 110 ; 

blanca, xxxviii, 422 ; canuto, xxvi, 

541, 543 ; chargue, xxvi, 541,543; 

dorada, xxii, 106; macha, 

xxii, 106; morada, xxxviii, 421, 

422; negra, xxii, 106; plan- 

cha, iii. 111; de Quito, iii, 114; 

tabla, xxvi, 541 ; vera, xxii, 97 ; 

verde, xxxviii, 422 ; zamba, 

xxii, 106. 

CALLA aquatilis (Symplocarpus fce- 
tidus), viii, 1. 

CALLICOCCA ipecacuanha, iii, 184 — 
analysis, Pelletier, iii, 188. See Ipe- 
cacuanha. 

CALLITRIS (Australia), yields sandarac, 
xxviii, 73. 

CUPRESSIPORMIS ; VERRUCOSUS, 

yield resin, xxxv, 453. 
CALOMEL, adulteration; sulphate of 
baryta, Moritz, viii, 346 ; Thomson, 
xi, 169 — white precipitate, Thomson, 

xi, 169 — corrosive sublimate. Hart, 
vii, 7 ; T. & H. Smith, xi, 222— (Eng- 
lish calomel), xxxviii, 88 — behavior to 
ammonia, Kane, ix, 258 — to vegeta- 
ble acids (W. & B., 1161), Bauwens, 
xxviii, 527 — to alkaline chlorides 
(W. & B., 1161), Fleming, xxix, 391 
— conversion into corrosive sublimate, 
by chlorides, Mialhe (W. &B., 1160), 

xii, 167 ; Lepage, xv, 128 — by water, 
alcohol and heat (W. & B., 1160), 
Berthe, xxix, 171 — decoloriziyig power, 
Filhol, xxiv, 239 — preparation: pre- 
cipitated, Woehler (W. & B., 1159), 
xxvi, 419 — sublimed: Calvert (by 
steam), xv, 93 — Soubeiran (by cold 
air), XV, 89— Ph. U. S (30), ii, 329 
—Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix, 314— 
Ph. London (24), Prel. No. 20— dif- 
ference in properties according to 
method of preparation, Howard, xv, 
159 — Mialhe and others, ix, 178 — 
prohibited in the U. S. army, Ham- 
mond, xxxv, 329 — solubility in gly- 



cerin. Cap and Garot, xxvii, 159 — 
«M6Zimm^ temperature, Guy, xl, 246 — 
test for purity, Procter, jr., xxiii, 109. 

CALOMEL, IODIDE, Gobley (Parrish, 484), 
xxx, 168 — Maisch, xxxix, 475. 

CALORESCENCE, Tyndall, xxxvii, 219. 

CALORIC, electricity, ponderable bodies, 
analogy of, West, vi, 229. 

CAL( TROPIS GiCxANTEA. See Mudar. 

CALOTYPE, Talbot, xiii, 247. 

CALTHA PALUSTRis, xli, 437. 

CALUMBA (Columbo), contains berberina, 
Boedeker, xx, 322, xxxv, 457 — crys- 
tals (oxalate of lime), xxxvii, 32 — 
description of plant, Griffith, vii, 190 
— distinction from Frasera root, Stolze 
(W. & B., 191), iii, 271— loss m pow- 
dering. Redwood, xxi, 31 — tasteless 
(by charcoal), Weppen, xviii, 203. 

CALURUS AURicEPS, red coloring matter 
of feathers, Bogdonow, xxx, 166. 

CALX (Calcaria, Lime), compare Cal- 
cium. See Limb. 

ACETATE, drying, Pliicker, xxiii, 53 

— manufacture, xxiii, 50. 

achilleate, Zanon, xix, 59. 

BENzoATE, solubility in water, Otto, 

xxxv, 30. 

bisulphite, as antiseptic, Polli, xxxiv, 

447— Scott, xl, 81. 

borate, Graeger, xli, 549. 

and bromine, Loewig, ii, 176. 

carbolatb (so-called), Squibb, xli, 

355. 

carbonate, compare Limestone j 

Chalk. 

, formed in aqueous solution of 

lime in sugar,Pelouze, iv, 260 — prepa- 
ration pure, Graeger, xl, 312 — solu- 
bililyin syrup of lime, Barreswil, xxiv, 
79 — in water, Fresenius, xix, 51. 

carbonate and chloride of calcium 

(double salt), Fritzsche, xxxiii, 407. 
. carbonica precipitata, adulteration 
(plaster Paris), Maisch, xxvi, 211 — 
Stabler, xxii, 307 — preparation, Greg- 
son (from dolomite), xviii, 231 — in 
finest powder. Bridges (from boiling 
solution (W. & B., 1030), xvi, 161— 
test for purity, Procter, jr., xxiii, 318.. 
See Calx, carbonate, 
chlorinated, action of water, Frese- 
nius (W. & B., 187), xxxiv, 260— 6c- 
havior to animal charcoal, Graham, 
iii, 153 — constitution, Fresenius (W. 
& B., 187), xxxiv, 260; compare hy- 
pochlorites — spontaneous decomposi- 
tion, Hoffmann, xxxiii, 72 — keeping 
dry, xlii, 299 — estimation, Calvert (ar- 
senious acid), xix, 279 — Davy (ferro- 
cyanide and bichromate of potassi- 
um), xxxiii, 348 — Mercer (ferrocyanide 
of potassium), xxxiii, 347 — Mciellner 
(hyposulphite of soda; and baryta), 



54 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



CALX, CHLORINATED [Continued). 

xxviii, 61 — WittsteiQ and Claude 
(sulphate of iron method unreliable, 
W. & B., 188), xxviii, 359— as insec 
ticide, xxxiv, 364 — preparation and 
manufacture, Glasgow, xiii, 208 — 
(chloride of chromium as source of 
chlorine), xxxiii, 483 — Durand, i, 
277, 278— Schrader (W. & B._, 186, 
note), XXXV, 546 — reaction limit (for 
oxalate of ammonia), Hastings, xiii, 
203. 

DiGiTALATE, Morin,. xvii, 183. 

HYPOPHOSPHITE, adulteration, cause 

of explosion, preparation, etc., Jans- 
sen, xxxiv, 162 — preparation, Procter, 
jr. (W. & B., 1531), XXX, 118— Scheffer 
(Parrish, 398), xxx, 222. 

HYPOSULPHITE, Lancau (W. & B., 

1532), XXXV, 223. 

MALATE, from berries of Sorbus au- 

cuparia, Kohl, xxviii, 351 — from su- 
mach berries, Rogers (W. & B., 711, 
note), vii, 56. 

MBTAGUMMATB (Cerasiu), Gelis, xxv, 

39— Fremy, xxxii, 368. 

OXALATE, crystals of various plants, 

xxxvii, 31. 

PBKSULPHOMESiTYLATE, Kane, X, 207, 

208. 

PHOSPHATE, administration car- 
bonic acid), Antisel, xxvi, 364 — (car- 
bonate of lime and sugar of milk), 
Kilchenmeister, xxviii, 366 — adultera- 
tion Hodgson, jr., x, 27 — decolorizing 
power, Filhol, xxiv, 23d— Ph. Dublin 
(26), iii, 325. 

and POTASSA, sulphate (double salt), 

Phillips, xxiii, 343. 

saccharated, compare Syrupus cal- 

cis. 

, Beral (W. & B, 1197), xiii, 

173— Cleland (Parrish, 400), xxxii, 
167— Squibb, xxxix, 335; xl, 158— 
Trousseau (W. & B , 1197, note), xxv, 
468. 

and SODA, borate. See Tinkalzite. 

sulphate (Plaster Paris), compare 

GYPSUM. 

, solubility in muriatic acid, 

Johnson, xxxv, 465 — in sulphuric 
acid, Struve, xiii, 319 — in syrup, 
Sostmann, xl,333. 

SULPHITE, PoUi, xxxiv, 447. 

SULPHOCARBOLATE, Procter, jr., xiii, 

136. 

SULPHOMKSITYLATE, Kane, X, 208. 

SUPERPHOSPHATE, volumetric analysis, 

Jones, xxxvii, 345 — manvfacture Cal- 
vert, xxxvii, 260 — Wicke, xxix, 80. 

tartrate, found in senna leaves, 

Casselmann, xxviii, 53 — reduces ni 
trate of silver, Casselmann, xxviii, 54 
— preparation, Firmin, xxvi, 329 — 



Gatty, xxvi, 336 — solubility in water, 
Casselmann, xxviii, 54. 

CALYCANTHUS Florida, as emetic, iv, 
277— as tonic, v, 286. 

CAMBOGIA gutta, xx, 126. See gam- 
boge. 

CAMERARIA latipolia, fruit presented 

to Philadelphia College, xv, 236. 
CAMPANULA rotundifolia, yields blue 

color, vi, 72. 
CAMPHENE congelation, Faraday, xvii, 

22 — formation, Berthelot, xxxi, 73. 
CAMPHENIC series, Berthelot, xxxi, 73. 
CAMPHOL (from camphor), Berthelot, 

xxxi, 74 — (from coal tar), Mansfield, 

xxi, 48. 

CAMPHOR, compare different essential 
OILS ; see Laurus Camphora ; Dryo- 
balanops Camphora. 

action, on resins and gum resins, 

Planche (W. & B., 195, note), x, 212 
— upon the hearty Lombard, ix, 261 — 
adulteration (artificial, W. & B., 196), 
Dumont, xxxiv, 189 — behavior to pen- 
tachloride of phosphorus, Pfanndler, 
xxxiii, 218 — to permanganate of po- 
tassa, Cloez and Guignet, xxxi, 81 — 
collection, de Vriese, xxiv, 339 — com- 
position, Dumas, x, 21 — Liebig, iv, 
347 — from the tops of a species of 
Blumia, McClelland (W. & B., 192), 
xvi, 56 — in mixtures, Hodgson, jr. 
(with myrrh), iv, 13— T. & H. Smith 
(by chloroform, W. & B., 198), xxi, 
374 — its place in the constitution of 
essential oils, Procter, jr., x, 22 — pre- 
vents oxidation, Wellborn, xli, 30 — in 
pills (plasma), xiii, 208 — Githens 
(soap and honey), xxxiii, 206 — pow- 
dering (with dry magnesia), xiii, 505 
— Fish (with magnesia), xxxiii, 68; 
xiii, 505, note — (with cold water, 
and then sift), xxxiii, 381 — cause of 
rotary motion, Matteucci, vi, 174 — 
solubility in liquid carbonic acid, 
Gore, xxxiii, 328 — in glycerin, Cap 
and Garot, xxvii, 160 — in water, Mar- 
koe, xxxvii, 195 — makes corrosive 
sublimate more soluble in alcohol and 
ether, Karls, i, 158 — subliming tem- 
perature, Guy, xl, 249. 

artificial, Procter, jr., xvii, 312. 

BORNEO, account. Ph. Edinburgh 

(30), iii, 257 — source, v, 176. 

and bromine, Loewig, ii, 188. 

fluid, Murray (W. & B., 1001), xx, 

105. 

FORMOSA, Swinhoe, xxxvi, 31. 

ice. Bakes, xxxix, 5 — Piesse, xxviii, 

85. ' 

MALAY, Yvan, xvii, 219. 

SASSAFRAS. See Oleum sassafras. 

SUMATRA, de Vriese, xxiv, 329. 

turpentine. See Terpin. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



55 



tJAMPTICON, Walton, xxxv, 331. Com- 
pare Kamptulicon. 
CAMWOOD, charcoal, absorption of am- 
monia, carbonic acid. Smith, xxxv, 
563. 

CANARIUM BALSAMIPERUM ; COM- 
MUNE ; ZEPHYRINUM, sourccs of 

elemi. See Elemi. 

CANARY-SEED, analysis, Hanaman, 
xxxvi, 108. 

CANCER, remedies, juice of Hippomane, 
mancinella, vii, 262 — mistura cor- 
ticis adstringentis brasiliensis, Mer- 
rem, xii, 22*7. 

CANDLES, PAKAPPiN, Young, xxv, 219. 

price's patent, xxv, 62. 

RAT-POISONING, CaussG, xxxiv, 512. 

STEARIC, Wilson, xxiv, 252. 

WAX versus stearic candles in catho- 
lic churches, xxiii, 381 — manufac- 
ture, xxv, 218. 

- ■■ • 'TREE, Seeman, xxiv, 83. 

CANDY, couCxH, Parrish (Parrish, 280), 
xxviii, 18. 

CANELLA ALBA, analysis^ Meyer and 
Reiche (W. & B., i99), xvi, 67, 75— 
loss in powdering^ Covell, xxxix, 
116 — Redwood, xxi, 31 — structure^ 
Schenck and Weissbecker, xxxiii, 27. 

Compare vVintbrs' bark; Cos- 

TUS DDLCIS. 

RUBRA (from West Indies), Daniell, 

xxxi, 346. 

CANIRAMIN, Geiger,=brucia, xxxvi, 215. 

CANNA SPECIOSA, source of Indian tur- 
meric, Daniell(W.&B., 199),xxxii, 59. 

CANNABIN, T. & H. Smith (W. & B.,380), 
xix, 39; xxviii, 362, note — Laneau, 
(W. & B., 381), xxviii, 361. 

CANNABIS INDICA, description a.nd proper- 
ties, Duhamel, xv, 252 — as substitute 
for erffota, Christison (W. & B., 382), 
xxiv, 173 — preparations, Duhamel, xv, 
254— Muller, xxvii, 360~resiti, J. & H. 
Smith (W. & B., 380), xix, 319 ; xxviii. 
362, note — test for resin, Procter, jr. 
(W. & B., 1091), xxxvii, 23— antidote 
to strychnia^ Mc Williams, xli, 125. 

SATIVA, XV, 252. 

CANNtE, dehiscence of pollen, Aldridge, 
xiii, 216. 

CANORA TARTAREA, its coloriug matter, 
Heeren, iv, 346. 

CANQUOIN S, digestive ointment, vii, 261. 

CANTH.iRIDATES, Dragendorff, xlii, 241. 

CANTHARIDES. See Cantharir. 

CANTHARIDIN, assay,^ Mortreux, xxxvi, 
417 — hehaoior to bichromate potassa 
test, Jenkins, xxxiii, 528 — to chro- 
mate of potassa and sulphuric acid, 
Eboli, xxix, 369 — to sulphuric acid 
and permanganate of potassa, Guy, 
xxxiii, 526 — composition, Pelletier and 
Henry, vii, 142 — detection^ Tichbourne, 



xxxv, 252 — locality in Cantharis (W. 
& B., 203), Ferrer, xxxii, 270— j»r«- 
paration: Bluhm (calcined magnesia, 
diluted sulphuric acid, etc.), xxxviii, 
247 — Fumouze (chloroform, bisul- 
phide of carbon), xl, 116 — Mortreux 
(ether, bisulphide of carbon), xxxvi, 
417 — Procter, jr. (chloroform, W. & 
B., 203, note), xxiii, 124 — Robiquet 
(water, alcohol, ether), iii, 211 ; xiii, 
316— Thierry (ether, W. & B., 203), 
vii, 140 — Williams (benzole), xxvi, 
3 40— Wittstein (water, ether, W. & 
B., 203, note), xxviii, 231 — properties, 
xiii, 318 — Procter, jr., xxiv, 294 — 
solubility, in acetone, Procter, jr., xxiv, 
294 — in alcohol ; benzole ; bisulphide 
of carbon ; chloroform; ether, Bluhm, 

xxxviii, 247 — in chloroform, Procter, 
jr., xxiii, 124; xxiv, 294 — ether, Proc- 
ter, jr., xxiv, 294 — subliming tempera- 
ture, Guy, xl, 246 — volatility, Proc-. 
ter, jr. (W. & B., 202, note; 1039), 
xxiv, 220, 293 — yield from Cantharis 
and Mylabris, Warner, xxviii, 193 — 
Leidy, xxxii, 157 — Procter, jr., xxiii, 
125, "126. 

CANTHARIDIN, acetate, Dupuy, xxiv, 
219 — remarks, Procter, jr , xxiv, 220. 

OIL. See Oleum cantiiaridin. 

PREPARATIONS, Octtingcr, xxii, 226. 

CANTHARIS, activity when perfect and 
when worm-eaten, Derheims and Fa- 
rines (W. & B, 202), Prel. No. 73-— 
when young, Nentwich, xlii, 528 — 
adulteration (Cetonia ; Melaleuca), 
Duhamel, xiii, 289 — (Lytta syriaca), 
Batka, xvii, 79 — (Chrysomela fastu- 
osa), Emanuel, xxiii, 181 — (previously 
extracted with ether), Wald, xv, 460 
— analysis, Robiquet (W. & B., 202), 
xvi, 84 — constituents, Fumouze, xl, 
117 — description, Davis, xvi, 81 — de- 
velopment and growth, Zier, ii, 255 — 
distinction from Meloe, Durand, ii, 275 
— indigeyious species, Durand, ii, 271 
— poisonous action promoted by oil 
(W. & B., 204), Schroff, xxviii, 365— 
loss in poivdering, \, 138 — Covell, 

xxxix, 116 — Redwood, xxi, pre- 
servation, Lutrand (chloroform), xxiii, 
132 — Piette (vapor of oils of Labi- 
ates), vii, 171 — Riquet (ether), xiii, 
174 — Warner (oil of turpentine), 
xxviii, 197 — contain uric acid, Robi- 
quet, xiii, 318— stra?igury prevented 
by boiling in water, Scattergood ; 
Beasley (W. & B., 1041), iv, 185— hy- 
groscopic water, xxvii, 86. 

in Greece, Landerer, xxv, 31. 

PREPARATIONS, Davis, xvi, 83 — Red- 
wood, xiii, 306. 

of the Argentine provinces, Bur-* 

meister, xxxvii, 268. 



56 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



CANTHARIS, compare Lytta. 

adspersa, xxxvii, 269; seneas ; 

aszeliana^ ii, 282 : albida, 

ii, 278; atrata ii, 281 ; xxxv, 172 ; 

cinerea, ii, 279 ; marginata, ii, 28u ; 

JVuitallii, ii, 277; polita, ii, 

282 ; punctata^ xxxvii, 269 ; 

vesicatoria, ii, 276; vindipennis, 

xxxvii, 270 ; vittata, ii, 278 ; 

vittigera, xxxvii, 270. 

OAOUTCHENE, congelation, Faraday, 
xvii, 22. 

CAOUTCHOUC, mentioned by Priestley, 
1T70, V, 87 — account, Simmonds, xxix, 
4:68— analysis, Faraday, (W. & B., 
1484), Prel. No. 63 ; iii, 29o— behavior 
to liquid carbonic acid, Gore, xxxiii. 
329— behavior to fused chlorate of 
potassa, Boettger, xxx, 71 — bleaching 
for collars, etc., xxxix, 86 — collection, 
Herndon, xxvi, 257 — Spruce, xxiv, 
78; xxvii, 545— Weddell, xxvii, 542 
— deodorized, Bourne, xxxix, 236 — 
liquid, use, xxviii, 182 — oil, see oleum 
CAOUTCHOUC — poro&ify, Pay en, xxxix, 
186 — properties, iii, 292 — in sheets, 
Mitchell, i, 311 — solubility in chloro- 
form, Lepage, xxiv, 147 — oil of sassa- 
fras, Mitchell, i, 312 — oil of turpen- 
tine, Bouchardat, xvii, 224; xviii, 229 
— spiritus distilled, composition, Dal- 
ton, viii, 81 — contains starch, Claus- 
sen, xxviii, 171 — wse of chloroformic 
solution, xxx, 90 — vulcamzatio7i,Brock- 
edon, xix, 206 — Payen, xxiv, 355. 

ARTIFICIAL, xxxv, 331 — Clausscu, 

xxviii, 171. 

VAKNiSH. See Varnish, caoutchouc. 

CAOUTCHOUCOID, Hodgson, jr., xxx, 
117. 

CAPARA GUAREOiDES, oil, Webster, Tii, 
174. 

CAPHOPICRITE (from rhubarb), Henry. 
(W. & B., 707), i, 147. 

CAPILLARY ATTRACTION (nature). Dra- 
per, vi, 245, 292. 

CAPILLARITY as a means of analysis, 
Goppelsrceder, xxxv, 179. 

CAPNOMOR, Reichenbach, vii, 2 46. 

CAPPARIS spiNOSA contains quercitrin, 
Hlasiwetz ; Rochleder, xxxii, 222, 444. 

CAPROYLE (from coal tar) xxxiii, 41. 

CAPROYLENE, xxxiii, 43. 

CAPRYLENE, Bouis, xxvi, 415. 

CAPSICINE (volatile) Felletar, xli, 432. 

(crystalline), Heidenreich, (W. & B., 

208, note), xxx, 296— Taylor, xxix, 
303, 306. 

CAPSICUM ANNuuM, analysis, Heiden- 
reich, xxx, 296 — Preston, xxxvii, 161 
— Taylor, xxix, 303 — in delirium tre- 
mens, Lyons, xxxix, 183. 

CAPSULES, coPAivA and cubebs, Queru, 
xxxvi, 9. 



CAPSULES, coPAivA and rhatany, Coo- 
ley, XV, 328. 

ETHER, Clertan (W. & B., 954), xxvi. 

80. 

GELATINE, (medicinal), Dublanc and 

Mothes, vii, 351— Guillou, ix, 20. 

(for capping bottles), Hasel- 

den, xxxviii, 248. 

^METALLIC (for Capping bottles), Betts^ 

xlii, 477. 

PORCELAIN, cleaned (bichromate of 

potash and sulphuric acid), xxxii, 
182 — platinum-coated, Eisner, xxxiii, 
571. 

CARAJURU (red color from Guiana) Vi- 

rey, xvi, 149. 
CARAMATA bark, Hancock, v, 149. 
CARAMEL in dialyser, Graham, xxxiv, 

315 — preparatioji, Adriana, xxxix, 441 

—Sherlock, xxxix, 447. 
CARAMELAN, xxxix, 334. 
CARAMELIN, xxxix, 334. 
CARANNA (from Panama), Maisch, xli, 

231. Compare Bursera. 
CARAPA TOULOUCOUNA, Pereira, xv, 124 

— as cosmetic, xxvii, 339 — analysis of 

bark, Caventou, xxxi, 231. 
CARAYA. See Carya. 
CARBO ANiMALis. See Boneblack; Char- 
coal, ANIMAL. 
LiGNi and 

VEGETABILIS. ScC ChARCOAL, VBGET- 

ABLE. 

CARBOHYDRATES, behavior to water, 
at elevated temperature, Loew, xxxix, 
334. 

CARBOLINE, Crookes, xxxix, 232. 

CARBON, estimation of finely divided, 
Cloez and Guignet, xxxi, 80 — degree 
of heat, Faraday, xxxvii, 392. 

INORGANIC, Gore, xxxv, 45. 

VAPOR, specific gravity, Gay-Lussac; 

Exley; Thomson, x, 343. 

BICHLORIDE as anaesthetic, Simpson,. 

xxxviii, 171 — behavior to nascent 
hydrogen, Genther, xxxiii, 217. 

BISULPHIDE, action on resins and gum- 
resins, Sace, xlii, 243 — on wood. Si- 
dot, xlii, 461 — as ansesthelic, Simpson, 
XX, 248 — capillary power, Franken- 
heim, xxxv, 248 — congelation, Wartha, 
xlii, 528 — deodorizing, Cloes, xlii, ISd 
— Millon, xli, 15 — is it a true ether? 
D.B. Smith, iv, 121 — flame (powerfully 
photographic), Babo and Miiller, 
xxviii, 466 — medical properties, xxxv, 
355; Wutzer,iv, 172 — neuralgia, Page, 
xxviii, 219 — poisonous qualities, Del- 
pech (W.& B., 1475), xxviii, 366, 532 
— preparation: Chandelon, (W. & B., 
1478), xxi, 181 — Contet, xlii, 157 — 
MuUer, ix, 242 — properties, Smith, iv, 
120 — Wertzer and Pellcngam, iv, 8d 
— purification, Millon, xli, 15 — Cloes,, 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



57 



'-CARBON, BISULPHIDE [Continued). 

xlii, 159 — tesi, Vogel, xxvi, 64 — indo- 
lent tumors, ix, 264 — use in extracting 
fatty matter, Deiss, xxviii, 356 — Le- 
page, xxviii, 446 — in pharmacy, Le- 
fort, xlii, 246 — vapor, igniting point, 
Hutton, xli, 252. 

and BROMINE, Loewig, ii, 99. 

HYDROCHLORIDE. See JEther, chlo- 
ric. 

protosdlphidb (W. & B., 1475), 

Baudrimont, xxix, 447. 

sulphide. Low, xxxviii, 415. 

superchloride. See Carbon, bi- 
chloride. 

terchloride (so called), xx, 100— 

Ure, XV, 267. Compare Chloroform. 

TETRABROMIDE ; TETRACHLORIDE; 

TETRAioDiDE, Bolas and Groves, 

xlii, 449, 450. 

CARBONATES, alkaline, decom- 
posed by sunlight, Draper, xvi, 91. 

CARBONIZATION of wood by superheat- 
ed steam, Violette, xxv, 554. 

-CARBURETS. See Hydrogen ; Sulphur. 

CARBYLS, Loewig, xxv, 380. 

"CARCAPULI AcosT^, xiii, 25. 

'CARDAMINE amara, yields rayronic acid, 
Winckler, xxii, 44. 

rhomboidea, xli, 438. 

CARDAMOMS, Ph. Edinburgh (30), iii 
255 — of Abyssinia, Pereira, xix, 312 — 
Ceylon, Pereira, xv, 18 — Korarima. 
Vaughan, xxv, 335 — Pereira, xix, 312 
— varieties, Guibourt, v, 332 — loss in 
powdering, Covell, xxxix, 116 — Red- 
wood, xxi, 31 — source of \i\g\i prices, 
XXXV, 134 — yield of seeds and cap- 
sules, Squibb, xxxix, 525. 

CARDAMOM UM ensal, v, 333 , vwjus, 

XV, 18, 23, 96; minus, v, 332; 

piperatum, v, 334 ; xv, 96. Com- 
pare Amomum ; Elettaria. 

CARDOL, Stsedeler, xx, 137. 

CARDS, visiting, poisonous (so ca'led 
mother of pearl) Ebert, xl, 29. 

CARICA papaya, acclimatization in Al- 
geria, B^chu, xxxvii, 337. 

■CARISSA Schtmperi, Hanbury, xxv, 234, 
note. 

CARLUDOVICA palmata (Panama hat 
plant), Seemann, xxiv, 175. 

CARMINATES, behavior to diflferent rea- 
gents, Luckow, xxxvii, 277. 

CARMINATIVE. See Dalby ; Dewees. 

■CARMINE, adulteration (starch), Ehren- 
berg, xi, 87 ; Maisch, xxxiii, 17 — (ver- 
million), Attfield, xxxii, 361 — from 
flowers of monarda didyma, Belhome, 
xxix, 31 1 — preparation [w'vAx albumen ; 
and with isinglass), Dumas, xix, I§8. 

Compare Acid, carminic; Cochineal. 

RED, Hlasiwetz and Grabowsky, 

xxxviii, 504. 



CARMINE grounds, xxvi, 190. 
CARNALLITE, Stromeyer, xl, 317. 
CARNAUBA wax. See Wax, Carnauba. 
CARONY BARK (Angostura), i, 26. 
CAROTIN, is cholestearin colored by red 

pigment, Frorde and Soeauer, xxxviii, 

505. 

CARP, composition of scales, Fremy, 

xxxvii, 256. 
CARPINUS bbtulus, amount of silica in 

wood-ashes, Schulze, xxxv, 163. 
CARRAGHEEN. See Chondrus crispus. 
CARROT root, behavior to tincture of 

guaiac, van der Brock, xxiii, 185. 
CARTHAMINE, preparation, Pereira, xxvi, 

183. 

CARTHAMUS tinctorius. See Safflow- 
er. 

CARUM, loss in powdering. Redwood, 

xxi, 31. 

CARVACROLE, composition, Schweitzer, 

xxviii, 231. 
CARYA amara, bark as febrifuge, Stearns, 

(W. & B., 1488), xxxi, 30. 
PORCINA, Stearns, xxxi, 30 — oil, see 

Oleum cary^. 

sulcata, Stearns, xxxi, 30. 

CARYOCAR barbierve ; brasiliense; 

butyrosum ; edule; ffla- 

brum: nuciferum ; tomentO' 

sum (Souari nuts), Mayer, xxxvi, 294, 

295. 

CARYOPHYLLIN, Martius (W. & B., 224), 
xxxii, 64. 

CARYOPHYLLUS, cultivation in Bencoo- 
len, xxiv, 53 — history, etc., Ruschen- 
berger, x, 30 — adulteration of pow- 
dered, Schroeder, xxxvi, 106. 

CARYPHA pumos, analysis, Fritsch, xxxii, 
213. 

CASCARA de Loxa, xi, 314. 

CASCARILLA (h&vk), adulteration (Oroton 
suberosum), Dubail, v, 349 — analysis, 
Duval (W. & B., 226), xvii, 300— 
crystals (oxalate of lime), xxxvii, 32 
— origin, Don ; Wright, vi, 238 — use 
in perfumery, Piesse, xxvi, 277, 365 — 
loss \n powdering. Redwood, xxi, 31 — 
tasteless by animal charcoal, Weppen, 
xviii, 203. Compare Croton. 

de CARACOL, Wright's, composition, 

Chandler, xlii, 368. 

(cinchona) aharquilla, iii, 37 ; 

amarilaza, vii, 327 ; amarilla, xxii, 

41 ; blanca,\\\, 327 ; blanqui- 

sima, iii, 103 ; boto de hoja morada, 

ii, 238; iii, 109; bova, iii, 37; 

cinicienta, iii, 103; claro-amarilla^ 

xxii, 41; colorada, ii, 237; iii, 

114; xi, 324; xxxviii, 425; 

crespilla, iii, 103; delgada, ii, 238; 

iii, 34, 108; delta o/a, xi, 314; 

ferruginea, iii, 109 ; fina, ii, 

237, 239; iii, 36; fina de Loxa^ 



58 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



OASCARILLA (cinchona) [Continued). 

iii, 30, 31 ; fina de Uritusinga, iii, 

28, 108 ; xl, 316; flor de ahazar, 

ii, 239 ; iii, 35 ; hoja aguda^ iii, 37 ; 

ichu^ xxii, 103 ; lagartijada^ 

iii, 103, 108 ; xxii. 40; lampinia, 

ii, 238 ; leonado-obscura, iii, 109. 

MAGNiFOLiA, souixe of Quina nova, 

Howa'-d, xxix, 38. 

morada, iii, 35 ; morena^ vii, 

326 ; naranjada^ iii, 28, 31 ; 

negrilla^ iii, 103; xxii, 40; del 

Pajonal^ xxii, 103 ; palida, ii, 

238 ; iii, 34 ; xi, 320 ; ■parda, ii, 

239 ; iii, 38 ; pardo-clara, iii, 103 ; 

pardo-obscura, iii, 103 ; 

parecida a la calisaga, xxii, 41 ; 

peluda^ ii, 239; iii, 37 ; pillao, 

ii, 238 ; provinciana^ xxii, 40 ; 

roja, ii, 239 ; iii. 114 ; xxix, 33 ; 

tabla^ vii, 327 ; verdadera, xxii, 

40 ; yana yana, vii, 326. 

compare Bark (Cinchona); Cinchona ; 

CASCARILLIN, Duval (W. & B , 227), 
xvii, 301. 

CASEIN, as cement^ Wagner, xxxv, 508 — 
for coating pills^ Jozeau, xxii, 77 — 
colored red by nitrate of mercury, 
Lassaigne, iv, 175. 

CASES, Ward's, xxv, 458. 

CASHEW NUTS. See Anacakdium occi- 

DENTALE. 

CASKS, oil, rendered impermeable, viii, 
257. 

CASSARILLA = Ladenbergia, xxxviii, 
426. 

CASSAVA bread, Dawson, xxxii, 456— 

starch, Cork, xxxiii, 270. 

compare Manihot; Tapioca. 

CASSIA (cinnamon), v, 299 — origin, 

Wright, xii, 217 — loss in powdering, 

Co veil, xxxix, 116. 

, compare Laurus Cassia. 

fistula, Landerer, xxiv, 37. 

(Senna). See Senna. 

absns, iii, 224 acutifolia, iii, 224 ; 

viii, 180, 184, 269, 270; x, 105 

angustifolia, xxi, 359. 

AURicuLATA, yields gum, xxix, 77. 

BRASiLiANA, yields Cassia fistula, 

xxiv, 38. 

elongata, iii, 226; viii, 269, 270; x, 

105. glandulosa, xxi, 361. 

hirsuta, xvii, 82. lanceolata, iii, 

226; viii 179,180,182,184,269,270; 

x, 105 ; xxi, 359. ligustrinoides, 

viii, 269, 270; xxi, 360. 

Marylandica, analysis, Martin, vii, 

19 — time of collection, Griffith, xvi, 
313 ; Procter, jr., xxviii, 412 — ct>n- 
sidered worthless as cathartic, Perot, 
xxvii, 300. 
MOSCHATA, Hanbury, xxxvi, 80. 



CASSIA obovata, iii, 224; viii, 184, 185 ,- 

, xxi, 362. obtusa, xxi, 362. 

, ORiENTALis (Fedcgoso root), xvii, 82.. 

; ovata, viii, 185, 270. 

, se?ma, viii, 179; xxi, 359. 

, Skinneri, viii, 270. 

. CASSIE (Acacia Farnesiana), in per- 
, fumery, Piesse, xxvi, 277. 

CASSIN, Martin, vii, 24. 
, CASSIUS' PURPLE. See Purple. 

■ CASSOLETTES, Piesso, xxvii, 467. 
I CASSUMUNIAR, v, 331. 
, CASSUVIUM occidentalb = Anacar- 
, dium occidentale, xx, 134. 
; CASTANEA Americana, twist of fibres,. 

Braun, xxviii, 67. 

- Peruviana (Souari nuts), xxxvi, 294. 

, VULGARIS, leaves for whooping cough,. 

Close, xxxv, 66. 

■ CASTILLEA elastica, yields caoutchouc^. 
, xxvii, 542 — Guibourt, xxxviii, 503. 

CASTILLON'S powder. See Powder. 
; CAS7 0R-0IL bean. See Ricinus. 

CASTOREUM, adulteration (factitious), ii,. 
, 244 — Muller, xviii, 276 — analysis^ 

Woehler, xxiii, 86 — difference be- 
tween American and Siberian, Pereira,. 
viii, 85 — cavity depends on drying,, 
Hoist, xxxiii, 557 — N'orivegian,'D\iieny. 

xxxiii, 557 — in perjumery, Piesse,., 
xxvii, 76 — preparing the sacs, Geiss, 

xxxiv, 36 — Siberian, Muller, xviii, 276. 
CATALPA BiGNONOiDES, active principle, 

Raw, xlii, 204. 

cordata ; coRDiFOLiA barky. 

properties, Jones, xli, 28 — seeds^, 
analysis, Grozsot, vi, 352 — in asthma, 
Automarcbi, vi, 352 — wood as, emetic, 
iv, 284 — twist of fibres, Braun, xxviii,. 
67. 

CATAPLASMA aluminis, Ph. Dublin 
(26), iii, 334. 

coNii, Ph. British (64), is inert, Har- 

ley, xxxix, 362. 

LiNi in France, Parrish, xxxi, 214. 

CATECHIN, composition, xxiii, 355 — 
properties, Neubauer, xxviii, 326.. 
See Acid catechuic. 
CATECHU (Cutch; Gambir), and its 
acids, Neubauer, xxviii, 326 — adultera- 
Hon (starch), ii, 243 — analysis, Delffs, 
XX, 140 — Bombay, Pereira, iv, 49 — in 
dialyser, Graham, xxxiv, 315 — exami- 
nation, Duhamel and others, xvi, 164 
— manufacture; Dumaine, xlii, 464 — 
Seemann, xxiv, 377 — Yvan, xvii, 215^ 
— loss \n powdering, Covell, xxxix, lift- 
— solution in liquor potassae, xxxvii,. 
305 — yield of tannin. Bowman, xli, 
194 — Mittentzwey, xxxvi, 318 — its. 
nature, Stenhouse, xxxiv, 255 — dif- 
ferent varieties, Guibourt, iv, 49. 

CATHA edulis; spinosa, xxv, 231,, 

232. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



59 



CATHARTATES, Groves, xli, 12. 
CATHARTICS, vegetable of U. S., Allen, 
V, 205. 

CATHARTIN {Rhamnus, W. & B., 1593), 
Winckler, xxv, 526 — Trenckler, xxv, 
181 — Lassaigneand Feneuille [Senna), 
xli, 65 — properties, Bley and Diesel, 
xxii, 68. 

CATHARTOCARPUS fistula = Cassia 

fistula, vii, 19; xxiv, 38. 
MoscHATus = Cassia moschata, 

xxxvi, 82. 

CATINGUA coERULEA, coloring matter of 
feathers, Bogdonow, xxx, 167. 

CATIVO DE MANGLE, examination, Maisch, 
xli, 236. 

CATTLE PLAGUE, disinfectants, Crookes, 
xxxviii, 356, 427 ; xxxix, 225. 

CAULOPHYLLIN, preparation Ph. 
Eclectica; (Parrish, 286, Hill's alum 
process), xxxi, 386 — examination, 
Ebert, xxxvi, 206. 

CAULOPdYLLUiM thalictrotdes, analy- 
sis, Ebert, xxxvi, 203 — contains sa- 
ponin, Mayer, xxxv, 99. 

CAUSTIC, BLACK, Velpeau (safifron and 
sulphuric acid, W. & B., 59), xvii, 
277 — (liquorice root and sulphuric 
acid), xxxix, 418. 

gutta percha, Maunoury (caustic 

potassa and gutta percha, W. & B., 
1279, note), xxviii, 115. 

Vienna (=Potassa cum calce. U. S., 

60), vii, 259. 

CAVENDISH society. See Society. 

CEANOTHUS americanus in aphthae, 
Hubbard (W. & B , 1489), vii, 341— 
yield of tannin, Bowman, xli, 195. 

CECROPIA peltata yields caoutchouc, 
xxvii, 542. 

CEDARS of Lebanon, xli, 435. 

CEDAR, RED. See Juniperus virginiana. 

WOOD in perfumery, Piesse, xxvi, 365. 

CEDRELA FEBRiFUGA, bark, Richard, x, 
71 — Fliickiger, xxxiii, 505 — crystals 
(oxalate of lime), xxxiii, 506 ; xxxvii, 
32. 

ODORATA, its gum, Griffith, vii, 189. 

CEDRINK (from Simaba cedron), Lecoy 
(Lewry? W. & B., 1489), xxiii, 376 

CEDRON. See Simaba cedron. 

CELASTRUS edulis; obscurus, xxv, 

233, note. 

scandens as emetic, iv, 280. 

CELLS, formation of walls, Schacht, 
xxxvi, 379 — growth, xxv, 74. 

CELLULOSE, composUion, xxxiv, 539 — 
division into amylon group and inulin 
group, Kiitzing, xxv, 38 — its nature, 
Fremy and Payen, xxxii, 70. 

CEMENT, compare Glue ; Lute ; Paste. 

acid proof, Fairthorne, xli, 332 — ar- 

menian, see diamond — casein, Wagner, 
xxxv, 508 — china, iv, 173, 352 ; xxii, 



376; xxiv, 171; xxxiii, 380; xxxviii, 
57 — diamond, iv, 173; xxiv, 171; 

xxxiii, 380; xxxviii, 57 — earthenware^ 
see stone — French, xxxvi, 373 — glass, 
see china — gutta percha, xxvi, 88 — 
Bel ford, xxvi, 82— Davy (W. & B., 
892), xxix, 457 — hard and unyielding, 
Schwartze. xl, 558 — knife handles, 
xlii, 469 — iron and stone, xxxix, 87 — 
metallic, Serbat, xxv, 469 ; Oersheim, 
xxxii, 182; composition of Oersheim's 
cement, Dussauce, xxxii, 203 — stone, 
xvii, 76 — Heller, xxiv, 80 — teeth, Ber- 
noth, xviii, 237 — Osterraayer, xvi, 
158 — Sorel, xxviii, 165 — Wagner, 
xxx, 182. 

CENSER, Piesse, xxvii, 468. 
CENTAUREA Behen, root, Hanbury, 

xxxiv. 549. 

CALCITRAPA, active principle, Colig- 

non, xxvii, 266. 
centaurium (Rhaponticum nostras), 

i, 142. 

cyanus, yields blue color, vi, 72. 

DUMULOSA, xli, 433. 

CENTAURIN, Dulong, ii, 340. 

CENTAURY, American. See Sabbatia. 

CENTIPEDES, bite and antidote, Roun- 
saville, xli, 124 — Wood, jr. (Tephro- 
sia Virginia), xxxviii, 561. 

CEPHAELIS IPECACUANHA. See Ipecacu- 
anha. 

CEPHALANTHUS occidentalis, as tonic, 
V, 289. 

CERA ALBA, and flava. See Wax, white, 
and yellow. 

CERASIA, of Conwell (from Prunus vir- 
giniana), is sulphate of lime, St. Proc- 
ter, vi, 12. 

CERASIN, Guerin, xxv, 39 ; xxxii, 367— 
is metagummate of lime, Fremy (W. 
& B., lo", note), xxxii, 368. 

compare Bassorin. 

artificial (= meta gummic acid 

W. & B., 10), Gelis, xxix, 365. 

CERASINIUM (organic structure of 
cherry- and plum-tree gum), Kiitz- 
ing, xxv, 39. 

CERASUS MARASCA, iv, 258. 

serotina. See Prunus virginiana. 

CERATONIA siliqua, xvi, 310. 

CERATES, compare Ointments. 

substituting paraffin for white wax, 

Carney, xxxiii, 72 — yellow for white 
wax, Bringhurst, xli, 59 — preserxmlion^ 
by benzoin, Doliber, xl, 33; Thomp- 
son, xxxviii, 152, compare Lard, 
benzoinated — in glass, Thompson, 
xxxviii, 151. 

CERATUM ADipis See Ceratum simplex. 

ARNiCyB, Jennings, xxx, 568. 

BENZoiNi, Eberle, xxxix, 349 — com- 
pare Lard, benzotnated; Unguentum 

BENZOINI. 



60 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



CERATUM CACAO, Duhamel, xiii, 18. 

CANTHARiDis, improvements Ph. U. 

S. (40) : a better consistence, xxiv, 
21 — Davis (modification of Procter's, 
xiii, 304, see below), xvi, 87 — Dupuy 
(with acetic acid and camphor), xxiv, 
219 — Procter, jr. (recommends addi- 
tion of the flies to the hot mass), xiii, 
303; (digestion with oil of turpentine, 
which is then driven off), xiii, 304 — 
Ph U. S. (50), Warner (is Ceratum 
extracti cantharidis, Ph U. S. (60). 

. See Unguentum canthauidis. 

CETACEi, Ph. U. .S. (60), Doliber 

(with benzoin), xl, 34. 

, Barnes (recommends un- 
bleached materials, W. & B , 1042), 
xxxiii, 155. 

EXTRACTI CANTHARIDIS, Ph. U. S. 

(60), remarks, Procter, jr., xxxvi, 303 
— Taylor, xxxv, 412. 

GALENi. See Cold cream. 

LABiALE. See Lip salve. 

mezerei, Pleischl, xv, 77. See Un- 
guentum MEZEREI. 

PLUMBI SUBACETATIS, Ph. JJ. S. (50), 

Eggenfels (improved manipulation, 
W. & B., 1043), xxxiii, 401— Ph U. S. 
(60), Doliber (benzoinated), xl, 35. 
See Unguentum plumbi subacetatis. 

RHUS metopii, Barham, xviii, 45. 

SABINE, Toller, cautions against the 

use of copper vessels, xv, 59 — Ph. JJ. S. 
(50), Graharae (with fluid extract), 
XXX, 313— Ph. U. S. (60), remarks, 
Procter, jr., xxxvi, 303 — Taylor, xxxv, 
412. See Unguentum sabin/E. 

SAPONis, Ph. U. S. (30), Durand (by 

boiling), viii, 27— Ph. U. S. (60), re- 
marks, Procter, jr., xxxvi, 303. 

SIMPLEX, adulteration (Japan wax), 

Maisch, xxxvi, 101 — [yellow wax pro- 
posed), Bringhurst, xxxviii, 337 — Ph. 
U. S. (30), D. Parrish (better con- 
sistence), V, 78. 

ziNCi carbonatis, Wiegand, xix, 91. 

CERBERA, AHOuiA ; manghas ; 

SALUTARis, viii, 102, 103, 

TANGHiN (ordeal bean of Madagas- 
car), vii, 190; viii, 102 — Boyer and 
Helsenbey, xi, 35 — compare Tanghi- 

NIA VBNENIFLUA. 

THEVETIA, viii, 103. 

CERCARIA viRiDis, viii, 336. 

CERCIS siliquastrum, twist of fibre, 

Braun, xxviii, 67. 
CEREOMETER, Legrip, (W & B., 240), 

xxxi, 422. 

CERIUM, oxalate, preparation, Mayer 
(Parrish, 411), xxxii, 1 — therapeutical 
properties, Simpson, xxxii, 1, note. 

CEROXYLON andicola, viii, 172. 

CERUSSA. See Plumbum, carbonate; 
White. 



CERUSSITE contains iodine, del Rio and 
Vauquelin, xxvi, 440. 

CETACEUM, fusing point, Wimmel, xli, 
23, 431 — effect of pressure on fusing 
point, Hopkins, xxvii, 107 — in mix- 
tures (yolk of egg), Hodgson, jr., iv, 
13— origin (W. & B., 242), Baudri- 
mont, vi, 240 — from filtering sperm 
oil, xxxvi, 502 — powdering., Powers 
(with almond oil), v, 108 — solubility 
in chloroform, Lepage, xxiv, 147 — aa 
substitute for xoax. Proctor, xxxv, 
527. 

CETENE, Dumas and Peligot, vii, 336. 

CETONIA AURATA, in hydrophobia, Eu- 
lenburg, xxxi, 345. 

CETRaRIA (Iceland moss), analysis, Ber- 
zelius, vi, 205. 

jelly, Beral, iii, 267. 

CETRARIN, behavior Ho bichromate po- 
tassa test, Jenkins, xxxiii, 528 — pre- 
paration and properties, Herberger 
(W. & B , 244), iii, 237 ; x, 54. 

CEVADILLA. See Sabadilla. 

CH. Coraoare Q. 

CHAKAZZI GUM (copal), xli, 343. 

CHALK, eating, Ely, xl, 347 — use in buty- 
ric and lactic fermentation.^ B^champ, 
xxxix, 54 — its organisms, Bechamp, 
xxxix, 56. 

drawing (colored), Piesse, xxxiii, 

473. 

precipitated. See Calx carbonate. 

prepared, test for purity, Procter, jr., 

xxiii, 318. 

CHAM^ROPS EXCELSA, amount of silica 

in ash of rind, xxxv, 164. 
SERRULATA (saw-palmctto), starch, 

X, 256. 

CHAMBERS' remedy for intemperance, 

composition, Chilton, Prel. No. 115. 
CHAMEL^A TRicoccA (=raezereon of 

Arabian authors), Bauhin, xiv, 254. 
(of Dioscorides), == Daphne oleoides, 

Sibthorp, xiv, 245. 
CHAMOIS, preparation, Calvert, xxxvi, 

409. 

CHAMOMILE, German. See Matricaria 

CHAMOMILLA. 

ROMAN. See Anthemis nobilis. 

WILD. See Cotula. 

CHARA vulgaris contains iodine, McAd- 
am, XXV, 67. 

CHARCOAL, ALUMiNiZED, Stenhouse, (W. 
& B , 215), xxix, 150; xxxvii, 262. 

ANIMAL, action on solutions : Es- 
prit (Chevalier; Dubrunfaut; Du- 
pasquier; Garrod ; Girardin ; Gra- 
ham; Lassaigne; Payen ; Weppen), 
xxii, 140 — Graham, iii, 148 — Wep- 
pen, xviii, 203 — antidote to poisons, 
Garrod (W. & B., 1035) xviii, 101— de- 
colorizing power (W. & B., 212), Bus- 
sy, i, 237 — active principles of plants 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



61 



CHARCOAL, ANIMAL [Continued). 

obtained, Lebourdais (W. & B., 1035), 
xxi, 87 — bitters removed, Hopff, viii, 
111 — in 5fZa?ic?M/ar affections, Weise, ii, 
162 — revivified; use \n sugar refining ; 
substitutes [artificial); see Bone-black 
— value of commercial estimated, 
Corenwinder, xxvi, 152. 

MINERAL. See Carbon, inorganic. 

VEGETABLE : absorption of gases, 

Smith, XXXV, 561 — behavior towards 
chlorine; iodine; bromine; chlori- 
nated lime; hyponitric acid ; Schoen- 
bein, xx, 243 — to metallic solutions, 
Lazowski, xx, 160— deodorizing pro- 
perties, Stenhouse (W. & B., 215), 
xxvi, 356 — Sutherland, xxvii, 518 — as 
disinfectant, Crookes, xxxviii, 363 — 
Stenhouse, xxvii, 167 — freshly cal- 
cined, properties, Moride, xxix, 46 — 
preparation by superheated steam, 
(W. & B., 2)4)^ Violette, xxi, 278. 

CHARCOAL BISCUITS, Warren, xxx, 125. 

CUSHIONS, Howell, xxiv, 276. 

PAPER (W. & B., 881), Pichot and 

Malapert, xxx, 536. 

" RESPIRATORS, Stenhouse, (W. & B., 

215), xxvii, 169. 

Compare Bone-black. 

•CHART A CANTHARiDATA, Oettingcr, xxii, 
228. See Paper, blistering. 

sinapinata, Rigolot, xl, 276, 312. 

VEsicANS. See Charta canthari- 

DATA. 

VESiCATORiA, Hcnsler, xvi, 236. 

See Paper ; Papier. 

CHEIRANTHUS. See Wallflowers. 

•CHELERYrHRlNA, identity v^iih sanguin- 
arina ( W. & B., 1492), Probst, xxxiii, 9; 
ShieljXXviii, 41 — composition and/?re- 
paration,S\\\Q\ (W. <teB. 740), xxviii, 42. 

CHELIDONINA, assay, Mayer, xxxv, 401 
— composition, xxxiii, 10 — preparation, 
Polex, xii, 328. 

CHELIDONIUM majus, analysis, Cheval- 
lier ; Godefroy ; Lassaigne ; Probst, 
xxxiii, 9, 10 — chemical history, Maisch, 
xxxiii, 7 — examination, Polex, xii, 328 
influence of drying, Schoonbroodt, 
xii, 321 — in itching, Graud-Clement, 
xxxiii, 474 — yields succinic acid, 
Reinsch ; Walz, xxxiv, 328. 

CHELIDOXANTHIN, Probst (W. & B„ 
1492), xxxiii, 9. 

OHELONE CAMPANULATA ; GENTIAN- 

oiDES ; adulterants of sabadilla, 
Schaffner, xxxviii, 500. 

GLABRA, as tonic, V, 290. 

CHEMICAL ACCURACY, Crookes, xii, 133. 

ARTS of aborigines, Green, v, 94. 

BODIES, influence of time on forma- 
tion, Liebig, xxi, 51. 

COMBINATION iuduced by porous bo- 
dies, Corenwinder, xxxiv, 92. 



CHEMICAL FOOD. See Syrupus, phos- 
phates COMP. 

NOMENCLATURE, Bachc, xxvii, 213 — 

Berzelius, ix, 5 — Hare, ix, 1 — Morris, 
xxvii, 114, 308. 

NOTATION, Berzelius ; Johnson, vi, 40. 

works, injury to timber and crops, 

XXV, 39. 

of Robert Dale (Manchester), 

Parrish, xxxi, 16. 
of Tennant (Glasgow), Parrish, 

xxxi, 110. 

CHEMISTRY applied to the arts, Calvert, 

xxxvii, 255. 

ORGANIC, observations, Johnson, vi, 

30. 

CHENOPODIUM ambbosioides in streets 
of Philadelphia, Barton, v, 179. 

anthelminticum, description, proper- 
ties, etc., Griffith, v, 177 — cultivation 
near Baltimore (W. & B., 245, note), 
xxii, 303. 

RUGOSUM, V, 179. 

CHERRY, WILD. See Prunus virginiana. 

CHERRY laurel. See Laurocerasus. 

CHESTNUT, leaves for whooping-cough, 
Close, xxxv, 66 See Castanea. 

MALABAR (fruit of Artocarpus incisa), 

xxxvi, 294. 

CHICA (red coloring), Virey, xvi, 149. 

CHICKENS, not poisoned by opium, Mit- 
chell, xlii, 188 — poisoned by orpi- 
raent, Landerer, xxix, 112. 

CHILBLAINS, liniment, iv, 351, xi, 170. 

CHIMAPHILA UMBELLATA, analysis, Fair- 
bank (W. & B., 247), xxxii, 254, 258 
— amount of tannin, Bowman, xii, 195. 

CHIMAPHILIN, Fairbank (W. & B., 247), 

xxxii, 256. 
CHINA. See Chinese. 

(quina), Bogota, xxvi, 360; 

braune, xxii, 41 ; Calisaya, 

xxxviii, 422 ; Carthagena, xxvi, 

360; flava, xi, 322; flava 

dura, xi, 254, 255, 328, xxii, 42, xxvi, 

360; jlava fibrosa, xi, 254, 255, 

328, xxii, 42 ; graue, xxii, 40 ; 

Huamalies, xi, 255, xxii, 41 ; Hu- 

anuco, xi, 255, xxii, 40 ; Jam, 

xi, 254, 255, 319, xxii, 41 ; Koe- 

nigs, xi, 320, xxii, 41 ; Kron, 

xxii, 40 ; Loxa, xi, 255, xxii, 40 ; 

nova Xauxa, xxv, 242 ; 

pseudo Loxa, xi, 255, 320, xxii, 40; 

pseudo-regia, xxvi, 360, xxix, 

115; regia, xi, 254, 255, 320, 

xxii, 41; regia nuda, xi, 321; 

rothe, xxii, 40 ; rubiginosa, 

xi, 329, xxvi, 361, xxix, 115; 

rubra, xi, 254, 255 ; Ten, blasse, 

xxii, 41 ; Ten, dunkele, xi, 320, 

xxii 40. 

. Compare Bark (Cinchona) ; Cali- 

SAYA ; Cinchona ; etc. 



62 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



CHINAWARE, cement — see Cement — elec- 
troplating^ Ridgway. xxv, 468. 

CHINCHONi^. See Cinchona (Howard, 
xxxviii, 426). 

CHINESE BOTANY, pharmacology, etc., 
xxix, 563. 

MATERIA MEDICA, ElHs, i, 150, 

POISONS, McGowan, xxx, 61. 

CHINIDIN, identical with Conchinin, 
Hesse, xli, 421, See Qdinidia. 

CHINOVIN. See Kinovin. 

CHINOLIN. See Quinolin. 

CHIOCOOCA anguipuga; densipolia 

(ipecacuanha of Zoazeiro), iii, 195. 

RACKMOSA (Kahinca root), active prin- 
ciple, Frangois and Caventou (W, & 
B., 1479), ii, P4 — analysis^ Frangois, 
Caventou, Pclletier, iii, 164, 166 — 
Rochleder, xxv, 242. 

. See Kahinca. 

CHIRAYTA. See Chiretta. 

CHIRATIN, Hoehn, xlii, 532. 

. See Chirettin. 

CHIRATOGENIN, Hahn, xlii, 532. 

CHIRETTA, analysis, Fliickiger, Hoehn, 
xlii, 529, 531 — Lassaigne and Boissel 
(W. & B,, 242), xii, 21— description, 
properties, etc., Carson, xii, 21, 

CHIRETTIN, Kemp, xlii, 534. See Chi- 
ratin. 

CHIRONIA angularis. See Sabbatia. 

chilensis. See Erythrtea chilensis. 

CHLORAL alcoholate, detection^ Schering 
(behavior to water, sulphuric and 
nitric acids), xlii, 400 — Hager (Lie- 
ben's iodoform test), xlii, 3! 9. 399 — 
preparation and properties, xlii, 239. 

amylate, Martins and Mendelsohn- 

Bartholdy, xlii, 455, 456. 

hydrate, antidote (strychnia), Lie- 

breich, xlii, 248 — chemical history, 
etc., Joy, xlii, 73 — Engelmann, xli, 
447 — for preparation of pure chloro- 
form^ Schering, xlii, 319 — literature^ 
xlii, 79 — physiological effects, Demar- 
quay. Worms, xlii, 77, 78 — prepara- 
tion^ Liebig, iv, 351 — (from alcohol 
containing aldehyJ), Hoffmann, xlii, 
371 — (from starch and chlorine), Sta- 
edeler, xlii, 75, 177 — purification (from 
bisulphide of carbon), Fliickiger, 
xlii, 405 — properties^ Martius and Men- 
delsohn-Bartholdy, xlii, 455 ; Scher- 
ing, xlii, 237 — test^ Hager, Riekher, 
xlii, 238, 239. 

mercaptide, Martius and Mendel- 

sohn-Bartholdy, xlii, 455, 456. 
— mesitic, Kane, x, 206, 211. 

— — mbthylate, Martius and Mendel- 
sohn-Bartholdy, xlii, 456. 

CHLORALISE, Roiaiquet, xxviii, 549. 

CHLORALOILE, Robiquet, xxviii, 549. 

CHLOR-ALUM. See Aluminium, chlo- 
ride. 



CHLORANIL, Hoffmann, xvii, 157. 
CHLORANILAMIDE, Laurent, xxxv, 544.. 
CHLORATES of alkaloids, Serullas, ii, 
304, 

in very diluted solutions distin- 
guished from nitrates, Vogel, jr. (lit- 
mus color), xiv, 304. 

test (sulphate of anilin), Boettger 

Braun, xli, 20, 

CHLORIDE, CARBONIC. See Carbon, bi- 
chloride (xxxviii, 171) 

CHLORIDES in general, Durand, i, 272, 
ix, 271, V, 121. 

precipitated by muriatic acid gas, 

Schradpr, xxxv, 34. 

of oxides, Durand, i, 272, iv, 271, v, 

121. 

CHLORIMETRY. See Chlorometry. 

CHLORINE, absorption by charcoal, 
Schoenbein, xx, 43 — action on alka- 
loids^ Pelletier, x, 160; Andr^, viii, 
211 — on absolute alcohol in direct 
sunlight, Streit and Franz, xlii, 466 
— antidote to poisonous alkaloids (not 
applicable to their saPs), Donn«, ii, 
83 — bleaching compounds, Martius, 
viii, 292 — as disinfectant^ Crookes, 
xxxviii, 430; G-^llard, xx, 129; Lam- 
bossy, xxx, 125 — distiriction from bro- 
mine and iodine, McDonald, xli 393 
— estimation, see Calx chlorinata — in 
organic compounds, Carius, xxxiv, 
332 — liquefaction, Faraday, xvii, 22 ;; 
Mohr, X, 261 — preparation, Oxland 
(muriatic acid g>«8 and atmospheric 
air), xvii, 313 — Rogers (bichromate 
of potassa and muriatic acid), xviii, 
236 — Shank (chromate of lime and 
muriatic acid), xxxvii, 254 — Weldon 
(manganite of lime), xli. 538 — specific 
gravity, Davy, Dumas, Exley, Thom- 
son, X, 342, 343 — tests (chromate of 
potassa), Caillot, vi, 81 — (ammonia^ 
and measure nitrogen evolved),. 
Henry and Plisson, v, 39. 

fluoride. Prat, xl, 125. 

LAMP, Hodgson, jr., xxiv, 205. 

oxide, crystallization, Faraday, xviiy 

21. 

SALTS, theory, BonsdorflF, Johnson,. 

vi, 37. 

CHLOROCARBON, See Carbon, bichlo- 
ride (xxxviii, 171), 
CHLORODYNE (Davenport vs. Freeman), 

xxxvi, 463 — examination, Dowse, xlii, 
437 ; Smith, xlii, 263— history, etc,,, 
xxxii, 334:- - preparation : Bullock, 

xxxvii, 17 ; Dowse, xlii, 442 ; Groves, 
xxxvi, 446; Mclnall, jr,, xl, 209 ; Og^ 
den (W. & B,, 966, note), xxxii, 181, 
334, xxxvii, 17, xlii, 263— Smith, xlii, 
267 ; Squire, xlii, 263. 

CHLOROFORM, account, Simpson, xx,, 
26, 50; D. B. Smith, iv, 116, 118 — 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



6a 



CHLOROFORM {Continued). 

administration^ Murdock, xlii, 561 ; 
Snow, XX, 98 — adulteration wi h alco- 
hol, see detection — antidote (oxjgen), 
Duroy, xxiii, 175 — (nitrite of amyl), 
xlii, 468 — as antiperiodic^ Delioux, 

xxiii, 181, 183 — as antiseptic^ Auguna, 

xxiv, 273 — apparatus^ Crew, xxxiv, 25 ; 
Maisch, xl, 292 — behavior to potassa, 
Genther, xxxv, 32 — to seleniuretted 
and sulphuretted hydrogen, Loir, 
XXV, 117, 118 — to sunlight, Hager, 
xl, 319; remarks, Maisch, xl, 321; 
Rump, xli, 19 ; from chloral hydrate 
not affected by sunlight, Hager, xlii, 
319; remarks, Biltz, xlii, 409; 
Schacht, xl, 291; Wiggers, xl, 291 ; 
compare Maisch, xxxix, 73, xl, 289, 
301 — masking bitter taste, xxxvi, 313 ; 
Grave, xxxiii, 412 — history of claim, 
Waldie, xlii, 572 — containing chlorine, 
Procter, jr., xxii, 335 — chloroxycar- 
bonic ether, Personne, xli, 206 — detec- 
tion of acid reaction, Maisch, xl, 304 
— of alcohol: Bilz (chromic acid), xlii, 
410 — Bremon (various tests), xxviii, 
529 — Hager (Lieben's iodoform test), 
xlii, 399— Hardy (sodium, W. & B., 
960), xxxiv, 396— Mialhe (water, W. 
& B., 960), XX, 96— Procter, jr. (chro- 
mic acid, W. & B., 960), xxviii, 213— 
Rabourdin (iodine), xxiii, 162 — R »us- 
sin (nitro-sulphide of iron, W. & B , 
960), xxxi, 418 — drops, minims, fluid- 
drachms, Bernouilly, xxxi, 441 ; Proc- 
tor, xxxv, 248 — versus ether, Marshall 
Hall, xxiii, 179; Seguin, xxxix, 221 
— manufacture and preparation, Guth- 
rie (W. & B., 955), iv, 177; Hirsch, 
xxxiv, 42 ; Huskisson, xxv, 41 ; Kess- 
ler and others, xx, 224 ; McFarlane, 
xxviii, 153; Maisch, xl, 289 : Petten- 
kofer (W. & B., 959), xxxiii, 421 ; 
Schering (from chloral hydrate), xlii, 
319; Soubeiran, iv, 117, xx, 93; 
Squibb, x.^ix, 430 ; Gray's Supple- 
ment, XX, 22; Ph. Dublin (50), xxiii, 
17 ; Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix, 313 — 
from oiY of turpentine, Chautard (W, & 
B., 600), xxiv, 254— nature of o%5m6- 
stance, Pemberton, xxv, 113; Soubei- 
ran and Mialhe, xxi, 314, 316— poiwn- 
ing, xxviii, 534, xxix, 83, xxx, 403, 
xxxii, 462, see Maisch, behavior to 
sunlight — preservation, Biltz, xlii, 410 
— Boettger (soda), xxxviii, 473, see 
Maisch, behavior to sunlight — puri- 
fication and rectification, Abraham, 
xxii, 348— Gregory (W. & B., 957), 
xxii, 328; Maisch, xl, 303— Ph. U. S. 
(60), remarks, Procter, jr., xxxvi, 299 
— pure and impure, Soubeiran and 
Mialhe, xxi, 313; Squibb, xxix, 430, 
etc. — solvent power, Lepage, xxiv, 



147 ; Pettenkofer, xxxi, 232— Schlim- 
pert (W. & B., 960, note), xxxii, 160 
— solidification, Soubeiran and Mialhe^ 
xxi, 317 — specific gravity, Bremon^ 
xxviii, 529 ; Maisch, xxxix, 72 — tests^ 
Ph. British (64), Brown (objects to 
potassium test), xxxvii, 289 — Hardy 
(sodium), xxxvi, 18 — Squibb, xxix^ 
437— Staedeler (bilirubin), xl, 290— 
vapor, specific gravity, Dumas, x, 343t 
— quantity taken up by the air, Snow, 
XX, 99. 

CHLOROFORM emulsion, Dannecy, xxviii,. 
181. 

GELATINIZED Massart, xxx, 127. 

METHYLic, (W. & B., 958), Soubeiran 

and Mialhe, xxi, 313. 
NORMAL, Soubeiran and Mialhe (W.. 

& B., 958), xxi, 313. 
PAREGORIC, Hartshorne (Parrish, 167),. 

xxviii, 19; xl, 238— xxx, 94. 

WATER, xxxix, 417. 

CHLOROMETRY, Calvert (arsenious 
acid), xix, 276 — Noellner (hyposul- 
phite of soda, and baryta), xxviii, 61 
— Pouillet (precipitated metallic sil- 
ver), vi, 87. 

• Compare Calx, chlorinated ; chlo- 
rine. 

CHLOROPHYLL, formation (in electrie- 
light), Herve Mangon, xxxiv, 59 — - 
(iron necessary), Pfaundler, xxxiii, 
218 — nature, Mohl, xxviii, 46. 

CHLOROPICRIN (from methyl alcohol), 
Priestley, xxxvi, 133. 

CHLOROSAMIDE, Piria, xl, 152, 157. 

CHLORRUBIN, Rochleder, xxv, 248. 

CHOCOLATE, adulteration, xl, 165; xvi,. 
289. 

COD-LIVER OIL, XXix, 84. 

FERRO-MANGANIC, Buriu, XXV, 175. 

PAULLINIA. xiii, 55. 

CHOLERA, influence of elevation of soil on 
mortality, xxvii, 184 — geographical 
progress from India, Peters, xli, 28 — 
prize for cure, xxvi, 282 — prophylac- 
tics; prevention; preservation: xxxix, 
436 — Hager (pills; wine; mixture), 
xxxviii, 43 — Lovignac (potio anti- 
cholerica), xxxviii, 44, note — Otto 
(vaccination), xl, 312 — la Roche (qui- 
nia), xxxix, 318 — source, Boehm ; Hal- 
lier, xl, 143 — treatment: British board 
of health, xxi, 93 — Metropolitan board 
of health (New York), xxxviii, 313 — 
Donavan (opium and acetate of lead), 
xxviii, 172 — in India (tinctura igna- 
ti.-c amarae), iii, 266 — Simmondg 
(guaco), xxiii, 346 — Sqnibb (advice 
and drops), xxxviii, 310 — (charcoal, 
and Stragonoff's tincture), xxvii, 22. 

INFANTUM, Rademaker (sesquioxidft 

of chromium), xlii, 113. 

drops, Squibb, xxxviii, 312, note. 



^4 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



CHOLESTEARINE, behavior to muriatic, 
nitric acids ; percbloride of iron, 
Schiff, xxxiii, 'ii2— found in carrots ; 
Frorde ; Soeauer, xxxviii, 505 — in peas, 
Beneke, xxxy, 223 — in urinary calculi, 
Bastillial, xiii, 349 — solubility in chlo- 
roform, Lepage, xxiv, 148 — test (acid 
and perchloridc of iron), Schiff, xxxv, 
326. 

'€HOLINA (in hog-gall) Strecker, xxxv, 
35. 

^CHONDRUS CRispus (Irish moss). Com- 
pare Sph^rococcds CRISPUS — analysis^ 
Feuchtwanger, (W: k B., 250), vi,'205 
— collection and curing in Massachu- 
setts, Bates, xl, 417— Melzar (W. & B., 
250), xxxiii, 1 A— description and prop- 
erties, Feuchtwanger, vi, 204 — as sub- 
stitute for isinglass, xli, 128 — mucilage, 
properties, Fliickiger and Obermayer, 
xl, 393 — contains nitrogen, Fliickiger 
and Obermayer, xl, 392 — preparations, 
Mouchon (see jelly; paste; saccha- 
ride ; tablets), xvii, 189. 

' mamillosus, Pereira, xxvi, 177. 

CHOREA, remedy, (castoreura, musk, hy- 
drocyanic acid, etc.), viii, 259. 

CHRISM, xxxiii, 262, note. 

CHROME ALUM (potash ; soda ; ammo- 
nia;) Blyth, xxvi, 160 — behavior to 
ferroso-ferric oxide, Schober, xlii, 
402 — utilization, Jean, xli, 256. 

IRON ore, American, xxxiv, 225. 

MINES of Chester, Pa., xxxiii, 234. 

BED preparation, Franzoy, xxxv, 547 

— Woehler and Liebig, iv, 172. Com- 
pare Plumbum, chromate. 

YELLOW, iv, 173 — Franzoy, xxxv, 547. 

CHROMIUM, antidote, xi, 114:— poisoning, 
Berndt, xi, 171; Christison ; Ducatel, 
V, J 72 — preparation, Liebig, iv, 259 — 
Vauquelin, iv, 84 — salts, behavior to 
alkaline polysulphides, Schiff, xxxiii, 
265. 

bichromate of PERCHLORiDE, Walter, 

xi, 84. 

and BROMINE, Loewig, ii, 177, 178. 

and NITROGEN, Briegleb and Genther, 

xxxv, 33. 

oxiCHLORiDE, Walter, xi, 84. 

OXIDE, behavior to permanganate of 

potassa, Cloez andGuignet, xxxi, 152 
— in cholera infantum, Rademaker, 
xlii, 113 — crystallization, Woehler, vii, 
346 — hydrates, Siewert, xxxvi, 109 — 
preparation, Jean, xli, 256 — Radema- 
ker, xlii, 1 13 — solubility, Carney, xxxi, 
128. 

PERCHLORIDE, Berzelius, xi, 84. 

SESQUioxiDE. See , oxide. 

<!HROMULITE (green coloring matter of 

leaves), xi, 212. 
€HRYSAMINAMIDE, xxx, 449. 
€HRYS ANILINE {muriate; nitrate; sul- 



phate ; platinum salt), Hoffmann, xxxv, 
347, 348. 

CHYSANTHEMUM parthenium. See 

Matricaria parthenium. 
CHRYSBNE, xxxiii, 41. 
CHRYSOMELA ^nba, analysis, Enz, 

xxvii, 525. 

FASTuosA, adulterant of cantharides, 

Emanuel, xxiii, 181. 
CHRYSOPHANE, de la Rue and Miiller 

(W. & B., 708, note), xxx, 367, 442— 

composition, Rochleder and Heldt ; 

Schlossberger and Dcepping, xxx, 445. 
CHRYSOPHYLLUM, supposed mother 

plant of monesia, xiii, 152. 
CHRYSORETIN, Bley and Diesel, (W. & 

B.. 773), xxii, 67. 
CHRYSOSPLENIUM americanum, xli, 437. 
CHRYSOXYLON pebripugum (= How- 

ardia febrifuga), Weddell, xxvii, 448. 
CHUFA (tuber of Cyperus esculentus), an- 
alysis, xxx, 485. 
CHURRUS, preparation in Bengal, (W. & 

B , 380), XV, 157— Duhamel, (W. & B., 

380), XV, 254. 
CHYMOSINE, Dechamps, xii, 194. 
CiBOTIUM cuMMiNGii (source of Peng- 

hawar djambi), Hanbury, xxix, 160. 
CICADA septemdecim, xl, 451. 
CIOHORIUM iNTYBUS, time of collection^ 

Nentwich, xv, 142 — yield of oxalic 

acid by potassa, Possoz, xxx, 552 — 

percolation with water, packing, Soii- 

beiran, viii, 225. 
CICUTA maculata. Compare Conium 

maculatum. 
analysis of seeds. Young, (W. & 

B., 1496), xxvii, 289, 294—027 from 

seeds. Young, xxvii, 291. 
MAJOR, vi, 267. 

VIROSA, antidote (nut-galls), Meyer, 

XV, 153; xvi, 154 — innocuous near 
Edinburgh, xxxiv, 273 — oil of seeds, 
Trapp,xxxi, 251 — poisoning, xxix, 319. 

CICUTIN, Brandrs, vi, 271— Young (from 
conia), xxxvi, 330. 

CIDER, adulteration, xvi, 291. 

CIGARETTES, anti-asthmatic, Dannecy, 
xxx, 404. 

medicated, Bowman (arsenical; mer- 
curial; nitre; balsamic), xxxv, 363. 

CIMICIFUGA bacemosa, analysis, Davis, 
(W. & B., 251), xxxiii, 391, 396— 
Jones, XV, 1, 5— Tilghman, (W & B., 
251), vi, 14, 20 — description and pro- 
perties, Davis, xxxiii, 391 — Jones, 
XV, 1 — Tilghman, vi, 14 — pharmacy, 
Procter, jr., xxvi, 106. 

CINCHOLIN. See Quinolin. 

CINCHONA. Compare Bark (cinchona); 
Calisaya. 

estivation, Don, xi, 247. 

general remarks. See after Cincho- 
na vera. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



65. 



CINCHONA ACADEMiCA, xxxviii, 423. 

ACUMINATA, Wood, iii, 24. 

ACUTiFOLiA, De CandoUe, ii, 239; 

Wood, viii, 37. 

of Africa. See Malouetia, (xxxi, 430 ) 

ANGUSTiFOLiA, De Candollc, ii, 238 ; 

Wood, iii, 39. 

ANGUSTUEA (suppOScd tO be BI- 

colorata), Carson, xiii, 51. 
ARiCA, xxii, 41. 

AURANTIACA, XXix, 115. 

AUSTRALis, Weddell, xxii, 29. 

BicoLOR, supposed identity with Pi- 

aya, Batka, vii, 333. 

BicoLORATA, analysis, Cardone ; Pel- 

letier and Petros, xiii, 50 — descrip- 
tion, etc , Carson, xiii, 49. 

BOLiviANA, Carson, xxii, 107 — How- 
ard ; Weddell, xxxviii, 421. 

BONPLANDiANA, Howard, xxxviii, 425. 

BBAsiLiENsis, assay, Buchner, xxiv, 

43, 45. 

CADUCiFLORA," De Candollc, ii, 239 ; 

Wood, iii, 37. " 

CALiSAYA, Weddell, xxii, 29, 41 — ac- 
count^ Howard, xxxviii, 419 — descrip- 
tion^ etc., Weddell ; Carson, xxii, 97 — 
microscopic structure, xxvi, 184 — root 
hark, Howard, xxxvi, 127, 322. 

josEPHiANA, Weddell ; Carson, 

xxii, ,9 8, 100, 103. 

LUCUM.EFOLiA, growth In India, 

xxxiv, 239. 

CARABAYA, characters, Delondre and 

Bouchardat, xxvi, 51 — Howard, xxix, 
41. 

CARiBAEA, Wood, iii, 23, 24. 

CAROLiNiANA, De Caudollc, ii, 293 — 

Wood, iii, 24 — Pereira, xi, 248. 
CARTHAGENA, xxix, 115 — characters, 

Delondre andBouchardat, xxvi, 51, 52 
CHAHUAGUERA, Dc CandoUc, ii, 237 

— account, Howard, xxxviii, 424, 425. 

cocciNEA, De Candolle, ii, 238. 

COLORADA de HuARANDA, Howard, 

xxix, 39, 40. 
CONDAMINEA, Dc Caudollc, ii, 237, 295 ; 

Wood, iii, 25, 30, 35, 108; Pereira, 

xi, 314, 316; Weddell, xxii, 40, 41 ; 

Howard, xxxviii, 424 — worthless as 

shrub, Hanbury, xxxv, 371. 

CONVOLUTA, Bergen, xi, 254. 

CORDIFOLIA, De Candolle, ii, 238 ; 

Wood, iii, 27, 32, 113, 117; Pereira, 

xi, 322, 328 ; Weddell, xxii, 41, 42— 

characters, Delondre and Bouchardat, 

xxvi, 52 — constituents, Battley, iv, 170 

— rediscovered, Ernst, xiii, 449. 
CORONA, and coronalis. See 

Bark, Crown. 
corymbosa, Karsten, xxx, 534 — 

xxxiii, 113 — xxxviii, 422. 
CRASSiPOLiA, De Candolle, ii, 239 — 

Wood, iii, 37. 



CINCHONA CRisPA, Tafalla; Howard,, 

xxxviii, 425. 
DiCHOTOMA, De Candolle, ii, 239 — ■ 

Wood, iii, 37. 
ERYTHRODERMA, Howard, xxix, 36, 

40 ; xxxviii, 417. 
EXCELSA, Wood, iii, 24 — Pereira, xi, 

248 — contains sesculin and no quinia, 

Broughton, xl, 353. See Hymenodic- 

TYON EXCBLSUM. 

FALSE, Pereira, xi, 330. 

FLAVA, Pereira, xl, 257, 320, 327 — 

assay, Buchner, xxiv, 43, 45. 
DURA, behavior to reagents, 

Anthon, ix, 130. 
FIBROSA, behavior to reagents, 

Anthon, ix, 131. 

See Bark, yellow. 

floribunda, Wood, 24. Compare 

EXOSTEMMA. 

fusca, Pereira, xi, 258,''326 — assay,. 

Buchner, xxiv, 43. See Bark, brown. 

glabra. Wood, iii, 29. 

glandulifera, De Candolle, ii, 239 

— Wood, iii, 36— Weddell, xxii, 40. 

glandulosa, De Candolle, ii, 239. 

grandiflora, De Candolle, ii, 239. 

GREY, De Candolle, ii, 295. See 

Bark, grey. 
hirsuta, De Candolle, ii, 238 — Wood, 

iii, 33, 34, 109— Weddell, xxii, 41. 
HUAMALiES, assay, Buchner, xxiv, 43, 

44. See Bark, Huamalies. 

HuANuco. See Bark, Huanuco. 

INVOLUTA, Bergen, xi, 253. 

Jaen, Pereira, xi, 319. See Bark, 

Jaen. 

Java, royal, assay, Jobst ; Gunning, 

xiii, 401. 

JosEPHiANA, Weddell ; Carson, xxii, 

98, 100, 103. 

lanceolata, De Candolle, ii, 238 — 

Wood, iii, 29— Weddell, xxii, 40. 

lancifolia, De Candolle, ii, 237, 295 

—Wood, iii, 27, 31, 38, 104, 107, 112 
— Pereira, xi, 320, 322 ; xxvi, 185 — 
Weddell, xxii, 40, 41 — Delondre, vii, 
325 — Howard, xxix, 37 — Karsten, 
xxxviii, 422 — yield of quinia and cin- 
chonia, Karsten (W. & B., 279, note), 
xxx, 534; xxxiii, 113. 

lucum^folia, growth in India, xxxiv, 

239. 

LUTESCENS, De Candollc, ii, 239. 

MACROCALYX, Dc Candollc, ii, 239 — 

Wood, iii, 37— Weddell, xxii, 40. 

macrocarpa, De Candolle, ii, 239 — 

Wood, iii, 36, 118. 

MAGNiFOLiA, Wood, iii, 35, 115 — De 

Candolle, ii, 239, 295— Guibourt, 
xxix. 37, note. 

MiCRANTHA, De Candollc, ii, 239 — 

Wood, 36— Delondre, vii, 327 — Wed- 
dell, xxii, 40, 41 — Howard, xxix, 37 j 



66 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



'OINCHONA MiCBANTHA [Continued). 

xxxviii, 417 — growth in Jamaica, 
Quin, xxxvi, 357 — in Bengal, xxxviii, 
354, 355 — grown in India, contains 
chiefly quinidia, Howard, xxxviii, 419. 

MONTANA, active principle (monta- 

nine), van Mons, iv, 352. 

MORADA, De Candolle, ii, 238. 

New Granada, analysis, Urieoechea, 

xxvi, 360— yield of alkaloids, (W. & 
B., 279 & 280, note,) Karsten, xxx, 
534 : xxxviii, 113 — Procter, jr., xxv, 
306,' 

■ NiTiDA, De Candolle, ii, 238 — Wood, 

iii, 28, 31— Delondre, vii, 325— Wed- 
dell, xxii, 40-^Howard, xxxvi, 89, 90 
— growth in J^fmirt/ca, Quin, xxxvi, 357. 

NODOSA, Bergen, xi, 251. 

■ NOVA, Pereira, xi, 329 — Delondre and 

Bonchardat, xxvi, 52, 55 — analysis, 
Pelletier and Caventou, xi, 330 — sup- 
posed Fitaj/a hark, vii, 333. 

NUDA, Bergen, xi, 250. 

OBLONaiFOLTA, Dc Candolle, ii, 239 — 

Wood, 27, 35, 115, 118— Pereira, xi, 
325, 329— Guibourt, xxvi, 52 ; xxix, 
37, note — Howard, xxix, 38. 

OBTUSiFOLTA, Wood, iii, 24. 

■ OFFICINALIS, De Candolle, ii, 238 — 

Wood, iii, 23, 25 — cultivation in In- 
dia, xxxviii, 354. 

— BoNPLANDiANA, Howard, xxxviii, 

425. 

■ CoNDAMiNEA, Howard , xxxviii, 

424. 

CRiSPA. Tafalla ; Howard, 

xxxviiii, 425. 
^ URiTUSiNGA. Howard, xxxviii, 

423. 

. ORANGE, De Candolle, ii, 238, 295— 

Delondre and Bouchardat, xxvi, 52. 

ovALiFOLiA, De Candolle, ii, 238 — 

Wood, 36, 37, 118— AVeddell, xxii, 41. 

■ ovATA, Wood, iii, 33 — Pereira, xi. 

320 — Weddell, xxii, 40 — Howard, 
xxix, 39, note; xxxviii, 417 — con- 
tains neither quinia nor cinchonia, 
Bouchardat ; Manzini, xii, 332. 

ERYTHRODERMA, Howard, XXix, 

36, 40, 41 ; xxxviii, 417. 
RUPiNERVis, Weddell, Carson, 

xxii, 107; Howard, xxxviii, 417, 
Pahudiana in India, xxxviii, 355 — 

in Jamaica, Quin, xxxvi, 359, 

PALLEscKNS, De Caudollc, ii, 238. 

■ PALLIDA, Pereira, xi, 257,314; xiii, 

49. See Bark, pale. 

Pavonii, Wood, iii, 37. 

Payta, analysis, Hesse, xlii, 470. 

pelalba, De Candolle, ii, 239 ; Wood, 

iii, 37. 

peruviana (Pitaya), vii, 333. 

Philippica, Wood, iii, 24. Compare 

EXOSTEMMA. 



CINHONA PiTAYA (=bicolorata), xiii, 49 
— examination. Bull, xxiii, 168. See 
Bark, Pitaya. 

pseudo-regia, behavior to reagents, 

Wittstein, xxix, 115 — analysis of 
ashes, Crawford and Krombach, xxix, 
117. 

PUBESCENS, De Candolle, ii, 238, 295; 

Wood, iii, 23, 2^, 37— Pereira, xi, 
320; Weddell, xxii, 41; Howard, 

xxix, 37. 

purpurea, De Candolle, ii, 238, 295; 

Wood, iii, 33, 108, 109; Weddell, 
xxii, 40, 41 ; Howard, xxxviii, 425, 
note 

REGiA, Pereira, xi, 257, 320, 321. See 

Bark, yellow. 

RiMOSA, Bergen, xi, 251. 

ROSEA, De Candolle, ii, 239 ; Wood, 

iii, 27. 

rotundifolia. Wood, iii, 37 — redis- 
covered, Ernst, xlii, 449. 

rubra, Pereira, xi, 258, 323 — beha- 
vior to reagents, Anthon, ix, 129. 
See Bark, red. 

rugosa, Bergen, xi, 251. 

scrobiculata, De Candolle, ii, 237, 

295; Wood, iii, 37, 108; Pereira, xi, 
316 ; Weddell. xxii, 40, 107— Procter, 
jr. (W. & B., 272, note), xix, 178— 
Howard, xxix, 37 — analysis, Rochle- 
der, xxv, 242, 244. 

stenocarpa. Wood, iii, 37. 

subconvoluta, Bergen, xi, 253. 

succirubra, Weddell, xxix, 39 — ana- 
lysis of bark and leaves, Howard (W. 
& B., 255, note), xxxv, 513, 516— in- 
fusion of leaves as febrifuge, Ander- 
son, xxxv, 187 — composition of mother 
liquor from heart of tree, Howard, 

xxxvii, 349 — cultivation in India, 
xxxvi, 321, xxxviii, 354 — in Jamaica, 
xxxvi, 357. 

SURINAM, assay, Buchner, xxiv, 43, 

45. 

tenuis, De Candolle, ii, 238. 

TUBULATA, Bergen, xi, 253. 

TUCUJENSis (~ Quina maracaibo), 

xlii, 449. 

URITUSINGA, De Candolle, ii, 237; 

HowHi'd. xxxviii, 423. See Bark, 

URITUSINGA. 

'vera, Pereira, xi, 256. 

CINCHONA BARKS, alkaloids : classifi- 
cation, Howard (polarized light), 

xxxviii, 419 — compounds of, Hesse, 
Hoffmann, Strecker, xxxv, 54 — dis- 
crimination : Bouchardat ( polar' i ad 
light), xxx, 241, 2A2—Bra7ides (chlo- 
rine and ammonia), xxx, 241, 244 — 
Leers (combination of Brandes and 
Liebig), xxx, 241, 245 — Liebig (ether), 

xxx, 241, 245 — Marchand (nascent ox- 
ygen), xxx, 241, 244 — Fasteur (polar- 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



67 



CINCHONA BARKS, alkaloids {Contin' d) . 
ized light), xxx, 241, 242 — Felletier 
chlorine gas), xxx, 241, 244 — Stokes 
fluorescei ce), xxx, 241, 242 — Vogel 
(modifications of Brandes), xxx, 241, 
244 Von Heiningen (oxalate of am- 
monia), xxx, 242, 244 — de Vrij (hy- 
■df iodic acid), xxx, 242, 244 — loss pre- 
vented (by shading the bark when 
drying), Pasteur, xxv, 538 — microsco- 
pical examination, Howard, xxxviii, 
346 — natural state, Henry and Piisson 
,(W. <fe B., 285), ii, 233— polartzing 
power (Parrish, 647), Bouchardai 
and Pasteur, xxx, 242; Howard, 
xxxviii, 419 — properties and reactions, 
Kerner, xxxiv, 417 — value of differ- 
ent tests, bird Herapath, xxx, 241, 
compare discrimination — table o^ yield, 
Delondre, xxvii, 90 ; Guillermond, 
xxxvi, 16 — conditions for large yield, 
Karsten, xxxiii, 113. 

lODO-suLPHATES, Bird Herapath 

(W. & B., 1319, note), xxix, 245, xxx, 
246. 

ASSAY, Andr^ (chlorine and ammo- 
nia), viii, 214 — Buchner (acidu- 
lated water and ammonia), xxiv, 42 
— Carles (quicklime and chloroform), 
xUi, 525 — Duflos (bichloride of pla- 
tina), vi, 32 — Goebel (acidulated water 
and potassa), ii, 254 — Guillermond 
(W. & B., 296, note), xxxi, UQ—Kleist 
(acidulated water, soda, chloroform), 
xxxi, 565 — Riibourdin (chloroform, 
W. & B., 295, note), xxiii, 2^2— Schnei- 
der (quicklime and alcohol), xli, 22 — 
Squibb (modification of Winckler's 
process), xxxix, 293 — Tilloy (alcohol 
and ammonia), Prel. No. 97 — Velt- 
mann (acidulated alcoholic vapor and 
lime), ii, 254, iii, 90— Fo^c^ (boiling 
alcohol and lime), xlii, 372 — Winchler 
(W. & B , 295), xxr, 339. Compare 

QUINIA TESTS. 
BOTANICAL HISTORY, CLASSIFICATION, 

CHAKACTBRS, Bergen, xi, 255 — De Can- 
dolle, ii, 234, 290 — Delondre and Bou- 
chardat, xxvi, 50 — Geiger, xi, 254 — 
Goebel, xi, 2b3 — Guibourt, ix, 23. xi, 
255, xxii, ^2—Percira, xi, 246, 314— 
Weddell, xxii, 26, 40— Wood, iii, 22, 
96. 

COLLECTION, PercirtN, xi, 248 ; Wed- 
dell, xxii, 36 ; Wood, iii, 101. 

COMMERCIAL HiSTORV, Wood, iii, 96; 

Weddell, xxvi, 539. 

CONSTITUENTS, Rochledcr, xxv, 2 46: 

Hesse, xxxiii, 171. 

CRYPTOGAMic PLANTS, Percira, xi, 251. 

CRYSTALS (oxalate of lime), xxxvii, 

32. 

CULTURE in Algeria, xxiv, 80— in Ben- 
gal, Anderson, xxxviii, 354 ; Clarke, 



xlii, 422 — in C'ey^o/i, Markham, xxxviii, 
352 — in England (under glass), How- 
ard, xlii, 257 — in India, Markham (W. 
&. B., 255, note), xxxi, 429, xxxiii, 
233, 576, xxxiv, 238, xxxv, 365— de 
Vrij, xxxvi, 321 — in Jamaica, xl, 396 
— in Java, Miquel, xxviii, 325 ; de 
Vrij, xxxiii, 47 — in Mexico, Fink, xlii, 
542 — in United States, Buckalew, xxxi, 
475. 

CINCHONA BARKS, districts of the An- 
des, Cross, xxxix, 160. 

EFFECTS of locality, climate, etc., 

Cochet, iv, 349 ; Howard, xxxviii, 
419. 

entitled to entry (per centage), xxiv, 

24, xxv, 302. 
at exhibition of 1862, Hanbury, 

xxxiv, 548. 

EXTRACTED best by cold water, Bou- 

illny, X, 13. 
FORESTS in South America, Scherzer, 

xxxv, 124. 

geography, De Candolle, ii, 295 ; 

Pereira, xi, 248. 
HUMOiD constituents, Hesse, xxxiii, 

171. 

HYBRIDIZATION, Broughton, xlii, 467. 

state of KNOWLEDGE, Howard, xxxviii, 

417. 

LEAVES, de Vrij, xxxvi, 427 ; xxxvii, 

253. 

LIQUOR, Battley, iv, 170. 

MOSSi^^G, Hanbury, xli, 571 ; de Vrij, 

xxxvi, 322. 

NORMAL powder (W. & B., 297, note), 

Guillermond, xxxvi, 16. 

PERCOLATING With watcr, packing, 

Soubeiran, viii, 225- — comparative 
result of percolating with water (cold 
and hot), and alcohol, Boullay, Guil- 
lermond, x, 10. 

pharmacy, Squibb, xxxix, 289, 398, 

513. 

PHYSICAL PROPERTIES, Pereira, xi, 

250. 

POWDER, adullerotion, Thomson, xi, 

169 — (contaminated with iron) Ellis, 
ii, 216 — Zoss in povk'dering, i, 138; Co- 
vell, xxxix, 116; Redwood, xxi, 31. 

PREPARATIONS (glycerin prevents pre- 
cipitate), Taylor, xxxvii, 50. 

RESiNOiD MATTER, bthavior to cam- 
phor, Planche (W. & B., 195, note), 
X, 214. 

ROOTBARK, Howard, xxxvi, 127, 430 

— de Vry, xxxvi, 322. 

SEEDS, Forbes, xxxviii, 414. 

SUBSTITUTED by gcntiana (recom- 
mended), Kuchenmeister, xxiv, 170 — - 
Adansonia digitata, Duchassaing, xx, 
328. 

TESTS, true from false, Stenhouse 

(testing for kinic acid, W. & B., 293, 



68 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



CINCHONA BARKS, tests {Continued). 
note), xvii, 156— Grahe (W. & B., 294, 
note, dry distillation), xxx, 351 — 
compare Cinchona, assay; quinia, 
TEST ; etc. 

THICKENING of bark. See Cinchona, 

MOSSING. 

VALUE, Delondre and Henry, jr., vii, 

325, 328— Dierbach, iii, 1V6— discus- 
sion in American Pharmaceutical 
Association, 18o2, xxv, 7. 

several varieties ought to be classi- 
fied under Ladenbergia, Howard, 
xxxviii, 418. 

CINCHONETINE, Marchand, xvi, 197. 

CINCHONIA, behavior to reagents, Frese- 
nius, xxxviii, 452 — to benzole^ Mans- 
field, xxi, 330 — to bichromate of po- 
tassa test, Jenkins, xxxiii, 528 — to 
bromine, Blengini, vi, 336 — to carbo?iic 
acid, Langlois, xxvi, 238 — to chlorine, 
Pelletier, x, 168 — and ammonia, 
Andre, viii, 213 — chromaie of potassa, 
Eboli, xxix, 369 — to heat, Guy, xxxiii, 
526 — to ferrocyanide of potassium. Bill 
(W. & B,, 289), XXX, 460— to nascent 
hydrogen, Rochleder, xxxix, 319 — to 
iodide of cadmium and potassium, 
Marme, xli, 18 — to iodohydrar gyrate 
of potassium, Mayer (W. & B., 1542), 
XXXV, 21, 23 — to u&scQui oxygen, Mar- 
chand, xvi, 197 — to pentachloride of 
an^mo?ji/ and phosphoric acid,'Schulze, 
xxxii, 138, 235 — to bicacbonate of 
soda and tartaric acid, Oppermann, 
xvii, 299 — to sulphuric acid and per- 
manganate of potassa, Guy, xxxiii, 526 
—to tannin, Henry, vii, 228, 230. 

composition, Hlasiwetz, xxiii, 255 — 

Laurent, xxvi, 185 — Regnault, xi, 219 
— with aricina and quinia, considered 
as three grades of oxida'ion of a pecu- 
liar base, Pelletier, v, 259 — crystalline, 
Hlasiwetz, xxiii, 255 — Winckler, xx, 
238 — formation in Cinchona succi- 
rubra, Howard, xxxv, 516 — fluores- 
cence, Stokes, xxx, 2i3— fusing point, 
Duflos, vi, 82; Erdmann ; Schwabe, 
xxxv, bb— preparation, Calverl (W. & 
B., 1315), XV, 199— Henry and Plis- 
son, iii, 305 — Henry, vii, 2'i'i— polar- 
izing power (Parrish, 647), Bouchar- 
dat and Pasteur, xxx, 24:1 — Howard, 
xxxviii, 419 — properties, Gregory, 
xxix, 92 — solubility in alcohol, Hesse, 
xxxv, 54 — in chloroform, Lepage, 
xxiv, 148; Pettenkofer, xxxi, 232; 
Schlimper, xxxii, 160 — in ether, 
Hess©, xxxv, 54 — in glycerin, Adol- 
phus, xxxix, 150; Klever, xlii, 222 — 
ic olive oil, Pettenkofer, xxxii, 185 — 
Attfield, xxxv, 250 — in water, Hesse, 
xxxv, 54 — as substitute for quinia, 
Howard, xxxv, 423 — (recommended) 



D. B. Smith, xxvii, 573 — worthless 

in tropical countries, Daniell, xxxv,^ 
333 — tists, s^e behavior — yield from 
ash bark, Michaelis, xi, 320 — from 
Bogota bark, Procter, jr., xxxv, 30& 
— from Brown bark, Goebel and Kirst, 
xi, 254, 327— Michaelis, xi, 327— from 
Carthagena (hard), Goebel and Kirst, 
xi, 254, 329— from Gray bark, Gcebel 
and Kirst, xi, 254, 318 — IVtichaelis; 
von Santen, xi, 318 — from Loxa, 
Goebel and Kirst, xi, 254 — Pelletier 
and Caventou, xi, 317 — from Pitaya 
condaminea, Guibourt, xxvi, 185 — 
from Red bark, Goebel and Kirst, xi, 
254, 326 — Michaelis; von Santen, xi, 
326 — from Silver bark, see Gray — 
from cinchona barks in general, De- 
londre, xxvii, 90. 
CINCHONIA AMORPHOUS, Winckler, xx, 238 

and ANTIMONIUM, TARTRATE, HcSSC, 

XXXV, 57. 

ARSENIATE, HcSSe, XXXV, 57. 

BENZOATE, HcSSe, XXXV, 55. 

Beta. See Beta-cinchonia. 

BIBROMO-, Gregory, xxix, 93. 

BICHL0R0-, Gregory, xxix, 92. 

BiTANNATE, Henry, vii, 231. 

BR0M0-, Gregory, xxix, 92. 

CHLORATE, Serullas, ii, 305, 307 — 

Diehl, xl, 102. 

CHROMATB. HeSSC, XXXV, 57. 

CITRATE, Hesse, XXXV, 56. 

FORMiATB, Fell, xxx, 220. 

HYDROCYANATE (Schwabe), contains 

no hydrocyanic acid, Hesse, xxxv, 56. 

HYDRIODATE, HcSSe, XXXV, 56. 

HYPOSULPHITE, HcSSC, XXXV, 56. 

lODATE, Serullas, ii, 301. 

IODO-. See loDO-CINCHONIA. 

KiNATE, Henry and Plisson (W & B., 

293), ii, 232. 

MURIATE, Hesse, xxxv, 55. 

NITRATE, Hesse, xxxv, 55. 

OXALATE, Hesse, xxxv, 56. 

OXY-. See OXY-CINCHONIA. 

PHOSPHATE, Hesse, xxxv, 56. 

SANTONATB, PaVCSi, XXX, 374. 

SESQuiBROMiDB, Gregory, xxix, 93. 

SUCCINATE, Hesse, xxxv, 56. 

SULPHATE, behavior to ammonia, Ker- 

ner, xxxiv, 425 — tb iodohydrargyrate 
of potassium, Mayer (W. & B., 1542), 
xxxv, 23— Ph. U. S (60), remarks, 
Procter, jr., xxxvi, 303 — solubility in 
alcohol, Hesse, xxxv, 55 — in chloro- 
form, Schlimper, xxxii, 160 — in gly- 
cerin, Klever, xlii, 222 — in water, 
Hesse, xxxv, 55, 

suLPHOCYANiDE, Under the micro- 
scope, Stoddart, xxxvii, 44. 

SUPERKINATE, xi, 325. 

TARTRATE, Arppe, xxiv, 157 — Hesse, 

xxxv, 56. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



69 



CINCFIONIC RED, xi, 323, 325. 

CINCH ONICIA, Pasteur (W. & B., 291), 
XXV, 534 — Gregory, xxix, 92 — polar- 
izing power, Bouchardat and Pasteur, 
xxx, 422 — Howard, xxxviii, 419. 

QmCllOmmXJ'luorescence, Stoke?, xxx, 
242 — formation in Cinchona sncri- 
rubra, HoAvard, xxxv, 51G — polarizing 
power (Parrish. 647), Boucbardat and 
Pasteur, xxx, 242; Ilowi.rd, xxxviii 
properties^ etc., Gregory, xxix, 
92— Kerner, xxxiv, 420— Pasteur (W. 
& B., 290), XXV, 536— Wittstein (W. 
& B., 292, note), xxix, 115 — reaction^^ 
Kerner, xxxiv, 420— Wittstein, xxix, 
115, 116 — Ilerapath on Wittstein, 
xxx, 246 — solubilil/i in oil, Attfield, 

xxxv, 250 — tcsts^ Leers (ether, chlor- 
ine, ammonia), xxx, 241, 245. 

lODosuLPHATE, behavior, Bird Hera- 
path, xxix, 245; xxx, 24G. 

SULPHATE, behavior to ammonia, 

Kerner, xxxiv. 424. 

METHYLO-, Gregory, xxix, 93. 

C IN CHON I U M , M E T H VLO- , G r egory ,xxix. 93 . 

and POTASSIUM, iodide, Smith, xxiv. 

305. 

PROTiODiDE, Smith, xxiv, 305. 

CINCHOTINE, HIasiwetz, xxiii, 256 — 

identical with conchinin (Hesse, xli, 

421). 

CINCHO-QUININE (Nichols & Co.), Wen- 
zell (= pure cinchonia), xlii, 342. 

CINNABAR (Vermillion), of the ancienls 
■= Dragon's blood, Simmonds, xxix, 
466 — of California analysis of ore, 
Bealey, xxiv, 51, 53— account of 
mines, Lyman, xxi, 44 — of Corsica^ 
xxiii, 384 — of New Almnden^ see Cali- 
fornia — preparation^ Fiimenich, xxxiv, 
167 — Ringaud, xxxiv, 444. 

of ANTIMONY, iMathieu, xxviii, 338. 

CINNABAR, CHINESE (preparation in 
China) vii, 169. 

CINNAMATE8, Kopp, xxxiv. 186. 

CINNAMEIN (W. & B., 156), Fremy, xi, 87 
= Stolze's oil of balsam Peru (xlii, 
236.) 

CINNAMENE (identical with styrol), 
Kopp, xxxiv, 186. 

CINNAMIN. See Cinnamein. 

CINNAMODBNDRON corticosum, sup- 
posed source of West India red ca- 
nella, Daniell, xxxi, 347. 

CINNAMOMIN, Simon, xiv, 266. 

OINNAMOMUM. (Compare (Cassia cin- 
namon); LAURUS cassia) aromati- 

cum ; iner.i ; sulphur aturn ; 

zpylanicum^ Wight, xii, 221, 222 

CINNAMON, history^ etc., Ruschenberger, 
X, 32 — gardens of Ceylon, xxxiv, 434 
— region of East Africa^ Cooley, xxi, 
339 — powder^ adulteration, Schrceder, 

xxxvi, 107 — loss, i, 138. 



INDIA, Carson, xxi, 296. 

WHITE. See Canella alba; Costus 

DULCIS. 

CINNARUBRIN, Hare, ix, 211. 
CISSAiMPELlNA. (Compare Pereirinb), 

Feneulle; Wiggers, (W. & B., 638), 

xi, 352. 

CISSAMPELOS argentea; capiha; 

guayaquilcnsis ; n^auritiana ; 

microcarpa ; pareira ; 

scandens, Griffith, vii, 193, 194. See 
Pareira. 

CISTERNS in Venice, Grimaud, xxxiii, 79. 
CITRATE OF MAGNESIA. See Liquor 

MAGNESI/E CITRATIS. 

CITROMEL FEiiiu lODiDi, Horncastle 
(Parrish, 258), xxxi, 64. 

CITRON (succade) contaminated with 
copper, Bauwens, xxxi, r>76. 

CITRONYL, Blanchet and Sell, viii, 44. 

CITRUS BiGARADiA, oil. See Oleum, or- 
ange, CHINESE. 

LLMiA, oil. See Oleum citri lumi^. 

CITRYL, Blanchet and Sell, viii, 44. 

CIVET, account, Vaughan, xxv, 336 — ia 
perfaraery, Piesse, xxvii, 75, 

CLADONIA EAXGiFERiNA, yields alcohol, 
St^nberg, xli. 17. 

CLARET. See Wine, claret. 

CLAVARIA CLAVUS is ergota, xi, 121, 

CLAVICEPS purpurea is ergota, xli, 523. 

CLAY extracts ammonia, from watery so- 
lution. Way, xxviii, 48 — as dressing 
for sores, Schreber, xxxvi, 272 — m 
paper. Penny, xxxiii, 377. 

CLAYTONIA tirginica, xli, 438. 

CLEANSING (in chemical manipula- 
tions), Faraday, i, 40. See under 
diiferent heads. 

CLEMATITIS baccifera (=Pareira bra- 
va), viii 193. 

CLOTH and Clothing rendered incom- 
bustible (tungstate of ammonia), 
Versmann and Oppenheira, xxxiiij 
541. 

rendered waterproof (glue, soap, 

alum), xxxv, 89 — Thieux (alum, sugar 
of lead), xxx, 76. 

rendered air and waterproof, Sten- 

bouse (parraffin in benzole, etc.), 
xxxv, 320. Compare Varnish, water- 
proof. 

CLOVERSEED, amount of starch, Drag- 
en dorff, xxv, 139. 

CLOVES. See Caryophyllus. 

CI OVORUBRIN, Hare, ix, 211, 

CLUSIA ROSEA, Wright, xl, 537. 

CLUTIA CASCARILLA; eluteria„ 

See Cascarilla (vi, 238), 

CNEORUM tricoccon (supposed to be 
Mezereum of Arabian authors), Bau- 
bin, xiv, 254, 

CNICINE (from Carduus benedictus), xxTj 
136. 



[6] 



70 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



COAL, analysis (with nitrate of ammonia), i 
V, 292 — products of distillation, Runge, 
vii, 250. 

Albert, composition, Wetherill, 

xxxiv, 539. 

ANTHRACITE. See ANTHRACITE. 

• BITUMINOUS, composition. Johnston ; 

Kiihnert and Graeger ; Regnault, 

xxxiv, 539. 

BRASSES, Mctear, xl, 435. 

BROWN, composition, Schroetter ; Wos- 

kresensky, xxxiv, 534 — products of 

distillation, Paul, xxx, 530. 
in California, Bhike ; Whitney, 

xxxiv, 186. 

OUST, CONSOLIDATED, XXxix, 443. 

containing soda, Wayne, xxxv, 19. 

WORKING power, Rogers, xxxiv, 90. 

NAPHTHA. See Naphtha. 

OIL, rectified, specific gravity, Mar- 

tius, V, 60 — vapor, igniting [)oint, 
Hutron, xli, 254. See Petkolbum. 

tar, colors, Kopp, xxxiii, 39, 129, 245 

—products, Kopp, (W. & B., 1497), 
xxxiii, 39, 129, 245. Compare Tar. 

COBALT, preparation of metallic, Shars- 
wood, xxxi, 433 — purified from zaffre, 
Paul, xix, 37 — salts, behavior to 
alkaline p<jl3'sulpbides, Schiff, xxxiii, 
265 — separated from manganese, Vcel- 
ker, xviii, 309 — tenacity, xxxiv, 159. 

ammonio-iodide, Reade, xxx, 58. 

blue, Gaudin, vii, 47. 

carminate, Luckow, xxxvii, 277. 

FORMIATE, Fell, xxx, 221. 

IODIDE, Ramuielsberg, xiii, 86, 

OXIDE, crystallized anhydrous, Bec- 

querel, v, 345. 

YELLOW, St. Evie, xxx, 157. 

COBALTLNG, electro-, Kurtz, xv, 65. 

COBWEB. See Spiders' web. 

COCA, account, Martins, xv, 156 — Valdez 
xxxiii, 323 — constituents, Maisch (W. 
& B., 1513), xxxiii, 496 — iNiemann 
(W. & B , 1513), xxxiii, 122— physio- 
logical prop rties, Mantegazza, xxxii. 
4i7_Weddell (W. & B., 1513), xxvii, 
33, 45— Valdez, xxxiii, 323. 

COCAINA, preparation, Lossen, xxxiv, 
400— Niemann (W. & B., 1513) xxxiii, 
122 — Woebler and Niemann, xxxii, 450. 

COCCININ, Hlasiwetz and Grabowsky, 
xxxviii, 504. 

COCCOLOBA uviFERA (Kino), Guibourt, 
iv, 54 

COCCOON, antidote — . See Feuillia 

CORDIFOLIA. 

COCCULUS CRisPus, Carson, viii, 279. 

iNDicus, analysis, Casaseca, Prel. No. 

64 — Pelletier and Couerbe (W. & B., 
306), vi, 330— origin, Griffith, viii, 19. 

PALMATUS. See Calumba. 

SUBEROSUS, viii, 20. 

COCCUS CACTI. See Cochineal. 



from Abies nigra (Canada), red dye, 

Lawson, xxxiii, 367. 

iLicis, supposed origin of syria (red 

dye), Virey, xii, 175 — collection, etc., 
Landerer, xxiv, 376. 

COCHINEAL, adulteration, baryta sul- 
phate, xlii, 220; lead, xvi, 77; talc, 
xvii. 57 — analysis, Dietrich, xl. 32 — 
Shiiizenberger, xxx, 261 — culture: 
Algeria, xxvii, 107 — Ararat (Porphyr- 
opbora Hamelii), ix, 82 — Asia Minor 
(W. & B., 308, note), Pertwee, xxxv, 
455 — Canary Islands, Martins, xxvii. 
434 — India. Royle. xiii, 137 — in dia- 
lyser, Graham, xxxiv, 315 — estimation: 
Anthon (alumina), x, 73; xvii, 58 — 
Leiellier (colorimetric test), xvii, 59 
— Robiquet (chlorine) xvii, 58 — (fer- 
roc^^anide of potassium), xxxiii, 410 
in whooping cough, Wacht, xv, 275, 

AMMONIACAL, XXvii, 84. 

BLACK ( W. & B., 309), Fabcr. xviii, 47. 

CAKE (W. & B., 309, note). Stark, 

xxvii, 262. 

COLORING (without potash or alumj, 

Dickson, xxxvii, 192. 

DOWN, Letellier, xvii, 60. 

SILVER ( W. & B., 309). Faber, xviii, 47. 

C -mpMre Carmine. 

COCHLOSPEHMUM gossypium yields in- 
ferior triigacanth, xxix, 80. 

COCK, VALVE-, air-tight. Hare, v, 249. 

COCKROACHES, use as anti-spasmodic : 
as bait in fishing, A\'ebster, vii. 170. 

CO'^OA (Theobromay See Cacao.' 

COCO-NUT, WATER, composition, Buch- 
ner, ii. 339 — Loewenich, xxiv, 276. 

COCOS coRONATA (Urucuri palm), xxiv, 78. 

CODAMINE, Hesse, xlii, 395, 396. 

CODEIA, action on birds, Mitchell, xlii, 
189 " (7.S-.SY7?/, Mayer, xxxv, 394 — beha- 
vior to bichromate potassa test, Jen- 
kins, xxxiii, 528 — to chromate of pot- 
assa test, Eboli, xxix, 369 — to iodide 
of cadmium and potassium, Marme, 
xli, 18 — to iodohydrargyrate of pot- 
as-ium, Mayer, xxxv, 394 — to nitric 
acid, Guy, xxxiii, 526 — to nitric and 
sulphuric acids, Couerbe, viii, 175 — 
to penta chloride of antimony and 
phosphoric acid, Schulze, xxxii, 138, 
235 — to tannin, Henry, vii, 228 — com- 
position, xi, 219, xxxiii, 24, xxxvii, 67 
— phiisiological and medical properties, 
Barbier (W. & B., 620), vi, 347 , Ber- 
nard, xxxvii, 70; Kunkel, vi, 88 ; Mi- 
randa (W, & B,, 621), X, 175— modi- 
fied by iodide of methyl. Brown and 
Frazer, xl, 442 — preparation, Henry, 
vii, 233; Merck, vii, 171; Robiquet, 
vi, 266 ; Winckler, vii, 259 — attempted, 
by conversion of morphia, How, 

xxxvii, 68 subliming temperature, 

Guy, xl, 248. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER 



THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



71 



CODEIA BiTANNATE, Henry, vii, 231. 

and IODINE conapound, Anderson, 

xxiii, 85, 

• METHYL-. See Mbthyl-codeia. 

and morphia, double salt, Koene, x, 

83. 

CODFISH BONES, composition, Fremy, 

xxxvii, 256. 

€CELOCLINE polycarpa, contains berbe- 
rina (W. & B., 150Q), Stenbouse, 
XXXV, 457. 

COFFEACE^. See Oapfeace.e. 

'COFFEE (beans), analysis, Payen (W. & 
B., 178), xxix, 374 — Rochleder, xxv, 
242, xxix, 373 — as antidote, Langen- 
schwarz, xxix, 398 — percentage of 
caffeina, (Jrahara and olbers, xxix, 
375; Kobiquet and Boutron, ix, 226, 
332 — contains citric acid, xxv, 242 — 
percentage of nitrogen, Graham and 
others, xxix, 372 — physiological effects, 
Lehmann, xxvi, 254 — contains ruhid- 
ivm, Grandeau, xxxiv, 440 — viridic 
acid, xxv, 242. 

ROASTED, adulteration, xvi, 291, 

xxiii, 277, xxix, 371 — as deodorizer, 
xxviii, 183 — influence on yield of caf- 
feina, xlii, 431 — taste of sulphate of 
quinia diminished, Quevenne, xx, 154. 

Sandwich Islands, xxvii, 238. 

FININGS. See Caramel. 

• LEAVES, analysis, Stenhouse, xxvi, 

249 — yield of theine, xxvi, 250 — as 
tea, xxv, 321, xxvi, 249. 

COGNAC. See Brandy. 

COBATE root, Arnozan, xvii, 186. 

COHESION FIGURES, Tomlinson [W. <fe B., 
595, note), xxxvi, 248, 343. 

COHOSH, BLACK. See Cimicifuga race- 

MOSA. 

BLUE. See Oaulophvllum tha.lic- 

TROIDES. 

COINS. SILVER, amount of lead, Eliot and 
Storer, xxxiii, 335. 

COINAGE, international, xl, 82. 

COLCHICACE^E, dehiscence of pollen, 
Aldridge, xiii, 216. 

COLOHICEIN', nature (does not admit 
its pre-existence), Hilbler, xxxviii, 

106 preparation and properties, 

Maisch, xxxix, 102— Oberlin (W. & 
B , 312, note), xxix, 235, xxxix, 98. 

COLOHICIA, action on carnivorous and 
herbivorous animals. Hiibler, xxxviii, 

106 — indifferent to acids, Hiibler, 

xxxviii, 106 ; remarks, Procter, jr., 

107 — chemical history, Maisch, xxxix, 

i)l preparation: Aschoff (Parrish, 

659), xxxix, 98, 103 ; Bley, xxxix, 99, 
103; Carter (W. & B., 312, note), 
xxx, 205; xxxix, 99, lul ; Geigcr and 
Hesse (see hyoscyamin, W. & B., 460), 
vi, 320 — Hiibler, xxxviii, 105 ; xxxix, 
100, 103; HUbschmann, xxxix, 99; 



Ludwig and Pfeiffer, xxxix, 99 ; Lud- 
wig and Hiibler, xxxviii, 105; Walz, 
xxxix, 9d— properties, reagents, etc., 
Maisch, xxxix, 101 ; Walz, xxxiv, 348. 

SULPHATE (Carter) — colchicein, 

Maisch, xxxix, 103. 

COLCHICUM (corm), relative activity of 
corm and seeds, Schroff, xxix, 324 — 
source of alcohol, Coraar, xxviii, 219 
— crystals (oxalate of lime), xxxvii, 

32 influence of drying, Schoon- * 

broodt. xli, 320 — medicinal use, Henry, 
vi, 32G— preservation (W. & B., 311), 
Houlton, xviii, 52 — contains veratria, 
Pelletier and Caventou, xxix, 235. 

(seeds), poisoning, Casper, xxvii, 539 

— powdering, Cummings, xxviii, 397. 

ZEYLANicuM (sourcc of rouud zedo- 

ary), v, 329. 

COLD, INTENSE (—87° F.), produced. Loir 
and Orion (forcing air through vola- 
tile liquids), xxxiii, 223 — effects, Kane, 
xxvi, 375. 

. See Freezing. Temperature, re- 
duction. 

COLD CREAM, improved, Ph. U. S. (30), 
Durand (proportion of oil and sper- 
maceti), V, 32, 11— Ph. U. S. (40), 
Laidley (leaves out rose-water and 
adds glycerin, W. & B , 1417), xxii, 
119 — TurnbuU (adds borax, Parrish. 
765), xvi, 11— Ph. U. S. (50), Warner 
(adds glycerin and borax), xxx, 316 
— Ph. U. S. (60), Moore (leaves out 
rose-water), xlii, 63, 65 — Ph. London, 
(1650),xlii,64— Ph.Suecica (69), xlii, 
88. 

, ALMOND, Piesse, xxviii, 84. 

, ALUMINA, Bonnamy, xxxviii, 86. 

, camphor ; cucumber; rose: 

violet, Piesse, xxviii, 84, 85. 

COLEUS Verscheffelti (petals as test 
for alkalies). Boettger, xlii, 511. 

COLIC, painters' (alum and sulphuric 
acid) Gendrin, iv, 258 — due to oil 
of turpentine and not to white lead, 
Marechal, xxix, 84. 

COLLAPISCIUM. See Isinclass. 

COLLARS, India-rubber, xxxix, 86. 

COLLEGES of Pharmacy. See Pharm- 
acy. 

polytechnic, of Pennsylvania, xxvi, 

477. 

COLLEMA (cryptogamic plant on Loxa 
bark), xi, 252. 

COLLINSONIA cayiadensis as diuretic. 
Hooker, v, 175, vi, 200. 

prmcox; scahra; scabriuscnla 

as adulterants of Serpentaria, i, 265. 

COLLODION. Compare Gun-cotton. 

COLLODIUM for burns, Liman, xxiii, 182 
— composition, Parrish, xxi, 292 — crys- 
tals, Leidy, xxii, 24 — discovery, Bige- 
low.' Maynard, xx, 181, 182 — prepara^ 



72 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



COLLODIUM ( Conliiiued). 

tion: Beitson (from fresh gun-cotton), 
XXV, 19 — Cutting (drying by strong 
alcohol ), xxvii, [-51 — Livermore (dry- 
ing by alcohol. Parrish, 497), xxix, 
106 — Musgiller (adds glycerin or cas- 
tor-oil and more gun-cotton), xlii, 
145 — Sharp (prepares gun-cotton with 
nitric and sulphuric acids and nitrate 
of potassa) xxx, 538 — by nitrate of pot- 
assa and sylphvric acid, Hoffmann, 

xxix, 64; Mialhe, xxi, 42,234; Par- 
rish, xxi, 291 : Schacht, xxix, 64— 
Ph. U. S. (60), Procter, jr., xxxvi, 
304 — by nitric and mtphuric acids, Cas- 
par), xxx, 371; Edwards, xxi, 233 ; 
Maynard, xxxviii, 563; Parrish (Par- 
rish, 497), xxi, 289 ; Parrish and Liv- 
ermore, XX, 181; Procter, jr., xxix, 
105; Sherman, xxx, 212; Thompson, 
xlii, 114; Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix, 531 
—for waterproofing s//A;.s\ Barnwell and 
Rollason, xxxii, 236 — for protecting 
silverware, Strolberger, xli, 370 — sub- 
stituted by shellac varnish (W. & B., 
1545), Mellez, xxiii, 376, 

, ACOXiTAL, Shinn, xxx, 217. 

, ATROPiCAL, Shinn, xxx, 217. 

, BELLADOXNAL, Shinn (Parrish, 501), 

xxx, 217. 

, f'ANTHABIDAL, llisch (W. & B., 1049), 

xxi, 295, xxii, 19 — Oettinger, xxii, 
229— Ph. U. S. (60), remarks, Proc- 
ter, jr., xxxvi, 304 — Ph. Helvetica 
(65), xxxix, 531— Rand (W. & B., 
1014), xxii, 18— Thompson, xlii, 11— 
Tichborne, xxxiv, 320 — not entitled 
to entry in Russia, xxxi, 483. 

, CANTHARiDiNATKi), Dclpech, xHi, 240. 

, CAUSTIC (W. & B., 1048), Macke, xxx. 

12Y. 

, GONIAL, Shinn, xxx, 2lY. 

, ELASTIC, Lauras, xxv, 185 ; Musgiller, 

xlii, 146; Rand (Parrish, 498), xxi, 

209. 

, FERRDGixous, Aran, xxvi, 81. 

, FLEXILE. See ELASTIC. 

. lODixAL, Shinn (Parrish, 501), xxx, 

217. 

COLLODION, lODOSULPHURAL, Shinn, xxx, 
218. 

PAPER, Thompson, xlii, 116. 

, PHOTOGRAPHERS ( With iodidc of tetra- 

ethylamine), Babo, xxviii, 442. 

, SILK, Persoz, xxxix, 182. 

, siNAPic, Tichborne, xxxiv, 323. 

, STYPTIC See Colloid, styptic. 

, SULPHURAL, Shinn, xxx, 217. 

, TANNATE (containing carbolic acid, 

benzoic acid), xli^ 404. See Colloid, 

STYPTIC. 

, VESICATING. See , CANTHARIDAL. 

COLLOIDS (W. & B.,896, note), Graham, 
xxxiii, 613. 



, STYPTIC, Richardson, xxxix, 367. Sefr 

COLLODIUM, TANNATE. 

COLLYRIUM, acacia seeds, vii, 171. 
ATROPINE, Bouchardat, xxii, 88. 

TANNATE OF MANGANESE, Marietta,. 

xxxvii, 337. 
of SOOT, Duvillard and Baudelocque 

(W. & B., 1601), vi, 325. 

STRYCHNLE, Heuderson, viii, 170. 

COLOCYNTHEIN, Walz (Parrish, 669), 

xxxi, 332. 

COLOCYNTHIN, preparation and prop- 
erties: Bastick (VV. & B., 316), xxiii,. 
68 — Hiibschmann, xxxiv, 333 — Le- 
bourdais (W. & B., 1(»35, charcoal), 
xxi, 91— Mouchon (W. & B., 317, 
note), xxviii, 167 — Procter, jr. (Mou- 
chon's process), xxxiv, 137 ; (details 
of manipulations), xxxv, 116 — Shiv- 
ers, xxxiv, 138— Walz (W. & B., 316), 
xxxi, 331. 

COLOCYNTHITIN, composition, Walz, 
xxxiv, 333 — preparation, Walz (W. & 
B , 316, note), xxxi, 331. 

COLOCYNTHS, bitter taste removed (char- 
coal), Weppen, xviii, 203 — entitled 
to entry, xxv, 302 — sign of maluriiyy 
Squibb, xxxix, 17 — powder, adultera- 
tion (aloes), vii, 119— loss in pow- 
dering, Redwood, xxi, 31 — proportion 
of pulp and seeds, Squibb (W. & B., 
1093), xxix, 98; xxxix, 16 — resinoid 
matter, Faber, xxxiv, 505. 

, PREPARED, Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix,. 

531. 

COLOGNE, Farina (W. & B., 1253, note), 
xxxvi, 375 — Foerster, xxiii, 280 — 
Gray's supplement, xxvi, 86 — Otto, 
xxiii, 280 — Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix, 
535 — Piesse, xxiii, 179 — Varientrap, 
xxiii, 279. 

EARTH, American, analysis, Clem son,. 

vii, 70. 

COLOMBIN. See CoLUMBiN. 
COLOMBO, American. See Frasera. 
See Calumba. 

COLOPHANK, composition, Blanchet and 
Sell, viii, 45 — crystallizable and un- 
crystallizable. Rose, viii, 49, 50. 

COLOPHONON, Schiel, xxiii, 240. 

COLOPHONY, composition, Blanchet 
and Sell, xvii, 175 — account, Sim- 
monds, xxix, 135. 

See Resin. 

COLORS. See different heads. 

, COAL-TAR. See Coal-tar colors. 

, coppBR-ARSENic, detection, Puscher^ 

xlii, 217. 

of FLOWERS and their properties, 

Filhol, xxvi, 545. 

of glass bot'iles, influence on con- 
tents (red, best), Dumey, xxxiii, 411. 

influence on the absorption of heat 

and odors, Stark, vii, 69. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



73 



C/OLORS of METALS, electro-chemical, Bec- 

querel ; Nobili ; Priestley, xxxiv, 11, 

Compare Nobili's rings. 

, SHOW. See Show colors. 

of VEGETABLES (form homologous 

series), Rochleder, xxxvi, 374. 

, WATER-, size for painting, viii, 173. 

COLORING PRINCIPLES, mixtures, analyzed 

by capillarity, Goppelsrceder. xxxv, 

179. 

COLUMBO. See Calumba. 

WOOD, xxvi, 189. 

• , American. See Frasera. 

FALSA. See COSCINIUM FENESTRATTM. 

COLUMBL^, Baedeker, xx, 324— behavior 
to bichromate potassa test, Jenkins, 
xxxiii, 326 — prejmralion : Lebourdais 
(W. k B., 1035, charcoal), xxi, 90— 
Wittstock (W. & B., 191), iii, 89, 173; 
xxxix, 417. 

COLUTEA ARBORESCENs, as cathartic, v, j 
206 — as adulterant of senna, viii, 268 | 

COLYTICS, Smith, xxxviii, 369. ' j 

COLZA SEEDS, amount of starch. Dragen- 
dorflf, xxxv, 139. i 

COMMELYNA COMMUNIS, yields blue color, 
vi, 72. 

COMMELYiSTACE^, dehiscence of pollen, 

Aldridp^e, xiii, 216. 
COMMENCEMENT. See Pharmacy. 
COMPANY, Apothecaries', xiii, 322. 
€OMPASS PLANT, Hill, xxxvi, 37. 
COMPOUND preparations. See these. 
COMPTONIA ASPLENiFOLiA, amouut ofi 

tannin, Bowman, xli, 193. 
CONCHININ, Hes:e, xli, 421; xiii, 401, 

note. 

CONCHOCARPIJS, ii, 55, note. 

OONCRETION of hair in a cow's stomach, 
Plumraer, xxv, 101 — in horse stom- 
ach, Wetlierill and Boye, xviii, 93. 

•CONDENSATION, fractional. Warren, 
xxxvii, 449. 

CONDENSER (W. & B , 890), Warner, 
xxxiii, 15. 

Liebig's improved. Feldhaus (zigzag 

tube), xxxiii. 215. 

tubular, Keates, xxxiii, 500. 

CONDURANGO, xiii, 513. 
CONES. See Pastilles, fumigating. 
CONFECTIONERS' poisonous colors, xvi, 

290. 

CONFECTIONS See Electuary. Opiates. 

' absorbing power of vegetable powder; 

gum resin ; mineral substance ( VV. k 
B, 1050), Baume, ii, 341 — honey 
recommended instead of syrup, Du- 
rand, v, 31 . 

CONFECTIO ciNcnoNiK], Gloninger, xxx, 
145. 

, coMPOsiTA, Copland, xxxix, 417. 

ET sulphuriSj de Smet, xxxix, 

417. 

fkrri COMPOSITA, Ileathcotc, xvi, 157. 



opii. Ph. London (24), Prel. No. 23. 

pipbris nigrt. Ph. London (24), Prel. 

No. 26. 

ROS.E, Ph. U. S. (30), ii, 237. See 

CoNSERVA ROS^. 

SENN^j, Ph. U. S. (50), improved. 

Thayer, xxix, 547— Ph. U. S. (60), 
Markoe, xli, 150 — Procter, jr., xxxvi, 
305— Ph Suecica (69), xiii, 87. 

scLPHURis, xxxix, 418. 

CONFERENCE, British. See Pharmacy. 
CONFERVA moniliformis in semi-opal 

from Berlin, Turpin, ix. 264. 
CONHYDRlA, W^ertheim, xxix, 321 
CONIA, more active in saline state, Chris- 
tison (W. & B., 320), viii, 169— 6^- 
haviir to reagents, Fresenius, xxxix, 
29 — to iodide of cadmium and potas- 
sium. iMarme, xli, 18— to iodohydrar- 
gyrate of potassium, Mayer (W. & B., 
1542) xxxv, 21,23; xxxvii, 211— to 
nitrate of silver, Mayer, xxxvii, 211 
— to pentachloride of antimony and 
phosphoric acid, Schulze, xxxii, 235 
i — to tannin, Henry, vii, 228 — compo- 
sition^ Blyth ; Gerhardt ; Ortegosa. 

xxiii, 73 — decompositiov,^ Blyth, xxiii, 
73 — in ophthalmia^ Fronmiiiler, xxiii, 
273 — preparation : Brandes, i, 76; vi, 
271— Geiger (W. & B.,319), vii, 246: 
remarks by Deschamps, vii, 241 
— Young, xxvii, 293 — W^illiams (ben- 
zole), xxvi, 342 — solub'lity in chloro- 

i form, Procter, jr. xxiv, liS— thera- 
peutic use. Young, xxxvi, 310 — in 
toothache, Reid, xxx, 4 00 — vapor, 
Harley, xxxix, 460 — i/ield, from ex- 
tract of conium, Jandous, xxxvii, 31 
— from seeds, Schroff, xiii, 404. 

MURIATE, Close, xli, 61. 

CONIFER.E i'ov paper making, xxviii, 170 
— test (sulphuric acid), Kubel, xxxix, 
262. 

CONIFERIN, composition, nature and 
properties, Hartig, xlii, 220 — Kubel, 
xxxix, 261. 
CONIUM. Compare Cicuta 

crispatulum, vi, 268. 

MACULATUM, LEAVES, action of soil and 

culture, Warren, xxxviii, 52 — activity, 
largest in immature seeds. Smith, xl, 
459 — remarks, Procter, jr., xl, 459, 
note — comparison between conium 
from U S. and from Europe, Jones. 

xxiv, 107 — in asthma, Landerer, xxv, 
32 — description and properties, Grif- 
fith, vi, 267 — influence of drying, 
Schoonbroodt, xli, 320 — percolation 
wilh water, packing, Soubeiran, viii, 
225 — percolation and maceration with 
alcohol, comparison, Boullay and 
Guillermond, x, 10 — value of prepara- 
tions of Ph. Britannica (61), Barley, 
xxxix, 266, 358, 450. 



74 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



COXIUM MACULATUM SEEDS viiost active 
parts, Smith, xl, 459 — remarks, Proc- 
ter, jr., xl, 459, note — production in 
U. S., Fish, xxxiii, 136. 

CONOCARPUS LATiFOLiA yields gum, 
xxix, 77. 

CONRAD, Dr , resignation, xlii, 573. 

CONSERVA wo&Ai (color heightened by 
minute quantities of cream of tartar 
or alum), Durand, v, 32. See Cox- 

FECTIO KI)Si«. 

CONSUMPTION {agaric)^ Andral, vii, 87— 
(ergota), Parola, xxx, 374 — (hi/pophos- 
phites), Churchill, xxx, 143 — [suljthu- 
rous acid gan)^ Dewar, xxxviii, 469 — 
( Tima,) xxxiv, 37. 

CONTAGIONS, raode of action, Liebig, 
xiii, 218. 

CONTAGIOUS distinction from infec- 
tious, Crookes, xxxviii, 356, note. 

CONTRAYERVA (from Mexico), Gui- 
bourt, xxxviii, 501. 

( Aristolochia odoratissiraa), Hamil- 
ton, xviii, 45, 

DoifSTENJA contrayerva), llanbury, 

xxxiv, 545. 

Bastard (Aristolociiia trilobata), 

xviii, 46 

CONVALLAMARETIN, Walz, xxxi, 579. 
CONVALLAMARIN (W.&B., 150l),WaIz, 
xxxi, 578. 

CONVALLARIA majalis, analysis^ Walz 
( W. & B., 1501), xxxi, 577— in ecchrj- 
mods, xxxiii, 335. 

CONVALLARIN, Walz (W. k B., 1501), 
xxxi, 577. 

CONVEPvSTON. See different headings. 

CONVOLVULACE.E, purgative, Andou- 
ard, xxxviii, 206. See Jalapa ; Scam- 
mony; Turpeth root. 

CONVOLVULUS althv-eoides ; rat- 
tat as, xi, 181. 

BRASiLiENSis (=PareIra brava), viii, 

193. 

■ EDULIS, xi, 181 ; ERUBESCENS, 

xxviii, 72. 

FARiNOsrs (supposed to be the scam- 

mony of Dioscorides), Sibthorp, xx, 2. 

JALARA See Ipom.ea .jalapa. 

, description, ii, 31, 32 ; vi, 119- 

• MECHOACAXA, li, 23 ; xi, 181. 

OFFICINALIS, vi, 120 — analysis (W. & 

B., 488), Cadet, ii, 33 ; x, 225. 

ORiZARENSis, iii, 265 — analysis^ Leda- 

nois (W. k B., 490, note), ii, 35; x, 
224 ; xiv, 292 — description^ Guibourt, 
X, 224, note — crystals (oxalate of lime), 
xxxvii, 32. Compare Ipom^ea oriza- 

BBNSIS. 

PANDURATrs, analysis, description, 

etc., Shinn, xi, 177, 180. 

SCAMMONIA. See SCAMMONIUM. 

SCHIEDEANUS, XXV, 352. See Ipom.«a. 

scoPARius, xi, 185; sepidm, iii, 



265 ; SOLDANELLA, xi, 181 J ■■ 

SYRIACUS, XX, 2. 
TURPETHUM. See TURBITH ROOT. 

compare Ipom^ea ; Jalapa. 

CONYZA SQUARROSA, adulterant of Digi- 
talis, xxx, 402. 

COPAHINE Mege, Jozeau, xxv, 181; xl> 
313. 

COPAIFERA officinalis, i, 3 ; tra~ 

PEZiFOLiA, xix, 188. 

COPAIBA, Durand, i, 3 — Procter, jr., xXj, 
289 — contains acetic acid^ Durand j 
Staples, i, 5, d> — administration (as 
tincture, with magnesia in spirits of 
nitre), viii, 258 — adulterations and 
their detection: castor oil, ii, 245 — 
turpentine x, 276 — fixed oil, Maisch, 
xxxvi, 101 — oil of sassafras (sulphu- 
ric acid and alcohol) ; Venice tur- 
pentine (litharge), Hager, xlii, 520 — ■ 
Reveil (ammonia), xxxiv, 396, com- 
pare tests — analysis^ Durand, i, 5; 
xxii, 291, 294— Gerber (W. & B., 324), 
ii, 340; xviii, 303; xxii, 291, 294— 
Guibourt, xxii, 292, 294 — Stoltze, xxii,. 
291, 294— Whipple, xxii, 292, 294— 
cohesion figure, xxxvi, 256 — decolorizes 
indigo solution, Plummer, xxv, 400 — 
drops and minims, Bernouilly, xxxi, 
441 — Durand, i, 169 — in mixtures, iii^ 
291; iv, 11, 12 — solidification, Faur6 
and others (magnesia), iii, 39 — Du~ 
hamel (wax), xiii, 288 — Maisch (wax)^ 
XXXV, 13 — taste removed (mixed with 
magnesia), Planche, ii, 162 — (tar)^ 
Ricord xxxiii, 381 — tests for purity l 
Batka (alcoholic solution of potassa), 
ii, 84 — Cooke (spirits of nitre), v, 34 
— Gerber (ammonia), ii, 340 — Gui- 
bourt (none reliable), xxv, 132 — 
Oberdoerffer (alcohol test not relia- 
ble), xviii, 302 — Redwood (yield of 
volatile oil only reliable test), xix, 
187 — Simon (Planche's ammonia test 
not reliable, W. & B.,324), xvi, 236 — 
compare adulterations — as vermifuge^ 
Webster, vii, 173 — varieties, Loewe 
(W. & B., 325, note), xxvi, 537— Pos- 
selt (W. & B., 323, note), xxi, 260. 

CAPSULES. See Capsules. 

Pepsin and Bismuth, Ricord, xxxiii, 

381. 

resin, Morson's soluble, i, 118. 

composition, Fehling, xv, 36 — 

Rose, viii, 45, 48. 

SEEDS, contain hydrocyanic acidj 

Webster, vii, 173. 

and storax in croup, Tridau, xxxy, 

278 ; xxxviii, 375. 

and TAR, Ricord, xxxiii, 381. 

from Trinidad, Hanbury, xxxiv, 548. 

COPAL, account, Simmonds, xxix, 141 — 
Ruschenberger, xxix, 140 — distinc- 
tion from amber (oil of cajuput), Dra^. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



75 



COPAL {Gontimied). 

per, xxxiv, 445 — behavior to different 
solvents, Sace, xlii, 242 — products 
of distiUation, Schivler, xxxii, 448 — 
— fusing point, Violette, xxxv, 141 — 
origin^ Plajfair. xxxviii, 255 — proper- 
ties, SchindltT, xxiii, 22 — solubility in 
chloroform, Lepage, xxiv, 147 — oil 
of rosemary, Schindler, xxiii, 22, 23 
— testing solubility, Heeren, xxvi, 
344; by heating to 700° F., Violette, 
xxxix, 181 ; by heating with alcohol, 
Daken, v, 260. 

from Aden, Vaughan, xxv, 333. 

from Angola, Welwitsch, xxxviii, 

439. 

, GOOSE- xxvi, 343. 

, Iksect- Schindler, xxiii, 23. 

OIL. See Oleum, copal. 

, tree- (Anim^), Kirk, xli, 443. 

VARNISH. See Vaknish. 

white (Mexico), Guibourt, xxxviii, 

503. 

from Zanzibar, Kirk, xli, 441. 

COPALCHI BARK, Howard (W. & 13 , 225, 
note), xxvii, 161 — analysis^ Howard, 
xxii, 269 ; xxvii, 162 — Mercadieu, 
xxii, 268 — Mauch, jr , xli, 417 — mQ^'i- 
csil properties^ Stark (W. & B., 225, 
note), xxii, 266 — compare Wayne, 
xxix, 5, 6, 8. 

COPALCHIN, iVlauch, jr., xli, 417. 

COPALM (= sweet gum), xxxviii, 33. 

COPERNICIA CERiFERA, yields Carnauba 
wax, xli, 207. 

COPEY. See Clusia rosea. 

COPPER. Compare Cuprum. 

adhesion to mercury, Guyton, vi, 306 

antidotes, Schrader ( W. & B. , 341), 

xxvii, 537 : Benoist (carbonate of 
soda),xiii, 341 ; Roucher (magnesia), 
xxiv, 180— behavior to weak alkaline 
solutions, Vogpl, xi 82 — to cold con- 
centrated sulphuric acid, Barruel, jr. 
(is acted upon), vi, 127 — to fused 
chlorate of potassa, Boe tiger, xxx, 
70— separation from cadmium^ Hoff- 
mann, xxxiii, 312 — does not decom- 
pose carbonic acid when red hot, Lau- 
termann, xxxii, 448 — detection in bran- 
dy (olive oil), Bojttiger, xxvi, 86 — 
chemico-legal, Georges, xxvii, 535 — 
Verguin (platinum and iron, W. & B., 
341), xiii, 343— Lancelot (butter), 
xxxvi, 370 — in minute quantities, Fil- 
hol (platinum and zinc), xviii, 238 — 
estimation in food, etc., Hager (plati- 
num and iron), xxxvi, 42 1 — reaction^ 
limit (ammonia ; ferrocyanide of po- 
tassium ; iron), Hastings, xiii, 204 — 
of sulphuretted hydrogen, Reinsch, 
xi, 217 — salts^ behavior to alkaline 
polysulphides, SchifT, xxxiii, 264 — to 
glucose in presence of acetates, Rey- 



nosa, xxviii, 140 — silvering^ Boudier, 
xxxii, 224 — in .'Wz<^,Hirschberg, xxxiii, 
215 — vessels^ untinned, use, Vasey, 
xxviii, 158. 

AMALGA M, analysis of Oersheim's, Dus- 

sance, xxxii, 203. 

and arsenic colors, detection, Pus- 

cher, xlii, 217. 

BLUE, artificial, Walter, xix, 216. 

indigo. See Copper blue. 

and manganese alloy, Prieger, 

xxxviii, 377. 
WIRES, electric conductivity, Thom- 
son, xxx, 276 — gilding^ Helouis^ xl, 
416. 

COPPERAS manufacture at Cape Sable, 
Maryland, Durand, v, 12 — in Stafford, 
England, Locke, iii, 55. 

. See Ferrum, sulphate. 

COPPERING, Weil, xxxviii, 174. 

, elect uo- Ruolz, XV, 64. 

COPPERPLATING in various colors, 

Wells, xl, 415. 
COPTIS Teeta, Carson, ix, 196 — contains 

berberina, Perrins, xxxv, 458. 
trifoliata, as tonic, v, 285 — con- 
tains berberina, Mayer ; Maisch; Proc- 
ter, jr., xxxv, 97. 
CORALS contain no iodine, Fyfe ; Stra- 
tingh ; Sarphati, xxvi, 440 — rate of 
growth, xxxi, 185. 
CORALLINE, rouge; jaune, are poison- 
ous, Tardieu, xli, 366. 

CORCHORUS capsularis ; olithoriuSy 

for paper making, xxvii, 42 ; m- 

dicus, for paper-making, xxviii, 169. 
CORDIA BoissiERi, origin of Anacahuite 
wood, Hanbury, xxxv, 87. 

mgz'i ; sebestena, fruits for cough. 

H • nbui'y, xxxv, 87. 
CORDIAL, Calamus, Maisch, xxxii, 114. 

, Godfrey's. See Godfrey. 

CORIAMYRTIN, Eiban (W. & B., 1504), 

xxxvi, 1 14. 
CORIANDRUM maculatum is Conium 
maculatum, vi, 267. 

SATIVUM in Sandwich Islands, xxvii, 

240 — loss in powdering. Redwood, 
xxi, 31. 

CORIaRIA ruscifolia (= Toot-poison 
of New Zealand, W. & B., 1504)^ 
Lindsay, xxxvi, 259. 

sarmenlosa ; tutu. See Coriaria 

ruscifolia. 

CORIXA fermorata; mercenaria (eggs 

form hautle), Guerin, xxxi, 76. 
CORK, collection, history, use, etc.. Jack- 
son, xxxvii, 305 — growth and pro- 
duction, De Candolle, xxxiv, 541, 
xxxv, 186. 

CORKS, acid-proof Fairthorne, xli, 332— 
revived in France, xxxvii, 156 — trade 
of Bordeaux, xxxiii, 504. 
, India-rubber, xxxiv, 91. 



76 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



CORKING bottles, apparatus, xxx, 82, 
CORN, Indian 8ee Indian Corn. 
CORNELIAN, coloring principle, Claubrey, 
vii, 88, 

CORNUS circinata, Carpenter, i, 73. 

FLORTDA, o naif/sis, Cockbura (W. & 

B., 329), vii, 109 — dcHcripthm and pro- 
perties, Ellis, vii, 2i'jb— fibre twists to 
the right, Braun, xxviii, 67 — amount 
of tannin, Bowman, xli, 194 — as tonic, 
V, 289. 

CORONILLA EMERUS yields blue color, 
va, 72 — wild senna, xxix, 232. 

CORROSn^B SUBLIMATE. See Sub- 
limate. 

CORTEX adstringens brasiliensis, xli, 
224 ; xiii, 152 

Thukis xxvi, 448. 

Thymiamatis, Hanbury, xxvi, 448. 

. S e under their different names. 

CORTiClNE, Braeonnot, iii, 174. 

CORYDALIA, preparation, etc , Wenzell 
(W. & B , 15U5), xxvii, 207 — compo- 
sition, etc., Leube, jr, xxxiii, 112. 

CORYDALIS FORMOSA, analy.-is, Wenzell 
(W. & B., 1505), xxvii, 205, 210. 

CORYLUS rostrata, Duhamel, xlv, 280. 

CORYPIIA UMBRACCLiFSEA (supposed 
source of Ceyon sago), xxii, 154. 

CORYZA, remedy (fumes ot opium), Lom- 
bard, xxvii, 109. 

COSCINIUM FEXE^;TfiATUM vlelds bcrbe- 
rina, Perrins, xxvi, 189; xxxv,457. 

COSME'S POWDER. See Powder, Cosme. 

COSMETICS, danoerous, viii, 350. 

examined, Chandler, xlii, 362. 

COS-MIBUENA, xi, 247. Compare Buena. 

COSTUS ACRis, Y, 323. 

AMARUS, Y, 3:3 — (belahe bark), Gui- 

bourt, X, 47. 

ARABIGUS, Y, 321. 

BASTARD (= Pastinaca opoponax), v 

322. 

DULCis, V, 323 — analysis, Meyer and 

Reiche, XYi, 67, 75. Compare Canel- 
LA alba. 

spaciosus, Guibourt, y, 321. 

COTARN'IA, formation, Mathiesson and 
Forster, xxxiv, 521. 

COTTON, accoimi of American, Battpy. 
xxviii, 401 — behavior to citric, oxalic 
and tartaric acids, C ilvert, xxvii, 83 — 
culture in Algeria, xxvii, 107 — in In- 
dia, Royle, xxx, 337 — dyedros^] pur- 
ple, Malegue, xxvii, 81 — strength of 
fibre of Orleans cotton, O'Neill, xxxv, 
470 — compared to Linen for bandages, 
etc., Raspail, v, 345 — distinction from 
linen, see Linen — restored from gun- 
cotton, Bechamp (W. k B., 1525), 
xxvi, 80 — test in woollens (alloxan, 
tin and ammonia), Overbeck, xxix, 

185 wooly absorption of water, 

Ruschenberger, xxxv, 161. 



FARRios rendered non-inflammable, 

xxxii, 187. 

mercerized (caustic soda and sul- 
phuric acid), xl, 273. 

ROOT. See GossYPiuM herbaceum. 

seed, as aniiperiodic, Frost (W. & B.. 

425), xxiii, 175 — hulling, Hagner, vi, 
59. 

OIL. See Oleum, cotton seed. 

xYLOiDiN, Gladstone, xxv, 21. 

COTULA, anahjsh, Warner ( W. & B.. 331), 
xxx, 388, 390— as emetic, iv, 283— as 
tonic, V, 289 — as vesicatory, Ashley, v, 
297. 

COU(^INIA cocciNEA, Griffith, iv, 116. 
COUGH, WHOOPING-. See Whooping-cough. 

candy. See Candy, cough-. 

COULTERIA tinctoria, properties, viii, 
105. 

COUMARIN, in Liat-is odoratissima (W. 
& B., 1615), Procter, jr., xxxi, 556— 
in Melilotus, Guillemette (W^. k B., 
1555), vii, 257 — Myroxylon toluife- 
rum, Leroy, xix, 116 — preparation 
(Tonca), Goessmann (W. & B., 1615), 

xxviii, 445 — by synthesis, Perkins, xli, 
205. 

COUMAROUNA odorata, vii, 118. See 

Tonka beans. 
C0URTPLA8TER. See Plaster, court-. 
COWIIAGE. See Mucuna. 
COWS' bones_ composition, Fremy, xxxvii, 

256. 

COW-TREE, analysis of milky juice, 

Heintz, xviii, 75. 
COWRIE-RESm, Donnelly, xxxii, 199. 
CRAB-ORCHARD salts. See Salts. 
CRAJURU.* See Carajueu. 
CRAM BUS pinguinalis (book-worm j, 

xxix, 182. 

CRANBERRY. See Oxycoccus macro- 
carpus. 

CRASSULACE^, dehiscence of pollen, 

Aldridge, xiii, 210. 
CRATJS.jrUS OYYCANTHA contaias propy- 

lamin, Wicke, xxvii, 110. 
CRAYONS, COLORED, manufacture, Piesse, 

xxxiii, 473. 

CREAM, preservation, Moigno (Appert's 
method), xxvii, 18 — as substitute for 
cod-liver oil, Fonssagrives, xxxiv, 
189. 

of ALMONDS, saponaceous, PiessG, 

xxv, 82 ; xxvii; 564. 

, ambrosial, saponaceous, Piesse, 

xxvii, 565. 

, CIRCASSIAN, Piesse, xxviii, 178. 

, COD-LIVER OIL, xlii, 247. 

, MARROW, Piesse, xxviii, 179. 

, ORIENTAL, Phalon's, analysis, Chand- 
ler, xlii, 368. 

. Compare Creme. 

NUTS, See Brazil ndts. 

of Tartar. SeePoTASSA, bitartrate. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



77 



>'CREAM of TARTAR soLiTBLE. See Boron 

AND POTASSA, TARTRATE ; POTASSA, BO- 
RO-TARTRATE ; TaRTARUS BORAXATUS. 

'€RE SoTK (COAL-TAR.) See Acid, car- 
bolic. 

(wood), adulleration (alcohol), xiii, 

1 1 1 — cohe&ion-fiyure^HomWii^ovi, xxxvi, 

2:1 2 composition, Gurup-Besanez, 

xxviii, 22(^; Voelckel, xxviii, 227 — 
drops in drachm, Bernouillj, xxxi 441 
— distinction from coaL-tar creosote, 
Gorup-Besaaez (VV. & B., 334), xxv, 
538, xxxix, 416: Rust (collodi. n), 
xl, 257 — identity, Kent, xxvi,39'; Kei- 
chenbach, vi, 132 — nniure, Deyille 
(W. & B., 331), xvi, 195, xvii, 154— 
preparation, Buchner, vi, 311 ; Calde- 
rini, vii, 80; Cozzi, x, 339; Reichen- 
bach, vi, 131 — i'vom peat, Paul, xxx, 

533 properties, Buchner, vi, 312; 

Reichenbach, vi, G6 rectification, 

Kent, xxvi, 39 — solubility, etc., from 
Storer's Dictionary, xxxv, 573 — use, 
Buchner, vi, 313. 

from guaiac resin, Righini, viii, 170. 

"CliEASOTUM CHLOROFORMATUM, XXXlii, 

116. 

'CREATIN'E, preparation and properties, 
Chevreul, v, 84 — Liebig xix, 151. 

CREATININE, Liebig, xix, 151. 

-ORE VIE DE BISMUTH, BuisUnicre, xxxix, 
184. 

DB pistache, Piesse, xxviii, 83. 

. See Cream. 

CREPON RouCxE, Piesse, xxviii, 272. 
ORESCENTIA edulis, analysis of fruit, 

Walz, xxxiv, 38. 
CRESOL (cres}lic acid), Squibb, xli, 260. 
ORliSYLE, hydrate, Williamson, xxvii. 

55. 

CRESYLIN, Crookes, xxxix, 232. 
•CRESYLOL (cresylic acid), Squibb, xli, 
260. 

CRETA. See Chalk; Calx, carbonate. 
CRETINISM, not owing to deficinncy of 

iodine in the air, Lobmejer, xxv, 521. 
CRIME A, loss of French troops, xxx, 183. 
CRITHMUM MA.RITIMUM. oil (volatile and 

fiT-ed), Herouard, xxxviii, 301. 
CRITHxMYLE, hvduret, Herouard, xxxviii, 

301. 

CROCA MAGNA, saffron ointment, xxi, 38. 

CROUIU.VI, satfron ointment, xxi, 38. 

CROCUS AUREUS ; luteus, xxiii, 85. 

SATivvB. adulteration detected, Biroth, 

xxxix, 307 — Hanbury, xlii, .'i32 — with 
stamina, Bentley, xxxviii, 225; Gui- 
bourt, xxxvi, 418 — flowers and petals 
of foeminella, Soubeiran (W. & B., 
338), xxvii, 318 — of Sapon>iria, Ar- 
nica, Pulicaria, xxxviii, 226 — of Car- 
tharaus. Calendula Miisch, xlii, 390 
— chalk and honey, Hcraeus, xlii, 318; 



chez, xli, 323— glucose and plaster 
Paris, xlii, 218 — analysis, Quadrat 
(W. & B., 337,338), xxiv, 352 -color- 
in^/ matter, Quadrat, xxiv, 352 — cul- 
ture in Austria, xxi, 37 — Cape, Archer, 
xxxvii, 187 — the East, Landerer, 
xxiii, 85 — France, xxi, 37 ; xlii, 373 
— Kashmere, Lowther, xxviii, 63 — 
Pennsylvania, Heinitsli, xxxix, 38 — 
Persia, xxx, 40 I — discussion in Ameri- 
can Pharmaceutical Association, 
xxxvii, 430 — p rcolation with water, 
packing, Soubeiran, viii, 2z6. 

Spruneri ; VARIEGATUS. xxiii, 85. 

CROGNON vulgare contains iodine, xxvi, 
440. 

CROPS, injurious effects of chemical 

w(;rks, xxv, 39. 
CROTALARIA juncea for paper-making, 

xxvii, 42. 

CROTALUS DURissus. See Rattle- 
snake. 

CROTON Cascabilla, vi, 238. Spe Cas- 
carilla— as Copalchi bark, xxii, 267. 

eluteria, vi, 238. See Cascarilla. 

erythr^ema, analysis, Peckolt, xxxiv, 

334. 

glabellum, vi, 238. 

lanceolatum, yields blue color, vi, 

73. 

LINBARE, vi, 240. 

malambo, description, Karsten, xxxii, 

161. See Malambo bark. 

MiCANS ; nitens, vi, 238. 

pseudo-china. See Copalchi bark. 

suberosum, xxii, 267 — as adulterant 

of Casciirilla, Dubail, v, 349— as Co- 
palchi bark, xxvii, 161. 

tiglium, alkaloid (W. k B. 607, note), 

Tuson, xxxvi, 418 — description and 
properties, Frost, Prel. No. 61 — oil, 
see Oleum tiglii. 

tricuspidatum, yields blue color, vi, 

73. 

CROTONATFS, Schlippe, xxx, 411. 

CRUTONIN, Tu^on, xxxvi, 418. 

(of Brandes),isamagnesiasofip, Wep- 

pen (W. & B., 607), xxvii, 162. 
CROTONOL, Schlippe (W. k B., 607, 

note), xxx, 412. 
CROUP remedies (copaiba, storax, cube- 

ba), Tridau, xxxv, 278 : xxxviii, 375. 
CROWN, imperial, saccharine eecretion, 

xxxiv, 507. 
CROZOPHORA tinctobia, yields blue 

color, vi, 73. 
CRUCIBLES, Hessian and Beanfay's,' 

composition, vii, 345. 

liine, St. Clair, Deville, xxxi, 434, 

CRUSTA genus equina in epilepsy, Met- 

tauer, vii, 193. 
CRYOLITE and its products, Ellis, xl, 71 

— industrial application, .xxxv, 244 — 

statistics and uses, Simes, xl, 193. 



78 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



CRYOPHORUS, improved, Hare, ix, 30. 

CRYPTOLIN, Brewster, xl. 370. 

CRYPTOPIA actioa on birds, Mitchell, 
xlii, 189 — compoHition, xlii, 396 — T. & 
H. Smith, xxxix, 431 — preparation 
and properties, T. & H. Smith, xxxix, 
421 — subliming temperature, Guy, xl, 
248. 

CRYPTOSTIGEIA grandiflora yields 
caoutchouc, xxix, 469. 

CRYPTUS coNQuisiTOR (parasite of meas- 
uring worm), xl, 306. 

CRYSTALS from Africa (carbonate of 
lime), Pearsall, xxvi, 79 — formation 
and growth, Copney, xxiii, 348 — con- 
taining fluid, Dancer, xl, 370 — in 
plants, xxxvii, 31. 

CRYSTALLIN (of Unverdorben), is ani- 
line, Erdmann, xxxiii, 46. 

CRYSTALLI FERRI lODlDI SACCHARA.TI, 

Thomson, xiv, 60. 

ziNci , Thomson, xiv, 60. 

CRYSTALLIZATION, causes, Gaudin, vi, 
86 — relation to fermentation, Schroe- 
der, xxxi, 273 — method of obtaining 
large crystals, JPayen, xxiv, 373 — evo- 
lution of light. Rose, viii, 157 — super- 
saturated saline solutions, Gernez, 
xxxvii, 379 — protection of vessels 
(coating with paraffin), Stolba,xl, 522 

CRYSTALLOIDS, Graham (W. & B., 896, 
note), xxxiii, 513. 

CUBEBA, analysis, Bernatzik, xlii, 224 — 
Monheim (W. & B., 339), xviii, 168— 
Schmidt, xlii, 222, 224 — administra- 
tion, Labelonye, viii, 315 — camphor, 
composition, Schmidt, xlii, 225 — 
contain chloride potassium, Maisch, 
xlii, 225, note — diuretic principle (the 
soft resin), Heidenr- ich, xl, 42 — loss 
in powdering, Covell, xxxix, 116 — 
Redwood, xxi, 31 — neutral resin, com- 
position, Schmidt, xlii, 225. 

, African, Archer, xxxvii, 188. 

from Dutch East India (W. & B., 

339, note), xxxv, 511. 

CANiNA, xxvi, 181. 

, Clusii, analysis, Stenhouse (piperin 

and not cubebin, W. & B., 339, note), 
xxvii, 267 — description, Daniell. 
xxvii, 19. 

CUBEBIN, behavior to bichromate of po- 
tassa test, Jenkins, xxxiii, 528 — to 
nitric, and to sulphuric acids, Guy. 
xxxiii, 526 — composition, Schmidt, 
xlii, 225 — is nearly inert, Heidenreich 
xl, 42 — preparation, Nollenberger, xx, 
19. 

CUBILOSE (principle of edible birds' 

nests), Payen, xxxii, 184. 
CUCUMBER JDICE, dialysed, Attfield, 

xxxvi, 530 ; xxxvii, 208. 
OINTMENT. See Ungdentum cucume- 

RIS. 



CUCUMIS ciTRULLUs, analysis of seeds-, 
Ritter, xii, 89, 93. 

CUCURBITA LAGENARiA in Sandwich Is- 
lands, xxvii, 235. 

PEPO. See Pepo. 

CUCURBITIN, Dosch, xlii, 202. 

CUICHUNCHILLI, viii, 105— account and; 
origin, Bancroft (W. & B., 1542), viii, 
125. 

CUISINIER'S Syrup. See Syrupus su- 

DORIFICUS. 

CULTIVATION, effect on active principles 
of plants. Warren, xxxviii, 45. 

CUMIDINE (from coal-tar), xxxiii, 41. 

CUMINUM, loss in powdering, hedwood^ 
xxi, 31. 

CUM OLE (from coal-tar), xxxiii, 41. 

, TRINITRO-, xxxvii, 312. 

Compare Cymole. 

CUMULATIVE action of medicine de- 
nied, Percy, xli, 204. 

CUNILA MARIANA, analysis, Milleman^. 
xxxviii, 495. 

CUPIDO BARK, Mauch, jr., xli, 417. 

CUPRUM. Compare Copper. 

ACETATE, yield of acetic acid, Thom- 
son, xxiii, 263 — of acetone, Thomson, 
xxiii, 55 — solubility in glycerin, Kle- 
ver, xlii, 222. 

, BLUR, Woehler, viii, 330. 

, NEUTRAL, preparation, xli, 448. 

AMMONio-oxiDE, solvent for vegeta- 
ble fibre, Schweitzer (Parrish, 494)^. 
XXX, 230 ; xxxii, 43. 

AMMONio-suLPHATE, behavior to ani- 
mal charcoal, Graham, iii, 151 — limit 
of reaction (as test for arsenious 
acid), Hastings, xiii, 202. See Cu- 
prum S U LPH U RI CO- AMMONIAT UM . 

ARSENiATE, decomposed by oxalic 

acid, Slater, xxviii, 345. 
BiNiODiDE and AMMONIA, Rammcls- 

berg, xiii, 86. 
BORATE. a.s substitute for Scheele'* 

green, Bollay, xxxv, 313. 

and BROMINE, Loewig, ii, 182. 

cARMiNATB, Luckow, xxxvii, 277. 

DiGiTALATE, Moriu, xvii, 184. 

FORMIATE, Fell, XXX, 221. 

— IODIDES, Duhamel, vi, 107. 

— LACTATE, Engelhardt, xxii, 74. 

— NITRATE, action of ferroso-ferric ox- 
ide, Schober, xlii, 402. 

— NiTRo-PRUssiDE, actioQ on essential' 
oils, Heppe, xxix, 325, 

— OXIDE, fcee Copper, Oxide. 

— phosphate, decomposed by oxalic- 
acid. Slater, xxviii, 345. 

— resinate, XXX, 83. 

— SALiciDE, Piria, xi, 144. 

— SULPHATE, behavior to animal char- 
coal, Graham, iii, 151 — to ferroso- 
ferric oxide, Schober. xlii, 402 — color 
of eschar, vii, 262 — separation of iron 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER 



THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



79 



CUPRUM sulphatp: [Continued). 

(subcarbonate of copper), xxxiv, 507 ; 
Maisch (acetate of ammonia imprac- 
ticable), xxxii, 523 — Wurtz (deutox- 
ide of lead and carbonate of baryta), 
xxxi, 67 — manufacture^ xxiii, 235 — 
pure^ see separation from iron — test 
for purity, Procter, jr., xxiii, 111 — for 
preservation of skins, Wicke, xxvi, 
279 — solubility in glycerin, Adolphus, 
xxxix, 150— klever, xlii, 222. 

QUADRUPLE SALT with ammonia 

and hyposulphite of soda. Peltzer, 
xxxvi, 376. 

SULPHATE, PENCILS, Calmbcrg (W. & 

B., 345), xxxvi, 106, 109. 

suLPHO-CARBOLATE, Sansom, xli, 445. 

suLPHURico-AMMONiATUM, Ph. Helve- 
tica (65), xxxix, 313, See am- 

MONIO-SULPHATE. 

xanthosantalate. Plummer, xxvii, 

118. 

CURAl^E. See Woorari. 

CURARIN, behavior to iodide of cadmi- 
um and potassium, Marme, xli, 19. 
Compare Woorari, 

CURCAS purgans, oil. See Oleum cur- 

CAS. 

CURCUMA, African, (W. & B., 364, note), 

Daniell, xxxii, 58. 
amada, V, 329. 

ANGUSTiFOLiA, fnruishes arrowroot, 

V, 348. 
aromatica, V, 329. 

TINCTORIA, V, 328. 

zedoaria, V, 330, 

ZERUMBET, V, 329. 

on different t»ane?:ees, Guibourt, V, 325 

— oil, Gajewsky, xlii, 466 — loss in 
poivderinff, Redwood, xxi, 31. 

CURCUMIN, Gajewsky, xlii, 466— Vogel, 
xvi, 350. 

CURRANT, BLACK, for wine making in 

France, xxxiii, 222. 
CUSPARIA febrifuga; Galipaea, 

See Angostura ; Galipaka. 
CUSPARIN (W. & B., 117), Saladin, v, 

346. 

CUSSO. See Kousso. 

CUSTOM-HOUSE circular, xx, 295. 

CUTCH. See Catechu. 

CUTTLEFISH, habits, xxxiii, 548. 

CYANIDES, conversion into ammonia and 
formic acid, Pelouze, v, 43 — different 
products by action of soda and po- 
tassa on animal matter, Possoz, xxx, 
551 — test (hyposulphite of soda), 
Frtt-hde, xxxvi, 125. 



CYANOGEN, relative absorptionhy differ- 
ent kinds of charcoal, Smith, xxxv^ 
563 — behavior to permanganate of po- 
tassa, Cloez and Guignet, xxxi, 151 — ■ 
freezing, Faraday, xvii, 22. 

CYANOGEN and bromine, Loewig, ii, 169. 

, iodide in commercial iodine (W. &" 

B., 469), Klobach, xxiii, 83. 

, perchloride, SeruUas, i, 232. 

CYANOL, Runge, vii, 250. See Kyanol. 

CYCAS circjnalis, vii, 188: xi, 17. See 
Sago. 

CYCLAMEN europ.eum, analysis of ashes 
of root, Ubaldini, xxx, 21, note — active 
principle, de Luca (VV. & B., 1508), 
xxix, 313 ; xxx, 21. 

CYCLAMIN, composition, Klinger (W. & B.,, 
1508), xxxii, 151 — preparation and 
properties, de Luca (W. & B., 1508), 

xxix, 313; xxx, 21 — Martins, xxxii, 
154 — Schroff, xxxii, 156. 

CYCLAMIRETIN, Klinger, xxxii, 155. 
CYCLOPIA LATiFOLiA (yields Kinone), 

Stenhouse, xxvi, 252. 
CYCLOPIN VoGELii (cyclopic acid), 

Church, xlii, 460. 
CYDONIA. See Quince. 
CYMBALARIN, Walz, xxxv, 295. 
CYMOL (from camphor and anhydrous 

phosphoric acid), Dumas and Peligot^ 

X, 177 — (from coal tar), xxxiii, 41 — 

Compare Cumol. 

CYNANCHUM argel : ole^folium, 

viii, 267. 

CYPERUS EscuLENTUs, analysis of tuber, 

xxx, 485. 

STOLONiPERUs as Origin of spikenard. 

Ainslee, vi, 21. 

CYPHOMANDRA betacea, source of cit- 
ric acid, Silvestri, xlii, 511. 

CYPRIPSDIUM HUMiLE, therapeutical 
use, Ives, xxiii, 179. 

PUBESCENS, analysis, Blair, xxxviii, 

494 — therapeutical use, Ives, xxiii. 
179. 

SPECTABiLE, therapeutical use, Ives» 

xxiii, 179. 

CYSTINE (Vallet's) not found, Legrip, 
xvii. 38. 

CYTISIN, behavior to iodide of cadmium 
and potassium, Marme, xli, 19 — pre- 
paration and properties, Husemann,. 
xli, 547. 

CYTISITE, Chevallier, xiii, 179. 
CYTISUS scoPARius, Sandwich Islands, 

xxvii, 240. 
CYTRYL SeeCiTRVL. 



80 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN N.4ME OF BASE) 



DADYL (in oil of turpentine), Blanchet 
and Sell (W. & B , 600), viii, 44. 

(= oil of cajuput), Blanchet and 

Sell, xxxiii, 545. 

DAGOBOOT (root fiom Aden). Yau^han, 
XXV, 334. 

DAGUERREOTYPE plates, e^c^i/^^^/, Fizeau, 
xix, 235 — preparation^ Claudet. xiii, 
253. 

DAIRY, Science, xxxix, 18G. 

DALBY'S CarnQioative (Parrisb, 825), v, 

28 ; xi, 72. 
DALLEOCEIXE (Parrisb, G43). xxxiii, 

407. 

DAMMAR, account, Siramonds, xxix, 139 
— behavior to different solvents, Sace, 
xlii, 242. 

Australian, Donnelly, xxxii, 190. 

VAExiSH, See Yabnish. 

DAN -A IS, ii, 294, iii, 24: vii, 334: xi, 247. 
DAI^IELLA THURiFERA, baniell (W.& B., 

1569), xxvii, 338. 
DAPHNE, varieties, properties, uses. 

Squire, xiv, 255. 
■ oxiUaris ; Cneorum ; colli- 

na ; Davphinii ; gnidium; 

indica; laureola, xiv, 256. 

• MEZEREUM, xiv, 256. See Mezereum. 

neapolitana ; olefc folia, xiv, 256. 

■ OLEoiDES, xiv, 255 ; xli, 434 

pontica : iarton-raira, xiv. 256. 

DAPHNETIN, Zwenger, xxxiii, 32 7! 
DAPHNIN, Enz, xxxi, 351— Zwenger (W. 

k B., 548), xxxiii, 325. 
DATURA METEL native of East Indies, 

Schlechtendal, xxx, 542. 
■ SAXGUiNEA, account. Seemann, xxiv, 

83. 

■ STRAMOXio-TATULA, Naudin, xxxvii, 

341. 

STRAMONIUM, native of Russia, Schlech- 

tendal, xxx, 541 — account, Naudin, 
xxxvii, 341. See Stramonium. 

tatula. native of America, Schlech- 
tendal, xxx, 542. 

■ tatula-stramonium. Naudin. xxxvii, 

341. 

DATURIA, heharior to bichroniato of po- 
tassa test, Jenkins, xxxiii, 5'-'8 — to 
chromate of potassa and sulphuric 
acid, Eboli, xxix 369 — conatiuiion 
(identical wi h atropia), Planta, xxiii, 
3^ -prfparation and properties, Gei- 
ger and Hesse, vi, 31P — Simes. v, 114 

DAUCOSMA laciniata, Durand,xl, 107. 

DAUCUS carota. See Carrot. 

DEATH and life in nature, Dana, xxxv. 
129. 

DEATHS. See Obituary. 
DECATYLE, hydride, xxxvii, 312. 



DECOCTIONS, remarks. Powers, v, 104— 
Pii. Dublin (50), xxiii, 11— Ph. Bo- 
russica (46), xx, 155. 

DECOCTUxM ALOES compositum, decompo- 
sition prevented. Bland ; Fisher ; Ty- 
son, XV, 125, 127 — nature of decom- 
position, Bustick, XX, 49 — improved, 
Graham (Parrisb, 126), xxx, 355 — 
Maddock, xiv, 334. 

ciNOHON.i; FLAV^ Ph.U.S (60), (gly- 
cerin proposed), Taylor, xxxviii, 237. 

DiuRETicuM, Ph. Hamburg. (1804). ii, 

109. 

H.-EMAToxYLi. Ph. Dublin. (26), iii, 

334. 

PEc'TORALE coRROBORANS, Ph. Batavia 

(1805), ii, 109, no. 

PYROL^, Ph. Dublin (26), iii, 334. 

SABBATiyE, D. B. Smith, ii, 215. 

SARSAPARILL^ COMPOSITUM, Ph, U. S. 

(40), (percolation recommended), 
SteAvart, xii, 31— Ph. U.S. (60), (time 
of maceration shortened), Saunders, 
xl, 37. 

SENEGyE, Ph. Hispanica (1798), ii, 109 

—Ph. U. S. (20), ii, 108. 
SERPENTARKE, Ph. Gallica (28), i, 

268. 

spiGELi.E, Ph. Wiirzburg ( 1 796), iv, 7. 

TARAXACi, Ph. Dublin (26), iii, 335. 

ziTTMANNi (W. k B., 1062, note), vii, 

175 — remarks, Vviggers. xii, 51. 

DECOLORIZATION. See respective head- 
ings. 

DECOLORIZING power of several sub- 
stances, Filhol, xxiv, 238. 

DECOMPOSITION. Sec respective head- 
ings. 

DECREPITATION, its cause, Baudrimont, 
viii, 3 45. 

DECUBITUS, ointment, powder, wash, 
Tott, xvi, 158. 

DELIRIUM TREMENS, Lyons (capsicum), 
xxxix, 183. 

DELPHINIA, helinvior to bichromate of 
})0tassa test, Jenkins, xxxiii, 528 — to 
chromate of potassa and sulpliuric 
acid, Eboli, xxix, 369 — to iodide of 
cadmium and potassium, Marme, xli, 
18 — to perchloric acid. Bullock, xxxvii, 
21 — to sulphuric acid (hot, cold, and 
with permanganate of po assa), Guy, 
xxxiii, 526 — to tannic acid, Henry, 
vii, 228 — preparation, Plenry, v, 175 — 
Hopkins (W. k B., 1605), xi, ii—ivh- 
Jiimiig temperature, Guy, xl, 247. 

DELPHINIUM ANTHEROiDES, xli, 433. 

CONSOLIDA, analysis, Hopkins (W. & 

B., 349), xi, 1, 8 — contains acoaitic 
acid, Wicke, xxvii, 152. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



81 



DELPHINIUM STAPIIYSAGRIA, V, ITS. 

DELPHIJSU8 MARGiNATUS, oil contains 
valerianic acid, Berthelot, xxvii, 375, 

DENjSIMETER, t^pacowsky, xxxi, 135. 

DENTAL ANESTHETIC, xxxi, 4H0. 

DENTIFRICE. See Tooth powder. 

, ELECTUAEY,vii 351 — Lalande,xxxviii, 

538. 

, tincture, xxix, 184, 

DENTISTS' HARD RUBBER. See Rubber, 
DEODAR, acclimatization in England, 
xxvi, 375. 

DEODURIZATION by atomized fluids, 
Richardson, xxxviii, 55. 

DEOXIDATION by protosalts of iron, 
Henipel, xxxiii, 217. 

DEPILATORY (innocuous), Boudtt, xxiii, 
77, 82 — Piesse, xxviii, 2 70. 

DERO.SNE'S salt (narcotia). vii, 125. 

DE^jICCATION, apparatus. Hare, ix, 31. 

DEFECTION. See different headings. 

DETERMINATION. See different head- 
ings. 

DEXTRIN, analysis of commercial, Fors- 
ter, xlii, 621 — chemical history, Proc- 
ter, jr., xi, 265 — estimation in glucose 
and cane sugar, Gentele, xxxii, 81 — 
accidental dtkcovery^ Simmonds, xxix, 
75 — found in manna^ Buignet, xl, 401 
— preparation^ Berzelius ; Procter, jr.; 
Thenard ; Thii.us, xi, 277. 278; 
Thomas, xix, 284 — purijication^ Eager, 
xlii, 327 — distinction from soluble 
starch, Bechamp, xxvii, 141. 

DIABETES, bread iov patients, Percy, xxi, 
24:2 —detection, Cappezuoli (copper 
and caustic potassn), xvi, 234 — (car- 
amel tesi), xxxni,415—physwlofficalli/ 
and chemically considered, Petten- 
kofer and Voigt, xxxix, 316 — treat- 
ment, Wheeler (peroxide of hydrogen), 
xli, 409 — Sampson (permanganate of 
potassa), XXV, 276. 

DIALYSIS, Graham, (W. & B., 896, note), 
xxxiii, 51!:! — Procter, jr., xxxiv, 312 
— Riederer, xxxix, 509 — (porous 
earthenware), Guignet, xxxv, 152 — 
of alkaloids, Grandeau, xxxvi, 414 — 
of gases, Graham, xxxviii, 510 — of 
plant juices, Attfield, xxxvi, 530; 
xxxvii, 206 — of poisons from organic 
mixtures. Bowman, xxxv, 383 — 
(thinks it too inaccurate for pharma- 
ceutical use), Gillespie, xxxix, 128; 
remarks by Riederer, xxxix, 509 ; by 
Procter, jr., xxxix, 511. 

DIALYTIC prt-parations,Dowler,xxix,314. 

DIAMONDS in Brazil, statistics, xxxiv, 89 
— vegetable origin, Bischoff, xxvii, 
288— Goeppert, xxxvii, 383. 

artificial, Gannal, i, 76. 

DIANIUM, Kobell, xxxii, 425. 

DIAPHRAGM, flexiblb, Bourne, xxxix, 
236. 



DIARRHCEA, Kinovic acid, de Vrij, xxxvi, 
427 — sorghum molasses, Rounsaville, 
xli, 125 — trumpet-plant, Palmer, xli, 
292, 396. 

CHRONKJ, heroic doses of strychnia, 

Kendall, xxxix, 438. 

DIASTA8E, Procter, jr., xi, 266— action 
on starch, Payen, xxxvii, 336 — prepa- 
ration, Payen ; Persoz (W. & B., 446), 
xi, 268. 

DIATOMS on the sea-bottom at great 

depths, xxxv, 352. 
DICTAMNUS albus, analysis, Duhamel, 

xi, 103,108 — inflammability of flowers,. 

llahn, xxxiii, 222. 
DIDION ATiNGO, furnishes isinglass, iii,. 

20. 

DIDYMIUM. Mosander, xv, 155. 
DIEFFENBACHIA Seguina, poisonous 

property, xv, 81. 
DIET of paupers. Smith, xxxix, 464. 
DIEFUSION of liquids, Graham, xxii, 169., 
DIGESTION, BrOcke, xxxv, 475— Bernard. 

and Barreswil, xvii. 138. 
DIGIT ALA GRIN, Walz,' xxxv, 294. 
DIGITALATES, Morin, xvii, 181. 
DIGITALETIN, Walz, xxxv, 294. 
DIGITALICRIN (W. & B., 351, note),. 

Walz, xxxv, 293. 
DIGITALIDE (W, & B., 351, note), Hom- 

olle and Quevenne, xxxv, 293. 
DIGITALIRETIN (W. & B,, 351), Kos- 

mann, xxxiii, 70; xxxv, 294 — Walz, 

xxxv, 294, 

DIGITALIN, behavior to bichromate of 
potassa test, Jenkins, xxxiii, 528 — to 
pentachloride of antimony and phos- 
phoric acid, Schultze, xxxii, 138, 236 
— to perchloric acid. Bullock, xxxvii, 
21 — to sulphuric acid (cold, hot, and 
with permanganate of potassa), Guy, 
xxxiii, 526 — constilution (W, k B., 
351), Kosmann, xxxiii, 69 — dialysed, 
Grandeau, xxxvi, 414 — German and 
French, Lefort, xxxvi, 512 — physio- 
logical properties, Homolle, xvii, 104 
— poisoning, Heer, xxx, 265 — (Pom- 
merais' case), xxxvi, 455 — preparation 
and properties, Homolle (W. & B,, 
350), xvii, 97 — Homolle and Que- 
venne (W. & B., 351, note), xxxv, 
293 — Lfcbourdais (charcoal process, 
W. & B., 1035,) xxi, 88— Leroyer (a 
mixture of chlorophylle, resin, etc.), 
BraultandPoggiale,vii, 219; xi,206— 
Mayer, xxxv, 297 — Ph. Britannica (64) 

xxxvi, 381 — Planiava, vii, 219; xi, 
206— Pauquy, vii, 218; xi, 206— 
Williams (by benzole) xxvi, 342 
— solubility in chloroform, Schlim- 
per, xxxii, 160 — sublimed, Helwig, 

xxxvii, 29; xxxix, 540 — subliming 
temperature, Guy, xl, 247 — test (sul- 
phuric acid aad bromine), Grandeau, 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



DIGIT ALIN {Continued). 

xxxvi, 416 — therapeudc Siction, Strohl, 
xxii, 273 — j/ield, comparative, before 
and after flowering, Warren, xxxviii, 
47 ; from American aud European, 
Dutfield, xli, 55. 

CRYSTALLIZED, Nativelle, xli, 315. 

. , FLUID (W. & B., 352), Engelhardt, 

xxxvi, 126. 

DIGITALIS, LEAVES, action of soil and cul- 
ture, Warren, xxxviii, 52 — active prin- 
ciple, Mayer, xxxv, 296 ; yield before 
and after flowering. Warren, xxxviii, 
47 — adulteration (Conyza squarrosa), 
XXX, 402 — volatile alkaloid, Engel- 
hardt (W. & B,, 352), xxxvi, 126— 
comparative yield of digitalin from 
American and European, Duffield, xli, 
55 — analysis, Brault and Poggiale 
( W. & B., 351), vii, 220 ; xi, 207— Ho- 
molle, xvii, 97 — Warren (of ashes), 
xxxviii, 55 — Welding, v, 89, 91 — 
chemical history, Mayer, xxxv, 292 — 
proper time of collection, Schneider, 
xlii, 221 — e//?cao_y ascertained, Palken, 
(ferrocyanide of potassium), xviii, 
160 — action on the heart, Lombard, 
ix, 262 — empyreumatic oil, Morries, 
V, 262 — percolation and maceration 
compared, Bo lilly and Guillermond, 
X, 10 — pharmaceutical and toxicological 
experiments, Bonjean, xv, 196. 
— SEEDS, active principle, yield before 
and after change of color, Warren, 
xxxviii, 48 — analysis^ Buchner, xxiv, 
153 — recommended as substitute for 
digitaline, Broussard, xxx, 398. 

DIGITALOIN, Walz, xxxv, 295. 

DIGITALOSE (W. & B., 351, note), Ho- 
molle and Quevenne, xxxv, 293. 

DIGITALO.SMLV, Walz, xxxv, 295. 

DIGIT ASO LIN (W.&B , 351, note), Walz, 
xxxv, 293. 

DIMOOARPUS LicHi, xxxvi, 295, note. 

DIM ORPHAN rUS edulis, xxxvi, 291. 

DINITR\NILIN, xxxiii, 249. 

DIOSOOREA BATATAS, analysis, Fremy, 

xxvii, 261. 

villosa, medical use (bilious colic), 

Riddell, viii, 19. 
DIOSPYROS embryopteris (glutinous 

fruit), xxix, 140. 

• LOTUS (of ancient Egypt), v, 138. 

VIRGINIANA, analysis, Bryan, xxxii, 

215~Smith (W. & B., 355), xviii, 161, 

167 — time of collection, Procter, jr., 

xxviii, 412 

DIOXYPAPAVERINA (=Rhoeagenina), 

Hesse, xlii, 397. 
DIPHrHERlA, Tridau (Storax, copaiba, 

C'lbebs), xxxv, 278 : xxxviii, 375. 
DIPPEL'S OIL. See Oleum ammale Dip- 

pelii. 

DIPTERIX ODORATA, vii, 118. See Tonka. 



DIPTEROOARPUS turbinatus yields 
wood-oil (W. & B., 325, note), Hao- 
bury, xxviii, 159. 

DIRCA PALUSTRis as emetic, iv, 278. 

DISEASES, INFECTIOUS, parasites of, Hal- 
lier, xli, 143. 

DISERNESTON gummiferum, xv, 263. 

DISINFECTANTS, comparison, Beranger, 
xl, 395 — distinguished from antisep- 
tics, Crookes, xxxviii, 361 — general 
remarks, Crookes, xxxviii, 360, 428 — 
Reveil, xxxv, 262 — Ferrari (fluoboric 
acid gas), vi, 263. 

DISINFECTING fluid, Ledoyen, (W. & 
B., 661), xix_, 269. 

POWDER, Keist, vi, 85 — Demeaux and 

Corne (W. & B., 1J98), xxxi, 579— 
Morfit, xxvii, 501. 

DISPENSARY, Northern, New York, 
statistics, xxiii, 276. 

DISPENSATORY, U. S. See Reviews. 

DISPENSERS, hints to, Biroth, xl, 544— 
Taylor, xxxviii, 347. 

DISPLACEMENT. See Percolation. 

circulatory, AUsop, viii, 89 — Laid- 

ly, xxiv, 318 — Procter, jr., xvi, 313. 

DISPLACER, steam-. Smith's (Parrish, 
137), Procter, jr., xviii, 98. 

See Percolators. 

DISS, ergot of, analysis, Lallemant, 
xxxvii, 335. 

DISTANMETYL. xxxv, 216. 

DISTANNBTHYL, chloride, xxxv, 219. 

DISTILLATION, fractional, Regnault, 
xxxvii, 28 — Wanklyn, xxxv, 558 — la 
glass vessels. See Boiling. 

DISYMMETRY, molecular, of organic 
products, Pasteur (Ruschenberger), 
xxxiv, 1, 97. 

DIURETIC (bee-bread), Whitmire, xxxviii, 
56. 

DIVIDIVI, amount of tannin, Muller, 
xxxi, 429. 

DOCTORATE, its cost in Paris, xxiv, 178„ 
DCE BE REINER'S glass, ii, 252, 
DOGWOOD, Jamaica. See Piscidia 

erythrina. 
DOKU-QUATZ, xxxvi, 291. 
DOLICHOS filiformis, xviii, 44. 

pruriens. See Mucuna, 

DOLPHIN. See Delphinus. 

DONIUM (in Davidsonite), Richardson 

and Bause, viii, 345. 
DONOVAN'S solution. See Liquor ar- 

SENICI et hydrargyri iodidi. 
DOREMA ammoniacum, iii, 262 ; xv, 263— 

description, Don, v, 261. Compare 

Ammoniacum. 
DORSTENIA contrayerva. See Contra- 

YERVA. 

DOVER'S powder. See Pulvis ipbcacit- 

ANH^E COMPOSITUS. 

DOVER'S SOLUTION. See Solution, Do- 
ver's. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTITE CLASS, 



DRAC/ENA Draco, Vanghan ; Wellstead, 
XXV, 334, and note. 

of Teneriffa destroyed, x1, 271. 

^ Compare Blood, Dragon's. 

DRACONINA, Herberger, iii, 262— Me- 
landri, iii, 259. 

DRACONTIUM POiTiDUM, analysis, Turn- 
er,^ viii, 1, 8, 10. 

DRAGEES, preparations, Agnew, xlii, 
270. 

DE SANTONINE COMPOSEES, FoUgCra, 

xxxvi, 100. 
DRAGON'S BLOOD. See Blood, Dragon's. 
DRAGON TREE. See Dracaena Draco. 
DRAUGHT of valerianate of zinc, De- 

vay, xvi, 300. 
DRESSING for sores (fine clay), Schre- 

ber, xxxvi, 272. 
DRIMYS CHiLENSis, description, Carson, 

xix, 81 — source of Cupido bark, 

Mauch, jr., xli, 417. 
granatensis, xix, 81. 

MAGNOLIAFOLl/E, xix, 82. 

DRIMYS PUNCTATA xix, 164. 

WiNTERi description, Carson, xix, 

161. Compare Winterana aroma- 

TICA. 

DROPS, /orma/?or? and size, Quin, xxxvi, 
522 — versus minims, Durand. i, 165; 
Proctor, xxxii, 428 — smallest (soapy 
water), Eckfeldt and Dubois, xxix, 
177 — table, Bernouilly, xxxi, 442 ; 
Durand, i, 169; Proctor, xxxii, 430. 

, BLACK. See Acetum opii. 

DROPPING bottle, Dymond, xxt, 213. 

machine (make-shift), xlii, 300. 

vials (broader and thinner lip), 

Ebert, xlii, 542. 

DRUGS, adulteration, Christison, x, 116— 
Edwards (report), xxi, 154 — Royal 
College, Edinburgh (rejjort), x, 114 
— in England, Hassall, xxviii, 29 — 
Procter, jr. (editorial), xli, 81 — 
Thomson, xi, 169 — behavior to solar 
rays, Hunt, xix, 144 — Brazilian, Car- 
son, xvii, 81 — CAm<?.s'e( recommended), 
Wooster, xlii, 187 — colleclion, care- 
less. M isch, xxxix, 304 — imported at 
New York, 1857, xxix, 565 — indige- 
nous, xxxvi, 263 ; collection, Proc- 
ter, jr, xxviii. 411 ; trade in Cincin- 
nati, xxxii, 455 — Mexican, Guibourt, 
xxxviii, 497 — Panama, Maisch, xli, 
230 — poicdering, remarks, xxii, 282 — 
Hagner, xxiii, 197~Redw('0d, xxi, 
19 — loss, Covell, xxxix, 114 — Red- 
wood, xxi, 31 — preservation, iVlaisch, 
xxx, 309 — dry, Melsens, xlii, 253 — 
prices at. the South, 1862, xxxiv, 380 
— rejected in Baltimore, xxviii, 507 — 
New York, xxi, 159, 382 ; xxv, 76, 
. 495 — standard, xxiv, 22 ; xxiii, 288, 
391 — tests for purity, Procter, jr., 
xxiii, 31G. 



DRUG examiners, Squibb ; Procter, jr., 
xxxiii, 186 — instruction, xxv, 301 — me- 
morial, xxxiii, 281. 

INSPECTORS, when began, i, 259 — 

about removal for political reasons, 
xxii, 280 — memorial about qualified 
inspectors, xix, 313 ; xxv, 297, 299 ; 
Procter, jr. (comments), xxv, 370 — 
discussion in American Pharmaceu- 
tical Association, xxv, 498. 

INSPECTION, of New York, Bailey, 

xxv, 75 — in Maryland, Aiken, xxviii, 
506. 

LAW, effects, xxiv, 365; xli, 379, 496, 

504, 562 — joint action of medical and 
pharmaceutical committees, xlii, 82, 
278 — some points, Taylor, xxii, 192. 

MILL, Redwood, xxi. 20. 

TARIFF, xxiii, 288, 395. 

THIEVES, xxv, 283. 

DRUGGISTS, LIABILITY, XXXV,' 378 ; xli, 
127. 

. See under Pharmacy. 

DRUSIUM (resin of oak), Liancourt, ii, 
344. 

DRYING. See under plants; iiERBS—plants 
for herbaria, Hooker, xxxii, 51 — Mot- 
ley (succulent plants), xxix, 561 — 
Wright (succulent plants), xxx, 149. 

INFLUENCE on plants. Schoonbroodt, 

xli, 320. 

DRYNESS, to ascertain, xlii, 208. 

DRYOBALANOPS Camphora, v, 176— 
xvii, 2 1 9 — description, etc.. de Vriese^ 
xxiv, 329. Compare Camphora, Bor- 
neo ; SUMATRA. 

DUCKS not poisoned by opium, Mitchell, 
xlii, 188. 

DUG G A BOOT, xxv, 334. 

DUGONG, OIL, account, Fewtrell, xxxii, 
230. 

DULCAMARA, action of soil and culture. 
Warren, xxxviii, 52 — alkaloid, Henry, 
V, 176 — analysis, ^\m^s,\'n\, 15 — ttme 
of collection, Piocter, jr., xxviii, 412 
— influence of drying Schoonbroodt, 
xli, 320— contains lactic acid. Wilt- 
stein, xxix, 311 ; xxx, 127 — percola- 
tion with water, packing, Soubeiran, 
viii, lib— poisoning Pli^tschke, xxiii, 
181 — contains tannin, Peitenkofer, 
xxvii, 54. 

DULCITE (of Laurent) identical with Mel- 

ampyrite, and Euonjmite (of Kubel), 

Gilmer, xxxv, 35, 289. 
DURIO ziBETHiNUS, xxiv, 342. 
DUTCH LIQUID, its anaesthetic effect (W. 

k B., 1494), Simpson, xx, 245. 
DWARF TREES, how obtained, xxxvi, 323. 
DYES. See Color; and different colors. 

Hair-. See Hair dyes. 

METALLIC, gray, Robiquet, iv, 173. 

POISONOUS (coralline rouge: jaune), 

xli, 366. 



84 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



DYEING-, INDIGO (reduction by turnips), DYSENTERY, is due to a peculiar fun- 
Leuchs, xxxviii, 260. gus, Hallier, xli, HS — treatment (ki- 

subsiitution of bisulpliate of soda novic acid), de Vrij, xxxvi, 42Y — 

for cream of tartar and alum, xxvi, (glycerin) Daude, xxxiii, 116 — 
471, (mudar) Durant, xxxix, 62. 

con'ributious to tpieoky, Bolley, i DYSPEPSIA, treatment (colombine), 

xxxii, 359. j Wittstock, xxxix, 417 — (gizzard of 

DYEWOOD, apparatus for extraction,] South American ostrich), Waj^ne, xl,. 
• Schlumberger, xviii, 191. | 123. 



EI. 



E. Compare ^E. ^ | 

EARTH, new, Biscboff, xxxvii, 40. 1 
EAIJ. Compare Aqua; Water. j 

DE BoxFEBME, Ph. Gallica (26), Prel.: 

No. I'<3. 

DE BoTOT, Piesse, xxvi, 462. 

DE BouLE, xiv, 225. 

A BRULER, Piesse, xxvii, 471. 

DE Chyi're, Piesse, xxvii, 178. 

DE Cologne. See Cologne water. 

DE FLEUR d'oranger. See Water-, 

. Orange flower. 

DE Luce, Piesse, xxvii, 79. 

MEDiCiNALE DE HussoN, Henrj, vi, 

326— Wilson, vii, 347. 
DE MER, gazbusb. See Water, Sea-, 

AERATED. 

DE MiLLEFLEURS, Piesse, xxvii, 274. 

. DE AiOussELAiNE, Piessc, xxvll, 275. 

DE Portugal, Piesse, xxvi, 464. 

SEDATIVE, Raspail, xiii, 262 ; xxviii. 

221. 

EBLANA (Eblina?), Scanlan, ix, 316. 

EBONY charcoal, absorption of ammo- 
nia; of carbohic acid, Smith, xxxv, 
563. 

ECBALINE, preparation, etc., Garrod ; 
» Williams (W. & B., 363), xxxii, 259, 

261. ''ompnre Elaterixe. 
ECBALIUM officinarum. See Momor- 

dicaelatekium ; compare Elaterium. 
ECBOLINA, behavior to reagents, Wen- 

zell, xxxvi, 197 — preparation and 

properties, Wenzeil (W. & B., 368, 

note), xxxvi, 194. 
ECGONIN (W. & B., 1513), Lossen, xxxiv, 

406, 

ECLECTICISM, definition, Kost, xxx, 187. 
ECLECTIC pharmacy, Parrish, xxiii, 3i9. 

Compare Resinoids. 
preparations, Shakers', Procter, jr.. 

xxviii, 91. 

remedies (Keith's) examined, Wayne, 

xxvii. 388. 

ECOLE pratique de hautes etudes, Paris, 
xli. 413. 

EDINBURGH university, Parrish, xxxi, 
101. 



i EDITORIALS. See und^r Pharmacy, U. 
I S., Journal of Pharmacy. 
I EDUCATION, mkdical, and Apothecaries' 
Socioty in London, ix, 56 161, 248. 

professional, of medical students, 

xxxix, 375. 

pharmaceutical, Procter, jr., xxxiii^ 

476. 

of the shop, xxvi, 388. 

EFFERVESCENCE, apparatus for show- 
ing the efft'ctof pressure, Hare, vi, 273- 
EFFLORESf'ENCE, Gay-Lussac, iii, 179.. 
EGGS, CHEMICAL facts respecting them, 
Barreswil, xxi, 3! 1 — contain no iodiney. 
Lohmeyer, xxv, 250 — how to keep. 
Burnouf, xxxviii, 88. 
— - POWDER (for baking), xxvi, 46. 
EL.'EOSACCHARA, Ph. Helvetica (65), 

xxxix, 532, 
EL.EOSACCHARUM yanill^e, Ph. Helve- 
tica (65), xxxix, 532. 
ELAIDIN, Boudet, vi, 84. 
ELAIN, preparation, Fremy, viii, 342, 
ELAIOME TER, Gobel, xvi, 24. 
ELAI8 guineensis as cosmetic, xxvii, 339. 
Compare Oleum palm.e. 

melanococca as cosmetic, xxvii, 33&. 

ELATERIN, compare Ecbaline — behav- 
ior to bichromate of potassa test, 

Jenkins, xxxiii, 528 to sulphuric 

acid (hot, cold, and with permanga- 
nate of potassa), Guy, xxxiii, 526 — 
preparation, Morries (W. & B., 363). 
iii, 130. 

ELATERIUM, compare Kusia — remarks, 
Hancock, ii 252 — cuUivaiion at Hit- 
chin, England, xxxii, 163 — at Mit- 
cham, England (W. & B., 362 note), 
xxiii, 31 — culture in U. S., Thomas,, 
xxxiv, 504 — poisnning, Craig, xl, 375 
— standard at New York, xxiv, 24, 
XXV, 302. 

ELATINE, Paris (W. & B., 363), iii, 130. 
ELECTRIC FISHES as shock-machines, 

Wilson, XXX, 41. 
ELECTRIC LIGHT. See Light, electric. 
ELECTRICAL machine protected from, 
dampness. Munch, xxiii, 178. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLA8S. S5 



13LECTRTCAL machine (wood), Jerning- 
ham, xxxviii, 343, 344. 

'ELEC TRICITY, atmospheric, a cause of. 
Becquerel (current between living 
plant and soil), xxix, 180 — quantity 
connected with atoms, Faraday, xxv, 
80 — caloric and imponderable bodies, 
analogy, West, vi, 229 — great French 
prize, xxxviii, 563 — in poisoning with 
strychnia (W. k B., 1356), Duclos, 
xvi, 154 — applied to manufacture of 
sulphuric odd, Bell (W. k B.. 54), 
xxv, 255 — identity of voltaic and fric- 
tional, Faraday, xxvi, 259 — test for 
feeblp currents, Osann, xviii, 317. 

ELECTRO-CHEMICAL coloring of met- 
als, Becquerel, xxxiv, 77. 

decomposition of insoluble sub- 
stances, XXXV, 431. 

ELECTRO-GILDLNG, Briant, xxvii, 356 

ELECTRO-MAGNETIC machine (Sax- 
toii's), Green, vi, 153. 

ELECTRO-METALLURGY, Morfit, xxix, 
22. 

J:LECTRO-PLATmG china-ware, Ridg- 
"way, xxv, 468. 

. See under respective metals. 

ELECTUARIUM lenitivum, Ph. Helvetica 
(65), xxxix, 532. 

ELECTUARY. Compare Confectio. Opi- 
ate. 

absorbing power of the dry powder, 

Baum^ (W. & B., 1050), ii, 341. 

' DENTIFRICE. See Dentifrice. 

, CASTOR-OIL, Piesse, xxv, 365. 

, TURPENTINE, Bouchardat, xv, 329. 

ELEMENTS, arrangement of, in vegeta- 

^ ble compounds, Prout, vi, 32 — all 
formed of one kind of matter, Dumas, 
xxxii, 387. 

ELEMT, account, Cooley, xvi, 232 — analy- 
sis, Bonastre (W. &'B., 365), xvi, 232— 
artificial, Cooley, xvi, 232 — behavi'-r to 
various solvents, Sace, xlii, 242 — from 
Bengal, Guibourt, iv, 84 — oil, see Ole- 
um ELEMi — crystalline re.sin, Rose, viii, 
52 — seluhility in chloroform, Lepage, 
xxiv, 147 

ELETTARIA cardamomum. See Carda- 
mom. 

major, description. Pereira, xv, 23, 

98. 

ELIXIR acidum Halleri, drops in drachm, 
Bernouilly, xxxi, 441. 

ammoni.i^ valerianatis, Enos (Par- 

rish, 166), xxxiii, 345 — Moore (Mary- 
land College formul i), xxxviii, 150 — 
Pierlot (W. & B., 975), xxix, 367. 

ARMOKACI.'E iodo-fkrro-phosimiora- 

TUM, Fougera, xxxix, 312. 

BisMUTin, Bakes, xxxix, 120. 

CALISAYylJ, SCC ElIXIR CINCHONiE 

Diehl, jr. (treated with moist .scsqui- 
oxide of iron), xl, 104. 



FERRATUM, Diehl, jr., xli, 104. 

See Elixir cinchona ferratum. 

FERRi ET BisMUTHi, Gardner, 

xli, 219. See Elixir cinciion;e, etc. 
■ Castillon's, xxvi, 287. 
CHLOROFORM!, Washington formula, 
xl, 238. 

• ciNCHON/K, Taylor (W. k B , 1391, 
note), xxxi, 18. See Elixir cali- 

SAY.^:. 

FERRATUM, Shinn (Parrish, 165), 

xxxiv, 204. See Elixir calisay^, etc. 
ciNCHON.E, FERRi ET BISMUTHI, Wash- 
ington formula, xl, 237. See Elixir 
calisaytE, ete. 

FERRO-PHOSPHORATUM, BakeS 

(Parrish, 165), xxw, 228. 

FERRI ciTRO-LACTATis, Robincaud, 

xxxi, 416. 

PYROPHOSPHATis, Washington 

formula, xl, 238 
ETSOD^: PYROPHOSPHATIS, Maisch, 

xxxix, 388. 

GENTIANvE FERRATUM, ThompSOn, 

xxxix, 206. 

HORSE-RADISH. See Elixir armora- 

ci^. 

IRON. See Elixir ferri, etc. 

OPii McMuNN, supposed to be a solu- 
tion of meconate of morphia, Duha- 
mel, xviii, 17 — preparation, Chilton 
(W. k B , 1404, note), xxxvi, 262— 
substitute, Dupuy, xxiii, 211 : Procter, 
jr., xxiii, 212, note. 

d'or. See Tinctura, Bestucheff. 

PECTORALE, Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix, 

532. 

picis LIQUID.^ coMPOsiTUM, Washing- 
ton formula, xl, 239. 
E succo GLYCYRRHiz^. See Elixir 

PECTORALE. 

TARAXACi COMPOSITUM, Candidas, xlii, 

71. 

— VALERIANATE OP AMMONIA. See ElIXIR 
A MMONl^ VA LERIAN ATIS . 

viTRiOLi MvNSiCHTi, Ph. Gallica (26), 

Prel. No. 104 — oriyinal formula, xiii, 
174— Ph. London (1721), xxxv, 545. 

ACIDUM, Ph. London (1746), 

xxxv, 545. 

. See AciDUM sulphuricum aro- 

MATICUM. 

ELM, SLIPPERY. See Ulmus. 

ELYMUS SABULOsis, xi, 117. 

EMAIL DE PARIS, Jared, composition, 

Chandler, xlii, 366. 
EMBROCATION for piles, Stearns, xxix, 

527. 

EMERY mine, Chester, Massachusetts, 
Jackson, x xxvii, 277 — composition^ 
Jackson, xxxvii, 280 — detection of 
adulteration (W. & B., 1511), xxxiii, 
112; xxxiv, 137 — estimation (W, &' 
B,, 1511). xxxiii, 112. 



86 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



EMETIA, hi^s never been obtraned pure, 
Dumas, vii, 351 — behavior to bichro- 
mate of potassa test, Jenkins, xxxiii, 
528 — to iodide of cadmium and po- 
tassium, Marme, xli, 19 — to nitric- 
acid, Guy, xxxiii, 52G — to tannic acid, 
Henry, vi, 228 — conrposUion^ Lefort; 
Peiletier ; Dumas, xli, 309 — jf/?rj?9«r«- 
/iow, lieury (tannin process), vii, 234 
— Lefort (by chloroform from alka- 
line extract of alcoholic extract), xli, 
307 — t^olubiiiiy m chloi oform, Lepage, 
xxiv, 248. 

cnLOiioHYDK.iTK, Lcfort. xli, 310. 

SULPHATE, Lefort, xli, 309. 

EMETICS, VEGETABLE, of IJ. S., Griffith, 
iv, 276. 

EMODIN, composition, Rochleder, slii. 

355 — preparation, etc., Warren de la 

line ftnd Muller, xxx, 446. 
EMPETUUxM NiGRtjM, yields blue color, 

vi, 72. 

EMPIRICAL preparations prohibited in 
Russia, xxxi, 483. 

EMPLASTRUM. Compare Plaster. 

ACiDi CARBOLici, Hirsh (with isin- 
glass), xli, 349 — Jenkins (with chalk), 
xli. 293 — Lister (with Empl. plumbi), 
xli, 154 — Martindale (with shellac), 
xli, 153. 

ACONiTF (iiADicis), Procter, jr. (W. it 

B., 1087, note), xxv, 202— (with nor- 
mal tincture), xxxiii, 104. 

ADH-32SIVUM, Audrews ( with i>inglass), 

XXXV, 321 — Cadet de Gassicourt (with 
India rubber), iii, 296 — Deschamps 
(flour paste and gelatin), v, 84 — Feld- 
haus (soft plaster improved by lard), 
xxxiii, 315 — Hensler (on paper), xvi, 
236— Herpin (tannate of lead, W. & 
B., 1074), xxvii, 565 — McCIintock 
(contains Burgundy pitch), v, 33 — 
Pettenkofer (from lime soap, W. & 
B. , 1074, note), xix, 97 — Prestat (con- 
tains gura ammoniac and mastic), xvi, 
159 — Shecut and Day ( fndia rubber), 
xviii, 235. Compare Empl. plumbi; 
Tissue. 

ANGLicuM.. See Plaster, court. 

ammoniaci, Ph. U. S. (50), details ol 

manipulation, Procter, jr., xxxiv, 209 
—Ph. Dublin (50), xxiii, 14— Ph. Sue- 
cica (69), xlii, 87. 

ANODYNUM. Sharp, xxix, 476. 

antimonii, Hodgson, jr. (with Empl. 

adhaesivum) ,v, 295— Ph. U. S. (60), 
remarks, Procter, jr., xxxvi, 305. 

ARNICA, Procter, jr., xxvii, 514 — Ph. 

U. S. (60), Orth (with Burgundy pitch 
and Cerat. cantharides), xxxvii, 246 
Procter, jr., remarks, xxxvi, 306. 

aromaticum, extempore, Procter, jr. 

(with fluid extracts), xxxi, 540 — Par- 
rish (Parrish, 786), xxviii, 19. ' 



— ass^F(etid^, Ph. U. S. (30), Hodg- 
son, jr. (melts in alcohol and strains^ 
W. & B.. 1 067), V, 36— Needles (ia 
waser), v, 77— Ph. U. S. (50), Proc- 
ter, jr. (with ether and alcohol), xxxii^ 
533 — in heart disease, Lombard, ix, 
261. 

belladonx.^, Southall (prefers alco- 
holic extract), xxviii, 218 — Balmer 
(prefers extract of root), xli, 348. 

CANTHAPiiDis. See Ceratum can- 

TitARiDis ; Plaster, blistering. 

Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix, 532 

—Ph. London (24), Prel.'No. 24. 

PKRPETUUM, Ph. Helvetica (65), 

xxxix, 532. 

carbolicum. See Empl. acidi car- 

BOLICI. 

coNii, Duclou (wi'h extract), vi, 

35.3-Duhamel (with powdered leaves), 
xiii, 288. 

CORN. See Plaster, corn. 

croton oil. See Empl. olei tiglii. 

cuMiNi, Ph. London (24), Prel. No. 

24. 

DIAPALMyE, i, 38. 

frigidum, Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix^ 

532. 

galbani, Ph. U. S. (30), ii, 328— 

Needles (melts in water), v, 77. 
crocatum, Ph. Helvetica (65)^ 

xxxix, 532. 
HYDRARGYRi, Ph. U. S. (40), Procter, 

jr., xvi, 71 — Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix,. 

533. 

lithargyri. See Empl. plumbi. 

meliloti compositum, Ph. Helvetica 

(65), xxxix, 532. 
oLEi TiGLii, Bouchardat ; Caventou, 

XV, 66. 

opii, Ph. London (24), Prel. No. 24 — 

Ph. U. S. (50), Procter, jr. (with ex- 
tract), xxxiv, 210— Ph. U. S. (60), re- 
marks, Procter, jr., xxxvi, 306. 

oxycroceum, Ph. Helvetica (65),. 

xxxix, 533. 

peruviaxum, Washington formula, 

xl, 329. 

picis BURGUNDici with caoutchouc, 

Lorigne, xli, 208. 

cum cantharide, Ph. U.S. (60), 

remarks, Close, xxxix, 21 — Procter, 
jr., xxxvi, 3(6 — Taylor, xxxv, 411. 

compositum, Ph. London (24), 

Prel. No. 24. 

plumbi. Ph. U. S. (30), ii, 328— (wa- 
ter necessary in its preparation), Prel. 
No. 62 — Diehl, jr., manipulation, 
xxxix, 385 — Davallon (glycerin ne- 
cessary to consistence, W. k B., 1073), 
XV, 27 — Ellis (amount of water bound), 
vii, 284 — G^lis (by double decompo- 
sition, W. & B., 1072), ix, 124— (con- 
sidered impractical by B^ral, x, 48) — 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



87 



EMPLASTRUM plumbi (Contmued). 

Lienau (details ot'preparaiion),xxxiii, 
317 — Mussey (lecoiumends an oleo- 
margarate o^' zinc, W. & B , 1U72), 
xxviii, 220 — D. B. Srai h (withouf 
water, with deutoxide of lead), iv, 
2G3 — Spencer Thoinas (recomraend-^ 
lard, W. & B, 1072), xix, 172— Ph. 
Helvetica (65), xxxix, 532. 

PLUMBI CAKBONATIS, Ph U. S. (30), 

Wood (W. & B., 1073, note), iii, 20t<. 

• RESix.'ii, Ph. Dublin (50), xxiii, 14. 

B.ESINOSUM, Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix 

533. 

SAPONis, Ph. U. S. (60), remfirks, 

Diehl, jr., xxxix, 386 — Ph. Britannica 

(64) , remarks, Pr >cter, jr., xxxvi, 
381— Ph. Helveti-'a (65), xxxix, 533 

SIMPLEX. See EImpl plumbi. 

siNAPis. See .Mustard plaster. 

EMULSIN, action oa amygdulin, Liebip 
and Wrehler; Procrer. jr , x, 193 — 
composition, Bull, xxi, 357 — Thomson; 
Richardson, x, 353 — in leaves and 
bark of Primus^ etc., Procter, jr.. x, 
200 — preparation^ Bull, xxi, 3 )1 — 
— Groves, xl, 60 — Thomson; Rich- 
ardson, X, 352 — propertipH, Bull (VV. & 
B., 108), xxi, 351— 2i,se, Groves, xl, 60 
— solution, Liebig and Wcjehler, x, 193. 

EMULSINES, Pies-e, xxviii, 78. 

EMULSIN AU jasmin, Piesse, xxviii, 80 — 

AU viOLETTE, Piesse, xxviii, 80. 

EMULSIONS, Mohr, Redwood, Procter, 
jr., xxi, 216. 

EMULSIO AMYGDALARUM, Ph. Helvetica 

(65) , xxxix, 533. 
, ANTHELMINTIC (turpentine, scammo- 

nium, cop'tiba), v, 2.'9. 
, containing b jrax, improved by ad- 
dition of acetic acid, Geissler. xxix, 
185. 

Butter of cacao, Duhamel, xiii, 18. 

, CASTOR OIL. See Emulsio olei ricini. 

CHLOROKORMi, Dannecj, xxviii, 181. 

, COD liver oil. See Emulsio olei 

MORRHUiE. 

haschicin, Laneau, xxviii, 363. 

, negative, Proctor, xxxvii, 480. 

of OILS and f^ts (by carbonates), Jean- 

nel and Monsel, xxx, 461 — Nougarei 
(in the bottle), xli, 204 — Uverbeck 
(in the mortar, W. & B,, 1228, note), 
xxiii, 377 ; (recommended by Procter, 
jr., xli, 205.) 

OLEO-RESiNyii; cubeba^, Proctcr, jr., 

xviii, 169. 

OLEOSA, Ph.Helvetica (65). xxxix, 533 

OLE! MORRHU^i), Milliau (with syrupus 

calcis), xli, 238 — (with magnesia), 

xxviii, 1. 

OLEI RICINI, Manne, xx, 309. 

, pancreatic. Dob' 11, xxxviii, 143. 

picis, Jeannel, xxxix, Ibl. 



, POSITIVE, Proctor, xxxvii, 480. 

, PUMPKiN-SEBD and male fern, (W. & 

B. 639), xxxvi, 213. 

of RKSiNS and gum-resins, Constaa- 

tin (W. k B., 902), xxvii, 61. 

of tar. See Exmulsio picis. 

ENAMEL OF America, composition, Chan- 
dler, xlii, 366. 

of cast-iron vessels, xvii, 239 — Ro- 

der, xxii, 375. 

SNOW-WHITE, Phalon, composition, 

Chandler, xlii, 367. 

ENAMELINE, Bradford's, composition, 
Chandler, xlii, 367. 

ENDONEUllON suberosum, for stupefy- 
ing bee-^, xxvii, 376. 

ENDOSMOSIS, nature, Draper ; Diitro- 
chet, vi, 304. 

ENEMA ASSAFffiTiD.E, Moore (with his 
purified as-afoetida), xl, 388. 

perri protiodidi, Dupasquier, xiii, 

122 

ENFLEURAGE, Piesse, xxvi, 273— Proc- 
ter, jr., xxxviii, 67. 

ENGRAVINGS, old and faded restored, 
Gorup Besanez (ozone), xxxiii, 539 — 
cleaned and preserved, Hayes, xxxiY, 
397. X 

, GALVANOPLASTIC, DuloS, XXXvi, 325. 

, PHOTOGLYPTic, Talbot. xxxi, 478. 

, PHOTOGRAPHIC. See Photography. 

, STEEL, photographic. See Photo- 
graphy. 

MACHINE, electromagnetic, Hansen, 

xxvii, 278. 

. Compare Photography. 

ENNOMOS SUBSIGNARIA, analysis and the- 
rapeutical use, Shryock, xl, 305. 

EPICIA (Abies excelsa), xii, 127. 

E PI D END RON vanilla, xxii, 176. See 
Vanilla. 

EPIG.'E A REPENS, amount of tannin, Bow- 
man, xli, 194. 

EPILEPSY, remedies (indigo), Ideler, 
viii, 86— (potassii bromidum, etc.), 
Close, xxxviii, 323. 

EPIPOLISM. See Fluorescence. 

EPISTAXIS, remedy (onions). Rover, 
xxvii, 319. 

EP0CR!D.4CE^, dehiscence of pollen, 

Aldridge, xiii, 217. 
EPSOM salts. See Magnesia, sulphate. 
EQUISETUM pluviatile contains aconi- 

tic acid, xxvii, 152. 
hiemale, amount of silica in ashes, 

Struve, XXXV, 164. 
limosum contains aconitic acid, 

xxvii, 1 52 — contains iodine, McAdam, 

XXV, 67. 

for p'^per-making, xxviii, 169. 

KQUIVALENTS, Bache, xxxii, 385. 
f'.RASINE, xxxvii, 394. 

EKECHTHITbS pr^alta ; hieraci- 

FOLiA, Duhamel, xvi, 8. 



88 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



ERGOTA, of Ampblodksmos tenax, ana- 
lysis, Lallem int, xxxvii, 335. 

of Indian corn, Cressler (W. & B., 

1623), xxxiii, 32C— Roullin (W. & B., 
1623). ii, 85 — abortion in cows (W. &: 
B., 1624), xxxiii, 412. 

of RYB, anaJyi^is, Baker, xxiv, 97, 101 

— Legrip (W. & B., 3^7), xvii, 39— 
Vauquelin, xi, 124 — WiggeTS (W. & 
B., 367), V, 258— Wenzell (W. & B., 
368, note), xxxvi, 193, 202— Winck- 
ler, xxiv, 172; xxv, 412 — anatomical 
and phj'siological observations (W. 
& B., 366), Qaeckelt, xi, \ \Q— ashes, 
analysis, Bakt-r, xxiv, 104 — Herr- 
mann, xlii, 143 — time of collection, 

Boe'tcher, v, 258 in covsumption, 

Parula, xxk, 315-~dr-i/ifi(/, influence, 
Schoonbroodt, xli, 321 — m.sect found 
in it. Barton, x, 270 — oil, Bnker (W. 
& B., 368). xxiv, lOl— origin, Muller, 
x, 269; Pereira, xxvi, 179; Queck- 
ett, xi, 237 ; Reunie, vii, 347 — phar- 
maccu ically considered, Procter, jr., 
xxix, 540 — conliiins sulp hate o/potafsa , 
Attfield, xli, powdering, V, 172 — 

preservation, Nunn (camphor), xxvii, 
309; aud Stabler, xxiii, 122 — Procter, 
jr. (chloroform), xxiii, 122, note — 
substituted by Cannabis indica (W. & 
B , 382), Chri?tison, xxiv, 173 — sugar. 
Mitscberlich (W. & B , 368), xxx, 346 

of WHKAT (is not liable to spoil), 

Grandclement, xxiv, 315. 

ERG0TJ5TIA ABORTANS, xi, 130, 241. 

ERGOTLNE, preparation and properties, 
Bonjean (W. k B., 371; Parrish, 
212), XV, 219, 259 — Wiggers (W. k 
B., 367), XV, 258 — (remarks on Bon- 
jean and Wii/gers, Duhamel, xv, 258 ;) 
Wenzell, xxxvi, 195. 

ERGOTISM, Thompson, xvi, 79. 

ERICA VULGARIS, analysis of asbes, Salm- 
Horstm^.r, xx, 159. 

ERICACE^, dehiscence of pollen, Ald- 
ridge, xiii, 217. 

ERIGERON CANADENSE ; PHILADEL- 

PHicuM. iv, 290. 
ERIOPHORUM CANNAP.iNUM, for paper- 

m ikitig, xxvii, 40. 
ERYSIPELAS, (glycerole of alum and 

white precipitate,) Anciaux, xxx, 403. 
ERYTHIiyEA CHACHANLAHUEN, vi, 276. 

CHiLKNsis. Carson, vi, 276; xv, 314 

ERYTHRIM (coloring matter of orchil- 

licheu?), Heeren, iv, 346 — behavior to 

ammonia, xiii, 231. 
ERYTHRINA indica yields lac, xxix, 378. 
ERYTHROCENTAURIN, Mehu, xxxviii, 

303. 

ERYTHROGLUCIM, combination with 

tartaric acid, Berihelot, xxx, 154. 
ERYTHcJONIUM amertcandm, as emetic, 



ERYTHROPHLEUM, xxiii, 303. See Sassy 

BARK. 

JUDiciALE, Lindley (W. & B., 1597), 

xxix, 114; Procter^ jr., xxiv, 395. 
See Sa.«5Sy bark. 

ERYTHROPHYLL, Berzelius, xi. 34. 

ERYTHROPRUTIDE (of Mulder), Liebig, 
xviii. 130. 

ERYTHRORETIN, deposited from Tinc- 
tura rhei. de la Rue and Muller, xxx, 
367. 

ERYTHROSINE, Garod (W. k B., 708), 
xxii, 242. 

ERYTHROXYLON coca. See Coca. 

ESCHARS, color of, from various chemi- 
cal Hgents. vii, 262. 

ESCHSCHOLTZIA californica yields 
succinic acid, Walz, xxxiv, 329. 

ESCULIN. See^^scuLiN. 

ESERINE, Vee and Leven, xxxvii, 204. 

ESPRiT DE NKROLi, Piesse, xxvi, 463. 

DE ROSE TRIPLE, Piessc, xxvi, 469. 

. Compare Bouquet; Eau; Essence; 

etc. 

ESSAYS, INAUGURAL. See Inaugural es- 
says. 

ESSENCES ( = essential oils). See 
Oleum. 

Ph. Dublin (50). xxiii, 15. 

. Compare Bouquet; Eau; Esprit; 

etc. 

of ambergris, Piesso, xxvii, 75. 

of APPLE, Fehling, xxv, 156; Kletz- 

insky, xxxix, 239. See Oleum, ap- 
ples. 

of APRICOT, Kletzinsky, xxxix, 239. 

See Oleum, apricot. 

of BEEP (Gillon's); Brady, xxxviii. 77. 

BOUQUET, Piesse, xxvii, 179. 

of OHERKY, Kletzinsky, xxxix, 239. 

of CLOVE-PINK, Piesse, xxvi, 467. 

of Cognac, xxxviii, 168. 

of Eglantine, Piesse, xxvi, 367. 

, French, estimation of strength, 

Jackson (chloride of calcium), xxv, 

264. 

, FRUIT, xxiv, 184; Fehling, xxv, 155; 

Kletzinsky, xxxix, 238 artificial, 

Holfmiinn, xxiv, 248. 

of grape, Kletzinsky, xxxix, 239. 

of GoosEBEKRY, Kletziusky, xxxix, 

239. 

of Iceland wintergrken, Piesse, 

xxvi, 562. 

of Jargonella pear (W. k B 1516), 

xxiv, 38. 

of LAVENDER, Piesse, xxvi, 273. 

of lemon, Kletzinsky, xxxix, 239. 

of LILAC, Piesse, xxvi, 374. 

of magnolia, Piesse, xxvi, 460. 

DE Mandarine, analysis (W. & B., 

149, note), de Luca, xxx, 136 

of MELON, Kletzinsky, xxxix, 239. 

of Moss-KOSE, Piesse, xxvi, 469. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



89 



ESSENCES of MUSK, viii, 81. 

of MYRTLE, Piesse, xxvi, 461. 

of ORANGE, Kletzinsky, xxxix, 239 — 

for soda-water syrup, Shinn, xxxiii, 

311. 

of PEACH, Kletzinsky, xxxix, 239. 

of PEAR, FehliDg, xxv, 156 — Kletzin- 
sky, xxxix, 239. See Oleum, pear. 

of pine-apple, Febling, xxv, 155; 

Kletzinsky, xxxix, 239. 

of PLUMS, Kletzioslcy, xxxix, 239. 

of QUINCE, Wagner, xxv, 320. 

of RASPBERRY, Kletzinsky, xxxix, 

239. See Oleum, raspbkrry. 

of RESEDA, Piesse, xxvi, 461. 

of rondeletia,- Piesse, xxvii, 2'76. 

of roses, Piesse, xxvi, 469. 470. 

of spring-flowers, xxxix, 370. 

of spruce, Stearns, xxxv, 30. 

of strawberry, Kletzinsky, xxxix, 

239 — from juice, Martin, xxvii, 313. 
See Oleum, strawp.errv. 

of sweet-briar, Piesse, xxvi, 367. 

of sweet-pea, Piesse^ xxvi, 466. 

of tea-rose, Piesse, xxvi, 470. 

of VETIVERT, Piesse, xxvi, 560, 

of VIOLET, Piesse, xxvi, 561. 

of VoLKAMERiA, Piesse, xxvi, 562. 

of AVALL-PLOWERS, Piesse, xxvi, 562. 

of WHITE ROSE, Piesse, xxvi, 469. 

of WINE, xxxviii, 168. 

ESSENTIAL salt op bark, Ellis, xiv, 106. 

ETCHING- by photography. See Photo- 
graphy. 

ETHER. See .Ether. 

capsules, Clertan (W. & B., 954), 

xxvi, 80. 

ETHSRIFICATION, Graham (W. & B., 
953), xxiii, 267 ; Hennel, ii, 73 ; Kuhl- 
mann, xiii, 47 ; Liebig, viii, 215. 

ETHERINE, sulphate. Hare, ix, 148. 

ETHEROXYLIN, Parrish, xxi, 293. 

ETHICS, code of, xxv, 16. 

of the shop, Inoe, xxxviii, 570. 

BTHIOPS. See.EpHiops. 

ETHYLAMIN (from cyanide of barium), 
Wagner, xxxiii, 404. 

bichloree, Wurtz, xxv, 142, note. 

ETHYLAMYLSOLANIA, Moitessier, xxix. 
331. 

ETHYLR, acetate. See ^ther, acetic. 

, bromide. See iEfHER, bromic. 

codeia-ammonium, How, xxvi, 163 

CYANIDE, physiological properties, 

Turnbull, xxvii, 31. 

, IODIDE, action of aluminium, chrome, 

glucinium, iron, magnesium, tin; Ca- 
hours, xxxv, 106, 107, 108. See 

^THKR. HYDUrODIC. 

MORPHIA, How, xxvi, 163. 

, NITBATK. See yRrHER, NITRIC. 

, NITRITE. See tEther, nitrous. 

, oxide. See tEther. 

, iMiosi'HiDK. .Janssen, xxxiv, 163, note. 



QUiNiA and combination, Strecker, 

xxvii, 321. 

QUJNiUM, Gregory, xxix, 91. 

soLANiA, Blanchet; Moitessier, xxiXj, 

330. 

ETHYLO-NARCOTIN, xxxiv, 520. 
ETUA-TREE (Kiglia Africana), xxxiii, 550. 
EUCALYNE (saccharoid from Eucalyptus 
mannifera), Berthelot (Parrish, 511), 

xxviii, 157. 
EUCALYPTENE, Cloetz, xlii, 465. 
EUCALYPTOL, Cloetz, xlii, 465. 
EUCALYPTUS AMYGDALiNA, tallcst tre» 

in Australia, xl, 49 — yields so-called 
oil of peppermint, xxxv, 451. 

COLOSSBA, xl, 49. 

GLOBUSiUS, introduction into Spain^ 

xli, 300. 

MANNIFERA (manna from Australia), 

V, 86 — saccharoid, Berthelot (Parrish, 
511), xxviii, 157. 

OLEOSA, yields illuminating oil, XXXV, 

452. 

RESiNiFERA, as sourcB of kino^ Gui- 

bourt, iv, 54 — description, xxxvii, 393 
— its kino has gelatinizing proper- 
ties. Redwood, xiv, 259 — examinatioa 
of kino and juice, Procter, jr. (W. & 
B., 499, note) xxxi, 226, 

viMiNALis yields manna, Haubury, 

xxxiv. 546 ; xxxv, 454. 

EUDIOMETER and 

EUDIOMETRY, Hare (nitric oxide gas), 
vi, 179 — (copper-turnings and am- 
monia), Lassaigne, xvii, 294— Saus- 
sure (lead), viii, 321— (disadvantage 
of phosphorus), viii, 324. 

EUGE'VIE'S FAVORITE, Jouvin's, composi- 
tion. Chandler, xlii, 367. 

EUGENIA australis, chemical research- 
es, de Luca and Ubaldini, xxxviii^ 
212, 

■ NEUROCALYX, XXXV, 351. 

pimenta. St^e Pimenta. 

EUGENIN (from cloves), Bonastre (W. k 

B., 224), vii, 83. 
EUONYMIN, Wenzell (W. & B., 374), 

xxxiv, 389. 
EUONYMITE, Kubel (W. & B , 374), xxxv^ 

518. Compare Dulcite ; Melampy- 

RITB. 

EUONYMUS ATRO-PURPUREA, analvsis^ 
Clothier (W. & B., 374) xxxiii, 490— 
Santos, XX, 83 — Wenzell, xxxiv, 385. 

EUROPy^icus (contains euonymite)^ 

Kubel, xxxv, 518. 

EUPA rORIUM aya-pana, vi, 6. 

cannabinum, vi, 5. 

(JONNATUM, vi, 1. 

iNCARNATUM, sourcc of mata, Maisch, 

xl, 123, note. 
GLUTiNosuM (supposcd source of ma- 

tico), xxxvi, 1 18. 

MACULATUM, vi, 6. 



90 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



EUPATORIUM PERFOLiATUM, analysis, 
Bickley, (W. & B., 876), xxvi, 495— 
Peterson, xxii', 206 210 — description 
and properties, (Griffith, vi, 1 — as 
emetic, iv, 283 — as tonic, y, 288. 

• PURPUREUM, yi, 6 

TEUCRIFOLIUM, vi, 6. 

EUPHORBIA coROLLATA, analiisis, Zolli- 
koffer, y, 165— as cathartic, v, 2"7 — 
as emetic, iy, 280 — properties, Zollikof- 
fer, V, 163. 

CYATHiPHORA, as emcic, iv, 280. 

CYPARissiAS ; — — ESULA, yield yel- 
low color, Sticke^ xvii, 153. 

• iiELioscopiA, yields blue color, vi, 73. 

HYPEKiciFOLiA, niedical properties. 

Zoilikoflfer (W. & B., 377), V, 70. 

IPECACUANHA, as emefic, iv, 280. 

LATHYRis, iv, 124 — as cathartic, v, 207 

—oil, Scaitergood (W. & B., 1568), iv, 
124 — Soubeiran (four distinct princi- 
ple-), vii, 260. 

MARGiNATA, as emctic, iv, 280. 

NEURiFOLiA ; TiRUCALLi, yield 

elnstic crum, xxix, 471. 

EUPHORBIUM, action of camphor (W, & 
B., 195, note) Plnnche, x, 2!4, 215—' 
composition, Fliickiger, xl, 394 — crys- 
talline resin. Rose, viii, 52. 

EUPHORBON, Fliickiger, xl, 393. 

EUPHORIA LiTcni, iMaver. xxxvi, 205. 

PUNiCEA, xxxvi, 295, note. 

EUPION, Reichenbach, v, 63. 

NAPHTHA, xxxiii, 367. Compare Ben- 
zine. 

EURIBALI, Hancock,' V, 144. 

EUROPE, and Paris Exhibition, Piocter, 
j'-., xxxix, 565. 

EVAPORATION, Marcet, xxvi, 261— as- 
certain point of dryness, xlii, 208 — 
under reduced -pressure (apparatus), 
Prescott ( — Barry's process, W. & B., 
1083), xlii, 349. * 

EXC^ECARlA AGALLOCHA sourcc of aloes 
wood, vi, 200 — poisonous plant, xxxv. 
351. 

EXCHANGES, Procter, jr., xxxiv, 94. 

EXHIBITION of London : 1851, xxii, 381 
— 1853, chemical and pharmaceuti- 
cal products, XXV, 565, 572 — 1862, 
xxxiii, 575 — committee for specimens, 
xxxiii, 574 — specimens of materia 
medica, xxxiv, 190; xxxiv. 545, (Han- 
bury)— report of committee, xxxiv, 
277, 566. 

of Paris : 1855 xxvii, 85, 284—1867. 

xxxix, 187 — list of jurors, xxxix, 371 
—Procter, jr., xl, 518 ; xli, 8, 108. 

EXOGONIUM purga. See Jalapa. 

EXOSTEMMA, De Candulle, ii, 291— Pe- 
reira, xi, 247 — Wood, iii, 24 — sup- 
posed source of Pitaya bark, Brera 
and Guibourt, vii, 334 — sestivation, 
Don, xi, 247. 



carib^:a, ii, 292. 

florihunda, ii, 292; vii, 334; xiii, 50. 

EXPEDITION to South America, Agas- 

siz s, xxxvii, 303, 394; xxxiiii, 91. 
EXPEDITIONS, national scientific, xxv, 

284. 

EXPERIMENTERS, young, advice, Fara- 
day, i, 1 25. 

EXPLOSIONS: in chemical laboratories, 
Buchner, xxi, 25U — burning fluid, 
protection against, Locke, xxxi, 85 — 
hydrocyanic acid, xiv, 326 — hypo- 
phosphite of lime, Janssen, xxxiv, 
162 — hypophosphite of soda,Tromms- 
dortI■(W, & B., 1531), xxxii, 87— mu- 
riatic acid, xxxi, 479 — nitroglyceria 
(A.spinwall; San Francisco), xxxviii, 
316 — oil of turpentine and sulphuric 
acid, XXXV, 378 — phosphoric acid, 
Eisner, xxxiv, 187 — chlorate of po- 
tassa and tannin, xli, 470. 

EXTRACTION of drugs. Cadet de Gassi- 
court, viii, 222 — Schwa^rzler, xxvi, 
17. 

Compare Percolation, etc, 

EXTRACTS IN general: 

, ALCOHOLIC, Vielguth and Nentwich, 

xxxi. 237. 

, ALKALOIDS estimated. See Extracts, 

NARCOTIC. 

, AQUEOUS, Vielguth and Nentv^ich, 

xxxi, 236. 

from AROMATIC plants, Pierlot (with 

eiherfrom fresh plants), xxxiv, 544. 

, COLORED green by salts of copper, 

viii, 349. 

, degrees of consistence, Vielguth and 

Nentwich, xxxi, 234. 
, KTHERKAL, Vielguth and Nentwich, 

xxxi, 237. 

, flavoring. See Flavoring ex- 
tracts. 

, fluid. See Fluid extracts. 

, glycerinated, Wiegand (W. & B., 

1C85). xxxv, 117. 

, hydro-alcoholic, Vielguth andNent- 

wich, xxxi, 237. 

, narcotic, yield of alkaloid, Jeandous, 

xxxvii, 30 — assay: (iodobydrargy- 
ri^te of potassium). Groves, xxxvi, 
535; Lepage (W.& B., 1085, note), 
xxxv, 314; Mayer, xxxvii, 15, 16 — 
(pho6phomol.\ bdic acid criticised), 
M.--yer, xxxv, 63 — Gundermann (sep- 
arates the alkaloid by ether and chlo- 
roform), xxxiii, 216 — preparation: 
Battley (with the chlorophyll, W. & 
B., 1078), ii, 86— Krai (fresh herbs), 
xli, 313 — Scheidemandel (percolates 
successively with alcohol and water, 
evaporates separately and mixes) xvi, 
250 — Thompson, (Scheidemandel's 
process slightly modified,) xxxii, 539 
Ph. Helvetica (65) xxxix, 533. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER 

EXTRACTS, powDEKED (with sugar), 
Gauger, xv, 221 — Procter, jr., xxix, 
573 — (powdered liquorice root), Viel- 
gutli and Nentwich, xxi, 235. 

PREPABAT[ON,Berjot (like dried froth), 

xxxiv, 567 — -Burin (with rectified 
spit-it), xvi, 174; (criticised by Sou- 
beiran, xvi, 180) — Squire (all the so^t 
parts and the flowers), xxxiv, 169^ 
(criticised by Groves, xxxiv, 249) — 
Thomson (green color a criterion), 
viii, 349 — Ph. Austriaca (55); Ph. 
Belgica (54); Ph. Borus?ica (46), 
xxxiv, 174 — Pn.Britanriica(64),xxxvi, 
381— Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix, 533 
—Ph. Norvegica (54); Ph. U.S. (50), 
xxxiv, 174. 

PRESBKVATiON, E'Hz (Appprt's meth- 
od), xxxii, 555 — Everitt (deprived of 
moisture over sulphuric acid under 
an air pump), xii, 88 — Menigaud 
(softness preserved), vii, 275. 

, SHAKERS, Procter, jr., xxiii, 93. 

SOLUTION of small quantities (test 

tube), Ebert, xlii, 540. 

, suLPHO-CARBONic, Lefort, xlii, 246. 

■ , Thayer's solid, Procter, jr., xxix, 

288. 

, Tildex & Co., Procter, jr., xxii, 205. 

• in VACUO, priority (Tilden versus Sha- 
kers), xxiv, 187. 

relative value from diff-rent parts 

of the plant, Hirtz, xxxiii, 414. 

YIELD, Kohlmann, xli, 301 — Vielguth 

and Nentwich, xxxi, 237. 

EXTRaCTUM abibtis canadensis. See 

HEMLOCK BARK. 

ABSiNTHii, yieM^ Kohlmann, xli, 301 

— Vielguth and Nentwich, xxxi, 237 
— poivdered^ Vielguth and Nentwich, 
xxxi, 235. 

ACHILLEyli. See EXTR. MILLEFOLII. 

ACONITI (foliorum), preparation. Ph. 

U. S. (50), Sharp (with chlorophyll), 
xxvii, 392— Ph. U. S. (60), Procter, 
jr., xxxvi, 393 — powdered^ Vielguth 
and Nentwich, xxxi, 235 — yield. Viel- 
guth and Nentwich, xxxi, 237. 

(radicls), compared with ex- 
tract of leaves, Hirtz, xxxiii, 414 — 
preparation Procter, jr., xxxiii, 104 — 
yieW, Kohlmann, xli, 301 

AMMONiATUM, Turnbull, vii, 

146. 

ALOES, rendered tasteless by animal 

charcoal, Weppen, xviii, 203 — Ph 
Borussica (62), yield, S'"hwabe, xlii, 
404— Ph. Dublin750), xxiii, 11. 

ANGELiCyi'2, yield, Vielguth and Nent- 
wich, xxxi, 237 — powdered, Vielguth 
and Nentwich, xxxi, 235. 

ANTHEMiDis, Ph. Britanulca (64), re- 
marks, Procter, jr., xxxvi, 381. Com- 
pare ExTRACTUM OHAMOMILLyl';. 



THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 91 

ARiSTOLOCHi^, Ph. Br uns viccnsis 

(1777), i. 269. 

ARNICA (florum), Ph. U. S. (60), re- 
marks, Procter, jr., xxxvi, 394 — Tay- 
lor, XXXV, 412 — Ph. Germanica- (65), 
yield, Kohlmann, xli, 301. 

(radicis), powdered and yielf^, 

Vielguth and Nentwich, ?:xxi. 235, 
237. 

ASPARAGUS, dry, Boullay, vi, 353. 

AURANTii (coRTicis), yield, Kohlmann. 

xli, 301. 

of BARK, BASIC, BuUock, xix, 46. 

of BEEP. See OP MEAT. 

BELLADONNyE (poliorum), adulteration 

(dulcamara), T. and H. Smith, xi, 
223 — contains ammonia, ]\[ayer, xxxv, 
65 ; xxxvi, 229, note — as antiyalactic. 
Storment, xli, 29 — contains asparagin, 
Biltz, vii, 345 — assay, Mayer, xxxv, 

29 — yield oi atropia (various authors), 
xxxvii, 30 — poisoning, xi, 83; see mis- 
takes — powder, Y\kt.\\y^\\\\ & Nentwich, 
xxxi, 235 — preparaiion,'Q\x\\a (bruised 
plant in alcohol), xvi, 175 — Geiger 
and Hesse (aqueous extract with al- 
cohol), v, 293 — Sharp (with the chlo- 
rophyil), xxvii, 392 — Solon and Sou- 
beiran (recommend clarification), 
viii, 228 — Southall (prefers alcoholic 
extract to inspissated juice), xxviii, 
218 — Squire (flowers and soft parts), 
xxxiv, 169 — Shakers', Procter, jr., xxiii, 
94 — yield, Vielguth and Nentwich. 
xxxi, 237. 

(radicis), yield atropia, May- 
er, XXX V, 330 — Procter, jr., xxxvii, 

30 — compared to extract from h aves, 
Hirtz, xxxiii, 414 — yield. Majev. xxxiv. 
329. 

BuAHAREM (Monesia), xvii, 84. 

CALABAR BEANS, Enz. x!ij, 321. 

CALAMI, poicder, Vielguth and Nent- 
wich, xxxi, 235 — yield, Kohlmann, xli, 
301 — Vielguth and Nentwich, xxxi. 
237. 

CALisAYyE, ElliS (Parrish, 211), xx, 

15. 

pR.ECii'iTATUM, Hubbell, xxxiii. 

19. 

■ Compare bark: 

CINCH0NyT3. 

■ CALUMB/E, Ph. Britannica (64), xxxvi, 

381 — powder, Vielguth and Nentwich, 
xxxi, 235 — yield, Kohlmann, xli, 301 
— Vielguth and Nentwich, xxxi, 237. 

CANNABIS (from American male hemp), 

Wood, xlii, 185. 

iNDiCyE, in mixtures (with oil), 

Githens, xxxiii, 203 — preparation: La- 
neau (with a mixture of alcohol and 
ether, or chloroform), xxxvii, 24 — 
Procter-, jr, (with alcohol), xxxvii, 25 
— Robertson (alcohol vapors, W". k 



92 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



EX TRACT UM [Continued). 

B,, 380), xix, 195; xx.wii, 24— T. & 
H. Smith (W. & B., 38C), xxxvii, 25— 
j)ropei-iie,s, Procter, jr., xxxvii, 25 — 
tipuriovs (frcm English hemp), Proc- 
ter, jr., xix, 197, note — test, Procter, 
jr. (nitric acid. W. &B., 1091), xxxvii, ; 
26. 27 — yeld, Koblmann, xli, 301. 

: — puRiFiCATUM, Ph. U. S. (60), re- 
marks, Procter, jr., xxxvi, 396 — Tay- 
lor, XXXV, 412. 

cANTiiAKiDis ACETicuM, Soubeiran, XV, 

240. 

CAP.sicr, Rakes, xxv, 513. 

CARDUi BENEDICT!, powdcr aud yield, 

Vielguth and Nentwich, xxxi, 235, 

236. 

oARDAMOMi, tthcreal, Procter, jr., 

xxi, 1 1 6. 

CARNi.s. See , OF meat. 

CASCARiLL.?-:, powder and yit-ld, Viel- 
guth and iNentwich, xxxi, 235, 237. 

CENTAUREi MiNORis, powdeT and yield, 

Vielgu h and Nentwich, xxxi, 235, 
237. 

■ CHAMu.MiLLvE (matricaria? ), vou-der, 

Vielguih and Nentwich, xxxi, 235 — 
yieid, Koblmann, xli, 301 — Vielguth 
and Nentwich, xxxi, 237. Compare 
Extract i:m anthemidis. 

CHELiDOxii. Ph. Bavarica (59), xxxiii, 

10 — powder and yield, Vielguth and 
Nentwich, xxxi, 235, 237. 

ciCHOREi, powder and yield, Vielguth 

and Nentwich, xxxi, 235, 236. 

ciMiciEUO.E, Moore (Parrish, 212), 

xxxiii, 343 — Procter, jr. (dry extract, 
\V. k B., 252, note), xxvi, 107. 

ciNciiox.K, JjHbarraque (quinium, W. 

& B., 1092, notp), XXX, 400— Squibb 
(alcohol and glycerin), xxxix, 408, 
513— yield, Koblmann, xli, 3^1. 

HAsicuM. See of bark. 

coMPOSiTUM, Squibb, xxxix, 514. 

Fusci AQUOSUM, powder and 

yield. Vielguth and Nentwich, xxxi, 
235, 236. 

NORMAEE, Guillermond ( W, & B., 

297, note), xxxvi, 16. 

COD-LIVER, Barr, xxxviii, 140, 142 — 

remarks, Procter, jr.. xxxviii, 139. 

coLCHioi ACKTicuM, Ph. Dublin (50), 

xxiii, 12— Ph. U. S (6.j), contains col- 
chiceine, Maisch, xxxix, 103. 

coLOCYXTHiDis, Ph. U. S. (60), re- 
marks, Procter, jr., xxxvi, 396 — yield, 
Koblmann, xli, 301 ; Procter, jr., 
xxxix, 15: Squibb, xxxix, 16 — from 
pulp and from seeds, Squibb (W. & 
B., 1093), xxix, 98. 

COMPOSITUM, Ph. Helvetica (65), 

xxxix, 534— Ph. London (24), Prel. 
No. 22— Ph. U. S. (40), Duhamel and 
Procter, jr. (propose percolation), xi. 



192— Ph. U. S. (50), Bannvart (podo-^ 
ph}llin for scammony), xxxi, 20 — 
Squibb (mixed dry, and powdered to- 
gether), xxix, 97, 102— Ph. U. S. (60), 
Procter, jr., xxxix 18 ; Squibb, xxxix^ 
19. 

COLUMBO. See ExTRACTUM CALUMByE.. 

coNii, Ph. Britannica (64), (is inert),. 

Harley, xxxix, 456 — Aicher (recom-- 
mends removiog the chlorophyll),, 
xxiii, 170 — remarks on Archer, Proc- 
ter, jr., xxiii, 174, note — yield oi'coniay. 
Jandous, xxxvii. 31 — S/iakers, Procter, 
jr., xxiii, d'i—Tilden ^ Co , Procter, jr., 
xxii, 207, 382 ; xxiii, 174, note — pow- 
der and yield, Vielguih and Nentwich, 
xxxi, 235, 237. 

(seminum), compared to extract 

of the leaves, Hirtz ; Hepp, xxxiii, 
414. 

CDBEB,*; ^thereum. Sce Oleo-resin a^ 

ALCOHOLicuM, ( outains chloride 

of potassium, Maisch, xiii, 225, note.. 

FLUiDUM, Puche, xiii, 78. 

AQUOSUM FLUIDUM, Pucho, xiii,. 

78. 

HYDRO-ALCOiiOLJCUM, Labelonye,. 

viii, 316. 

DIGITALIS (foliorum), powdcr Viel- 
guth and Nentwich, xxxi, 235 — prepa- 
ration, Burin, xvi, 178 — yield, Viel- 
guth and Nentwich, xxxi, 237. 

(seminum) compared with ex- 
tract of leaves, Hirtz, xxxiii, 414. 

DULCAMAR.E, preparation, Simes, viii, 

18— Ph. U. S (60), remarks, Procter, 
jr., xxxvi, powder and yield, 

Vielguth and Nentwich, xxxi, 235,. 
236. 

ERGOT.'E .ethereum See Oleum er- 

GOT.-E. 

ALCOHOLICUM, for hypodermic in- 
jections, Langenbeck, xli, 406 — pow- 
der, Vielguth and Nentwich, xxxi, 235 
— preparation, Stickel, xxv, 211-— 
Koblmann, xli, 301 ; Vielguth and 
Nentwich, xxxi, 237. 

FERRi POMATUM, Maisch, xxxi, 26. 

FiLicis -ETHEREUM, examination, Bock, 

xxiT, 61 — importation prohibited ia 
Russia, xxxi, 483 — application in tape- 
loorm, Bowman, xxxvi, 442 -powder 
and yield, Vielguth and Nentwich, 
xxxi, 235, 237. 

GALL^] COMPOSITUM, Procter, jr., xli, 

390. 

GENTiAXyE, examination, Leibundgut, 

xxxiv, 175 — preparation: Burin (with 
rectified spirit), xvi, 177 — (remarks 
on Burin, Soubeiran, xvi, 180) — Feld- 
haus (avoiding the pectin), xxxiv, 3S 
— Geisler (entire root), viii, 263 — 
powder and yield, Vielguth and Nent* 
wich, xxxi, 235, 236. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER 



THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



9a 



EXTRA-C'TUiM GLYCYiuiHiZyE, American^ 
Procter, jr. (W. & B , 383, no'e), 
xxvii, 311 — aduUeration (starch and 
Dutch-pink), Ingenohl, xvi, 319 — (ex- 
tractum grarninis), Versmann, xxxiii, 
315 — preparation, Delondre (with 
steam, W. &B.,383) xxix, 157— loss in 
powder. Covell,xxxix, 116 — yield, Viei- 
guth and Nentwich, xxxi, 236. 

. See LiQuomcE. 

GRAMiNis, yifld, Vitlguth and Ment- 

wich, xxxi, 236. 

GUAHAREM (moncsia), xvii, 84. 

GUAiAoi, Soubeiran, vi, 260 — yield, 

Kohlmann, xli, 301 — and powder, 
Vielguth and Nentwich, xxxi, 235, 237. 

HvEMATOXYLI. See OF LOGWOOD. 

HELLEBORi NiGTti, Bacher (W. k B., 

1098), Soubeiran, vi, 338— powder 
and yield, Vielguth and Nenlwich. 
xxxi, 235, 237. 

viRiors, yield, Kohlmann, xli. 

301. 

of HEML0(^K BARK, Spcnccr Thomas, 

xxxviii, 214. 

HUMULi, Ph. U. S. (30), not an fligi- 

ble preparation, y, 294 — yield, Kohl- 
mann, xli, 301. 

HYOSCYAMi (foliorum). Crystals (ni- 
trate of potassa and chloride of cal- 
cium), Recluz, V, 293 — (nitrate ot 
potassa, W. & B., 46u), Mahla, xxxi, 

402 hygroscopic nature explained, 

Procter, jr., xxix, 573 — yield of hyos- 
cyamin^ Jandous, xxxvii, 31 — powder, 
Vielguth and Nentwich, xxxi, 235— 
preparation: Burin, xvi, 175 — Crack- 
nell, xxiii, 245 — Geiger and Hesse 
(aqueous extract wiih alcohol), v, 
293 — Groves (only leaves and tops ol 
branches, W. & B., 1099, note), xxxiv, 
249 — Sharp (with chloroph'U) xxvii, 
392 — Solon and Soubeiran (green fe- 
cula inert, W. & B , 1098), viii, 230— 
Thompson, (separately with alcohol 
and water), xxxii, 541 — Tilden & Co., 
Procter, jr., xxii, 207 — yie.ld^ Bell, 
xxiii, 153; Vielguth and Nentwich, 
xxxi, 237. 

(skminum), compared with ex- 
tract of leaves, Hirtz, xxxiii, 414. 

IGNATLT<: AMAR.E, Ph. U. S. (60), as- 

say, Mayrr, xxxvi, 219 — n-marks on 
preparation, Procter, jr , xxvii, 227 ; 

xxxvi, 397. 

IPECACUANHA ALC;OH(»LICUM SACCHA- 

RATUM, Dunn, xxvi, 236. 

jALAPyE, Ph. U. S. (30), remarks, 

Hodgson, jr. (objects to boiling), v, 
34— Ph. U. S (60), remarks, Taylor 
(ol)jects to the aqueous extract), 

xxxvii, 220 — spurious (with gamboge, 
W. & B., 1100), Bullock and Parrish, 
xxxiv, 1 13. 



ALKALiNUM, Durand, iii, 87. 

AQUOSUM (is inert). Long, xxxiii,. 

487; Taylor, xxxvii, 219. 

- JECORIS ASELLI. See COD-LIVER. 

- JiTGLANDis (poliorum), yield, KohU 
mann, xli, 301. 

(nucum), powder and yield, 

Vielguth and Nentwich, xxxi, 235,, 
237. 

- KRAMERLi;, adulteration (Kino), Gui- 
bourt, vi, 282, 283 — preparation.^ Proc- 
ter, jr. (W. & B., 1102), xiv, 267— re- 
port on Procter's paper, Duhamel and 
Turnpenny, xiv, 273 — in Port winCy 
xviii, 1^1— yield, Procter, jr. (W. & 
B, 1102), xxxiv, 209— Vielguth andi 
Nentwich, xxxi, 235, 236. 

,t;THEREUM, Tissier, xv, 317. 

- LACTUC-E, Ph. London (24), Prel. No. 
25 — powder and yield, Vielguth and 
Nentwich, xxxi, 235, 237. 

- of LArTUCARiuM, Aubcrgicr, xvii, 240. 

- of LIQUORICE. See Extractdm gly- 
cYRBHiZy^: ; Liquorice. 

- LOBELIA ACETicuM, Proctcr, jr. (Par- 
rish, 211), xiv, 108. 

- of LOGWOOD, behavior to fused chlor-^ 
ate of potassa, Boittger, xxx, 71 — ia 
dialyser, Graham, xxxiv, 315 — recom- 
mended as a dye, vi, 87. 

- LUPULI. See EXTRACTUM HUMULI. 

- LUPULiNi. Livermore (W. & B., 450), 
XXV, 294.' 

- of MALT, Holf, versus N. Y. Academy 
of Medicine, xxxix, 465. 

- MATICO, XXV, 212. 

- MATRICARIA. See ExTRACTUM CHAM- 
OMILL*:. 

- of MEAT, review of various makes, 
Brady, xxxviii, 76 — Borden's (and re- 
marks by Procter, jr.), xxxviii, 81, 
note — Crew's, xli, 187 — Liebig, (nutri- 
tive value), xxxviii, 82 ; xxxix, 143 ; 
(remarks by Allen & Hanbury, xxxix, 
146) — preparation, xxxviii, 78 ; (re- 
marks by Brady, xxxviii, 77) — Monte- 
video, Reich ardt, xlii, 320 — Tourtelot, 
xli, 157 ; (remarks, Procter, jr., xl. 
188.) 

from brine by dialyser. White- 
law, xxxvi, 354, 372. 

- MEZEHEi ATHEREUM.powderand yield, 
Vielguth and Nentwich, xxxi, 235, 237. 

- MiLLEEOLii, powder and yield, Viel- 
guth and Nenlwich, xxxi, 2 ;5, 237 — 
yield, Kohlmann, xli, 301. 

- of MOHicA, supposed identity with 
monesia, xiii, 152. 

- MONESIA, analysis, Derosne ; Henry;; 
Payen, xiii, 153. Compare Monesia. 

- Nucis VOMICA ALCOHOLicuM, Ph. Dub- 
lin (26), iii, 332— Ph. U. S. (60), as- 
say, xxxvi, 219 — prevent toughness (W. 
& B,, 1103), Zippel, xxxii, 135 — poi- 



94 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



EXTRACTUM {Continued). 

{toninffjSee mistakes — poivder an d yield, 
Vielgutb and Nentwich, xxxi, 235,237 
— yield, Kohlraann, xli, 301 

opii acf:ticum, Evans, Prel. No 59. 

AQuosuM, action upon corrosive 

sublimate., CHillot, vi, 243 — assay., May- 
er, XXXV, 399 — preparation (percola- 
tion recommended), Maisch, xxx, 13 
— yield Schwabe, xlii, 404. 

— — , FERMENTED, Martin, xviii, 79. 

■ , TITRATED (Bigelow's Svapnia), 

Procter, jr., xli, 222. 

■ PHYSOSTIGMATIS VENENOSI. See 

CALABAR BEANS. 

piMPiNELL.E, yield, Kohlmann, xli. 

301. 

PODOPiiYLLi, Ph. U. S. (30), Kodg-son, 

jr. (objects to boiling), v, 35. Com- 
pare PODOPHYLLIN ; PODOPHYLLUM ; 

Resina podophylli. 

polygal^b, yield, Kohlmann, xli, 301 

PRUNi viRGiNiAN.E, Procter, jr., xxviii. 

108. 

■ QUASSIA, contains nitre., Planche, x, 

40 — powder and yield, Vielguth and 
Nentwich, xxxi, 235, 236. 

of QUININE, Farr, Prel. No. 43. 

RHBi alcoholicum. Ph. Dublin (50), 

xxiii, 12 — Ph. Germanic (65), yi' ld, 
Kohlmann, xli, 301 — Ph. U. S. (60), 
remarks, Procter, jr., xxxvi, 397. 

AQUOSUM, Geisler (entire root), 

viii, 263 — jield, Vielguth and Nent- 
wich, xxxi, 236. 

COMPOSITUM. Ph. Helvetica (65), 

xxxix, 534. 

SABBATi.^;, D. B. Smith, ii, 215. 

SABINE, yield, Kohlmann, xli, 301. 

of safflower, xxvi, 183. 

SALVIA, powder and yield, Vielguth 

and Nentwich, xxxi, 235, 237 

sanguinaria (Tilden k Go's.), Proc- 
ter, jr., xxii, 2u6. 

SAPONARi.^-:, powder and yield, Viel- 
guth and Nentwich, xxxi, 235, 236. 

SARSAPARiLL-is and preparations, Be- 

ral ii, 65 — powder and yield, Vielguth 
and Nentwich. xxxi, 235, 237 — yield, 
Kohlmann, xli, 301. 

soiLL.E AOETicuM, Niblett (W. k B., 

763), XXV, 83. 

AQuosuM, powder and yield, 

Vielguth and Nentwich, xxxi, 235, 
236. 

secalis oornuti. See Extractum 

ERGOT.^i. 



SENEG^E, xiv, 287 — Ph. Borussica 

(1813); Ph Saxonica (1820), iii, 108. 

ET sciLL^., Ecky, xvi, 249. 

SERPENTABiyE, Ph. Brunsvicensis 

(1777); Ph. Wiirtemberg (1798), i, 
269. 

STRAMONii (foliorum), ossay, May- 
er, XXXV, 28 — preparation.. Burin, xvi, 
175 — Procter, jr. (from juice), xiv, 
343 — Sharp, xxvii, 392 — Solon and 
Soubeiran (W. k B., 1106), viii, 231 
—Ph. U. S. (60), remarks, Procter, 
jr., xxxvi, 394 — Shakers', Procter, jr., 
xxiii, 94. 

(seminum), Ph. London (24), 

Prel. No. 25 — compared yviih extract 
of leaves, Hirtz, xxxiii, 414. 

strychni seminum. See Extractum 

NUCIS vomicae. 

suDORiFicuM, Beral, ii, 68. 

TARAXACij preparalio7i: Epps (sponta- 
neous evaporation of juice), iii, 356 — 
Giles (cold maceration), xxvii, 129 — 
Groves (root collected in October), 
xxxii, 340 — Shaker.t'', Procter, jr., xxiii, 
94 — Tilden^ Co.., Procter, jr., xxii, 205 
— substi'uted by Extr. belladonnse^ 
XXV, 73 — yield at different seasons, 
Bell, xxiii," 281— Bley, xvi, 235— Viel- 
guth and Nentwich, xxxi, 236. 

T0RMENTILL.-E, powdcraud yield, Viel- 
guth and Nentwich, xxxi, 235, 236.1 | 

TRiFOLii FiBRiNi, powder and yield, 

Vielguth and Nentwich, xxxi, 235, 236. 

VALBF.iANyE, Burin, xvi, 179 — (re- 
marks on Burin by Soubeiran, xvi, 
181)— Ph. U.S. (60), remarks, Procter, 
jr., xxxvi, 397 — powder and yield, 
Vielguth and Nentwich, xxxi, 235, 
237. 

VALERIAN.^; AMMONIATUM, in CapSulcS, 

Dannecy, xli, 207. 

EXTRAITS. Compare Eau ; Essences ; 
Esprit ; etc. 

, PiESSE ; d'amhre, xxvii, 75; 

civet, xxvii, 76 : elderflowers, 

xxviii, 83 ; heliotrope^ xxvi, 369, 

370 ; honeysuckle., xxvi, 370; 

Hovenia^ xxvi. 370 ; jovquil, xxvi, 

372 ; lily of the valley, xxvi, 460 ; 

musk, xxvii, 77 ; orris, xxvi, 

464 ; patchouly, xxvi, 465 ; 

de hois de santal, xxvi, 556 ; de 

Tonquin, xxvi, 558 ; tuberose, 

xxvi, 557 ; vanilla, xxvi, 558 ; 

vervnine, xxvi, 559 ; wood- 
bine, xxvi, 370. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



95 



FAGARA PIPERITA, xxix, 444. 

FAGOPYRUM. See Buckwheat. 

FAGUrf SYLVATiCA. See Beech. 

FaHAM (= Angrjccum fragraiis), Jack- 
son, xxxviii, 441. 

FAHNESTO(-K S vermifuge, xxxi, 390 

FALSIFICATIONS. See Adultera- 
tion. 

FANCV and fashion in pharmacy, Par- 

rish and Bakes, xxxiii, 1. 
FARINA. See Flour. 

AMYGDALARUM. See AlMOND BRAN : 

Almond meal. 

FARINACEOUS matters. See Starch. 

FARRADIS Vl, xxxvi, 92. 

iFAT and fats (fatty bodies), influence on 
solubility of arsenic, Blondlot (W. & 
B., 31), xxxii, 220 — assimil'/tioe qua- 
lities, Berthe, xxviii, 524 — hehavior to 
bromine, chlorine and iodine, Lefort, 
xxvi, 315 — constitution, Prlouze, ix, 
352 ; Redtenbacher and Varrentrap, 
xiii, 220 — em2i/.sions, J e&nnel and Mon- 
sel, XXX, 461 — Jming and congealing 
point, Wimmel, xli, 22, 430 — preserva- 
tion, Olmstead (resin), xxii, 32?) — 
Kirzel (salt and alum, washing, W. 
& B, 68), xl, 334; Piesse, xxviii, 
176 — purification, Bancroft (caus'ic 
alkalies), xviii, 297 — rancid, nature of 
a^'id, Saladin, iv, 252 — bleached and 
purified. Chariot (chlorinated lime 
and soda), iii, 89 — deodorized, Geis- 
ler (sweet spirits of nitre), xxvi, 
304 — preventf^d. Groves (aromatics, 
(VV. & B., 1415, note), xxxvi, 532; 
xxxvii, 54 — Wright (ground slippery 
elm, W. k B., 843), xxiv, sapo- 
nification by chloride of zinc, Krafft 
and Tessie du Mottay, xxxi, 431 — in 
urine, xxxiii, 112. 

. Compare Grease ; Lard. 

FAUCETS, self-clusing, Tuthill, xxviii, 
371. 

FEATHERS, coloring matter, Bogdonow, 

XXX, 166. 
FECIT LA. See Starch. 
FEDEG030 root (of Cassia occidentalis), 

Carson, xvii, 82. 
FEEJEE ISLANDS, vegetable products, 

XXXV, 3 4 9. 

FERMENTS, origin, Pasteur (W. k B., 388, 
note), xxxiii, 165 — c/icm/ca/ (bestacted 
upon by carbolic acid), Crookes, 
xxxix, 226. 

, ALCOHOLIC, Bouchardat, xvi, 223. 

Compire Fermentation, alcoholic. 

of BEER, Bouchardat, xvi, 223. 

, BLACK, Bouchardat, xvi, 223. 

, RUAMN1N-, Stein, xli, 331. | 



FERMENTATION, Pasteur, xxx, 328— ac- 
tio7i on a mixture of oxygen and hy- 
drogen, Saussure, xi 85 — in filteredair, 
Pemberton, xxvii, 457 ; Schroeder and 
Dusch,xxvi, 376; xxxi, 276 — relation 
to crystalbzation, iSctirojder, xxxi, 

273 as cause of various diseases, 

PoUi, xxxv, 523 — on supposed forma- 
tion of inorganic elements during fer- 
mentation, Smith, xii, 122 — prevented, 
Liebig, xxxi, 307— by hydrocyanic 
acid, Jones, xviii, 161 ; compare in 
filtered air — influence of silicic acid, 
Leuchs, xxxiv, 32 — of sulphur, Leuchs, 
xxxiv, 90 — and geast plant. Bell, xlii, 
443. 

, acetic (due to Mycoderma aceti, W. 

& B., 13), Pasteur, xxxiv, 220 ; xxxvii, 
343 — of some alcoholic preparations, 
Bastick (W. & B., 1381, note), xx, 
47. 

, ALCOHOLIC, Pasteur (succinicacidand 

glycerin is formed, W. k B., 70), xxxi, 
72; xxxii, 62 — alkaloid, Oser, xl, 521 ; 
xli, 299 — quantity of yeast and sugar 
necessary, Thenard, xxxi, 3u7. 

of BREAD, substituted. See Bread. 

, butyric, origin, Pasteur, xxxiv, 2 22 

— use of chalk, Bechamp, xxxix, 54. 

, LACTIC, use of chalk, Bechamp, 

xxxix, 54. 

, VINOUS, in an atmosphere of carbonic 

acid, Dumont; Doebereiner, xxxi, 307 
— of hydrogen, Doepping ; Struve, xxxi, 
307 — microscopically examined, Cog- 
niard de Latour, xi, 45 — opinions by 
Gay-Lussac ; Thenard, xi. 5;>, 51. 

, VISCOUS, Pasteur, xxxiv, 222. 

FERMENTUM. See Yeast. 

CEREVisiyE, Bouchardat, xvi, 223. 

FyECis, Bouchardat, xvi, 223. 

NiGRUxM, Bouchardat, xvi, 2.^3. 

FERNS for paper-making, xxviii, 169. 

FERN, male. See Filix. 

FERONIA elephantum, ix, 144, 147— 
yields lac, xxix, 378. 

FERRIC hydrate, Attfield, xl, 454. 

FERKIERA sarsaparilla, v, 259. 

spectabilis, xli, 300. 

FERROSO-FERRTC oxide, behavior to 
saline solutions, Schober, xlii, 402. 

FERRUM (i) (iron), general properties, see 
Iron — scaled preparations (warm un- 
der side of glnss before removing), 
Bartlett, xlii, 252. 

acetas, yield of acetone and acetic acid, 

Thomson, xxiii, 263 — as antidote for 
arsenic, xvii, 55, 118 — of peroxide, 
Beral, iv, 63— Ph. Helvetica (65), 
xxxix, 314. 



96 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE,*: 



FERRUM ALBUMINATE, Coolej, XV, 133 
CompHre Feeri et son.i:, Albuminas. 

ALCOHOLISAfUM. See PULVIS. 

ET AMMONi.'E ACETAS, Beral, iv, 64. 

ET AMMONix CHLORiDUM, Cochrane, 

xxiv, 144. 

ET AMMONIA CITRAS, Cooley, XV, 158 

—Thompson, xxxiii 261— Ph. U. S 
(60), remarks, Procter, jr., xxxvii, 
333. 

ET AMMONI.E SULPHAS, HodgSOn, jr 

(W. & B, 1129), xxviii, 305, 478; 
xxx, 115— i'A. (J. S. (60), remarks. 
Diebl, jr.. xxxix, 139; Procter, jr.. 
xxxvii, 333. See Iron alum. 

ET AMMONi/ii tartras, Pmcicr, jr.. 

xii, 275— PA. U. S. (60), remarks. 
Procter, jr., xxxvii, 333. 

ET AMMONI.li TARTRIS and PERTAR- 

tris, Aikin, iii, 314, 318. 

ET AMMONI.E TA RTRO-SULPHAS, Alkin. 

iii, 320. 

ARSE.viAS, medicinal value, Haselden. 

xxix, 346 — decomposed by oxalic acid, 

Slaler, xxviii, 345. 
BENZOAS, Maisch, xxxii, 206. 

BINITRO-SULPHIDUM (W. & B., 960), 

Roussin, xxxi, 149. 

and BROMINE, Loewig, ii, 181. 

CARBAZOTAS. Draper (W. & B., 1486), 

xxxv, 169. 

CARBON AS, Fh. U. S. (30), remarks, 

Griffi h (gives no pure carbonate), 

iv, 199— Pb. Helvetica (65), xxxix, 
314 — solubilily in glycerin, Adolphus, 
xxxix, 150. 

. See Ferri proto-carbonas ; 

subcarbonas. 

EFP^ERVESCENS, Skinner (Par- 

rish, 417), xxxiii, 474 ; xxxiv, 157. 

carbonicum saccharatum, Ph. Hel- 
vetica (65), xxxix, 314— Clarke (W. 
& B., 1125), iii, 175— Klauer, X, 247. 

CARMiNATE, Luckow, xxxvii, 277. 

CHLORIDUM, rii. U. S. (60), remarks, 

Procter, jr , xxxv, 1 10 ; xxxvii, 326 — 
preparation. Beral, xvi, 143, 168; Ber- 
zelius, xvi, 143, 168; Burin, xxvii 
64 ; Gobley, xvi, 142, 167 ; xxvii, 63 ; 
Mohr, xvi, 143, 169; Orfila xvi, 143, 
169; Thenard, xvi, 143, \69— solubi- 
lity in glycerin, Adolphus, xxxix, 150 
— table of density of solution, Gob- 
ley, xxvii, 66. 

CRVSTALLiSATDM, Beral, iv. 62. 

LiQUiDUM, Beral, iv, 62. 

. See P^ERRi PROTO- and sesqui- 

CHLORIDUM. 

■ CITRAS, behavior to ferrocyanide of 

potassium Calloud, xviii, 310 — pre- 
paration: Bernier, xv, 151; Cooley, 
XV, 158; Procter, jr. (boiling avoided, 
W. & B., 1198), XV, 234; TurnbuU 
XV, 164 — of magneiic oxide; protox- 



ide; sesquioxide of iron, Beral, xiii^ 
72— of peroxide, Beral, iv, 63 

- CYANiDUM, Procter jr., xxvi, 504. 

- FERRO-CYANiDE, color increased by 
alkalies, Skey, xxxix, 176. See Prus- 
sian BLUE. 

- FERRiD-CYANiDB, color increased by 
alkalies, Skey, xxxix, 176. 

GAMBOGiATE (brown paint), Scoffern, 
xxiv, 80. 

- HYDROCYANATE, Tilden & Co. (Par- 
rish, 438), xxxi, 395 — McGuignan's, 
Mnyer, xxxi. 395 ; Procter, jr., xxxi,. 
401. 

- HYDROGENIO REDUCTUM. ScC FeRRUM 
REDACTUM. 

- HYPOPHOSPHis, Procter, jr (W. & B., 
1532), xxx, 121 ;— (P.^rrish, 428), xxx, 
31 1— Thompson, xxx, 317. 

- lODiDUM, composition, Dupasquier^ 
xiii, 113 — is not decomposed by gly- 
cerin, Barnes, xxxiii, 161 — deliquesc- 
ence due to carbonate of potassa, T. 
and H. Smith, xv, 294 — preparation^ 
Calloud, xviii, 170 ; Duharael, vi, 109, 
X, 280; Durand, iv, 289 ; Henry, i,, 
203; Mouchon, viii, 253; ('berdoerfiTer, 
xiii, 83, I 65 ; Thompson, vii, 305 ; Ph. 
Helvetica, xxxix, 314— /'A. U. S. (50), 
Squibb, xxxi, 52 — extempore, Gross, 
xxxvii, 251 ; Wright, xxvi, 6 — differ- 
ent preparations, see under respective 

cIhss preservation (with manna ; 

sugar of milk; cane sugar; honey 
glucose; c<;mparative value), Proc- 
ter, jr., xii, 13 — (with manna), Fou- 
cher, xxxv. 560 — (with cacao butter), 
Vezu, xxxiv, 186 — solubility in glyce- 
rin, Adul{)hus, xxxix, 150. 

, CRYSTALLIZED, Thompson xiv, 

60. 

. See Ferri periodide. Com- 
pare Liquor ferri iodidi ; Pilul.c 
ferri iodidi ; Syrupus ferri iodidi. 

, ciTROMEL, Horncastle (Par- 

rish, 258), xxxi, 64. 

tartromel, Horncastle (Par- 

rish, -58), xxxi, 64. 

- .jodatum saccharatum, Ph. Hanno- 
verana (54), xxvi, 303 — Ph. Helve- 
tica (65), xxxix, 314. 

- lactas, adulteration (Ferri sulphas 
exsiccatum, starch, sugar of milk),. 
Louradour, xii, 229 — preparation: Be- 
ra), xiii, 73 — Louradour (W. & B., 
1137), xii, 12. — Thirault (in atmos- 
phere of hydrogen), xxv, 556 — Ph. 
U. S. (60), remarks, Procter, jr.,. 
xxxvii, 332 — solubility in glycerin, 

Klever, xiii, 222 use, G^lis and 

Conte, xii, 118, 

- limatum. See Ferri pulvis. 

- et manganesii carbonas, saccha- 
rated, Speer (W. & B , 1554), xxvi, 127. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



97 



FERRUM AND MANGANESE, effervcsccnt 
powders, Buriu, xxv, 174. Other 
preparatioas, see under their respec- 
tive class. 

BT MAGNESI.'E CITRA8, Corput (W. & 

B , 1496), xxii, 3 14 ; Procter, jr., xxii, 
314 

, MAGNESIyt; ET QUINI.E SULPHAS. See 

FeRRI QUINIyE, etC. 

NiTUAs, Duhamel, xvii, 92 — (perses- 

qni-), Kerr, iv, 1G9. 

, NITRATES, Haussrtiann, xxvi, 316. 

OXALAS, fur preparation of iron by hy- 

droyen^ Soubeiran and Dublanc, xvii, 
305 — preparation, Moor*', xl. 111 — the- 
rapmticaL use, Craig, xxxix, 126, note ; 
Reynolds, xxxlx, 125; Simms, xl, 77; 
Schaffer, xl, 78 — (remarks on Schaffer 
by Procter, jr., xl, 80, note.) 

oxiDUM, temperature of reduction by 

hydrogen, Muller, xli, 335. Compart- 
Iron, oxide. 

■ HYDRATUM, alteration under wa- 
ter, Procter, jr. (W. & B., 29, 1139), 
xiv, 29; (reported on by Smith and 
Bridges, xiv, 37) — Wittstein, xix 6? — 
as antidote, history, Romain Beck, 
xiii, 239; Hall, x, 263 — preparation: 
Bunsen and Berthold, x, 1 > 8 ; Fisher, 
xii, 1 1 — not necessary to prepare it 
fresh. Fisher, xii, 1 ; Procter, jr., xiv, 
34; xxv, 104 — purification, Legrip, xiv, 
266. 

SACCHARATUM, Koehler, xU, 420 ; 

Koehler and Hornemann, xli, 326; 

Siebert, xli, 324. 
. See Ferri protoxidum; 

SESQUIOXIDUM. 

PERCHLORiDUM, its usGS, Demarquay ; 

Laurens, xxxii, 332, See Ferri chlo- 

RIDUM. 

— ^ — , PERiODiDE (does not exist), Squire, 
xxxiv, 439. 

, PEROXIDE See SESQUIOXIDE. 

PBR-SESQUi-NiTRAS, Kerr, iv, 169. 

PERSULPiiAS, anhydrous, Hart, xxvii, 

20 — neutral, Morfit, xxvii, 501 — prepa- 
ratio?i, Soubeiran, xxv, 215. 

, PERSULPHATE and SULPHATE OP COP- 
PER, Bastick, xxvi, 308 

, and SULPHATE op magnesia. 

Bastick, x.xvi, 309. 

, and SULPHATE of zinc, Bastick, 

xxvi, 309. 

phosph.aS, decojnposed by oxalic acid, 

Slater, xxviii, 345 — preparation and 
properties, Heidenreich, xxxiii, 294 — 
Holubditij. Maisch, xxxi, 410 ; Procter, 
jr , xxxi, 411. 

piCRAS. See Ferri carbazotas. 

et POTASSyE ciTRAS. See Liquor ; 

Syrupus. 

TARTRAS, composition, Phillips, 

xii, 33 ; Soubeiran and Capitaine, 



xii, 34 — preparation: Beral, iv, 63; 
Procter, jr., xii, 188 ; Soubeiran and 
Capitaine, xii, 33 — Ph. Helvetica (65), 
xxxix, 3.6 — scales, best in sunlight, 
Wood, xli, 329 — solubility in glycerin, 
Klever, xlii, 222. Compare Boulb dk 

MARS. 

with AMMONIA, Carrie, xxxi, 

257. 

• and POTASSIUM, sulphide, Preiss ; 

Schneider, xlii, 447. 

PROTo CARBONAS, Composition, Phillips, 

viii, 97 ; Wittstein, xvii, 76 — prepara- 
tion: Felix (carbonate of potassa), v, 83 
— Hopkins, viii, 96 — Moidenhauer 
(carbonate of ammonia), v, 83 — Proc- 
ter, jr. (on Vallet), x, 211; xiii, 183 — 
V^iUet, X, 273; xiii, 183. Compare 

PiLUL.I': FERRI CARBONATIS VaLLET. 

protochloridum, Am-lers, xxxiii, 

110. Compare Ferri chloridum ; 

TiNCTURA. 

protosulphas. See Ferri sulphas. 

PROTOSULPHiDE. See Ferri sulphu- 

RETUM. 

PROTOXIDUM. S e FeRUI OXIDUM ; 

Iron oxide. 

PULVis, account, Procter, jr., xxxix, 

11 — importation prohibited in Russia, 
xxxi, 483 — combustibdiiy (may be pro- 
duced by magnetization), Magnus, 

xxxi, 255 — preparation by healing ox- 
ala e of irun, Hoff, xvi, 89. Com- 
pare Ferrum redactum. 

PYROPHOSPHAS, alLotropic. Gladstone, 

xxxix, 419 — preparation. Outfield, xli, 
58; Procter, jr , xxxvii, 332 ; Robins, 

xxxii, 326; Sou^ieiran, xxv, 214; 
Squil)b, xxxii, 37 — scaliny, cause of 
failure, Gardn»-r, xli, 215 — solubilityj 
Robiquet, xxxi, 248. Compare Syru- 
pus. 

et QUiNJyE CITRAS adulteration, Wil- 
liams, xxv, 466 — behavior to sunlight, 
Wood, xli, 329 — preparation: Brral, 

xiii, 73; Fleurot, xxxvi, 437 — Gray's 
Supplement, xx, 23 — Procter, jr., 
xxxvii, 331 — Squibb, xxvii, 294 — 
Thompson, xxxiii, 268 — Turnbull, xv, 
313. 

iodidum, Smedt, xxxv, 507. 

, QuiNi^ ET MAGNESi.E SULPHAS, Fer- 
gus, xxxiii, 238. 

ET QUlNIyE PHOSPHAS, Cattcll, XXiv, 

173. 

, QuiNiA] ET STRYCHNi.E CITRAS, Dra- 
per, XXXV, 236. 

ET quinIyK sulphas, Laugeli, xxvii, 

316. 

REDACTUM, adulteration (plumbago), 

Lienart, xxxii, 185 — decolorizing pow- 
er, Filhol, xxiv, ,'39 — cxaminanon of 
commercial, Maisch, xxxiii, 220 — in 
pills, Githens, xxxiii, 206 — preparation: 



98 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



FERRUM (Continued). 

Hoff, xvi, Set — by carbon (pyrolignite 
of iron), Henry, xxxi, 129 — by car- 
bonic oxide, Fegueux ( W. & B., 1151), 
xxviii, 118 — from ferrocyaiiide of pot- 
assium, Morgan ( W. & B , 1151), xxvi, 
450 — by galvanism, Kramer, xxxiii, 
318 — from oxalate of iron, Souhei- 
ran and Dublanc, xvii, 305; Woehler 
(W. & B., 1 15 I ), xxviii, 139 ; Z^ngerle 
(VV & B.', 1151), xxix, 310— from sub- 
carbonate of iron, Procter, jr., six, 
11; xxvi, 217— Ph. U. S. (60), re- 
marks, Procter, jr., xxxvii, 33'2 — pre- 
■^ervation, de Liica (in atmosphere of 
hydrogen), xxxiii, 152. Compare 

I^ULVIS. 

SESQDicHJvOmDUM. See Ferri ohlo- 

RIi:>UM. 

SESQUI-CITRA8. See Ferri citras. 

SESQUi-NiTRAS. See Ferri nitras. 

SESQui-oxiDUM. See Ferri oxidum ; 

Iron, oxide. 
ET soD.E ALBUMiNAS, Fabbri (W. & 

B., 1457), XXXV. C9. Compare Syk- 

UPUS. 

ET soD.E CMLORiDUM, Cochrane, xxiv, 

137. Compare Liquor. 

ET HODAi nitras. See Liquor. 

ET strychnine citras, preparations: 

Abel, xxxi, 127— Bartlett, xlii, 251 — 
Hninitsh, xxxi, 23 — Procter, jr. (Par- 
rish, 422), xxx, 276 — therapeutical use, 
O'Connor, xxx, 275 
suBCARBONAS, adulteration, Pile, xxxi v, 
24— Ph. U S. (50), remarks. Rex (W 
& B., 1145), xxxiv, 193. Compare 
Ferri carbon as. 

SUBSULPHAS (Monsel's salt), prepara- 
tion^ Peck, xxxiv, 201 — L-iwrnnce 
Smith (Parrisb, 419), xxxv, 203— in 
scales. Dickey, jr., xxxii, 10. Compare 
Liquor. 

sulphas, behavior to fcrroso-ferric 

oxide, Schober, xlii, 402 — to sulphu- 
ric acid, Calloud, xiii, 347 — comnier- 
cial^ see Copperas — preparation : Bons- 
dorff (W. & B., 1147), X, 248— Hop- 
kins, viii, 95 — preservation^ Bertheraot 
(solution of sulphate filtered into 
acidulated alcohol), xi, 260 — Pavesi 
(scaling with gum arabic), xxxix, 183 
— Ruspini (dry to efflorescence), xxiii, 
183 — Wellborn (camphor), xli, 30 — 
purification^ Thor^l (with bitartrate of 
potassa) xxiii, 155 — Wurtz, xxxi, 68 
test for purity. Procter, jr., xxiii, 112 
— solubiliti/ in glycerin, Adolphus, 
xxxix, 150 — Klever, xlii, 22 J — pres- 
ence of ti7i inconvenient in search of 
arsenic, Sarzeau. x, 66. 

SACCHARATus, Latour, xxx, 33. 

suLPHO-CARBOLAS, Sansom, xli, 445. 

. SULPHUEETUM, RS antidote for cor- 



rosive sublimate, Mialhe (W. & B.,. 
1156), xiv, 3U9 — Wallace, xiv, 332 — 
for chemico-legal examinations, need 
not be free of arsenic, Kemper and 
Mayer, xxviii, 333 — found in 7nud un- 
der paving-stones, Chevreul, xxix, 
170 — soluble in oxalic acid. Slater,, 
xxviii, 345. 

TANNAS, in chlorosis, Benedetti, xix, 

61 — prcparaiion, Beral, xiii, 73 — Gad- 
di (W. & B., 1610), xix, 61. 

TARTRAS, behavior to ferrocyt^inide 

of potassium, Calloud, xviii, 310 — 
preparaiioh, lire, ii, 61 — recommend- 
ed as substiiute for other preparations 
of iron, Hodgson, jr , V, 35. 

TARTRO-MURiATE, Aikiu, iii, 321. 

tersulphas. See Ferri pebsulphas. 

VALERIANAS, adulteration, Bell, xxi, 

324 — Monnerat, xxxi, 482 — composi- 
tion, Wittstein, xvii, 198 — prepara- 
tion, Hanbury, xxxviii, 536 — Sutton, 
xxxviii, 532 — Wittstein, xvii, 198. 

ET ziNCi CITRAS, Draper fParrish, 

422), xxxv, 237. 

FERULA ERUBESCENS, xxiv, 380. 

GALBANiFERA, XV, 29, 30. See Gal- 
ban UM. 

PERSiCA, xvi, 230. See Sagapenum. 

FEUILLRA CORDIFOLIA, as aniiWo^e to veg- 
etable poisons, V, 172 — presented to 
Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, 
XV, 235 — therapeutical properties, Ham- 
ilton, xviii, 60. 

FEVER, (intermittent), remedies: chlo- 
roform, Delioux, xxiii, 181, 183 — de- 
coction of cotton-seed (W. & B , 425),. 
Frost, xxiii, 175 — Physalis alkekengi,. 
xxiii, 181. 

, MARSH, effervescent powder; mix- 
ture; etc., Meirieu, xv, 154 

, virulent (hypodermic injections of 

carbolic acid), Tessier, xli, 415. 

FIBRE, LIGNEOUS, oblique direction and 
twist of trees, Braun, xxviii, 66. 

FIBRIN, amount in blood, Mayer, xxxix, 
414 — colored red by proto-binitrate of 
mercury, Lassaigne, iv, 175. 

FIBROSE, Fremy, xxxii, 75. 

FICA RI A RANUNCULOIDES coutains iodine,.. 
Overbeck, xxvi, 439. 

FIGS, analysis of juice, Geiger, ii, 339 — 
properties of juice of unripe fruits, 
Landerer, xxxiii, 215. 

FILIX MAS, analysis of root and ashes,, 
Bock (W. & B., 397), xxiv, 64— influ- 
ence drying, Schoonbroodt, xli, 323. 

FILT/JEA suAVEOLENS, xxvi. 522. 

FILTERING apparatus, Hance, Griffith 
& Co., xl, 475. 

FILTERING PAPER. See Paper, filtering. 

FILTER accelerator, DwhlAnc, xxiv, 177; 
xxviii, 116 — for chemical liquids, 
Dahlke (silica and carbon), xxxiii^ 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



99^ 



FILTEFl [Continued). 

229— different /j/a?Ys, Avery, xl, 200— 
for oils, Warner (W,& 8., 883), xxxiii, 
15 — cloth in centre, Malapert, xxxiii, 
32 — support, Dublanc, xxiv, 177 ; 
xxviii, 1 16. 

FILTRATION, under pressure (Bunsen's 
arrangement), Hinrichs, xli, 412 — 
hastened, Lunge (Picard's arrange- 
ment), xxxviii, 177 — Spencer Thom- 
as's apparatus, Parrish, xxxviii, 107. 

FINE, heavy, for substitution, in the fif- 
teenth century, xlii, 165. 

FIR, SPRUCE-, resin, Hanbury, xxii, 260. 

, TEARS of, Guibourt, xii, 71. 

WOOL, and fir-wool oil, xxxv, 274; 

xxxix, 188. 

Compare Abies. 

FIRE, COLORED, Marchand, xxiv, 371: 
Blue ; Green ; Orange ; Pink ; Pur- 
ple ; Red; White; Fellow. Compare 
Flames. 

, GREEK, Virey, xiii, 52. 

, GREEN (Thallium), Crookes, xxxvi, 

48. 

FIRE-ARMS, determining the time of dis- 
charge, Boutigny, vi, 207. 

FISHES, ascertaining the maturity of 
eggs^ Valenciennes and Fremy, xxvii, 
376 — electric, as shock-machines, Wil- 
son, XXX, 41 — viviparous, Dowler, 

xxvii, 82. 

FLAMES, COLORED (gun-paper soaked in 
solutions of various salts), Church, 
xxxii, 275. See Fire. 

FLAVORING extracts: Procter, jr., 

xxviii, 215; xxxviii, 294. 

allspice, xxviii, 217 — hitter almonds, 
xxviii, 216; xxxviii, 295 — capsicum, 
see pepper, cayenne — celery, xxviii, 217; 
xxxviii, 297 — cinnamon, xxviii, 216; 
xxxviii, 296 — cloves, xxviii, 217 — cori- 
ander, xxxviii, 298 — ginger, xxviii, 
217 ; xxxviii, 296 — lemon, xxviii, 215 ; 
xxxviii, 294 — mace, xxviii, 217; 
xxxviii, 296 — nutmegs, xxxviii, 296 — 
orange, xxviii, 216*; xxxviii, 295 — 
pepper, black, xxviii, 217 ; xxxviii, 
297 — pepper, cayenne, xxviii, 217 ; 
xxxviii, 297 — rose, xxviii, 216; 
xxxviii, 296 — «oi//> herbs, xxxviii, 297 
— vanilla, xxxviii, 298 (See Fluid 

extract UM VANILLA). 

FLAX, fibre, behavior to citric, oxalic, 
tartaric acids, Calvert, xxvii, 83 — for 
paper-making, xxviii, 169. 

SEED, cntaplasma, French method, 

xxxi, 214 — cultivation, Hagner, vi, 57 — 
light-colored, Procter, jr. (W.&B 515, 
note), xxvi, 493 — meal, grinding, Hag- 
ner, xxxvi, 211 — mucilage, composi- 
tion, Gu^rin, iv, 162 — amount of 
starch, Dragendorff, xxxv, 139. 

FLEA, hospital, in India, xxxi, 184. 



FLESH, HUMAN, preserved, Burnetii, xl, 83, 

FLIES, defence against (oil of laurel), iv, 
351 — poison (quassia) xxv, 212. 

FLIN r SOAP, viii, 262. 

FLORA of New York, Maisch, xxxiv, 562 
— of Pennsylvania, Porter, xxxiv, 561. 

FLORES LIQUIRITL13, xvi, 319. 

FLOUR, adulteration, Chevallier, xvi, 283 
— detection of corn flour. La Grange, 
xxi, 183— of er^oi'a, Beilandt, xl, 313 
— separation of mineral substances, 
Lassaignr^, xxx, 402. 

, eqg (baking), xxvi, 46. 

FLOW of various liquids through syphon, 
Galletly, xxxvii, 376. 

FLOWERS, coloring matter, Filhol, xxvi, 
545 — crystallized (alum), Cr^'ezj, 
xxxix, 14 — heat developed, vi, 266 — 
preservation of aroma, Tich borne (W. 
& B., 994, note), xxxvi, 519; xxxvii, 
47 — of cut (charcoal in the water), 
xxxiii, 381 — in drug-stores (double- 
cased tin, or in glass, Appert's meth- 
od), Enz, xxxii, 556 — respiration, Ca- 
hours, xxxvii, 33 — of early spring, 
Chickering, xli, 436. 

FLOWER FARMS in France, xxxviii, 63. 

FLUID for BLOWPIPE lamp, Pisaui, xxx, 
184. 

, BURNING, explosions, experiments 

on, Horsford, xxii, 160 — protection 
against (wire gauze), xxxi, 85. 

, prophylactic (Darby's), Procter, jr., 

xli, 396. 

FLUIDS, movement in porous bodies, Ja- 
min, xxxii, 351. 

FLUID EXTRACTS, editorial, xxx, 382— 
table of doses, Sargent, xlii, 342 — 
economy \n alcohol, Procter, jr., xxxvi, 
405 — Squibb (75 p. c), xxxvi, 405; 
(fractional per'-olation), xxxvii, 182 ; 
xxxviii, 109 — Procter, jr., xli, 295 — 
debate in Am. Pharm. Assoc. xxxvii, 
425. 

preparation : Campbell (glycerin and 

previous maceration ), xli, 385 ; xlii, 
317; (criticisms: Archibald, xlii, 1 17 
— Kennedy, xlii, 62 — King, xlii, 29 — 
Procter, jr., xli, 527, note — Reynolds, 
xli, 525 — Taylor, xlii, 150) — Diehl,Jr., 
(fractional percolation ; 50 p. c ), 
xli, 337, 342 — Duffield (vacuum mace- 
ceration), xli, 2, note; (remarks by 
Procter, jr., xli, 2) — Maisch (proper 
menstrua), xxxi, 113, 305, 312 ; (re- 
marks by Procter, jr., xxxi, 316, note) 
— Merrill (separately with alcohol and 
hot water), xxxi, 43, 389 — Proct r,jr , 
xxvii, 477; xxviii, 88; xxx, 382; 
xxxi, 221, note, 316, note; xxxvi, 
405; xxxvii, 87, 181; xxxviii, 222 
note ; xli, 2, 295, 527, note — Sargent, 
(50 p. c), xlii, 331— Squibb, (75 p. c, 
fractional percolation), xxxvi, 405 ; 



100 



SALTS, SEE UNDER TiATlN NAME OF BASE ; 



FLUID EXTRACTS {Continued). 

xxxvii, 182; xxxviii, 109; debate in 
Am. Pharmac. Assoc , xxxvii, 425 — 
Stearns (sugar versus alcohol), xxix, 
520 — Thayer (alcohol versus sugar), 
XXX, 520; xxxi, 216 — Spencer Thomas 
(hydraulic pressure), xxxvii, 81 ; 

xxxviii, 218; (remarks, Procter, jr., 
xxxvii, 87; xxxviii, 222, note.) 

» PRESERVATION, Maisch (sugar versus 

alcohol), xxxi, 113, 305, 312— Thayer 
(alcohol versus sugar), xxx, 520; 
xxxi, 216. 

Squibb and Spencer Thomas, com- 
pared, Thomas, xxxviii. 218 — Procter, 
jr., xxxviii, 222, note. 

, Thayer"s, Procter, jr., xxviii, 88. 

, Tilden's & Co., Procter, jr., xxvii, 

477. 

Compare Percolation ; Repercola- 

TION. 

FLUID EXTRACTUM absinthii, Camp- 
bell (glycerin), xlii, 21. 

ACHILLEA (millbfolii), Tilyard, 

(with bicarbonate of potassa), xxxi, 
437. 

ACONiTi FOLiORUM. Campbell (glyce- 
rin), xlii, 21 — Procter, jr. (as fluid 
ext. hyoscyami, U. S. 60), xxxi, 532 
— poisoning, see Mistakes. 

■ ACONITI RADicis, Campbell (glycerin), 

xlii, 21 — Procter, jr., xxxi, 531 — crys- 
talline deposit consists of sugar and 
lime, Krehbiel, xxxvi, 296. 

ANTKEMiDis, Campbell (glycerin), 

xlii, 21 — Ileintzelman, xxxiii, 390 — 
(reruarks on Heintzelman, Procter,jr., 
xxxiii, 391)— Procter, jr. (Parrish, 
230), xxix, 111. 

' ARNiCiE FLORUM, Maisch, xxix, 292. 

AROMATicuM, Proctcr, jr., xxxi, 540 — 

Squibb, xxxix, 528. 

■ ' ASSAFCETiDA tethbreum, Fairthome, 

xl, 115. 

■■ ASCLEPiADis (tuberos.k), Rhoads, 

(W. & B., 145, note), xxxiii, 194. 

AURANTII AMARI COMPOSITUM, Squibb, 

xxxix, 519. 

bblladonn.*: poliorum, assay, Mayer, 

XXXV, 28 — preparation: Campbell, 
(olycerin), xlii, 21 — Procter, jr., (as 
fluid ext. hyoscyami, U. S. 60) xxxi, 
532— Tilden & Co.'s, xxvii, 477. 

BLACKBERRY ROOT, See FlUII) EXTR. 

RUBI VILLOSI. 

BUCHU, table of //'flc^w^icfZ percolation, 

Squibb, xxxviii, 127. 

, PREPARATION, Campbell (gly- 
cerin), xlii, 2\—Grahame, xxxi, 349— 
IIarte{with ether, alcohol and carbon- 
ate of potassa), xxx, 3 1 1 — Maisch (with 
ether, alcohol and sugar), xxxi, 313 
Fk. U. S. (60), remarks, Procter, jr., 
.xxxvi, 398; Taylor, xxxv, 413— 



Procter, jr , xx, 85 ; (as fluid extr, 
hyoscyami, U, S. 60) xxxi, 632— Rit~ 
tenhousc (ether, alcohol, carbonate of 
potassa), xxvi, 486 — Squibb (reperco- 
lation), xxxix, 129 — TiLden ^- Co., 
xxvii, 478. 

COMPOSITUM, Parrish (Parrish, 

227), xxviii, 17. 
BUCKTHORN. See Fluid extr. rhamni 

cathartici. 

burdock. See Fluid extr lapp.i<:. 

caffe.'K TosTiE, Campbell (glycerin), 

xlii, 22. 

CALAMI, Campbell (glycerin), xlii, 21 

— Maisch, xxxii, 112. 
CALisAY.K. Compare Fluid extk.. 

CTNCHON.E. 

, Squibb (aromaticum composi- 

tum), xxxix, 523. 
calumb.'E, Campbell (glycerin), xlii, 

21— Procter, jr. (as fluid extr. ser- 

pentarife, U. S. 60), xxxi, 535. 
CANELL.K (alb/i:), Procter, jr. (as 

fluid extr. zingiberis, U. S. 60), xxxi, 

539. 

CAPSici, Campbell (glycerin), xlii, 21 

— Procter, jr. (asfluid extr. zingiberis, 
U. S. 60), xxxi, 539. 

CARDAMOMi, Campbell (glycerin) xlii, 

21— Procter, jr. (as fluid extr. zingi- 
beris, U. S. Q ), xxxi, 539. 

caryophylli, Llewellyn (examina- 
tion of deposit) xli, Al— preparation, 
Procter, jr. (as fluid extr. zingiberis, 
U. S. 60), xxxi, 539. 

cascarill.k, Campbell (glycerin), 

xlii, 21 — Proc'er,jr. (alcohol, water, 
diluted alcohol), xxxv, 113. 

CATARLE, Campbell (glycerin), xlii, 

21. 

catechu, Campbell (glycerin), xlii, 

21. 

CHiMAPHiL.E, Campbell (glycerin), 

xlii, 21— Procter, jr., xxxi, 536. 

CHiRETT-E, Campbell (glycerin), xlii, 

2i_Procter, jr. (as fluid extr. serpen- 
tariffi, U. S. 60), xxxi, 535. 

ciMiciFUG.E, table fractional per- 
colation, Squibb, xxxviii, 127. 

, preparation: Campbell (gly- 
cerin), xlii, 2 \—Leamy (t-ther, alcohol, 
boiling water), xxvii, b\b— -Maisch 
(ether, alcohol, sugar), xxxi, 313—- 
Jfoo/e, xxxiii, 343— Procter, //-., xxvi, 
107 (with ether and alcohol); xxxi, 
534_/>A. U. S. (60), remarks, Proc- 
ter, jr , xxxvi, 398 ; Taylor, xxxv, 413 
-—Tilden ^- Co., xxvii, 478. 

ciNCHON.'E, table of fractional perco- 
lation, Squibb, xxxviii, 125, 127. 

PREPARATION, Campbell (glyce- 
rin), xlii, 2\— Jones (diluted muriatic 
acid), xxiii, 2[S—L?eno (wants it 
strained), xxix, 574 Procter, ,ir,, 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



101 



FLUID EXTRACTUM {Continued). 

xxiii, 218; xxxi, 536, (as fid. extr. sar- 
saparillae, U. S. 60)— PA. U. S. 60, re- 
marks, Procter, jr., xxxvi, 399 ; Tay- 
lor, XXXV, 412 — Ph. Britannica (64), 
xxxvi, 382 — Spence^ xxx, 45 — Squibb 
(fractional percolation), xxxviii, 122 ; 
(100 p. c, and with glycerin), xxxix, 
302, 406, bib— Taylor, xxiii, 219; 
(with glycerin), xxxvii, 51 ; xxxviii, 
^2Q— Thayer, xxx, 11— Walker (gly- 
cerin and sugar), xxxviii, 411. 

AROMATicuM, Squibb, XXXV, 230. 

COMPOSITUM, Squibb, xxxix, 

524. 

COMPOSITUM, Squibb, xxxix, 

517. 

RUBR^, Canavan (with diluted 

sulphuric acid), xxvii, 229. 
COMPOSITUM, Squibb, xxxix, 

518. 

GiNNAMOMi, Campbell (glycerin), xlii, 

21 — Procter, jr., (as fid. extr. zingi- 
beris,) U. S. 60, xxxi, 539. 

COCCI (coccionellae), Procter, jr., 

XXXV, 113. 

coccuLi, Procter, jr. (W. & B., 307, 

note), XXXV, 112. 
COFFEE. See Fld. extr. caffe.^ 

TOST^. 

coLCHici RADicis Contains colchicia in 

natural combination, Maisch, xxxix, 
103 — preparation: Campbell (glyce- 
rin), xlii, 21 — Procter, jr., (as fld. extr. 
serpentariae, U. S. 60), xxxi, 534 — Ph. 
U. S. (60), remarks, Taylor, xxxv, 
413. 

SEMiNUM contains colchicia in 

natural combination, Maisch, xxxix, 
103 — table of fractional percolation, 
Squibb, xxxviii, 119, ill— prepara- 
tion: Campbell (glycerin), xlii, 21 — 
Ph. U. S. (60), remarks, Procter, jr., 
xxxvi, 399; Taylor, xxxv, 413— 
Squibb (fractional percolation), 

xxxviii, 112 turbidity removed, 

Maisch (W. & B., 1112), xxxvi, 97. 

collinsonItE, Campbell (glycerin), 

xlii, 21. 

' COLUMBO. See Fl. Extr. CALUMByE. 

coNii, Campbell (glycerin), xlii, 21 

—Procter, jr. (U. S. 60), xxxi, 538— 
Ph. U. S. (60), remarks, Procter, jr., 
xxxvi, 400 ; Taylor, xxxv, 413. 

cubbb;!^, Canipbell (glycerin), xlii, 

21 — Procter, jr. (as fld. extr. zingi- 
beris, U. S. 60), xxxi, 539— Puche, 
xiii, 78. 

AQUOSUM, Puche, xiii, 78. 

CYPRiPEDii, Campbell (glycerin), xlii, 

21. 

DIGITALIS, Campbell (glycerin), xlii, 

21 — Procter, jr. (as fld. extr. hyoscy- 
ami, U. S. 60), xxxi, 532. 

[8] 



DULCAMARA, Campbell (glycerin)^ 

xlii, 21 — Procter, jr. (as fld. extr. 
sarsaparillse, U. S. 60), xxxi, 536 — 
Ph. U. S. (60), remarks, Procter, jr., 
xxxvi, 400 ; Taylor, xxxv, 413. 

ergotve, preparation : Baker (ether, 

alcohol, water), xxvii, 302 — Campbell 
(glycerin), xlii, 21 — Laidley (ether, 
alcohol, water, sugar), xxiv, 159 — ■ 
Mill (water and acetic acid), xl, 40 — 
Procter, jr. (alcohol and acetic acid), 

xxix, 543 ; xxxi, 638— Ph. U. S. (60)^ 
remarks, Procter, jr., xxxvi, 400 ; Tay- 
lor, xxxv, 413 — Ph. Britannica (64), 
remarks, Procter, jr., xxxvi, 381 — 
Thayer (diluted alcohol and sugar), 

xxx, 17 — Watson (33 p. c), xxviii, 
519. 

erigerontis (canadensis), Campbell 

(glycerin), xlii, 21. 

eupatorii, Campbell (glycerin), xlii, 

21 — Procter, jr. (as fld. extr. serpen- 
tariae, U. S. 60), xxxi, 535. 
prostwort. See Fld. extr. helian- 

THEMI CANADENSIS. 

GALL^E, Campbell (glycerin), xlii, 21 

— Procter, jr. (as fld. extr. sarsapa- 
rilla, U. S. 60), xxxi, 536. 

GELSEMii, Campbell (glycerin), xlii, 

21 — poisoning, Wormley, xlii, i. 
GENTiANyE table of fractional perco- 
lation, Squibb, xxxviii, 127 — prepara- 
Hon: Campbell (glycerin), xlii, 21 — 
Procter, jr. (water and brandy), xxvi, 
28 — (as fld. extr. serpentariee, U. S. 
60), xxxi, 535— Ph. U. S. (60), re- 
marks, Procter, jr., xxxvi, 401 — 
Thayer (20 p. c. sugar), xxx, 524 — 
Tilden & Co., xxvii, 478. 

AROMATICUM, Proctcr, jr., xxvi, 

29. 

FERRATUM, Proctcr, jr., xxvi, 

30. 

GERANii, Campbell (glycerin), xlii, 

21 — Procter, jr. (as fld. extr. sarsapa- 
rillffi, U. S. 60), xxxi, 536. 

GLYCYRRHiz.E, Campbell (glycerin)j 

xlii, 22 — Procter, jr. (from the ex- 
tract), xxxi, 545 — covers taste of sul- 
phate of quinia, Harrop, xli, 117. 

GRANATi RADICIS, Procter, jr. (as fld. 

extr. sarsaparilla, U. S. 60), xxxi, 
537. 

HELIANTHEMI CANAD.ENSIS, Primm, 

xli, 29. 

HELLEBORi NiGRi, Campbell (glyce- 
rin), xli, 21 — Procter, jr., xxxi, 534. 

HUMULi, Campbell (glycerin), xlii^ 

21. 

HYDRANGB^E (water and honey), But- 
ler ; Parrish (Parrish, 227), xxvii, 
228. 

HYDRASTIS CANADENSIS, Campbell 

(glycerin), xlii, 21. 



102 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



FLUID EXTRACTUM hyoscyamt (folio- 
rum), Campbell (glycerin), xlii, 21 
— Procter, jr. (contains sugar), xxv, 
410; (U. S. 60), xxxi, 532— Ph. U. 
S. (60), remarks, Procter, jr., xxxvi, 
401; Taylor, xxxv, 413— Tilden & 
Co., xxvii, 4Y7. 

' EXTEMPORE, Procter, jr., xxv, 

411. 

INUL/E, Procter, jr. (as fid. extr, zin- 

giberis, U. S. 60), xxxi, 539. 

iPECACUANHyE, Campbell (glycerin), 

xlii, 21 — Grahame (low temperature), 
xxxi, 146 — Procter, jr., xxxi, 534 ; 
(U. S. 60, without the acetic acid), 
xxxiv, 28— Ph. U. S. (60), Procter, 
jr., xxxvi, 401 ; Taylor, xxxv, 414. 

iRiDis FLORENTiNyE, Campbell (gly- 
cerin), xlii, 21 — Procter, jr. (as fld. 
extr. zingiberis, U. S. 60), xxxi, 539. 

jALAPyE, Procter, jr. (with carbonate 

of potassa, W. & B., 1101, note), 
xxix, 108 ; (without carbonate of pot- 
assa), xxxi, 534. 

jDGLANDis (corticis), Procter, jr., 

xxxi, 547. 

JUNiPBRi (baccarum), Campbell (gly- 
cerin), xlii, 21. 

Kino, Campbell (glycerin), xlii, 22. 

KRAMERi^, Campbell (glycerin), xlii, 

22 — Procter, jr. (water and sugar), 

xxxi, 547. 

LACTUCARTi, Campbell (glycerin), 

xlii, 22 — Parrish and Bakes (Parrish, 
231), xxxii, 229. 

LAPP.E, Grahame (W. & B., 508, note), 

xxxii, 178. 

LEPTANDRyE, Campbell (alcohol and 

potassa), XXX, 225 — Procter, jr. (alco- 
hol, W. & B., 511, note), xxxv, 112 ; 
xxxii, 326. 

LOBELiyE (foliorum), Campbell (gly- 
ceric), xlii, 22 — Procter, jr. (with 
acetic acid, W. & B., 521, note), xxiv, 
207— (as fld. extr. ergotae, U. S. 60)^ 
xxxi, 538— Tilden & Co., xxvii, 477. 

LUPULiNvE, Campbell (glycerin), xlii, 

21 — Procter, jr. (ether and alcohol), 
xxix, 28 — (as fld. extr. zingiberis, U. 
S. 60), xxxi, 539— Ph. U. S. (60), re- 
marks, Procter, jr., xxxvi, 402. 

— — MARRUBii, Campbell (glycerin), xlii, 
22. 

MATico, Maisch (separation of chlo- 
rophyll), xxxi, 315 — Procter, jr; (as 
fld. extr, hyoscyami, li. S. 60), xxxi, 
532. 

MATRICARIA, Tilden & Co., xxvii, 478. 

MBZEREON, Sheridcn, xxxiv, 393. 

MiLLEFOLii. See Fluid bxtbactum 

ACHILLEA. 

MYRiSTiCA, Campbell, xlii, 21. 

MYRBHA, Procter, jr. (as fld. extr. 

zingiberis, U S. 60), xxxi, 539. 



Nucis VOMICA, table of fractional per- 
colation, Squibb, xxxviii, 127. 

OPii, Ph Britannica (64), xxxvi, 382 

— remarks. Groves, xli, 160. 

PAREiRA BRAVA, Ph. Britanuica (64), 

xxxvi, 382 — Campbell (glycerin), xlii, 
22. 

PEPONis, Dosch (glycerin and alco- 
hol), xlii, 202— Hand (alcohol), xli, 
195 — remarks, Procter, jr., xli, 195, 
note. 

piMENTA, Procter, jr. (as fld. extr. 

zingiberis U. S. 60), xxxi, 539. 
piPSissEWA. See Fluid extractum 

CIIIMAPHILA. 

poDOPHYLLi, Procter, jr., xxxi, 534. 

PODOPHYLLiNi, Banuvaxt, xxxi, 19. 

polytrichi juniperini, Dohme, xxxii, 

329. 

PRUNi viRGiNiANA, Cavipbell (glycerin) 

xlii, 22 — Figueroa (glycerin and sug- 
ar), XXX, 305 — Procter^ jr, (with sugar 
of milk), xxviii, 21 ; (with cane sug- 
ar), xxviii, 107; (U. S. [60], but 100 
p. c), xxxi, 546; (filtering through 
chalk) xxxii, 390— PA. V. S. (60) 
remarks, Procter, jr., xxxvi, 402 — 
Taylor, xxxv, 413. 

FERRATUM, Warner (Par- 
rish, 230), XXX, 315. 

puMPKiNSEED. See Fluid extractum 

PEPONIS. 

pyrethri, Procter, jr. (as fld. extr. 

zingiberis U. S. 60), xxxi, 539. 
QUASSIA, Campbell (glycerin), xlii, 

22 — Procter, jr., xxxi, 547. 
QUERCUS ALBA, Campbell (glycerin), 

xlii, 22. 

RHAMNi CATHARTici, Tilden & Co., 

xxvii, 477. 

RHBi, Campbell (glycerin) xlii, 22 — 

(remarks by Archibald, xlii, 119) — 
Diehl, Jr. (repercolation), xli, 341 — 
Procter, Jr. (diluted alcohol), xix, 182; 
(suggests addition of aromatics), 
xix, 262 ; xxii, 110 ; (U. S. 60), xxxi, 
541— PA. U. S. (50), (too much sug- 
ar). Pile, jr., xxiii, 200— PA. Z7. S. 
(60) remarks, Procter, jr., xxxvi, 402; 
Taylor, xxxv, 413 — Taylor (glyce- 
rin) xxxviii, 326 — Tilden ^ Co., xxvii, 
477. 

BT POTASSA, Merrill, xxxi, 389. 

ET SENNA, Procter, jr. (Par- 
rish, 228), xxv, 23 ; (extempore), 
xxxi, 543 — Tilden & Co., xxvii, 47 7. 

ROSA, Procter, jr., xxxv. 111. 

rubi villosi (radicis), Campbell (gly- 
cerin), xlii, 22 — Procter, jr. (as fld. 
extr. sarsaparillge U. S. 60), xxxi, 537. 

RUMicis, Tilden & Co., xxvii, 478. 

SABiNA, Campbell (glycerin), xlii, 21 

—Grahame (W. & B., 724, note), xxx, 
373. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



103 



IFLUID EXTR ACTUM sanguinari^, Camp- 
bell (with acetic acid, Parrish, 230), 
XXX, 221 — Procter, jr., xxxi, 534. 

SARSAPARiLL^, Ca7npbell (glycerin), 

xlii, 22— Procter, jr, (U. S. 60), xxxi, 
531— Ph. U. S. (60) remarks, Proc- 
ter, jr.,xxxvi, 403 — Ph. Dublin (50), 
xxiii, 12— Tilden ^ Co., xxvii, 478. 

COMPOSITUM, Hodgson, jr. (ob- 
jects to boiling, W. & B., 1119), ii, 
282 — Procter, jr. (without sugar; con- 
tains chimaphila, dulcamara, etc.), 
xxii, 108; (with sugar) xxxi, 544 — 
Tilden ^ Co., xxvii, 478. 

SASSAFRAS (corticis), Campbell (gly- 
cerin), xlii, 21. 

sciLL^, Procter, jr. (as fid. extr. ser- 

pentariae U. S. 60), xxxi, 535. 

SCUTELLARIA, Bates, xxviii, 87— Til- 
den & Co., xxvii, 478. 

SENEGA, Campbell (glycerin), xlii, 

22 — Procter, jr. (as fid. extr. serpen- 
tariae U. S. 60), xxxi, 535 — gelatini- 
zation removed by bicarbonate of 
potassa, Procter, jr., xxxiv, 136. 

SENNA, table of fractional percola- 
tion, Squibb, xxxviii, 127. 

PREPARATION : Campbell (glyce- 
rin), xlii, 2 2 — i>zeAZ,yr.(repercolation), 
xli, 338 — Duhamel (with Hoffmann's 
anodyne), xiii, 290 ; (details of mani- 
pulation), xiv, 103 — Ellis, vi, 274 ; xvi, 
310— Procter, jr. (U. S. 60), xxxi, 542 
— Ph. U. S. (50), (contains too much 
sugar). Pile, jr., xxxiii, 200 — Ph. U. 
S. (60) remarks, Procter, jr., xxxvi, 
404; Taylor, xxxv, 414— Tilden ^ Co., 
xxvii, 477. 

AQUOSUM, Thayer, xxix, 102. 

BT RHEI. See Fld. EXTR. RHEI 

ET SENNA. 

ET SPIGELIA. See Fld. extr. 

SPIGELIA ET SENNA. 

ET TARAXACi, Tilden & Co., 

xxvii, 477. 

COMPOSITUM, Dupuy, xxiv, 

152. 

SERPBNTARiA, Campbell (glycerin), 

xlii, 22 Maisch (contains sugar), 

xxxi, 314— Procter, jr. (U. S. 60), 
xxxi, 535— PA. U. S. (60) remarks, 
Procter, jr., xxxvi, 404 — Savery, xxiii, 
119 — Taylor (successively with alco- 
hol and water), xxv, 206 — Tilden ^ 
Co., xxvii, 478. 

SPIGELIA, Campbell (glycerin), xlii, 

22 — Procter, jr. (as fld. extr. sarsapa- 
rillae U. S. 60), xxxi, 537— PA. U. S. 
(60) remarks, Procter, jr., xxxvi, 404. 

COMPOSITUM, Eastlack, jr. (with 

senna, sabina, etc.), xvi, 20. 

BT SENNA, Procter, jr., xx, 87 ; 

xxxi, 542 ; (extempore, U. S. 60), 
xxxi, b43— Tilden ^ Co., xxvii, 477. 



STiLLiNGiA, Campbell (glycerin), xlii, 

22— Tilden & Co., xxvii, 478. 

STRAMONii, assay, Mayer, xxxv, 28 — 

preparation, Procter, jr. (as fld. extr. 
hyoscyami U. S. 60), xxxi, 532. 

suMBUL, Procter, jr. (Parrish, 231), 

xxvii, 233. 

TABACi, AUinson (cider vinegar), 

xxii, 21. 

TARAXACI, Campbell (glycerin), xlii, 

22 — Procter, jr. (fresh root), xx, 86 ; 
(W. & B., 1539), xxxi, 545 ; (dry root), 
XX, 87 ; xxxi, 546— PA. U. S. (60) re- 
marks, Procter, jr., xxxvi, 404 — Til- 
den ^ Co., xxvii, 478. 

ET SENNA COMPOSITUM. See FlD. 

EXTR. SENNA ET TARAXACI COMPOSI- 
TUM. 

TEPHROSTA VIRGINIANA COMPOSITUM, 

Jones (W. & B., 1613), xxviii, 218. 

TONicuM, Procter, jr., xxvi, 28. 

uvA URSi, Campbell (glycerin), xlii, 

22 — Maisch, xxix, 301 — Procter, jr. 
(as fld. extr. sarsaparillse U. S. 60), 
xxxi, 537 — PA. U. S. (60) remarks, 
Procter, jr., xxxvi, 404 ; Taylor, xxxv, 
413 — Tilden ^ Co., xxvii, 478. 

UVA URSi ET LUPULiNA, Proctcr, jr., 

xxviii, 523. 

VALERIANA, Campbell (glycerin), xlii, 

21 — Ullis (alcohol, ether, water), xix, 
83 — Grahame (discards the ether), 
xxxi, 379 — Maisch (ether, alcohol, su- 
gar), xxxi, 314 — Procter, jr. (modifi- 
cation of Ellis' formula), xix, 184; 
(as fldextr. hyoscyami U. S. (60) xxxi, 
532— PA. U. S. (60), remarks, Proc- 
ter, jr., xxxvi, 405 ; Taylor, xxxv, 411 
— Roberts (ether, alcohol, carbonate 
of soda) xxix, 276. 

VANILLA, Procter, jr., xx, 255 ; (W. 

& B., 850, note), xxvi, 300— Shivers, 
(with sand), xxxiii, 383. 

VERATRi viRiDis, Crystalline deposit 

(sugar and lime), Krehbiel, xxxvi, 296 
— preparation, Procter, jr., xxxi, 534. 

XANTHOXYLi, Procter, jr. (as fldextr. 

zingiberis U. S. 60), xxxi, 539. 

YARROW. See Fldextr. Achillea. 

yellow dock. See Fldextr. rumicis. 

zingiberis, Campbell (glycerin), xlii, 

21— Procter, jr. (U. S. 60), xxxi, 539. 

FLUOBORIC GAS as disinfectant, vi, 263. 

FLUORESCENCE, of cinchona alkaloids, 
Stokes, XXX, 241, etc. 

FLUORIDES, constitution. Prat, xl, 124. 

FLUORINE in blood, Nickles, xxix, 312— 
diffusion, Nickles, xxx, 43 — equivalent, 
Prat, xl, 124— isolation, Prat xl, 124 
— in ashes of Lycopodium complana- 
tum, Salm-Horstmar, xxxiii, 406 — - 
properties, Knox, x, 79. 

FLUORSPAR behavior to phosphate of 
soda, Briegleb, xxviii, 529. 



104 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



FLUSTRA POLiACEA contains iodine, xxvi, 
460. 

FLUX, reducing (dried ferro-cyanide of 

potassium) Davy, xxxiii, 351. 
FLY. See Flies. 

FOENIOULUM vulgare in Sandwich Isl- 
ands, xxvii, 240. 

FOENUGRJECUM, loss in powdering, Red- 
wood, xxi, 31. 

FCETUS, how it receives sufficient oxygen 
from the mother, Clanny, xi, 22Y. 

FOLHA SAGRADA = Coca. 

FOLIAGE, action, Boussingault, xxxviii, 
461. 

FOOD, ADULTERATION ill England, xxviii, 
29. 

CHEMICAL, .Farrish (W. & B., 1143), 

xxix, 572. 

FORMENE, PERCHLORURETTED is BICHLO- 
RIDE OP CARBON, xxxviii, ITl. 

FORMIATES, Fell, xxx, 200. 

FORMULAE, construction of chemical, Mor- 
fit, xxi, 111 — criticism on plural form, 
xxxii, 131 — cAozCf? of, Salles, ix, 116 — 
locals xxvi, 89 ; xxx, 92. 

NON-OFFiciNAL of Washington, D. C, 

xl, 237. 

FORMYL TRiBROMiDE is Bromoporm, xlii, 
450. 

TRICHLORIDE IS CHLOROPORM, xlii, 

450. 

TRIODIDE is IODOFORM, xlii, 450. 

FOWLER'S SOLUTION. See Liquor potas- 
S,M arsenitis. 

FOSSILS in ice (Siberia), xl, 275. 

FRACTIONAL condensation. See Con- 
densation, fractional. 

percolation. See Percolation, 

fractional ; Repercolation. 

FRAGARIA vesca, leaves as tea, xxviii, 
114. 

FRANKINCENSE from Western Africa, 
Daniell (W. & B., 1569), xxvii, 338. 
See Olibanum. Compare Incense. 

FRASERA wALTERi, analysis^ Higinbo- 
thom (W.&B., 401), xxxiv, 23— Doug- 
lass, xii, 177 — Thomas (contains nei- 
ther albumen, starch nor berberina), 
xl, 309 — distinction from Calumha^ 
Stolze (W. & B., 191), iii, 271— as 
cathartic^ v, 208 — description and pro- 
perties, Griffith, iii, 269 — as tonic^ v, 
290. 

FRAXINUS excelsior, yields Kinone, 
Stenhouse, xxvi, 252 — leaves contain 
malate of lime, Garot (W. & B., 1515), 
xxvi, 168. 

OENUS, xiii, 124. See Manna. 

FREEMAN'S bathing spirits. See Spjr- 

ITUS. 

FREESTONE of extraordinary strength, 
xxxi, 183. 

FREEZING POINT in thermometers, its 
alteration, Joule, xxxix, 420. 



by ammonia, see Ice, artificial — by 

sulphocyanide of ammonium. Cloves, 
xxxviii, 270— Rudorff, xli, 426. 

mixtures, Hanamann, xxxvi, 104 — 

Meylinck, i, 318 — sulphocyanide of 
potassium, Reissig, xxxvi, 112 — sul- 
phate of soda and sulphuric acid, 
viii, 257. 

. Compare Cold ; Temperature, re- 
duction. 

FRENCH pharmacy, specialties, xxix, 347. 

troops, loss in Crimea, xxx, 183. 

FRITILLARIA imperialis (saccharine se- 
cretion), xxxiv, 507. 
FROTH, Gladstone, xxx, 548. 
FRUCTOSE, xxxvii, 362. 
FRUITS, acid, saccharine substance, Buig- 
net, xxxiii, 213 — estimation of free 
acid in juice, Gr^ger, xxiv, 371. 

ESSENCES, See Essences, Oils. 

MATURATION, Berthelot and Buignet, 

xxxiii, 230 — Fremy, xxi, 151. 

MINERAL substances, Vogel, xvi, 265, 

PRESERVED, Mayct (by steam), xxv, 

185 — Ranch (cotton, wool, etc.) xxxvi, 
64 — Russian method (slaked lime, 
creasote), xxxiv, 413. 

RESPIRATION, Cahours, xxxvi, 238. 

STARCH, Doebereiner, xvii, 237. 

TREES, propagation in China, Mur- 
ray, ix, 52. 
FUCHSIN freed from arsenic, Girard 
and Delaire, xxxiii, 255 — preparation, 
Girard and Delaire, xxxiii, 254 — Ren- 
ard and Franc, xxxiii, 251 — Verguin, 
xxxiii, 253 — crude, contains picric 
acid, Goppelsrceder, xxxv, 179. 

. Compare Anilin; Rosanilin. 

FUCUS CRispus, vi, 204. See Chondrus 

CRISPUS. 

DIGITATUS ; FILIUM, p. C. Of lo- 

dine, Riegel, xxvi, 438. 

LICHENOIDES (Ccylou moss), Schacht, 

xvii, 146, 

NODOSUS, xxii, 338 — yields mannite, 

Phipson, xxix, 238. 

SACCATUS ; SACCHARINUS, p. C. of 

iodine, Riegel, xxvi, 438 — yields man- 
nite, Phipson, xxix, 238. 

SERRATUS, xxii, 338 — yields mannite, 

Phipson, xxix, 238. 

siLiQuosus, p. c. of iodine, Riegel, 

xxvi, 438 — yields mannite, Phipson, 
xxix, 238. 

sPHyBRococcus (Ccylou moss), 

Schacht, xvii, 146. 

vEsicuLosus, p. c. of iodiuc, Reigel, 

xxvi, 438 — yields mannite, Phipson, 
xxix, 238. 
FULIGO. See Lampblack ; Soot. 
FULIGOKALI, Gibert (W. & B., 1517), 
xiv, 284. 

suLPHURATUM, Gibert, (W. & B.,1517), 

xiv, 284. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



105 



FULLER'S EARTH, as substitute for lard 
in ointments, Smith, xxx, 231. 

FULMINATING silver in indelible ink, 
xiv, 160. 

FUMIGATIO Picis liquid^e, Gray's Sup- 
plement, XX, 23. 

. See Pastilles ; Powder. 

FUNGI. See Mushrooms. 

FUNGIN, in ergota, Legrip, xvii, 37. 

FUNIS FELLEUS, Rumphins, is Cocculus 
CRiSPUS, viii, 279. 

FUNNELS, preventing obstruction of 
neck of bottles (with groove outside), 
XXXV, 572 — (with strips of something 
between funnel and bottle neck) Mil- 
lington, xxxvi, 3. 

for rapid filtration (Spencer's pat- 
ent), Parrish, xxxviii, 107. 

in percolation. See Percolation. 

FURFURAMIDE, composition, etc., Fow- 
nes ; Stenhouse, xvii, 55; 155. 



FURFURIN, preparation, etc., Fownes, 

xvii, 55, 155; xx, 336 — Stenhouse, 

xvii, 54, 154. 
FURFUROL, preparation, etc., Fownes, 

xvii, 54, 154 ; xx, 335 — Stenhouse, 

xvii, 54, 154. 
VAPOR, specific gravity, Fownes, xx, 

340. 

FURFUROLAMID, Fownes, xx, 336. 

FURNACE, GAS-. See Gas furnace. 

TABLE- (similar to Sefstroem's ar- 
rangement), vi, 262. 

FUSAGASUGA. See Bark, cinchona. 

FUSEL OIL. See Alcohol, amyl. 

FUSING point, effect of pressure, Hop- 
kins, xxvii, 107. 

FUSTIC, vi, 22— charcoal, absorption of 
ammonia; carbonic acid, Smith, 
xxxv, 563. 



a-. 



GADUIN, preparation, etc., de Jongh (W. 

& B., 585), xxi, 140. 
GADUS, species, iii, 19 ; vi, 13; xxiii, 97. 

See Isinglass; Oleum morrhu^. 
GAILLONELLA, in silex from Berlin, 

Prussia, Turpin, ix, 264. 
GALACTIN (from galactodendron), 

Thomson, x, 353. 
GALACTODENDRON utile, ii, 343 ; vii, 

116 ; x, 353. 
GALANGA, different varieties, Guibourt, 

V, 323. 
■ false, V, 324, 

GALBANUM, iii, 262— behavior to cam- 
phor^ Planche (W. & B., 195, note), 
x, 214 — entitled to entry ^ xxv, 302 — 
origin^ Buhse (W. & B 401), xxiv, 379 
—Persian, Ludwig (W. & B., 402), xv, 
30— purified, Mouchon, jr. (alcohol, 
acetic acid), ii, 49 — Proctor (magne- 
sia, W. & B., 147, note), xxxv, 356— 
therapeuiical properties, Plummer, 
xxvii, 305 — varieties, Ludwig, xv, 29. 

GALKOPSIS ochroleuca, xxiii, 181. 

GALIPEA cusPARiA, i, 27 ; ii, 55, note. 

febripuga, X, 144. 

heterophylla, ii, 56, note. 

lasiostemon, ii, 55, note. 

officinalis, ii, 58 — analysis, etc., 

Husband, v, 202. 

ossana, ii, 55. 

TRIFOLIATA, ii, 55, 

. See Angostura. 

GALIPOT, properties, Guibourt, xii, 136 

— Hanbury, xxxix, 546. 
GALIUM aparine ; verum, analysis, 

Rochleder, xxv, 243. 



GALL. See Bile. 

GALLtE, action of animal charcoal, Wep- 
pen, xviii, 204 — of ether. Bridges, 
xiv, 40 — analysis. Bley, xxvi, 237 — 
Guibourt (W. & 'b., 404), xvi, 237— 
as antidote to Cicuta virosa, Meyer, 
XV, 153 — to strychnia, opium, tartar 
emetic, Donne, ii, 83; (compare Acid, 
tannic) — estimation, Marriage (am- 
monio-sulphate of copper), xxxiv, 
429 — Mittentzwey (absorption of 
oxygen), xxxvi, 318 — Muller (gel- 
atin), xxxi, 427 — percolation with 
"wsiter, packing, Soubeiran, viii, 226 — 
structure, Lacaze Duthiers, xxv, 451 — 
yield of tannin, Bowman, xli, 194 — • 
Muller, xxxi, 429 — as test (keeping of 
aqueous infusion), Pettenkofer, xvii, 
80. 

Bassorah, analysis, Bley, xxvi, 237. 

See , MECCA. 

, Chinese, a new kind. Archer, xxxvii, 

186 — yield of tannin, Muller, xxxi, 

429 ; Stenhouse (W. & B., 403, note), 

xxxiv, 253. 
English (oak), d'Urban, xxxv, 333 — 

yield of tannin, Vinen, xxviii, 524; 

Judd, xxxvii, 486. 
MECCA, Lambert, xxi, 265. See 

Bassorah. 

of PiSTACiA, Guibourt, xvi, 32. 

of SUMACH, analysis, Watson, xxv, 196. 

^ — of Terebinthus, Guibourt, xvi, 32 — 

analysis, Ledanois, xvi, 32. 
GALLIPOTS (recommended to be made 

of glass), xiv, 288 — Thompson, 

xxxviii, 151. 



106 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



GALLSTONE, analysis, Neal, xvi, 247. 

GALLINE. See Acid, pyrogallic. 

GALLON, old corn, ii, 134. 

, old wine, ii, 134. 

GALVANIC BATTERY, Groves' improved 
(substituting platina and zinc by 
iron), Woehler and Weber, xiv, 130. 

PROCESS, Elkington, xv, 61 — Ruolz, 

XV, 62, 

GALVANIZATION of metals, Schoenbein 
(against Davy and Berzelius) xiii, 85. 
GAMBIR. See Catechu. 
GAMBOGE, analysis, Buchner, xv, 132 — 
Christison (W. & B., 405), ix, 133— 
behavior to camphor, Planche (W. & 
B., 195, note), x, 214 — to fused chlo- 
rate of potassa, Boettger, xxx, 71 — 
distinction from jalap, podophyllin, 
scammony, Bullock and Parrish, 
xxxiv, 117 — entitled to eiitry, xxv, 
302— oriffin, Christison (W. & B., 405), 
ix, 50, 133— Hanbury (W. & B., 407, 
note), xxxvii, 150 — Graham (W.& B., 
405, 406), xiii, 19 — poisoning, xxviii, 
366 — powdered, adulteration, x, 122; 
xxxi, 511 — loss, Covell, xxxix, 116; 
Redwood, xxi,31 — resin, analysis, 
Buchner, xv, 129 — solubility in chlo- 
' roform, Lepage, xxiv, 147 — in gen- 
eral. Bullock and Parrish, xxxiv, 116. 

from Ceylon, Graham (W. & B., 405, 

406), xiii, 19. 

from SiAM, Christison, xxiii, 43, 

^ from Tenasserim, Mason, xx, 126, 

GAMBOGIATES, as paint, Scoffern, xxiv, 
80. 

GANJA (Cannabis) xxvii, 360. SeeGuK- 
jah, 

GANTINE, Buhan, six, 237. 

GARANCIN, odoriferous principle, xl, 450 
— alcohol, xl, 450. 

GARCINIA Cambogia, xiii, 19, 21; xx, 

126. Cochi?ichinensis, xiii, 25 ; 

XX, 129. cornea, xiii, 29. 

elliptica, xiii, 28; xx, 128; xxiii, 44. 

indica, xiii, 29, morella, ix, 

50 ; xiii, 25, irictoria, ix, 148 ; 

xiii, 29; xx, 127; xxiii, 44. pur- 
purea, yields Kokum butter, xxiii, 
362, zeylanica, ix, 133. 

, See Gamboge. 

GARDENA Florida, for scenting 
xxvii, 531. 

GARIPOT. See Galipot, 

GARLIC. See Allium sativum. 

GASES, absorption by charcoal from 

ferent kinds of wood. Smith, xxxv, 
561 — dialysis, Graham, xxxviii, 510 — 
liquefaction, Faraday, xvii, 19, 121. 

GAS burners, xxi, 127, 
= FURNACE, reverberatory. Griffin, 

xxxiii, 533 ; (W. & B., 885, 886), 

xxxiv, 46 — with steam (as substitute 
for Russian lamp). Hart, xxvii, 475 — 



tea, 



dif- 



McGlensey (Parrish, 187), xxxii, 530 
— Parrish (Parrish, 185, etc.), xxxii, 
529 — patent regenerative, Siemens, 
xxxvii, 390, See Gas stoves. 

- GENERATORS, Ullgreu, xli, 297. 

- LEAKAGE in Loudou, xxxii, 467 — dis- 
covered, Fournier, xxxii, 466. 

- MANUFACTURE, Palmer, xx, 121 — crit- 
icism on Palmer, lire, xx, 132. 

- PIPES, leaks discovered, Fournier, 
xxxii, 466. 

- poisoning, Cluss, xxviii, 50. 
-from PEAT, xxviii, 71; xxx, 533 ; 
xxxi, 280 — illuminating power, Fou- 
cault, xxviii, 71. 

• from PETROLEUM, Martius, xiii, 326. 

■ from WOOD, Pettenkofer, xxiv, 379. 

■ from leaves of Xanthorrhoea, xxxv, 
453 — Simmons, xxxviii, 466. 

■ STOVES, Robison, xii, 262. See Gas 

FURNACES. 

■ WORKS of Philadelphia, xxv, 276. 
GASEOUS COMPOUNDS, to find specific 

gravity, Exley, x, 344, 
GASTERASE, Payen, xv, 287. Compare 
Pepsin. 

GASTRIC JUICE, Bernard and Barreswil, 
xvii, 138 — Lehmann, xxv. 478. Com- 
pare Rennet. 

GAULTHERIA hispidula, iii, 199. 

procdmbens, in Michigan, Stearns, 

xxxi, 31, 

GAULTHERIN, Procter, jr., (W. & B., 
1473), XV, 246. 

GAYLUSSACCIA resinosa, presented to 
Philadelphia College, xxxi, 84. 

GELATIN, ash, examined. Redwood, xxii, 
240 — for rectifying alcohol. Burgess, 
xl, 557 — behavior io ozone, Gorup-Be- 
sanez, xxxvi, 168— to permanganate 
of potassa, Cloez and Guignet, xxxi, 
152 — to water and caustic potassa. 
Redwood, xxii, 239 — colored red by 
proto- and binitrate of mercury, Las- 
saigne, iv, 175 — reactions, Carey Lea, 

xxxvii, 371 — test, Carey Lea (acid so- 
lution of nitrate of mercury), xxxvii, 
371. 

. Compare Glue ; Isinglass. 

atropized, Savery and Moore (W. & 

B,, 1020), xxxvi, 329. 
CALABARizED, Savcry and Moore (W. 

& B,, 1020), xxxvi, 329. 
capsules, Dublanc and Mothes, vii, 

351— Guillou, ix, 20. 
for capping bottles, Haselden, 

xxxviii, 248. 

META-. See Meta-gelatin. 

SUGAR. See Glycocoll. 

tannate, for taking casts of medals, 

viii, 170. 

GELIDIUM coRNEUM yields gelose, xxxii, 
356. 

GELIN (starch-cellulose) Kiitzing, xxv, 38 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



107 



GELOSE, Payen (W. & B., 465, note), 
xxxii, 355. 

GELSEMINIA, Eberle, xli, 35— Kollock, 
xxvii, 212 — Wormlej, xlii, 9. 

GELSEMINUM versus Jasminum (mista- 
taken identity) Procter, jr., xl, 30. 

SEMPBRViRENS, anoli/sis, Kollock (W. 

& B., 409), xxvii, 197, 203— descrip- 
tion and properties, Procter, jr., xxiv, 
307 — medical properties, Hill, xxiv, 
309 — micr oscopicalhj exa.mined, Worm- 
ley, xlii, 1. 

GEMS, spurious, distinguished from real, 
Dancer (microscope), xl, 370. 

GENERATION, spontaneous, Pasteur; 
Pouchet, xxxiii, 341 — Child, xxxvii, 
492. 

GENTIANA amarilloides, vi, 277. 

CATESBAEi, as tonic, V, 290. 

CHACHANLAHUEN (Erythrsea chilen- 

sis), vi, 276. 
CHiRAYTA, supposed Origin of the 

Calamus of the ancients, Guibourt, v, 

267 ; xii, 23. See Chiretta. 
DiEMENSis, medical properties, xxviii, 

73. 

LUTBA, ix, 333. See Gentiana. 

PERUVIANA (Erythrsea chilensis), vi, 

276. 

chemical history, Leconte, ix, 333 

— analysis, Henry, Caventou, Planche, 
Leconte (W. &''B., 411), xvi, 177— 
behavior to charcoal, Weppen, xviii, 
203 — proposed as dilatatory, Winck- 
ler, xl, 312 — contains glucose, Magnes, 
xl, 333 — percolation with water, /?ac/c- 
ing, Soubeiran, viii, 11^— powdering, 
loss, Covell, xxxix, 116 — Redwood, 
xxi, 31. 

GLUE, Leconte (W. & B., 412) ix, 

341. 

distilled water. See Aqua genti- 
ans. 

GENTIANIN, behavior to bichromate of 
potassa test, Jenkins xxxiii, 528 — 
preparation and properties, Baumert, 
XX, 45, 46 — Henry and Caventou, xvi, 
177 — as s'ubstit'ule for cinchona and 
quiniae sulphas, Kiichenmeister, 
xxiv, 170. 

GENTIOPICRIN, Ludwig and Kromayer, 

(W. & B., 412) XXXV, 330. 
GENTISIN, Leconte (W. & B., 411), ix, 

337; xvi, 177; xx, 45— Trommsdorflf, 

xvi, 177 

GEOFFROYA, crystals (oxalate of lime), 
xxxvii, 32. 

GEOMETRA niveo-sericeaeia. See 

Worm, measuring. 
GEORGIA (Cherokee), medicinal plants, 

Battey, xxix, 59. 
GERANIUM BATRAcinoiDBS (= 

maculatum), iv, 89. 
MACULATUM, analysis, Bigelow, iv, 94 



—Staples (W. & B., 414), i, 110— de- 
scription and properties, Griffith, iv,. 
89 — yield of tannin, Bowman, xli, 195. 

novaboracense (= maculatum),. 

iv, 89. 

ROSE-. See Pelargonium odoratis- 

smuM. 

spinosum, xxii, 151. 

GETTYSBURG mineral spring. Bell, xl, 

511 — analysis, Mayer, xl, 512. 
GILDING, electro-, Elkington and Ruolz, 

XV, 60. 

of silk, Pouilly, xxvi, 377. 

. See under difierent substances. 

GILEAD balsamodendrum, v, 140. 

GILLENIA stipulacea, distinction from 
Gillenia trifoliata, iv, 179. 

trifoliata, analysis, Bigelow, iv, 184 

— Lewis; Leraberger; Ruch, (W. & 
B., 417), xxvi, 49(;— Shrewe, vii, 28, 
30 — Stanhope, xxviii, 200 — Staples, iv, 
184— Wyeth (W. & B., 417), xxvi, 490 
— description and properties, Griffith, 
iv, 177. 

GILLENIN, Stanhope (W. & B., 417), 
xxviii, 201. 

GIN, poisoning, xi, 164 — vapor, igniting 
point, Hutton, xli, 254. 

GINGER. See Zingiber. 

WILD, See ASARUM canadense. 

GINGKO-tree (Salisburia adiantifolia), 
Hanbury, xxxiii, 502. 

GINSENG in China, i, 153— xxxii, 467. 

excitement in Minnesota, xxxi, 480. 

GLASS, action of alkaline and acid 
liquids, Emmerling, xli, 428 — on 
alumina, Thomson, xiii, 207 — of great 
heat, Prel. No. 32 — of oxalic acid. 
Slater, xxviii, 345 — of water, Pe- 
louze, xxix, 65 — adhesive force of 
crown glass, Draper, vi, 254, 293 — 
cleansed, xxxii, 182 — cracking, see 
Glass vessels — drilling (diluted sul- 
phuric acid). Lunge, xxxvi, 369 — 
gilding, Liebig, xxviii, 453 — green 
(with excess of lime), Warington, 
xvii, 158 — physical nature, Faraday, 
vi, 263 — p>latinizing , Boettger, xlii, 238 
— silvering, Bothe (Rochelle salts), 
xxxix, 350 — Liebig (sugar of milk), 
xxviii, 451 — Martin (grape sugar), 
xxxvi, 271 — Vohl (gun cotton), xxii, 
65, (see Casaseca, iv, 246) — writing 
(fluoric acid gas), Duhamel, xviii, 20 
— Brunnquell (a wax and stearin pen- 
cil, XXV, 403. 

cement (mastic, isinglass, ammoniac, 

etc.), iv, 173 — (curd, albumen, quick- 
lime, etc.), iv, 352. Compare Cement, 

CHINA. 

soluble, Doebereiner, ii, 252 — Fuchs, 

xxxii, 181 — different uses, Edwards, 
XXX, 336 — Maisch, xxx, 566— in man- 
ufacture of soaps, Storer, xxxv, 466. 



108 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



GLASS of STRONTiAN, Doebereiner, ii, 252. 

VESSELS, action of alkalies, acids, Em- 

merling, xli, 428 — of water, Pelouze, 
xxix, 65 — humping in boiling prevent- 
ed, see Boiling — coated with copper^ 
Edwards, xxi, 264— crac7fm<7 regularly 
(carbon point substituted by a hot 
glass pearl), xxxiv, 189 — (oil and red 
hot iron) ; (string dipped in turpen- 
tine), V, 1*72. Compare Bottles ; 
Glass. 

GLAUCIUM LUTEUxNJ, value of seeds and 
oil, Cloez, xxxiii, 8-0 — contains chele- 
rythrina, Probst, xxxiii, 9. 

GLEANINGS from French Journals com- 
menced, XXX, 397 — from German Jour- 
nals xxxii, 42. 

GLOBULARIA alypum (source of wild 
senna), Martin, xxix, 231. 

GLOBULIN, Turpin, xxvi, 178. 

GLONOINE. See Nitroglycerin. 

GLOVES, black dye, xxxvi, 379. 

, preparation of leather, Calvert, 

xxxvi, 410. 

GLUCINIUM, action on iodide of ethyl, 
and methyl, Cahours, xxxv, 107. 

GLUCOSE, technical history, Jay, xlii, 
410 — action on salts of copper in ace- 
tates, Reynoso, xxviii, 140 — in manu- 
facture of beer^ xlii, 414 — behavior to 
ozone, Gorup-Besanez, xxxvi, 167 — 
composition, Front, x, 354 — in dialyser, 
Graham, xxxiv, 315 — conversion into 
mannite by nascent hydrogen, Linne- 
mann, xli, 318 — estimation in presence 
of cane-sugar and dextrin, Gentele 
(W. & B., 731, note), xxxii, 81— 
Schmidt (Parrish, 517), xxxiv, 32— 
Midy, xlii, 526 — in gentiana, Magnes, 
xli, 333 — as protection for iodide of 
iron, Procter, jr., xii, 13 — in lactuca- 
rium, Lahens, xxvii, 69 — formation 
by leaves, Boussingault, xxxviii, 
160. 

MANUFACTURE and formation : from 

cellulose, xlii, 413 — from corn, xlii, 
412 — from malt, xlii, 412 — from pota- 
toes. Spencer, xviii, 58 — from starch, 
by sulphuric acid, Bouchardat, viii, 
123— Maubre, xxxviii, 19; xli, 429; 
xlii, 411 — by potato parings, xlii, 413 
— by oxalic acid, Spencer, xviii, 58. 

■ in opium, Lahens, xxvii, 69 — in re- 
reduction of chloride of silver, Boett- 
ger, XXX, 537 — combined with tarta- 
ric acid, Berthelot, xxx, 154 test, 

Franqui (Boettger's bismuth test), 

xxxix, 253 copper test: Cooley, 

xxxiv, 247 Fehling's, xlii, 415 

Trommer's, xlii, 416 — compare sugar, 
CANE, detection of glucose, — in thri- 
dace, Lahens, xxvii, 69 — in manufac- 
ture of wine, xlii, 415. 

. Compare Sugar of diabetes. ' 



GLUCOSIDES are not precipitated by io- 
dide of cadmium and potassium, 
Marme, xli, 19. 

GLUE, products of decomposition by 
chromic acid, Schlieflfer, xix, 29 — de- 
colorizing power when calcined with 
potash, Bussy (W. & B , 212), i, 238 
from leather, Stenhouse, xxx, 353 — 
manufacture, combined with that of 
phosphorus and muriate of ammonia, 
Gentele, xxx, 49 — solubility in glyce- 
rin, Maisch, xlii, 315. 

of GENTIAN, Leconte, ix, 341. 

— — liquid, Dumoulin (nitric acid), xxv, 
171 — Knaffl (muriatic acid, sulphate 
of zinc), xxxix, 319; xl, 330— (with 
white lead), xxxviii, 564. 

MARINE, xxxviii, 564; xxxix, 185. 

WATERPROOF, XXXiv, 377. 

. Compare Gelatin. 

GLUTEN, behavior to tincture of guaia- 
cum, xxiii, 184 — to proto- and bini- 
trate of mercury, Lassaigne, iv, 175 
— in crust of bread, Barral, xxxv, 557. 

, INDIGO. See Indigo gluten. 

, soluble (diastase), Berzelius ; Ein- 

hoflf, xi, 274. 

GLUTINOUS sustances, drying and pow- 
dering, Reischauer, xxxviii, 74. 

GLYCEL^UM, Groves, xl, 56. 

GLYCEMATUM (plasma), Redwood, 
xxxviii. 558. 

GLYCEMYLUM (plasma), Redwood, 

xxxviii, 558. 

GLYCERATE. Compare Glycbrole ; 
Plasma. 

GLYCERATUM picis liquids, Moore, xli, 
115. 

POTASSII lODiDi (Parrish, 785), 

Thirault, xxxiii, 236. 
GLYCERATUS rhei aromaticus, Bond, 

xlii, 177. 

simplex, Bond, xlii, 177. 

GLYCERE d'oxide de zinc, Rollet, xxxix, 

418. 

GLYCERIN, essay, Shinn, xxii, 124— Ste- 
vens, xxv, 289 history, Wilson, 

xxxiii, 158 — combination with acids, 
Berthelot, xxv, 357 — action on indigo 
solution, Plummer, xxv, 400 — pre- 
vents apotheme, Taylor, xxxviii, 325 
— behavior to chlorous acid, Schiel, 
xxxii, 443 — to hydriodic acid, Erlen- 
mayer, xxxiv, 332 — to ozone, Gorup- 
Besanez, xxxvi, 167 — boiling ^o'mi^ of 
diluted, Vogel, xli, 18 — cheap, Maisch, 

xxxix, 309 — combination with acida, 

Berthelot, xxv, 357 combustibility 

with sawdust, Brown, xlii, 86 — con- 
stitution, Pelouze, ix, 352 — contami- 
nated^iXh chloride of calcium, Mayer, 

xxxiv, 329 — conversion into true sugar 
(by the tissue of testicles), Berthe- 
lot, xxix, 450 — crystallized, Crookes, 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



109 



OLYCERIN {Continued). 

xxxix, 163 — Werner, xli, 17 — detec- 
tion of sugar and .dextrin, Hager ; 
Vogel (molybdate of ammonia), xli, 
206, 302 — Mahla (copper test), xl, 548 
— Procter, jr. (against Pope's reac- 
tions), xxxix, 109 in dialyser^ Gra- 
ham, xxxiv, 315 — in dysentery^ Daude, 
xxxiii, HQ— formed in alcoholic fer- 
mentation and in wine, Pasteur, xxxii, 
62 — as inte7'nal remedy, Crawcour (W. 
& B., 420), xxvii, 230 (compare thera- 
peutical use) — impurities, Bower (ni- 
trate of silver most reliable test), xl, 
264 — medicinal preparations. Cap and 
Garot, xxvii, 158 — manufacture, Mor- 
. fit (tallow and lime, W. & B., 418, 
note), XXV, 355 — Procter, jr., xx, 89 
— Rochleder (from castor-oil), xix, 
75; XXV, 358— Stevens (from soap- 
waste), XXX, 88 — Tilghman's process 
(by distillation), xxvii, 121 — Wilson, 
xxviii, 33 — for making quinia pills, 
Jenkins, xli, 119 — properties, Cap, 
XXX, 87 — Procter, jr., xx, 89 — purifi- 
cation, Bruere; Perrin, xxv, 549 — Wil- 
son, xxviii, 33 — and sawdust combus- 
tible, Brown, xlii, 86 — solvetit power, 
Adolphus, xxxix, 150 — Blockey (W. 
& B., 419), xxix, 556— Cap and Ga- 
rot, xxvii, 158 — Klever, xlii, 222 — 
Gros-Renaud, xxxiii. 111 — Storer's 
Dictionary, xxxv, 574 — insolubility in 
chloroform, Adolphus, xxxix, 151 — 
Procter, jr., xxxix, 110 — specific grav- 
ity of American, Thompson, xxix, 

277 spurious (glucose). Draper, 

xxxv, 46 — as substitute for oil and fats, 
Schacht, xxx, 252, — Stearns, xxix, 
522 — for tartaric acid in sugar-test 
solutions, Loewe, xlii, 549 — substi- 
tuted for water-bath, Vogel, xli, 17 — 
tests, Maisch, xxxix, 117 — therapeuti- 
cal use, Adolphus, xxxix, 149 — Craw- 
cour (W. & B., 420), xxvii, 230— 
Startin (W. & B., 420), xx, 90— phar- 
maceutical use, Baden Benger, xxxvii, 
61 — Gordon, xxxvii, 141 — Wilson, 
xxxiii, 158 — in cracked tongue, Brin- 
ton, xxix, 313— and loood-soot in ec- 
zema, Bougard, xxix, 313. 

Bowers\ Wiegand, xxxii, 308 — Gor- 
don's, Procter, jr., xli, 187 — Vienna, 
Mahla, xl, 548— P/i. Helvetica (65), 
xxxix, 314. 

ARTIFICIAL (from tribromide of al- 

lyl), Wurtz, xxix, 428. 

BALSAM, Piesse, xxviii, 86. 

CARBOLIC, Jenkins, xli, 293. 

FORMIATB, xli, 302. 

, IODIZED, Adolphus, xxxix, 152 — 

Richter (W. & B., 477), xxix, 133. 

LOTION, Olymer, xx, 92 — Moore, xlii, 

69. 



OINTMENT. See Unguentum glyob- 

RINI. 

PERFUMED, Bakes, xxxix, 6. 

styptic, Bayes (W. & B., 942,), xxviii, 

443. 

WATER, Bannvart, xxxi, 18. 

GLYCERODIN, Hirsch, = golcoin, xlii, 

155. See Glyconin. 
GLYCEROLE. Compare Glycerate ; 

Plasmata. 
GLYCEROLES, Wilson, xxxiii, 160. 
GLYCEROLATUM ACONiTiiB, Procter, jr., 

xxxiii, 102. 
aloes, Chausit (W. & B., 1088, note), 

xxxii, 85 — Haselden, xxxii, 84. 

, ALUM and white precipitate, Anci- 

aux, xxx, 403, 
atropi^, xxvi, 428 — Tichborne, 

xxxiii, 64. 

■ ferri protocarbonatis, Baden-Ben- 

ger, xxxiii, 66. 

FERRI lODiDi, Lewellen, xl, 108 — re- 
marks by Procter, jr., xl, 108. 

KINO, Love, xxxii, 467. 

LACTucARii, Stearns (Parrish, 259), 

xxx, 459, 

MORPHIA, Soubeiran, xxvi, 428. 

PHOSPHORi, Crawcour, xxvii, 230. 

picis, Cap and Garot, xxvii, 160. 

PLUMBi suBACETATis, Tilyard (Par- 
rish, 784), xxxi, 442. 

POTASS^ CHLORATis, Martinet, xxxiii, 

320. 

OLEi siNAPis, Grimault (W. & B., 

783 ; Parrish, 785), xxxiii, 320. 

STRYCHNIA, xxvi, 428, 

SUMACH (berries). Bakes, xxxix, 120. 

VERATRDE, xxvi, 428. 

GLYCOCIN, xxxvii, 265. 

GLYCOCOLL, composition, Laurent (Par- 
rish, 664), XIX, 78 — behavior to allox- 
an, Strecker, xxxv, 35. 

GLYCONIN, Hirsch, xlii, 155— Sichel, 
xxxix, 181. 

GLYCYPHILA el^espora ; eryth- 

ROSPORA (parasitic plants on sugar), 
Payen, xxiv, 146. 

GLYCYRRHIZA. Compare Extractum 

GLYOYRRHIZ^ ; LiQUORICE. 

analysis of root, Robiquet (W. & B., 

422), xi, ^^'J-— cultivation in U. S,, 
xxviii, 183 — percolation with water, 
packing, Soubeiran, viii, 225 — compa- 
rative results of maceration and de- 
coction with water, and alcohol, 
Bouillay and Guillermond, x, 10 — 
powder, adulterated, xi, 169 ; xvi, 319 
— loss, Redwood, xxi, 31. 

FLORBS, xvi, 319. 

GLYSAMYL, Hubbel, xxx, 280. 

GODFREY'S cordial (W. & B., 1405, 
note), V, 27 ; xi, 71. 

GOITRE. See Cretinism. 

GOLCOIN, Hirsch, = glvconin, xlii, 155. 



110 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



GOLD. Compare Aurum. 

adhesion to mercury, Gruyton de Mor- 

veau,vi,306 — behavioi- to salts of pro- 
toxide of mercury, Fisher, iii, 265 — 
colors obtained from it, Golfier Bes- 
seyre, vi, 215; (compare Purple cas- 
sius) — where /oMn(/, xxxvi, 30 — sepa- 
ration from platinum, Kemp, xiv, 315 — 
limit of reaction with sulphuretted hy- 
drogen, Reicsch, xi, 217 — recovered 
from cyanide solution, Huber, xxxv, 
469 — reduced from chloride by extract 
of soap bark, Bleekrode, xxxii, 242 — 
solubility in nitric acid and sulphuric 
acids, Reynolds, xxxvi, 536 — formed 
in malleable sponge^ Forbes, xxix, 248 
—yield, xli, 89. 

California, analysis, Oswald, xxii, 

178 — first mention, Lyman, xxi, 46, 

New Zealand, xxxvi, 270. 

Scotch (coal brasses), Mactear, xl, 

435. 

vessels formed by means of phos- 
phorus, Levol, xxvi, 377. 

GOLDEN parallels, xxxvi, 28. 

GOMPHOSIA CHLORANTHA, bark as adult- 
erant of quilled Calisaya, Howard, 
(W. & B., 273, note), xxvii, 157. 

GONORRHCEA, v, 174; vii, 261, 351; 
viii, 86, 88 ; xii, 351. 

GOOSEBERRIES, analysis, Wright, x, 
330 — alcohol in ripe berries, Wright, 
X, 333. 

GORGONIA PLABELLUM, contains iodine, 
xxvi, 440. 

GOSSYPIUM herbaceum, analysis of root, 
Battey, xxviii, 407— Shaw, xxviii, 419 
— therapeutical properties, Shaw (W. 
& B., 425), xxvii, 420. 

— , SEED. See CoTTOX seed. 

GOUT. See Paper. 

, benzoates and silicates of soda, Soc- 

quet and Bonjean (W. & B., 1471, 
1600), xxix, 314— oil of horse-chest- 
nut, Genevoix (W. & B., 1454), xxxi, 
231. 

GOUTTES ameres. See Tinctura igna- 

TI^ AMAR^ COMPOSITA. 

GRACILARIA lichenoides yield gelose, 
xxxii, 356. 

GRADUATES (measure). See Measure. 

. See Pharmacy, Pennsylvania — 

Catalogue till 1853, xxv, 563. 

GRAINS, how to prescribe and how to 
weigh, xxxvi, 359. 

DROPS and minims, Durand, i, 165 — 

Proctor, xxxii, 428. 

GRAIN, preserved from insects (chloro- 
form ; bisulphide of carbon), xxxiii, 
473 — removal of musty smell, Chal- 
ambel (quicklime), xxxvi, 423. 

GRAINS OP Paradise, Guibourt, v, 334 — 
Pereira (W. & B., 217, note), xv, 95. 

GRANADINE (from bark of root of Gran- 



atum), preparation, etc., Latour de 
Trie, iv, 173 — Landerer, xii, 331 — 
identical with mannite, Boutron (W. & 
B., 426), vii, 257. 

GRANATUM, fibre twists to the left, 
Braun, xxviii, 67. 

BARK of root, analysis, Latour de Trie, 

iv, 173 — commercial, is bark of the 
trunk, Harz, xlii, 220 — distinction from 
bark of Berberis, ii, 246 — crystals (ox- 
alate of lime), xxxvii, 32 — amount of 
tannin, Bowman, xli, 195. 

RIND of fruit, amount of tannin, Bow- 
man, xli, 195 — Stenhouse, xxxiv, 254. 

GRANULATED powders. Skinner (W. & 
B., 1305, note), xxxiv, 324. 

. Compare Magnesia citras, Granu- 

LATUS. 

GRANULES, preparation, Agnew, xlii, 
270— Archibald, xxxix, 199. 

ACONiTi^, Baumont, xxxi, 21. 

ATROPi^:, Beaumont, xxxi, 21. 

BISMUTHI SUBNITRATIS, Mcutcl, XXX, 

402. 

CONINE, Baumont, xxxi, 21. 

digitaliNyE, Baumont, xxxi, 21. 

strychniyE, Baumont, xxxi, 21. 

VERATRi^:, Baumont, xxxi, 21. 

GRANVILLE'S lotion, xi, 274. 

GRAPES, culture in Ohio, Rehfuss, xxvi, 
399 — disease (pentasulphide of calci- 
um), Price, xxvi, 76 — extraction of 
juice, Richter (centrifugal power), 
xxxvii, 395 — contain rubidium., Gran- 
deau, xxxiv, 440 — preservation (cot- 
ton). Ranch, xxxvi, 64. 

LEAVES as moxa, viii, 348. 

• seed, contain fixed oil and tannin^ 

Wagner, xxxiv, 89. 

SUGAR. See Glucose. 

vine contains lactic acid, Wittstein, 

xxix, 311. 

GRAPHIS sulcata, moss on ashy Crown 
bark, xlii, 449. 

GRAPHITES, adulteration (coal), xi, 169 
— behavior to fused chlorate of potas- 
sa, Boettger, xxx, 69 — fo7-med by ex- 
posing iron to sea-water, Eudes, x, 
81 — contains sometimes manganese, 
Bosttger, xxx, 69 — origin, Haidinger 
and others, xxxvi, 456. 

in California, xl, 355. 

GRASS for paper-making, xxviii, 170 — 
for coloring ointment of stramo- 
nium, Procter, jr., xxiv, 219. 

GRATIOLA AURBA, as emetic, iv, 284 — as 
cathartic, v, 209. 

latifolia, xxviii, 72. 

officinalis, analysis, Vauquelin, xvii, 

281— Walz (W, &B., 1523), xxxi, 340 
— as cathartic, v, 209 — chemical his- 
tory, Marchand, xvii, 281 — as emetic, 
iv, 284 — saponaceous principle, Mayer, 
xxxv, 300. 



PREPAEATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



GRATIOLA PUBESCENS, xxviii, 12. 
GRATIOLACRIN, Walz (W. & B., 1523), 
xxxi 341 

GRATIOLIN, Marchand, xvii, 285— Walz 

(W. & B., 1523), xxxi, 340. 
GRATIOSOLETIN, Walz, xxxi, 341. 
GRATIOSOLERBTIN, Walz, xxxi, 341. ' 
GR4TI0S0LIN, Walz (W. & B., 1523), 

xxxi, 341. 

GRAVEL, deodorizing and disinfecting 
properties, Sutherland, xxvii, 518. 

GRAVITY, SPECIFIC. See Specific grav- 
ity. 

GRAY dye on silk, Robiquet (chloride of 

silver), iv, 173. 
GREASE. See Fat; Lard; Pomatum. 

, Bear's, Piesse, xxviii, 1V8. 

. PURIFICATION, Wiggin (melt with 

sulphuric acid), xxv, 461. Compare 

Fat ; Lard. 
, LUBRICATING, Scrbat (from resin oil 

and lime), xxv, 124, 125. 
GREAVES, yield of prussiate of potash. 

Smith, XX, U2. 
GREEN, ANILIN-, xxxvii, 342. 

for Confectioners, XXXV, 180. 

color from China, Persoz, xxv, 176. 

dye from Grass, Schlumberger, xxx, 

271. 

from Quercitrin, Hlasiwetz, xxxii, 

444. 

quinine- (dalleochine, Parrish, 643), 

xxxiii, 407. 

dye from bark of Rhamnus catharti- 

cus, Charvin, xxxiii, 378. 

, Scheele's, antidote (hydrated perox- 
ide of iron), Spaeth, xii, improved^ 
Braconnot (contains acetate of cop- 
per), ii, 252 — preparation^ ii, 252 — sub- 
stituted by borate of copper, Bolley, 
XXXV, 313. 

SciiWEiNPURT, Creuzburg, ii, 308 — 

Ehrmann, x. 263. 

SAND. See Marl. 

color of WATER of the Delaware and 

Chesapeake canal, Durand, iii, 276. 

, Vienna-, Ehrmann, x, 263. 

GREGORY'S powder, xxx, 93. 
GRENADINE, Latour de Trie. See Gran- 

ADINE. 

GRIMMIA MARiTiMA, contains iodine, xxvi, 
439. 

GRINDELIA hirsutula, antidote to poi- 
son-oak, Canfield (W. & B., 838), 

xxxii, 414. 

GRINDING apparatus, Goodell, xxvi, 13. 

of drugs, Redwood, xxi, 19. Com- 
pare Drugs, powdering. 

GROSSULIN, Guibourt, iv, 153. 

GROUND-NUT. See Araciiis hypog^^a. 

GUACINE, Faure, viii, 247. 

GUACO, analysis^ Faure, viii, 245 — medical 
properties, ix, 86 — Simmonds, xxiii, 
346. 



GUAIACOLE, xxviii, 231. 
GUAIACUM aprum, vii, 115. 

, female (false guaiacum from Cuba); 

vii, 259. 

WOOD, adulteration, ii, 247— Hurault, 

xxv, 21^— analysis, Trommsdorflf (W. 
& B., 428). iv, 83— crystals in bark 
(oxalate of lime), Fliickiger, xxxvi, 
110; xxxvii, 31— (benzoic acid), Gui- 
bourt, xxxvii, 31— (sulphate of lime), 
Berg, xxxii, 47 ; xxxvii, 31 —false 
(from Bignonia leucoxylon), vii, 259. 

charcoal, absorption of ammonia 

and carbonic acid, Smith, xxxv, 563. 

RESIN, action of tincture on different 

vegetable grains, etc., Van der Broek 
(W. & B., 429, 430), xxiii, IS5— be- 
havior to camphor, Planche (W. & B., 
195, note), x, 214— behavior to oxide 
of copper, Schaer, xl, 394— yields ere- 
asote, Righini, viii, 11 ^—crystallized, 
Hlasiwetz (W. & B. 430), xxxii, 247, 
445_as test for feeble electric current, 
Osann, xviii, 317— entitled to entry, 
xxv, 302— and liquor potassse, xxxvii, 
305— in mixtures, Githens, xxxiii, 204 
— products of distillation, Deville and 
Pelletier, xv, Q1— solubility in chloro- 
form, Lepage, xxiv, 147— ^es^ (inside 
paring of raw potato), Ph. Britanni- 
ca (64), xxxvi, 286. 

GUAIACYLE, Deville, xvi, 196. 

GUANO, analysis, Marchand, xvii, 135. 

GUARAHEM, xvii, 84. 

GUARANA. Compare Paullinia. 

^ account of, xii, 340— Archer, xxxv, 

551_Carpon, xvii, 83— Cooke, xlii, 
558— medical properties, Gavrelle, xii, 
206 — contains tannate of caffein, Des- 
chasteles, xiii, 53— yield of theine, 
Stenhouse (W. & B., 1578), xxix, 68 
— preparations, xii, 208 ; xiii, 54. 

GUARANIA, Batka, xvii, 84— Martins ; 
Troramsdorff, xii, 340. 

GUIBOURT versus Mutis, xxvi, 52 ; xxix, 
37. 

GUINEA grains. See Grains op Para- 
dise. 

GUMS, composition, Fremy (W. & B., 10, 
note), xxxii, 366— Guerin, iv, 158, 
160; 164— of commerce, Simmonds, 
xxix, 71, 134, 225, 377, 465-Gui- 
bourt, vi, 42— Vaughan, xxv, 148 — 
yield of mucic acid, Guerin, iv, 165. 

GUM ACARoiDBS (Black boy ; Botany bay ; 
Yellow gum), presented to College 
of Pharmacy, xvl, 309— account, Sim- 
monds, xxix, 226, 227 ; xxxviii, 465 — 
Griffith, vii, 189. 

ALMONDS, composition and yield of 

mucic acid, Guerin, iv, 164, 165. 

ammoniac. See Ammoniacum. 

ANGico (from Acacia jurema), Car- 
son, xvii, 81. 



112 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



GUM ANiMB. See Anime. 

APRICOT, composition and yield of 

mucic acid, Guerin, iv, 164, 165. 

ARABIC, behavior to Lieben's iodoform 

test, Hager, xlii, 399 — to water at 
elevated temperatures, Loew, xxxix, 
335 — bleaching^ Picciotto (sulphurous 
acid gas, W. & B., 12, note), xxi, 321 
— (gelatinous alumina), xxxix, 219 — 
collectio7ij Simmonds, xxix, 76 — cow/po- 
sition^ Fliickiger, xli, 441 — detection of 
dextrin, xix. 286 — of gum senaar, 
Schlosser, xli, 419 — in dialyser, Gra- 
ham, xxxiv, 315 — powdering, its effect, 
Dorvault, xxv, 80 — loss, i, 138 ; Covell, 
xxxix, 116; Redwood, xxi, 31 — puri- 
rification, see bleaching — soluble trans- 
formed into insoluble, Gelis (W. & 
B., 10, note), xxix, 364 — solubility in 
diluted alcohol, Laidley, xxvi, 103, 
note — in glycerin, Cap and Garot, 
xxvii, 160— Gros-Renaud, xxxiii. 111 
— Vogel, xli, 16 — test, Lassaigne (per- 
sulphate of iron), xxiv, 79. 

from Aden, Vaughan, xxv, 148 

— from Australia, Simmonds, xxix, 
78 — from Cape, Simmonds, xxix, 74. 

, Barbary, Simmonds, xxix, 74. 

, Berbbra, Simmonds, xxix, 75 

— Vaughan, xxv, 148. 

, Felick, Simmonds, xxix, 75 — 

Vaughan, xxv, 148. 

Zeila, Simmonds, xxix, 75 — 

Vaughan, xxv, 148. 

AssAF(ETiDA. See Assafcetida. 

, artificial. See Dextrin. 

BALLS, falsification, Ch evallier, xli, 1 6. 

Bassorah, Guibourt (W. & B., 1470), 

vi, 47 — composition and yield of mu- 
cic acid, Guerin, iv, 164, 165. 

bdellium. See Bdellium. 

BENZOES. See Benzoes. 

Black boy. See Gum acaroides. 

Booraga (from Borabax malabri- 

cum), Simmonds, xxix, 79. 

Botany bay. See Gum acaroides. 

camphor. See Camphor. 

caramania, Procter, jr. (W. & B., 

1485). xxxvii, 105. 

, CHERRY', composition and yield of 

mucic acid, Guerin, iv, 164, 165 — 
product of decomposition of cells, 
Kiitzing (W. & B., 9, note), xxv, 38. 

COPAL. See Copal. 

Dammar. See Dammar. 

DiRisANi (from Acacia sirissa), Sim- 
monds, xxix, 79. 

Elemi. See Elemi. 

EuPHORBiUM. See Euphorbium. 

fungus, Kiitzing, xxv, 38. 

Galbanum. See Galbanum. 

Gambir. See Catechu. 

, grass-tree. See Gum acaroides. 

Guaiac. See Guaiacum. 



gutta. See Gamboge. 

, Hog (from Rhus metopium), viii, 

104 — Hamilton, xviii, 44, 

HoTAi, Vaughan, xxv, 151 — Han- 
bury, xxv, 151, note. 

Kauri. See Gum Kowrib. 

Keekur (from Vachillia farnesiana), 

Simmonds, xxix, 79. » 

Kino. See Kino. 

KuTERA, Martius (is Basora-gum), 

vi, 47. 

lacca. See Lacca ; Shellac. 

LiGNiRODE, Guibourt, vi, 49. 

Maguey (from Agave americana), 

Guibourt, xxxviii, 503. 

mesquite, analysis, Morfit, xxvii, 223 

— description and properties, Gui- 
bourt, xxxviii, 503 — Procter, jr. (W, 
& B., 1557), xxvii, 14, 223— Sim- 
monds, xxix, 78. 

mimos^]. See Gum Arabic. 

mineral (n= water-glass), xxx, 336. 

myrrh. See Myrrha. 

nopal, Guibourt, xxxviii, 503. 

, patent. Hunt, xxx, 272. 

, peach, composition and yield of 

mucic acid, Guerin, iv, 164, 165. 

, PERUVIAN, xli, 23. 

, PLUM, composition and yield of mu- 
cic acid, Guerin iv, 164, 165 — is a 
product of decomposition of cells, 
Kiitzing (W. & B., 9, note), xxv, 38. 

, Rhamnin, Stein, xli, 331. 

Rhus metopii, viii, 104 — Hamilton, 

xviii, 44. 

Sassa, Guibourt vi, 42, 46. 

senaar, distinction from gum arable, 

Schlosser, xli, 419. 

Senegal, adulteration (Bdellium), ii, 

247 — composition and yield of mucic 
acid, Guerin, iv, 164, 165 — origin, 
Guillemin, v, 348. 

, SWEET, xxxviii, 33. See Liquidam- 

bar styraciplua ; Styrax. 

Sonora, Guibourt, xxxviii, 503. 

Tragacanth. See Tragacanth. 

WAX, xxviii, 413; xxxviii, 36. See 

Liquidambar styraciplua ; Styrax. 

, YELLOW. See Gum acaroides. 

GUMMIFERA arabica yields tragacanth, 
xxix, 79. 

GUM RESINS of commerce, Simmonds, 
xxix, 71, 134, 225, 377, AQb— behavior 
to camphor, Planche (W. & B., 195, 
note), X, 212 — to nitric acid, Kopp, 
XX, 121, note — to various solvents, 
Sacc, xlii, 242 — emulsion, Constantin 
(W. & B., 902), xxvii, 61— entitled to 

entry, xxiv, 24 in liquor fotassse, 

xxxvii, 304 — in mixtures (with fixed 
oil), xxv, 270 — purification, Lamotho 
(water and oil of turpentine), xvi, 
297 — Mouchon (water and alcohol), 

vii, 49. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 11^ 



GUM. Compare Gums ; Resins. 

GUN COTTON, awmowzceca^^oZw^ww, proper- 
ties, Bechamp, xxv, 159 — behavior to 
heat, Pelouze and Maurey, xxxvii, 
221 — to permanganate of potassa, 
Cloez and Guignet, xxxi, 152 — for 
blasting^ xli, 169 — composition and na- 
ture, Gladstone, xxv, 21 — Pelouze 
and Maurey, xxxvii, 220 — Porret and 
Teschemacher, xxix, 105 — Redtenba- 
cher and others, xxxvii, 38 — 'UOt to 
be kept in corA;-stoppered bottles, 
Beatson, xxv, 19 — spontaneous decom- 
position^ Beatson (W. & B., 1525), 
xxv, 19 — Bouet, xxxiv, 187 — Glad- 
stone, xxv, 20, note Hoffmann, 

xxxii, 312 — de Luca, xxxiv, 401 — 
Procter, jr., xxv, 20, note — Tustin, 

xxv, 20, note electric properties, 

Johnson, xxxvi, 268; xxxvii, 293 — as 
filter for acids, Boettger, xxxii, 449 — 
deprived of mo25/M/'e, Cutting, xxvii, 551 
— preparation (compare Collodion), 
Lenk, xxxvii, 36 — Mann, xxv, 529 — 
Mialhe, xxi, 42 — Pelouze and Maurey, 
xxxvii, 36, 224 — (small scale best), 

xxxiii, 222 — Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix, 
531 — (for collodion), xxxiii, 316. 

, NEW (soaked in chlorate of potassa 

solution), Caldwell, xxviii, 4. 

, with SOLUBLE GLASS, Lenk, xxxvii, 

37. 

, SOLUBLE, Bechamp (W. & B., 1528), 

xxv, 159 — Sutton, xxxvi, 20. 

GUNJAH, Duhamel (W. & B., 380), xv, 
252. See Ganjah. 

GUNPOWDER, Violette, xxv, 556. 

, AMMONIA, Jouglet, xlii, 432. 

, NON-BXPLOsivE, Gale, xxxvii, 478. 

, WHITE, Augendre, xxii, 277 — Hud- 
son, xxxiii, 512 — Pohl, xxxiii, 510. 

GURA NUTS, xxix, 181. See Kola nuts. 

GUTTAPERCHA, ctccoMW<,Simmonds,xxix, 



469 — Montgomery, xix, 137 — applica- 
tions^ Whishaw, xx, 318 — behavior to 
liquid carbonic acid. Gore, xxxiii, 
bleached (W. & B., 432, benzole 
and calcined gypsum), xxxvi, 18, 377 
— compositions^ Baumhauer (W. & B., 
432), xxxiii, 407 — McLagan, xviii, 131 
— its decay^ Highton, xxix, 557 — na- 
ture and properties^ McLagan, xviii, 
131 — Scott, xix, 141 — solubility^ Stor- 
er's Dictionary, xxxv, 574 — starch, 
Claussen, xxviii, 171 — substituted by 
oiled paper, MeGhie, xxxi, 272. 
, artificial, Claussen (starch, resin- 
ous substance and tannin), xxviii, 
171. 

caustic (chloride of zinc, W. & B., 

1279, note), Maunoury, xxviii, 115. 

MEMBRANE, ActOU (W. & B., 433), 

xxi, 286. 

■ TREES destroyed at Singapore, xxix, 

559. 

, WHITE, Baden Benger (from chloro- 
form solution by alcohol), xl, 542 ; 
xlii, 469. 

GUTTA TABAN, Simmonds, xxix, 469. 
GUTTJE Lamotte. See Tinctura Bbstu- 

CHEPP. 

NERVINE. See Tinctura Bestuchepf. 

GUY'S tests for alkaloids, xxxiii, 526. 

GYMNEMA sylvestris (destroys the pow- 
er of tasting sugar), Edgeworth, xx, 
153. 

TiNGENS, yields blue color, vi, 73. 

GYPSOPHILA struthium contains sapo- 
nin, xii, 215, note — BoUey, xxvii, 43. 

GYPSUM, granular, from Arkansas River, 

Procter, jr., xii, 108 induration, 

Abate, xxx, 84 — hardening, xxiii, 87 — 
in manufacture of sulphuric acid, 
Reinsch, xlii, 469 — solidification of 
raw, Emmet, v, 48. 

. Compare Calx, sulphate. 



HACHISH. See Hashish. 

HADSHY. See Hashish. 

HEMATOXYLIN, behavior to bichromate 
of potassa test, Jenkins, xxxiii, 528 — 
composition and properties, Erdmann 
(W. & B., 434), xxxi, 453. 

HiEMATOXYLON, See Logwood. 

HEMEROCALIS ligtu. See Alstrmcee- 
ria ligtu. 

HEMINE, Scriba, xxxiv, 331. 

HEMOSTATICS, Butler (tannin in acid, 
sulphur, aromatic), xxviii, 114 — Han- 
non (benzoic acid, alum, ergotine), 
xxvii, 108 — Laurence (perchloride of 
iron), xxxii, 333 — Monsel (tannin. 



alum), xxvii, 316 — Pagliari's (W. & 
B., 166), Sedillot, xxv, 272 (compare 
Aqua h^mostatica Pagliari) — Piaz- 
za (perchloride of iron and chloride 
of sodium), xxxvi, 269. 
-. Compare Hemorrhage ; Styp- 
tics. 

HAHNEMANN'S liquor probatorius, i, 
57, note. 

SOLUBLE mercury. See Mercurius. 

HAIR, analysis, Bibra, xxix, 147 — color 
due to structure, Bibra, xxix, 147 — - 
falling off prevented, see Pomatum, 
etc. — percentage of sulphur, Bibra, 
xxix, 148. 



114 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



HAIR COLORING, Egyptian (contains hypo- 
sulphite of lead), xlii, 300. 

DRESSING, XXix, 184. 

DYE, blacky McCall Anderson, xli, 172 

— Grueling, viii, 260 — Piesse, xxviii, 
268, 270 — Turkish, xxviii, 268 — 
Twigg's, XXV, 188 — vegetable, Piesse, 
xxviii, 269 — brown, McDonald, xlii, 
227, 300 — French, Piesse, xxviii, 270. 

. See Liniment, Forestieri ; 

Pasta Ambrose Pare ; Pasta zimari. 

OIL, benzoin, Piesse, xxviii, 177. 

, crystalline; Piesse, xxviii, 178. 

, tonquin, Piesse, xxviii, 177. 

, vanilla, Piesse, xxviii, 178. 

See HuiLE. 

regenerator, Pearson ^ Go. ; , 

Tebbett — composition, Chandler, xlii, 
363, 365. 

RENEWBR, Hall's Sicilian, composi- 
tion, Chandler, xlii, 365. 

restorative, GlarKs distilled; , 

Gray^s ; , Hiawatha ; , Sing- 
ers ; Martha Washington^ s ; , 

Wood's — composition. Chandler, xlii, 
362-365. 

restorer, Allen's; of America, 

composition. Chandler, xlii, 363,364. 

TONiQiiE, Indian, Knittel's, composi- 
tion, Chandler, xlii, 365. 

VIGOR, Ayer's, composition, Chand- 
ler, xlii, 365. 

WASH (arnica), xxxiii, 473 — (cantha- 

rides and glycerin), xl, 523. 

HALICORE. See Dugong. 

HALYDRYS siliquosa, xxii, 338, 

HAMAMELIS virginiana, as tonic, v, 286 
— amount of tannin, Bowman, xli, 
194. 

HANCORNIA speciosa, yields caoutchouc, 
Claussen, xxvii, 542. 

HANDLES, KNIFE-, cement, xlii, 469. 

HAOFASH (bark in diarrhoea), xli, 31. 

HARVARD UNIVERSITY, herbarium, Asa 
Gray's donation, xxxvii, 300. 

HASHISCIN, Laneau (W. & B., 381), 
xxviii, 361. 

HASHISH, effects and properties. Aubert, 
xiii, 75 — Landerer, xvi, 147. 

BASTING'S naphtha. See Naphtha. 

HATS, Panama, cleaned, xxiv, 175 — man- 
ufacture, Seemann, xxiv, 175, 

HAUSTUS PBCTORALIS INCITANS, Ph. Ba- 
tav. (1805), ii, 109, 110. 

HAUTLE (animal bread of Mexico), Gue- 
rin, xxxi, 74. 

HAY, yield of oxalic acid by potassa, Pos- 
soz, XXX, 552. 

HEAT, absorption, influenced by colors. 
Stark, vi, 69 — source of animal, Frank- 
laud, xxxix, 32 as disinfectant, 

Crookes, xxxviii, 427 — developed in 
certain flowers, vi, 266 — by fungi, Du- 
trochet, xlii, 523. 



. See Temperature, high. 

HEATING stoneware vessels, Coffey (par- 
affin bath), xlii, 463. 
HEART, action of assafoetida, camphor, 
digitalis, senega, Lombard, ix, 
261. 

HEBBAKHADE, gum resin from Aden, 

Vaughan, xxv, 150. 
HEBERDEN'S ink, Ph. Dublin (26) (Mis- 

tura ferri aromatica), ii, 336. 
HEBRADENDRON, ix, 133. 

, CAMBOGioiDES, Xlii, 30; XX, 127; 

xxiii, 44 ; xxxvii, 152. 

ELLiPTicuM, xiii, 30. 

. Compare Garcinia ; Gamboge. 

HEDERA "HELIX yields kinone, Stenhouse, 
xxvi, 252. 

HEDERINE, Vandamme and Chevallier 

(W. & B., 1526), xiii, 172. 
HEDGEHOG is poison proof, xxx, 183. 
PIEDYS ARUM alhagi yields Persian man- 
na (W. & B., 533), ix, 199. 
HELENIN, Delflfs (W. & B., 467), xxiii, 82. 

Compare Inulin. 
HELENIUM autumnalb, Guibourt, xxxviii, 
502. 

HELIANTHUS annuus, analysis of seeds, 

Kromayer and Ludwig, xxxii, 135. 
HELIOCARPUS copallifera, Guibourt, 

xxxviii, 503. 
HELIOTROPE in perfumery, Piesse, xxvi, 
369. 

HELLEBORES, dehiscence of pollen, Al- 

dridge, xiii, 216. 
HELLEBOREIN, xxxviii, 245. 
HELLEBORIN, xx, 166— preparation and 
properties, Bastick (W. & B., 438), 
xxv, 145 — is a salt of potassa, Aber- 
nethy, xxxiii, 301 — properties, Marm^ 
and Husemann, xxxviii, 245. 
HELLEBORUS, active principles, Marm6 
and Husemann, xxxviii, 245 — relative 
value of different species, Schroff, 
xxxiii, 426. 

ALBus. See Veratrum album. 

FoeTiDUS, as cathartic, v, 205— de- 
scription, Walpers, xxiv, 229. 

NIGER, adulteration, AValpers, xxiv, 

227 — analysis, Vanquelin ; FeneuUe 
and Capron (W. & B., 438), xx, 166 
— description, Carson, xx, 161 — Wal- 
pers, xxiv, 227. 

ORiENTALis, xxxiii, 427. 

PONTicus, xxxiii, 427. 

PURPURESCENS, xxxiii, 427. 

viRiDis. See Veratrum viride. 

HELMINTOCHORTON. See Sph^rococ- 

CUS HELMINTOCHORTON. 

HELONIAS ASPHODELoiDES is Xerophyl- 

lum setifolium, xi, 183. 
DioicA as cathartic, v, 290 — as emet- 
ic, iv, 285. 

HELVELLA esculenta, poisoning. Ham- 
burger, xxix, 111. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS- 



115 



HEMIDESMUS indicus, v, 259— descrip- 
^ tion and properties, Bell (W. & B,, 

439), XV, 298. 
HEMIHEDRITY, correlation with rotary 

(polarizing) power, Pasteur, xxxir, 1. 
HEMLOCK timber^ durable when moist, 

Smith, xxxiv, S'?'? — resin, collection, 

Stearns, xxxi, 29. Compare Abies 

CANADENSIS. 

HEMORRHAGE (oil erigeron), Wilson, 
xxviii, 18. Compare Haemostatics. 

HEMP for paper making, xxviii, 169. 

HENNA, analysis, Abd-el-Aziz (W. & B., 
1546), XXXV, 177 — account, Berthe- 
rand, xxviii, 59. 

HENRICEA phaemacbarcha is,Gentiana 
chirayta, xii, 20. 

HEPTYLENE from coal tar, xxxiii, 41. 

HERACLEUM cordatum, source of Sici- 
lian angelica, vii, 282. 

LANATUM, use in epilepsy (W. & B., 

1527), vii, 281. 

PANACES ; SPONDYLIUM, vii, 281. 

HERAPATH'S salt. See Qum^ iodo- 

SULPHAS. 

HERAPATHITE, xxxiv, 419. 
HERBA SPIRALIS is Costus speciosus, v, 
321. 

HERBARIUM, drying of plants, Hooker, 
xxxii, 51 — Hunefeld, viii, 175 — Mot- 
ley, xxix, 561 — Reveil&Berjot (steari- 
nated sand), xxix, 163 — Wright, xxx, 
148 — gathering and preserving. Short, 
V, 218. 

MEDICAL, Allen, xlii, 575. 

PHARMACEUTICAL, Haubury, xxxviii, 

334. 

Harvard University (Asa Gray's 

donation), xxxviii, 300. 

ToRREY, xxxiii, 223. 

HERBS, dried, Lindsey, vi, 84 — preserved, 

Enz., xxxii, 556. 

Compare Plants ; Vegetables. 

HERRERIA sarsaparilla, xv, 278. 
HERRING pickle, analysis, Girardin & 

Marchand, xxxii, 316. 
HESPERIDIN discovered by Gaubius 

(1771), in old oil of orange flowers, 

iv, 261 — preparation, Cogswell (W. & 

B., 513), xxvi, 553 — de Vrij, xxxvii, 

478. 

HEUCHERA Americana, amount of tannin, 

Bowman, xli, 104. 
HEUDELOTIA africana, v, 350; xxvii, 

339. Compare Bdellium. 
HEVEA Guianensis yields caoutchouc, iii, 

292. Compare Caoutchouc. 
HEVEONE (by high temperature upon 

caoutchouc), Matthieu, xxxviii, 561. 
HEXYLENE from coal-tar, xxxiii, 41. 
HIAWATHA hair restorer, composition. 

Chandler, xlii, 362. 
HIBISCUS cannabinus, for paper making, 

xxvii, 41. 



esculentus, account della Sudda 

xxxii, 224 — seeds as coffee, viii, 20. 

SABDARiFFA for paper making, xxvii, 

41. 

HICKORY. See Carya. 
HIPPOCASTANE^, dehiscence of pollen, 

Aldridge, xiii, 216. 
HIPPOCASTANUS. See Aesculus. 
HIPPOGLOSSUM Valentinum is Globu- 
laria alypum (wild senna), xxix, 232. 
HIPPOMANES mancinella juice of fruit 

against cancer, vii, 262. 
HIRTELLA silicea, amount of silica in 
ashes of bark, Henrici, xxxv, 164. 

HIRUDO DECORA ; medicinalis, ir, 

265, 268. See Leeches. 
HOFFMAN'S anodyne. See Spiritus 

^^THEREUS COMPOSITUS. 

HOG-GALL. See Bile, hog. 
HOLCUS SACCHARATus, xxvii, 182. See 

Sorghum. 
HOLYHEAD blast, xxx, 277. 
HOMERIA coLLiNA, description and pois- 
onous properties, Pappe, xxiii, 361. 
HONEY, adulterations, Chevallier, xvi, 290 
—Colby, xl, 39— Stoddart, xl, 534— 

clarification, see Mel despumatum 

composition, Soubeiran (W. & B., 543), 
xxi, "i?)^— formation. Kraut, xxxvi, 112 
— Stoddart, xl, 529 — as protection for 
solution of iodide of iron, Procter, jr., 
xii, 16 — preservation, Enz. (Appert's 
method), xxxii, 554 — Koehnke, xix, 
229 — varieties, Koehnke, xix, 229. 

in California, xxxviii, 566. 

from Trebizond, Abbot, vi, 351. 

Compare Mel. 

HONEYSUCKLE, juice against stings of 

bees, Gumprecht, xxv, 213. 
HOOFS, yield of prussiate of potassa, xx, 
172 — percentage of sulphur, Bibra, 
xxix, 149, 

HOOPING cough. See Whooping cough. 
HOPS, analysis, Leroy, xiii, 65, 71 — vola- 
tile acid, Winkler, xxxiv, 331 — aspara- 
mid, Leroy, xiii, 69 — bitter, Lermer 
(W. & B., 449, note), xxxv, 540— 
curing, Tufts, xxxiii, 77 — use of ex- 
tract and volatile oil in manufacture 
of beer, Redtenbacher, xvi, 154 — oil 
(contains no sulphur and is not nar- 
cotic), Wagner, xxv, 442— stems for 
paper making, xlii, 318 — percolating 
with water, packing, Soubeiran, viii, » 
225 — amount of silica in leaves, Nes- 
bit, xxxv, 164 — substituted h J hoxwoodi 
in manufacture of beer, iv, 351 — de- 
tection of sulphur, Heidenreich (as 
sulphuretted hydrogen, W. & B., 448, 
note), xxviii, 350— Keinsch (metallic 
copper), xxxiv, 359 — Wagner (nitro- 
prusside of sodium, W. & B., 448, 
note), xxviii, 349— amount of tannin, 
Bowman, xli, 195— as tonic, v, 287. 



116 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



HOP GARDENS of Susscx, xxxix, 77. 

HORDEUM vuLGARE. See Barley. 

HORIA MACULATA, Burmeister, xxxvii, 269. 

HORN, colored red by proto- and binitrate 
of mercury, Lassaigne, iv, 175 — yield 
of oxalic acid by potassa, Possoz, xxx, 
552 — of prussiate of potassa, xx, 172 
— of sulphur, Bibra, xxix, 149. 

, DEERs', in Chinese Materia Medica, 

i, 151. 

HORNY substances, analysis, Bibra, xxix, 
147. 

HORSE, analysis of concretion frona the 
stomach, xviii, 93. 

HORSE-RADISH. See Armoracia. 

CHESTNUT. See Aesculus. 

HOSPITAL stewards (about rank and 
pay), xxxvii, 156, 398. 

HOTAI, gum from Aden^ xxv, 151. 

HOWARDIA caracasensis, xlii, 257. 

FEBRiPUGA, Weddell, xxvii, 447. 

HUANOCHINE, Erdmann (W. & B., 292, 
note), xxix, 553. 

HUCKLEBERRY, white, donation to cabi- 
net of College of Pharmacy, xxxi, 54. 

See Vacginium myrtillus. 

HUILE ANTIQUE, Piesse, xxviii, 180. See 
Hair oil. 

HTJMDLUS LUPULUS. See Hops — as tonic, 
V, 287. 

HUSSON, Eau medicinale. See Eau medi- 

CINALE . 

HYBANTHUS scandens, iii, 193. 
HYBRID Plants return to their parental 

form, Naudin, xxxvii, 341. 
HYDRACIDS action upon oxi-acids, Le- 

comte, XX, 78. 
HYDRANGEA arborbscens, analysis, 

Laidley (W. & B., 1529), xxiv, 13, 20. 
HYDRARGYRUM. Compare Mercury. 
(i) (Mercury). 

acetas, properties and behavior to 

various reagents. Bullock, xxxi, 265 
— in Keyser's pills, Garret, i, 73 — 
preparation, Vallee, i, 73. 

AMMONiATUM, behavior to excess of 

alkali, Kane, ix, 257 — to water, Kane, 
ix, 257 — composition, Kane (W. & B., 
1173), ix, 252, 256 — poisoning, see 
Mistakes, fatal — theory, Kane (W. 
& B., 1173), xii, 97. 

ammonio-iodide, Rammelsberg, xiii, 

90 — Reade, xxx, 58 — Ambrose Smith, 
xii, 272 ; xiii, 89. 

and bromine, Loewig, ii, 183. 

BiBROMiDUM, Ebcrt, xxxix, 107. 

BiCHLORiDUM. See Sublimate, cor- 
rosive. 

biniodidum. See Hydrargyri iodi- 

DUM RUBRUM. 

CHLORIDES, Kane, ix, 252. 

CHLORIDUM CORROSIVUM. ScB SUBLI- 
MATE, CORROSIVE. 

CHLORIDUM MITE. See Calomel. 



CHROMATE, dccomposed by oxalic 

acid, Slater, xxviii, 345. 

CUM CRETA, decomposition in Bombay, 

Haines (proposes calomel, starch, 
lampblack), xxxv, 232 — examination, 
Hamilton, xiv, 53 — Remington, xii, 
43— Squibb, xxix, 388. 
PREPARATION : Coxc; Hewson (by- 
shaking, W. & B., 1174), xxii, 316— 
Mettauer (starch), xxvi, 70 — Procter^ 
jr. (proposes glycerin), xii, 47 — Squibb 
(details of shaking process), xxix, 
Stewart (resin, W. & B., 1174), 
XV, 161 — (remarks by Lehman, xvi, 9 ; 
Procter, jr., xxii, 212) — Stoddart (re- 
commends shaking) xxviii, 161 — mer- 
cury 'separates when mixed with ox- 
gall. Turnpenny, xvii, 306. 

cyanidum, preparation, Chevallier 

(persulphate of mercury and ferrocy- 
anide of potassium), iv, 200; vi, 27— 
Ellis (red oxide of mercury and ferro- 
cyanide of iron), vi, 29— Ph. U. S. 
(30), vi, 24— Ph. Dublin (26), iii, 326; 
vi, 25— Ph. Gallica (28), vi, 26— 
Winkler (U. S. 60), vi, 26— importa- 
tion prohibited in Russia, xxxi, 483 — - 
solubility in glycerin, Adolphus, xxxix, 
150 — Klever, xlii, 222 — subliming tem- 
terature, Guy, xl, 249. 

depuratum, Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix,, 

314. Compare Mercury, purifica- 
tion. 

deuto-chloro-bromide, xxviii, 115. 

iodides [identity of both iodides), iv,. 

15, 122 — account, Duhamel, vi, 104 — 
decomposition. Rose, xxxvi, 264. 
lODiDUM FLAVUM, Constitution, Am- 
brose Smith, xii, 271 — preparation^ 
Duhamel, vi, 105; x, 278. 

lODIDUM RUBRUM, alcohoUc Solutloil,. 

properties, Schiff, (W. & B., 1164), 
xxxii, 442 — crystals, Inglis, viii, 83 — 
as paint, Heller, xvi, 155 — preparation: 
from nitrate, i, 75 — (with hot solu- 
tions), xxxi, 409 — Berthemot (dry 
process with alcohol) iii, 354 — Duha- 
mel (double decomposition from bi- 
chloride), vi, 106 — Dumas (dry, with 
alcohol), vi, 106— Henry (double 
decomposition from bichloride), i, 
205 — Squibb (dry, with alcohol), 
xxxi, 58 — solubility in alcohol. Cap 
and Garot, xxvii, 159 — in chloro- 
form ; fats, Barnes, xxvi, 83 — gly- 
cerin, Adolphus, xxxix, 150 — Cap and 
Garot, xxvii, 159 — oils; cod-liver oil ; 
pyroxylic spirit, Barnes, xxvi, 82, 83. 
Compare Hydrargyri periodidum. 

lODiDUM viRiDE, detection of biniodide, 

Squire (heating with anilin), xxxiv, 
439— on the color. Wood, xl, 337. 

preparation: Berthemot (dry, 

with alcohol), iii, 354 J vi, 105 — Boullay 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



117 



HYDRARGYRUM {Continued). 

(from acetate of mercury, double de- 
composition), vi, 104 — Boutigny (from 
calomel, W. & B., 1165), viii, 326— 
remarks by Berthemy, viii, 251 — by 
Bullock (W.& B., 1165), xxviii, 517 — 
by Canavan (W. & B., 1165), xxix, 9 
—by Maisch (W. & B.,' 1165), xxix, 11 
— Duhamel (from calomel), vi, 104 — 
Frederking (dry process ; product 
washed with solution of iodide of po- 
tassium), xxxix, 318 — Henry (double 
decomposition from the nitrate), i, 
204 — Reikher (dry, from biniodide), 
xxxix, 318 — Seeger (trom the acetate, 
W. & B., 1165), xxxi, 203— Squibb 
(particulars of process), xxxi, 57 — 
solubilitg in glycerin, Cap and Garot, 
xxrii, 159. 

lODO-CHLORiDE. See Calomel, iodide. 

LACTAS. See Hydrargybi proto 

LACTAS. 

NITRATE, action on nitrogenized bo- 
dies, Lassaigne, iv, 175 — crystallized^ 
Hutchinson, xli, 202 — color of eschar^ 
vii, 262 — preparation: Shakespeare, 
xxviii, 5 — (remarks by Procter, jr., 
xxviii, 6, note). Compare Unguentum 

HYDRARGYRI NITRATIS. 
NITRO-TANNATE. See UxGUENTUM HY- 
DRARGYRI NITRO-TAXNATIS. 

OLEATE, Jannel, xxxi, 415. 

OXALATE, explosive properties, Hart, 

xxxii, 416. 

~ OXIDES, Bullock (detection of small 

quantities in large bulk of organic 
matter), xxxi, 268 — Guibourt (denies 
the existence of two oxides), i, 214. 

oxiDULATUM NIGRUM, Ph. Helvetica, 

(65), xxxix, 314. 

oxiDUM ciNEREUM. See Mercurius 

SOLUBILIS HaHNEMANNI. 

PLAVDM, Pagenstecher, xxxix, 

262. 

NIGRUM, composition^ AUinson, 

jr., i, 81 — (does not, exist in blue mass 
and blue ointment), Allinson, jr., 
i, 101 — properties and 6e/iay/or to rea- 
gents. Bullock, xxxi, 268 — preparation: 
Bullock, xxxi, 268— Evans (W. & B., 
1 168, note), Prei. No. 35— Grifl&th, iv, 
200— Rattier (W. & B.. 1169, note), 
i, 218. 

RUBRUM, behavior to ammonia, 

Kane, ix, 259 — to reagents, Bullock, 
xxxi, 264 — nature, Attfield, xxxvii, 
367 — Maiihe, ix, 115 —preparation : 
Bullock, xxxi, 264— Griffith, iv, 251 
— Rattier, i, 219— in fine powder, Wie- 
gand (W. & B., 1168), xxx, 407— tem- 
perature of reduction by hydrogen, 
Muller, xli, 335 — in solid form, xxxv, 
276 — solubiiifg in water, Marchand . 
jc, 259— Wallace, xxx, 555. 



RUBRDM PER SE, Rattier, i, 220. 

PERIODIDE, i, 75. 

PERSULPHAS, Ph. Dublin (26), iii, 329. 

ET POTASS^ PROTOTARTBAS, Carbouell 

and Bravo, iii, 242. 

PROTOCHLORiDUM. See Calomel. 

PROTioDiDUM. See Hydrargyri iodi- 

DUM VIRIDB. 

PROTOLACTAS, Brlining, xxx, 423. 

PROTONiTRAS, Henry, i, 221 — Ph. Hel- 
vetica (65), xxxix, 314. 

PROTOSALTS, action on solution of 

salts, Fischer, iii, 265. 

ET QUININE PROTOCHLORIDUM, McDcr- 

raott, xvi, 156. 

SANTONAS, xxxii, 159. ■ 

sesquiodide. See Hydrargyri iodi- 

DUM FLAVUM. 

SOLUBLE, Hahnemann'. See Mercu- 
rius SOLUBILIS. 
SULPHAS. See Hydrargyri persul- 

PHAS: 

SULPHOCYA.NIDE, Proctcr, jr., xxxviii, 

61, 92, 99. 

sulphurato-stibiatum. Ph. Helvet- 
ica (65), xxxix, 314 — importation pro- 
hibited iu Russia, xxxi, 483. 

sulphurbtum, existence of two sul- 

phurets denied, Guibourt, i, 214. 

sulphurktum nigrum, Vogler, xxi^ 

271. 

SULPHUR etum RUBRUM. See Cinna- 
bar. 

zooticum. See Hydrargyri cyan'i- 

dum. 

HYDRASTIA, preparation, Durand, (W. 
& B., 457), xxiii, HQ— Merrill, xxxiv, 
308, 502 — (remarks by Procter, jr., 
xxxiv, 309, note; 497, note) — Perrins, 
xxxiv, 360 — Wayne, xxxiv, 497, note 
— properties, composition, etc., Mahla's 
(W. & B.,458), xxxiv. 141; xxxv, 433. 

HYDRASTIS canadensis, active princi- 
ples, Merrill, xxxiv, 308, 496— (re- 
marks by Procter, jr., xxxiv, 309, 
note ; 497, note) — analysis^ Durand 
(W. & B., 457) xxiii, 112, 118— con- 
tains berberia, Mahla, xxxiv, 141 — in 
inflammation of the eye, vi, 201 — as 
tonic, V, 285. ,< 

EIYDRAULIC limes, Kuhlman/f; xxvii, 
522. 

HYDRAULICITY of magnesia, Deville, 

xxxviii, ] 82 
IIYDRAZOCARBYL, Loewig. xxv, 380. 
HYDRILS, Lwwig, xxv, 381. 
FIVDROBENZAMIDK, Laurent, xvii, 239. 
FIYDROBENZOIN, Zinin, xxxv, 32. 
HYDROBRYORRTIN, Walz, xxxi, 251.- 
HYDROCARBONS, D. Smith, iv, 114. 
HYDROCARBON, aoktatk. See .Ether, 

acetic. 

BRNZOATE. See Mtheix, benzoic. 

bromidk. See Mtukk, bkomk;. 



C9l 



118 



HALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



HYDROCABBON chloride. See .Ethkr, 

CHLORIC. 

■ , HYDROCHLORATR. See JviHER, MURI- 
ATIC. 

HYPONITRITK. See ^i^THKR, NITROUS. 

iobir»E. See ^Ethkr, iodic. 

• SULPHATE. See jEtmer (sulphuric). 

suLi'HocYAXiDK. See vEther, sul- 

PHOOYA.MC, 

oxalatk. See -^Ether, oxalic. 

HYDRO(\\RBYLS, Loe\vig, xxv, 380. 

HYDROCAROTIX, Frorde and Soeaoer. 
xxxviii, 505. 

HYDROCIIINONE. See Hydrokinonk. 

HYDROCIIRYSAMID, xxx, 449. 

HYDROCOTYLE asiatica. id leprosy (W. 
& B., 1520), Boileau, xxvi, 222. 

HYDROGEN (nascent), action on aldehyd, 
Lorin. xxxv, 424 — behavior to organic 
compounds, Geuther, xxxiii,217 — de- 
odoriztd. Sten house, xxx, 260 — is a 
metal, Dumas, xvii. 22 ; Faraday, xvii, 
22, 123; Graham, xxxviii, 511; xli, 
144, 177 ; Hare, xv, 217, note ; Kane, 
XV, 217, note ; Lcew, xlii, 356 — occlu- 
xion b}-^ metal, Graham, xli, 144, 177 — 
passage through solid bodies, Louyet, 
xxi, 173 — fipecijic gravity ^ Davy; Thom- 
son; Berzelius: Gay-Lussac ; Exley, 
X, 342. 

AMALGAM. LoiW, xlii, 356. 

ANTiMOMURETTED, compare<l to ar- 

seniuretted, Simon, x, 217 — Dragen- 
dorflr, xxxix. 125. 

ARSEMUHET'i Ki>, Compared to antimo- 

niuretted, Simon, x, 217 — Drtigen- 
dorff. xxxix, 1 '2b—liquefaction^¥avA.(\Q.y. 
xvii, 22 — obatrvations, Rose, xiv, 152. 

, BicARBURETTKi), Faraday ( ~ ben- 
zole), xxvi, 337. 

, BICHLORIDE. Millon, xvii, 76. 

, CARBURKTTED, compounds, Daniel 

Smith, iv, 114. See ^Ethek com- 
pounds. 

GAS GBXKRATOR, Ullgren, xli, 297. 

and iROX, Klein, xlii, 560 — Deville 

and Troost, xxxvi, 326. 

LAMP, Doebereiner, xxxiv, 149. 

and PALLADIUM, Graham, xxxviii, 

511; xli, 144, 177. 

PEROXIDE. Schoenbein, xvii, 153 — in 

diabete,-;, Wheeler, xli, 409 — ethereal 
solution, Boettger, xxxiii, 114 — cbem- 
cal history, Wheeler, xli, 409 — quan- 
titative Wheeler, xli, 411. Com- 
pare Aqua oxygen at a. 

PERSULPHiDK, Hoifmann, xli, 238. 

PHOSPHURETTED (is a basc to be 

ranked with ammonia). Rose, y, 592 
— liquefaction, Faraday, xvii, 20. 

PHOSPHURETTED, UYDRIODATK, SCTUl- 

las, iv, 261. 

SBLEXIURETTED, actioii upou chloro- 

form, Loir, xxv, 118. 



— SULPHURETTED, portable ap2>aratusy 
Jicinsky, xli, 297, (see gtneralor) — 
behavior to nitric acid, Lecomte, xx, 
78 — action on chloroform, Loir, xxv, 
111— generator, Ullgren, xli, 297, (see 
apparatus) — liquefaction, Faraday, xvii^ 
20 — Kamp, viii, 261 — preservation in 
solution, Lepage (glycerin), xxxix^ 
368 — reaction, limits, Hastings, xiii, 
I 203, 204, 205 — removal from solutions,. 
I Rose (sulphate of iron), xxiii, 177 — 
i spontaneous evolution from sea water ^ 
Daniell, xiii, 254 — specific gravity, 
Thomson ; Gay-Lussac, x, 343 — sub- 
xtituted in analytical researches by 
hyposulphite of soda, Vohl, xxviii, 
i 466 — in tobacco smoke, Vogel and 
Reischauer, xxxi, 76. 

. Compare Sulphydrometer. 

HYDROGENIUM, density, Graham, xli^ 
179 — properties, Graham, xli, 179. See 
Hydrogex, a metal. 
HYDROGRATIOSOLERETIN, Wal/, xxxi, 
341. 

HYDRO-ISOCARBYLS, Lcewig, xxv, 378. 

HYDROKINuNE, Hoffmann, xxxv, 543. 

HYDROMETER, construction and gradu- 
ation. Pile, xxiv, 310— D. Smith, Prel. 
No. 10; ii, 9 — Thompson, xvi, 318. 

Baume, criticisms, Pemberton, xxiv, 1 

— D. Smith, ii, 286. 

official, Mead, xxviii, 209. Compare- 

Alcohol, specific gravity. 

. Compare Alcoholometer. 

HYDRO PHANE, artificial, Ebelmen, xvii,. 
318. 

HY'DROPHOBIA remedies: anagallis ar- 
vensis, Stoy, xxxi, 301 — Cetonia au- 
rata. Eulenburg, xxxi, 345. 

HYDROPOLYCARBYLS, Loewig, xxv, 
.378. 

HYDROQUINONE. See Hydrokinonk. 
HYDRORHODEORETIN, Kaiser, xvii, 26, 
27. 

HYDROSULPHUR, Ph. Helvetica (suU 
phuretted hydrogen), xxxix, 210. 

HY'GRINA (from Coca-leaves), Lessen 
(Parrish, 662), xxxiv, 407. 

HYMEN.EA courbaril." See Copal. 

MOSSAMBiciENsis, xxxviii, 256. See- 

Copal. 

HYMENODYCTION, De Candolle, ii, 293- 
Wood, iii, 24 — iiestivation, Don, xi, 
247. 

HYOSCYAMLi Z/M</v/or to iodide of cadmi- 
um and potassium, Marme. xli, 18 — 
crystallized, Kletzinsky, xxxix. 219. 

PREPARATION : Braudcs, vi, 83 — (shown 

to be a magnesia salt, Brault and 
Poggiale, vii, 221) — Geiger and Ilesse 
(W. & B., 460), vi, :n^—Runge, vii, 
221 — (shown to be a magnesia salt, 
Braultand Poggiale, vii, 222 j — Thoreij 
I (best from seeds), xlii, 324. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



119 



HY'OSCYAMIA properties, Tilden, xxxviii, 
527 — yield from extract, Jandous, 

xxxvii, 31 — yield from leaves, roots, 
stems, seeds, Thorey, xlii, 324 — 
Warren, xxxviii, 47, 48. 

xMALATE, XXXV, 222. 

HYOSCYAMUd agrestis, xiv, 308; xxiii, 
150. 

ALBUS, xlii, 324. 

NIGER. kSee Hyoscvamus, Leaves, &c. 

PALT^STRi.s, xxiii, 150. 

PALLinus, xiv, 308. 

liEAVEs, active principle, Tilden, 

xxxviii, 527 — amount before and af- 
ter lioweiing, Warren, xxxviii, 47 — 
liestroyed by caustic alkalies, Oarrod 
W. & B., 46*'l), XXX, 127, 228, 545— 
analysis, Braultand Poggiale, vii, 218 
— difference between annual and bien- 
nial, Houlton (W. <te B., 460), xiv, 
305; Uaher. xxxix, 557 — cultivaiion in 
Mitcham, xxiii, 150 — influence of 
dryiny, Schooubroodt, xli, 320 — com- 
parison of European and American, 
Jones, xxiv, 108 — amount of nilrate of 
potassa, Mahla (W & B., 460), xxxi, 
402 — -Tlioroy, xlii, '.VlA—nitrogenated 



compounds, Thorey, xlii, 323 — influ- 
ence of soil and cultivation, Warren, 
xxxviii, 52 — varieties^ Pereira, xiv, 
30 7. 

SEEDS, amount of active principle 

before and after flowering. Warren, 

xxxviii, 48. 
HYPERICACE.'E. dehiscence of pollen, 

Aldridge, xiii, 216, 
HYPERICUM kaccifkkcm; cayan- 

ENSE, sources of gamboge, xv, 129. 

PERFORATUM, aualysis, Blair, viii, 23'.. 

HYPEROXIDES, organic, Brodie, xxxiii,, 

113. 

HYPOOnLORITES. Millon (W. & B., 186. 

187), xi, 311. 
HYPOOHNUS RUBROciNCTDS on yellovsr 

bark, xi, 252. 
HYPODERMIC injections and toxicology j. 

Duffield, xxxix, 39. 
HYPOPHOSPHITES, preparation (W. k 

B., 1531), Procter, jr., xxx, 118— ia 

presence of alcohol, Bullock, xxXj. 

512 — and tuberculosis, Churchill, xxx,. 

143, 462. 
HYRACEUM, Pappe, xxiii, 373. 
HYRAX CAPBNSF8, xxiii, 373. 



I. 



ICE, coRpction, storage, distribution, ; 

Cummings, xl, 211 — density, Dufour, 

(VY. & B., 127), xxxiii, 379. 
ARTfFiciAL (ammonia), Carre, xxxiii, 

501 ; xxxv, 128; xlii, 102. Compare 

Freezing mixtures. 

MACHINE, Ohio, xxix, 183. 

SPRING in Rocky Mountains, Gibbs, 

XXV, 271. 

CAMPHOR-. See Camphor-ice. 

ICELAND MOSS. See Cetraria. 
ICHABOE resin, xxii, 151. 
ICHTHYLINE, Valenciennes and Fremy, 

xxvii, 376. 
ICHTHyOCOLLA. See Isinglass. 
ICIGA KUCARiBO, xvi, 232. CompareELEMi. 
ICTODES FOETiDus. See Dracontium 

FarriDUM. 

IGASURIA, Desnoix ( W. & B., 563) xxvi, 
31; xxxvi. 215 — (nine subalkaloids), 
Schiitzenberger ( W. k B., 563; Par- 
rish, 654), xxx, 534 — solubility in oil, 
Attfield. xxxv, 250. 

IGNATIA AMABA, analysis^ Caldwell (W. 
k B., 465), xxix, 294, 298— Jori, vii, 
2o8— assay, Mayer, xxxvi, 219 — against 
cholera in India, iii, 266. 

IGNITING POINT of vapors, Hutton, xli, 
252 — aj)paratu9, Hutton, xli, 255. 

ILEX A(,jurpoLiUM yields Kinone, Sten- 
house, xxvi, 252 — as tonic^ v, 288. 



cAssiXA, as emetic, iv, 282. 

DAHOON, as emetic, iv, 282. 

GONGONHA, as tea, iv, 251. 

OPACA, analysis of berries, and of 

leaves, Pancoast (W. & B., 1534), 

xxviii, 312, 315, 316. 
PARAGUAYENsis, account and use, 

Virey, iv, 250 — analysis, Lenoble, xxiii, 

182 — contains caffeo-tamiic acid, Roch- 

leder, xxi, 70 — yield of caffeina, Stahl- 

Bchmidt, xxxiv, 36. 

voMiTORiA, B.S cmetic, iv, 282. 

ILICIN, preparation, etc., Deleschamps, 

V, 174— Labourdais (W. k B., 1533), 

xxi, 89. 

ILICIUM FLORiDANUM, as tonic, v, 286. 
ILLUMINATION, electric, xxx, 87. 
IMPERATORINA identical with peuceda- 

nina, Wagner (W. k B., 1535), xxvii, 

165. 

IMPREGNATION, vegetable, Aldridge, 

xiii, 216. 
INAUGURAL THESES: 

AciDUM FORMicuM, E. R. Fell, xxx, 
218. 

sulpuo-carbolicum, T. 0. Guy, 

xlii, 209. 

TANNicuM, quantitative estima- 
tion, H. K. Bowman, xli, 193. 

Anagallis ARVENSis, J. A. Heint'/el- 
mann, xxxi, 29^. 



120 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



INAUGURAL THESES [Continued). 

AxBMONE LUDOviciANA, A. AV. Miller, 

xxxiv, 300. 
Anthemis cotula, W. II. Warner, 

XXX, 388. 

Aristolochia reticulata, Th.S.Wie- 

gand, xvi, 10. 
Arum trtphyllum, D. S. Jones, xv, 81. 
Asarum canadense, R. Rushton, x, 

ISI. 

Asclepias TUBEROSUM, E. Rhoads, 

xxxiii, 492. 

Baptisia tinctoria, L. Smedley, 

xxxiv, 310. 

Bromine, American, G. W. Patrick, 
xviii, 95, 

BucHU, H. N. Rittenhouse, xxiv, 484. 
Calamina, F. Briugburst, xxix, 305. 
Calomel and its adulteratio s, 

Hart, vii, 7. 
Cantharis vesicatokia. R. C. Davis, 

xvi, 81. 

viTTATA, etc., W. R. Warner, 

xxviii, 193. 
Capsicum annuum, F. V. Heidenreich, 

XXX, 296— D. Preston, xxxvii, 161 

— H. B. Taylor, xxlx, 303. 
Carypha pumos, it. Fritzsch, xxxii, 

213. 

CassiaI marylandica, E. L. Perot, 
xxvii, 300— J. J. Martin, vii, 19. 

Catalpa bignonoideS; E. a. Ran, 
xlii, 204. 

Caulophyllum tiialictroides, a. E. 

Ebert, xxxvi, 203. 
Cerasus serotixa, F. a. Figueroa, 

XXX, 304. 

Chimaphila umbellata. S. Fairbank, 

xxxii, 254, 

Chlorodyne, E. Mclnall, jr., xl, 209. 
Chrysanthemum parthenium, W. E. 

Knight, x, 200. 
CicuTA maculata, J. E. Young, xxvii, 

289. 

CiMIClFDGA RACEMOSA, G. H. Davis, 

xxxiii, 391 — J. S. Jones, xv, 1 — 
J. H. Tilghman, vi, 14. 

Colchicia, J. E. Carter, xxx, 205. 
Collodion, 0. G. Sherman, xxx, 212. 
Convolvulus panduratus, W. Shinn, 
xi, 177. 

CoRNus FLORIDA, J. Cockburn, jr., vii, 
109. 

CoRYDALis FORMOSA, W. T. Wenzell, 

xxvii, 205. 
Cryolite, S. F. Simes, xl, 193. 
CucuMis citrullus, B. Ritter, xii, 89. 
CuNiLA MARIANA, Ph. Milleman,xxxviii, 

495. 

Cypripedium pubbscens, H. C. Blair, 
""t:; xxxviii, 494. 
Daturia, S. Simes, v, 114. 
Delphinium consolida, Th. C. Hop- 
kins, x4, 1. 



Digitalis, W. J. Welding, v, 89. 
DiosPYROS virginiana, J. E. Bryan, 

xxxii, 215 — B. R. Smith, xviii. 
161. 

Emplastrum ARNicyE, F. C. Orth, 
xxxvii, 246. 

PLUMBi, N. Sp, Thomas, xix, 172. 

Ergota, T. R. Baker, xxiv, 94. 

of Indian corn, C. H. Cressler, 

xxxiii, 306. 

EUONYMUS atropurpureus, W. P. Clo- 

thier, xxxiii, 490. 
and americanus, O.A. 

Santos, XX, 81. 
Eupatorium perfoliatum, M. H.Bick- 

ley, xxvi, 495 — W. Peterson, 

xxiii, 2G6. 
Ferri nitras, Th. Lancaster, xxvi, 

400. 

PHOSPHAS, E. Ileydenreich, xxxiii, 

294. 

suBCARBONAS, T. A. Rex, xxxiv, 

193. Compare Iron ; Monsel's 

SALT. 

Fluidextractum pEPONis, Ch. Hand, 
xli, 195. 

. SERPENTARi.t;. J. C. Savery, xxiii, 

119. 

VALERIANAE, E. T. ElHs, xix, 83. 

Formula of U. 8. Ph., G. A. Gross, 

xxxvai. 249. 
Frazera Walteri, I. W. Douglass, 

xii, 177 — W. R. Higinbothom, 

xxxiv, 23 — Frk. W. Thomas, xl, 
309. 

Galipea officinalis, Th. J. Husband, 
V, 202. 

Gelseminum sExMpervirens, Ily. Kol- 
lock, xxvii, 197. 

GiLLENIA TRIFOLIATA, J. L. LembCT- 

ger ; D. Lewis ; J. H. Rush, xxvi, 

49©— Ch. S. Shreeve, vii, 28— 

W. B. Stanhope, xxviii, 200— J. 

Wyeth, xxvi, 490. 
Glycerin, S. E. Shinn, xxii. 124 — H. 

Stevens, xxv, 289. 
Gossypium herbaceum, R. Battey, 

xxviii, 401. 
Hydrargyri cyanidum, W. Ellis, vi. 

24. 

NITRAS CRYSTALLISATDS, H. Hut- 

chinson, xli, 202. 
Hydrastis canadensis, A. A. B. Du- 

rand, xxiii, 112. 
Hypericum perfoliatum, H. C. Blair, 

viii, 23. 

Ignatia amara, J. M. Caldwell, xxix. 
294. 

Ilex opaca, berries and leaves, D. P. 

Pancoast, xxviii, 312. 
Iodine and its combinations, A. Du- 

hamel, vi, 101. 
, its preparation and compounds, 

W. R. Fisher, i, 87. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



121 



INAUGURAL THESES {Continued). 

Iron and albumen, E. R. Smith, xxxv, 
209. 

Iron preparations, J. Hopkins, viii, 
95. Compare Ferrum ; Monsel's 

SALT. 

Jalapa, resin and aqueous extract, J. 

0. Long, xxxiii, 487. 
Jdniperus sabina, C. H. Needles, xiii, 

11. 

viRGiNiANA, W. J. Jenks, xiv, 

230. 

Kalmia LATiFOLiA, Ch. BuUock, XX, 
260. 

LiQDIDAMBAR STYRACIFLUA, W. P. 

Creecy, xxxii, 197. 
Liquor magnesia citratis, Ch. M. 

Allaire, xxxix, 196. 
Lobelia inflatAjW. Procter, jr., ix, 89. 
Magnesia calcinata ponderosa, Th. 

H. Barr, xxvi, 193. 
Magnolia glalca, VV, D. Harrison, 

xxxiv, 29. 

Marrubium vulgare, J. A. McMaken, 
xvii, 1. 

Matias bark, F. B. Dancy, xxix, 215. 
Matico, J. L Stell, xxx, 392. 
Measuring worm, A. Shryock, xl, 305. 
MiSTURA neutralis, J. Goodyear, ix, 
189. 

Monsel's salt, H. Peck, xxxiv, 201. 
Myrica cerifera, G. M. Hambright, 

xxxv, 193. 

Narcotic plants, A.Jones, xxiv, 196, 
Nickel salts, J. Broughton, xxvi, 402. 
Nicotin, J. C. Turnpenny, v, 198. 
Oledm arachis nYvoGMM, J. Winter, 

xxxii, 292. 

GOSSYPii, W. H. Weatherly, 

xxxiii, 208. 

MONARD,® (stearopten), Ch. T. j 

Bonsall, xxv, 200. 

MoRRHUyK, E. H. Robinson, xxvi, 1. 

Opium, Egyptian, J. Evans, jr., rii, 1. 

OXYCOCCUS MACROCARPUS, G. W. El- 

dridge, xxxv, 205. 
Pepo, B.G. Dosch, xlii, 200. 
Pharmacy, extemporaneous, W. H. 

H. Githens, xxxiii, 203— Th. H. 

Powers, V, 99. 
Pharmaceutical preparations, J. 

Laidley, xxii, 118. 
Phbllandrium aquatioum, Ch.Frone- 

field, xxxii, 211. 
Phytolacca decandra, E. Donnelly, 

XV, 165. 

Pills, sugar-coated, H. C. Archi- 
bald, xxxix, 199. 

PoDOPHYLiiN, H. Allen, xxxi, 206 — 
J. W. Cadbury, xxx, 301. 

Podophyllum peltatum, Th. J. Hus- 
band, jr., xli, 200 — J. R, Lewis, 
xix, 165 — W. G. Parrish, xxxii, 
208. 



Polygala Senega, R. Price, viii, 92. 
PoPULUS tremuloides, L. Turnbull, 
xiv, 275. 

PoTASsii lODiDUM, B. F. Hoeckley, ix, 
109. 

Powders, physical character of offici- 
nal, CI. Parrish, xl, 205. 
Prunus VIRGINIANA, "F. A. Figucroa, 
xxx, 304— J. S. Perot, xxiv, 109 
— St. Procter, vi, 8. 
Ptblea trifoliata, G. M. Smyser, 

xxxiv, 198. 
QuERCiA, J. Scattergood, i, 97. 
Resinoids, G. M. Abernethy, xxxiii, 
299. 

Rhubarb stalks, tomatoes, quinces, 
acid of, Thos. A. Lancaster, xxxi, 
193. 

Rhus glabrum, W. J. Watson, xxv, 
193. 

Ricinus communis, Hy Bower, xxvi, 
207. 

, leaves, G. J. Scattergood, 

xxviii, 206. 
Sabina, C. H. Needles, xiii, 11. » 
Sanguinaria canadensis, CI. J. Lee, 

vii, 23 — Th. M. Newbold, xxxviii, 
496. 

Senna, R. Rau, xxxviii, 193. 
Senna, American, I. J. Martin, vii, 19 

— E. L. Perot, xxvii, 300. 
SoD^ bicarbonas, Fr. R. Smith, i, 93. 
SoLANUM dulcamara, J. W. Simcs, 

viii, 15. 

Spigelia marylandica, Th. Eastlack, 

jr., xvi, 18. 
Statice caroliniana, E. Parrish, xiv, 
111. 

Sugar and Syrupus, W. H. Pile, jr., 

xxxiii^ 197. 
Suppositories, S. P. Wright, xlii, 
197. 

Symplocabpus FCETiDus, J. M. Turner, 
viii, 1. 

Syrupus assapcetid^;, R. Peltz, xxiv, 
313. 

Syrupus tolu and syrupus zingibb- 

Ris, J. D. Finley, xxiii, 219. 
Unguentum hydrargyri, G. Pile, 
xxxviii, 200. 

nitratis, Th. J. Covell, xli, 

211. 

mezerri, R. B. Sheriden, xxxiv, 

392. 

Urtica dioica, B. Shoemaker, jr., 

xxxviii, 492. 
UvA URSi, J. C. C. Hughes, xix, 88. 
Veratrum viride, Th. R. Mitchell, ix, 
181 — J. G. Richardson, xxix, 204 
— Hy. W. Worthington, x, 89. 
ZiNci ACETAS, Ambrose Smith, vii, 14. 
INCENSE, Piesse, xxvii, 468. Compare 

Frankincense. 
INCH OF RAIN, e([uivalent, xxxvii. 311. 



122 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



INCOMBUSTIBILITY of various sub- 
stances, R. A. Smith (sulphate of 
ammonia), xxii, 83. 
INCRUSTATION in boilers prevented, 
Horsley (oxalate of potassa ; ammo- 
nia phosphate of soda), xxii, 257. 

INDENIGEN, xvii, 266. 

INDENOXIDE, xvii, 266. 

INDEX, GENERAL, to the twenty first vol- 
umes, Taylor, xxii, 286. 

INDIA, scientific mission, Schlagintweit 
Bros., XXX, 175. 

INDIA RUBBER. See Caoutchouc. 

INDIAN CORN, ergota, Cressler (W. & B., 
1623), xxxiii, 306— Roullin, ii, 85— 
Jecula, microscopically examined, Ras- 
pail, xi, 25, 28 — leaves^ in fever, Dow- 
ell (with tiie addition of quinia!), 
xxix, 314 — for paper -making^ xxxiii, 
232 — amount of siUca^ xxxv, 166 — 
sugar^ Pallas, viii, 262. 

INDIAN INK. See Ink, indian. 

INDIGO from Aden, Vaughan, xxv, 231. 

, analysis^ Dumas, ix, 265 — </5say, Mit- 

tentzwey (absorption of oxygen) 
xxxvi, 319 — Muller (grape sugar and 
potassa), xxxi, 570 — Runge (protox- 
ide of tin and potassa), xxxi, 571 — 
Wittstein (Berzelius' test most relia- 
ble : sulphate of iron and potassa), 
xxv, 223 — behavior to fused chlorate 
of potassa, Bfiettger, xxx, 71 — to ni- 
tric acid, Koene, xvii, 265 — constitution^ 
Ure, iii, 157 — decolorizing power, Fil- 
hol, xxiv, 239 — decolorized by hydro- 
sulphurous acid, Schiitzenberger, xlii, 
243 — by essential oils, Frederking, 
xxxii, 46 — Plummer, xxv, 399 — dye- 
ing, Leuchs (by turnips), xxxviii, 269 
— in epilepsy^ Ideler, viii, 86 — physio- 
logical properties, Roth, ix, 266 — pre- 
paration and properties, Ure, iii, 157 — 
solubility in naphthalin, Vohl, xli, 552. 

BLUE, iii, 160 — analysis, Crura ; Du- 
mas ; Ro'y^er ; Thomson; Ure, iii, 161. 

BROWN, iii, 160. 

, COPPER-. See Copper, blue. 

, Florida, xxvii, 473 ; xxviii. 370. 

GLUTEN, iii, 160. 

GREEN, Chevreuil, iii, 160. 

, MANILLA, iii, 178. 

RED, iii, 1 60. 

from Sandwich-Islands, xxvii, 238. 

SULPHATE, behavior to ether, Cassola, 

V, 264. 

WHITE, Dumas, ix, 265. 

INDIGOFERA anil; argentea ; 

disperma ; Mexicuna : pseu- 

dotinctoria, iii, 158. 
INDIGOTIN, behavior to bichromate of 

potassa test, Jenkins, xxxiii, 528. 
INDISIN — anilin violet. See Anilein. 
INDIUM, Reich and Richter, xxxvi, 38. 

168. 



INFECTIOUS disease distinguished from 
CONTAGIOUS, Crookes, xxxviii, 356, 
note. 

INFUSIONS, Ph. Borussica, xx, 155— Ph. 
Dublin (50), xxiii, 12— remarks, Th. 
Powers, V, 104. 

CONCENTRATED, DoUOVaU (W. & B., 

1177), xxii, 80. 

INSPISSATED, Battley ( W. & B., 1177), 

xxiii, 64. 

PRESERVED, Alsop (Appert's method), 

viii, 90 — Fayard (closed with caout- 
chouc), ix, 351— Folberth (cotton), 
xxxiv, 336— Stevenson (Appert's me- 
thod), xxxi, 376. 

INFUSUM ALEXiTERiuM, Ph. Sardoa(l773); 

Swediaur (1817), i, 268. 

ACBTATUM, Swediaur (1817), i, 

269. 

BUCHU, Ph. Dublin (26). iii, 335. 

CALUMB^, Ph. London (24), Prel. No. 

22— preparation (cold infusion and 
heat to boiling, W. & B., 1178), 
Greenish, xviii, 141. 

CARDiACUM. See Infusum alexitk- 

RIUM. 

ciNCHONiE FLAV^, Taylor (addition of 

glycerin), xxxviii, 327. 

ergotvE, Ph. Dublin (50), xxiii, 12. 

gentians: compositum (extempore), 

Shinn (Parrish, 125), xxxiv, 307. 
junipebi compositum, Piocter, jr., 

xxv 205 

LiNi, Ph. U. S. (30), ii, 329. 

lobelttE Procter, jr., (recommends 

the addition of a little acid to the 

water), xiv, 109. 

MATico, Ph. Dublin (50), xxiii, 12. 

POLYGAL^, Ph. Dublin (50), xxiii, 12. 

RHEi {— tinctura rhei aquosa, Pb. 

Borussica), viii, 263, 
BOSiE compositum, Procter, jr., xxxv, 

112. 

SABBATIC, D. B. Smith, ii. 215. 

SENN.*:, Folberth (preserved by cot- 
ton-filtered air), xxxiv, 336— (by 
chloroform). Groves, xli, 74. 

SERPENTARLii, Ph. U. S.' (20)—Coxe 

(25)— Ph. Sardoa ( 1773), i, 268. 

SPiGELi^, Ph. U. S. (30), iv, 6. 

VANiLL.^s, Herschmann, xv, 239. 

ING A SASSA, vi, 42. 

INHALATION op medicines, Larocque, 
xxi, 260. Compare Atomizing. 

INJECTION of chloride of lime, Graefe, 
viii, 86. 

of iodide of iron, Pierquin, vi, 178. 

INK, copying, see Ink, writing. 

, Heberden's, Ph. Dublin (26) =mis- 

turaferri aromatica, iii, 336. 

, indelible. See , marking. 

, MARKING (indelible), black, known 

to the ancient Egyptians, Herapath, 
xxvi, 62 — preparation : (nitrate of sil- 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RilSPECTIVE CLASS. 



123 



4NK ( Co7itmned) . 

ver and printing ink), iv, 352 — Guil- 
ler (one preparation, W. k B., 1535), 
XXV, 33 — Jacobsen (anilin and copper 
compound), xxxix,319 ; xl, 335 — Kuhr 
(two preparaiions : hypophosphite of 
soda and nitrate of silver), xli, 404 
— Reade (one preparation), xx, 68 — 
Redwood (one preparation W. k B., 
i535), xix, 105 — fulminating silver 
formed, Burgess, xiv, 160 — stains re- 
moved (nitro-muriatic acid), iv, 123 
— Boettger (cyanide of potassium), 
xvi, 79 — Diciison (corrosive sublim- 
ate), vi, 264. 

, PURPLE (chloride of platinum 

and tin), xxv, 367. 

INDIAN, preparation in China (lamp- 
black), St. Julien, vi, 175 — substitute, 
xxxvi, 494 — test (drawing will not 
wash out), xxxix, 220. 

PRINTINO, with resin oil, Pratt, xxv. 

125. 

, black, Reade, xx, 69, 70 — blue, 

Reade, xx, 66, 69— rerf, Reade, xx, 69 

SYMPATHETIC (starch and iodine), vi, 

262. 

— WRITING, disappears between copper 

copperplates, ix, 82. 

, ALIZARIN, Leonhardi, xxix, 311 

— Winternitz, xxviii, 445. 

, black: Hunt, viii, 172 — Pile 

(Range's modified), xxiv, 316 — Proc- 
ter, jr., xiii, 189 — Reade (contains 
Prussian blue), xx, 67 — Runge, xxiv, 
316, note — Stein (Runge's and a few 
drops corrosive sublimate), xxiii. 82 
— Starck (with indigo) xxviii, 185. 

BLUE, Reade, xx. 65. 

— in CAKES, xxix, 352. 

COPYING, XXX, 184 ; xxxix, 3 70 : 

xl, 264. 

GRKEN, Winkler, xix, 238-. 

INDELIBLE (rcsiu, wax, soda, etc.). 

V, 346 — Herberger (gluten, acetic 
acid), xvii, 319 — Lucas (sugar, sul- 
phuric acid)' xxxvi, 420. 

RED (brazil wood and cochi- 
neal), xvii,. 314 — Plummer (suggests 
acetic decoction of Saunders), xxvii, 
116 — Reade (cochineal, tin), xx, 67 — 
Weber (brazil wood, alum, tin), xxv, 
464. 

VIOLET (logwood, acetate of 

manganese), xxxix, 370. 

, SPOTS removed, v, 259. 

JNK PLANT (Coriaria mjrtifolia). xxxvi. 

260, note. 
5N0CARPUS EDULis, xxxv, 350. 
INOSITE, Lane, ix, 492 ; xxxiii, 402, 
INSANITY and war, xxxix, 467. 
INSECTICIDE (benzole W. & B., 1472), 

xxxvi, 421 — (Pyrethrura) Willemot, 

xxxvi, 66 — (naphthalin) Markoe, xlii, ' 



72 — Pelouse, xl,' 522 — (petroleum), 
xxxix. 466. 

INSECTS, FAMILIES, xxix, 181. 

, INJURIOUS to vegetation, xxxviii, 90. 

PRESERVED, LeprieuT (arseniuretted 

alcohol), xxxiv, 245. 

POWDER, xxvii, 314 — Abel, xxxii, 525 

— Noodt (W. & B., 1537), xxxi, 373— 
activity due to volatile oil, Koch^ 
xxxvi, 313 — adulteration, Willemot, 
xxxvi, 69 — analysis, Hanaman, xxxvi, 
108 — French, dangerous character, 
xxxvi, 69 — preparation and use, Wille- 
mot, xxxvi, 71. 

INSPECTION of shop, Procter, jr., xli, 81. 

INSTRUCTION in the school of chemis- 
try in Michigan, Douglass, xxxix, 93. 

INTEMPERANCE, Chambers' remedy, an- 
alvsis, Chilton, Prel. No. 115. 

INTERNALREVENUElaw, xxxiv, 280. Com- 
pare Drug tax: Tax. 

INTESTINES preserved by sulphate of 
zinc. Falconet, xxiv, 170. 

INULA contains benzoic acid, Roettscher, 
XV, 157 — influence drying, Schoon- 
broodt, xli, 322 — loss in powdering, 
Redwood, xxi, 31. 

. Compare Helenium. 

BiFRONS, vii, 349. 

INULIN preparation, etc., Thirault (W. k 
B., 467), xxvi, 459: xxvii, 69. Com- 
pare Helenin. 

IODAL, Aime, x, 81. 

lODATES of alkaloids, Serullas, ii, 301. 

IODFIYDRINE, Berthelot and de Luca, 
xxvii, 22. 

IODIDES, alkaline, preparation, Mayer, 

xxxiv, 289. 

preparation, Henry, i, 200 — Dahamel. 

vi, 101 — Fisher, i, 87 — solubility in \\q- 
uorferri iodidi, Maisch, xxix, 210 — test 
for minute quantities, Hempel, xxxii, 
136 — Lassaigne, xv, 121. 
IODINE, acidification (by nitric acid), Con- 
well, iv, 340, (compare acid, iodic, 
preparation) — administration, Devergie, 
xxv, 273 — Heller, xxxi, 566 — adultera- 
tion, (coal), Hodgson, jr., ix, 18 — • 
(graphites), Herberger, xviii, 77 — 
(iron, silica), ix, 82 — (water), x, 119 
— does not occur in air, Lohmeyer, 
xxv, 520 — found in animals, Ohatin, 
xxiii, 383 — Riegel, xxvi, 438 — as an- 
tidote to uncorabined alkaloids, Don- 
ne, ii, 83 — to belladonna, Rioya, xxvii, 
534 — assay: Hesse [by silver; dis- 
solves iodine in sulphite of ammonia), 

xxxv, 30 — M'-iyer (sulphate of copper 
and iron), xxvii, 509 — Moride (ben- 
zine; W.k B., 471), xxv, 257— Pen- 
ny (bichromate of potassa and muri- 
atic acid), xxv, 263 — Rabourdin 
(chloroform. W.& B., 471). xxxiii, 161 
— Reiraann (chloroform and chlo- 



124 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



IODINE [Continued). 

fine), xxxiii, 220 — Reinige (perman- 
ganate of potassa), xlii, 321, (com- 
pare test) — behavior to animal char- 
coal, Graham, iii, 152 — Schoenbein, 
XX, 243 — to fused chlorate of potassa, 
Boettger, xxx, 71 — to aqueous ether, 
Maisch, xxxii, 524 — distinction from 
bromine and chlorine, Reinige (perman- 
ganate of potassa), xlii, 321 — not re- 
liable, McDonald, xli, 393— Moride 
(benzine, W. & B., 471), xxv, 257— 
from chlorine, Mayer (persulphate of 
iron and nitrate of silver), xxxii, 174 
— its combiyiations^ Duharael, vi, 101 — 
Henry, i, 200, compare preparations — 
commercial^ Iluskisson. jr , xxxvii, 370 
— contains cyanogen^ Klobach (W. & 
B., 469), xxiii, 83 — does not occur 
in eggs. Lohmeyer, xxv, 520 — entitled 
to entry, xxiv, 24 — extemporaneous 
evolution, apparatus, Hare, v, 194 — 
for external use in oil juniper. Heller, 
xxxi, 56G — extraction from diluted so- 
lutions, Persoz, xix. 301 — importation, 
Taylor, xxii, 193 — incompatibles, Dor- 
vault, xxiii, 66 — loss prevented in 
kelp, Wallace and LamoH (W. k B., 
468, note), xxxi, 463 — contains man- 
ga7iese, Boettger, xxx, 71 — in Mentha 
sativa, McAdam, xxv, 67 — does not 
occur in milk, Lohmeyer, xxv, 520 — 
in minerals, Arago, ix, 177 — Riegel, 
XX vi, 438 — del Rio, x, 81 — in mineral 
waters, xxvi, 441 — detection, Liebig 
(W. & B., 471), xxviii, 450— found in 
nitric acid, John, xxviii, 508 

PREPARATION and manufacture : from 

kelp, Bussy, ix, 233 — Delauney and 
others, xviii, 224 — Horsley. xxviii, 549 
— Porteus, xxix, 529 — in France, xxvi 
82 — in Glasgow, xiii,213 — from crude 
iodides, Luchs, xxxiv, 327 — from na- 
tive nitrate of soda, Faure, xxvii, 358 — 
direct from seaweed, Kemp, xxii, 338 
— its preparations. Fisher, i, 87. 

• in cod liver oil, Hopfer and Hauss- 

mann, ix, 350; de Jongh, xxi, 144 — 
estimation, Rabourdin (chloroform, 
W. & B., 471), xxiii, 161— Chevallier 
and Gobley (chloride of palladium) 
xxiv, 171 — in various plants, Arago, 
ix, 177; McAdam, xxv, 64; Riegel, 
xxvi, 438— limits of reaction, Hast- 
ings, xiii, 200 — reactions with alka- 
loids, Fairthorue (W. & B., 470, note), 
xxviii, 212 — with essential oils, Has 
hoff, iii, 266; Patterson (W. & B., 
1360), xxiv, 203; Guyot, ix, 79— in 
marine salt, Barruel, i, 154 — in Chili 
saltpetre, xxvi, 161 — in Saratoga wa- 
ter, Usher, i, 160; Steele, i, 2J2— in 
sarsaparilla, Guillermond, xxiii, 477 ; 
(denied by Winckler, xxiv, 376) — .'o- 



lubility in alcohol, Cap and Garot,, 
xxvii, 159 — benzole, Mansfield, xxi,. 
330 — bichloride of tin, Gerardin^ 
xxxiii, 214 — chloroform, Lepage, xxiv, 
147 — glycerin, Adolphus, xxxix, 150^. 
Cap and Garot, xxvii, 159 ; Klever, 
xlii, 222 — codliver oil, Fleischmann,, 
xxii, 376 — olive oil. Cap and Garot,. 
I xxvii, 159 — in syrup of orange peel 
j and in tannin, Debanque, xxiv, 171 — 
I anhydrous sulphurous acid, Sentini, 
j xli, 328 — in water. Cap and Garot,. 
j xxvii, 159 — Roller, xxxix, 181 — sta- 
! tistics, Chandler, xlii, 427 — Patterson,, 
j xxxix, 86, 

I TESTS : Casaseca (nitric acid, starch)^ 

j xxvi, 443; Chatin, xxvi, 444, 445 — 
i Grange (hyponitrous acid), xxvi, 444, 
j 445 — Laronde (petroleum and nitric 
' acid), xxxviii, 300 — Lassaigne (nitrate- 
j or chloride of palladium), xxvi, 442, 
443, 445 — Carey Lea (bichromate of 
potassa and starch), xxxviii, 444 — 
Marchand (starch, muriatic acid, 
chromate of potash), xxvi, 443, 445 — 
Marozeau, xxxii, 177 — Mayer (arsenite 
of potassa; hyposulphite of soda), 

xxxii, 176 — Moride (benzine), xxvi,. 
446 — Overbeck (nitrous acid), xxv,, 
461 ; xxvi, 445 — Fenny (muriatic acid,, 
chromate of potassa), xxvi, 446 — ■ 
Price (nitrites, W. & B., 471), xxv,. 
140 ; xxvi, 444, 445 — Rabourdin (chlo- 
roform), xxvi, 443, 445 — Rcynoso (per- 
oxide of barium), xxvi, 442 — Riegel^ 
xxvi, 438 — Thomson (chlorine, starch),, 
vi, 352 — Winckler (nitrites), xxvi, 443. 
— for purity, Proc^er,yr., xxiii, 106 — for 
minute quantities, Henry and Humbert 
(cyanide of silver ; chlorine) xxix, 449». 

detection in urine, Landerer, xxxi, 

350 — estimation of water, Bolley (W^ 
& B., 470), xxv, 261. 

AND BROMINE, Loswig, ii, 103. 

and CARBOLIC acid, Bullock, xl, 329. 

, CHLORIDE, Liebig, iv, 334 — Claudet,^ 

xiii, 253. 

and coDEiA, Anderson, xxiii, 85. 

and OIL OP cinnamon, Apjohn, xi^ 

227. 

, OXIDE, Sementini, iv, 346. 

; PHOSPHATE (!), Ph. U. S. (30), (New 

York edition), ii, 323. 
SPRING at Partenkirchen, Buchner, 

xxxiii, 406. 

and SUGAR, Fougera, xxxii, 25. 

lODINIUM PURUM, Ph. Dublin (50), xxiii^ 
12. 

lODOCINCHONIA, Gregoiy, xxix, 93. 

SULPHATE, Herapath, xxx, 248. 

IODOFORM, antiseptic ^vot^qvWqb, Righini^ 
xxv, 472 — behavior to cyanogen, Gilm^ 
xxxiii, 219 — in phthisis, Righini, xxv,, 
472. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER 



THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 125 



lODOQUINIA, BisuLPiiATB, Gregory, xxix, 

92 — Herapaih, xxx, 248. 
lODOSULPHATES of cinchona alkaloids, 

Herapath (W. & B., 1319, note), xxx, 

2 46 

lONIDIUM brevicaide, iii, 194; calceo- 
laria ; hetero2)hyUum ; hy- 

bantkm, iii, 193 ; indecorurn, iii, 

194; ipecacuanha^ iii, 192, 195; 

itubu, iii, 192, 194, 195. 

MARCucci, Bancroft (W. & B., 1 542), 

viii, 105, 125, 148— Griffith, yii, 186, 

parviflorurn, iii, 194 ; viii, 105, 150; 

' poaya ; polygsefoliuvi ; 

strictum ; urticsefolium^ iii, 194. 

IPECACUANHA, analysis^ Rochleder, xxv, 
242— Willick (W. & B., 482), xxiii, 
352 — comparison between Brazil and 
New Granada, Lefort, xli, 305 — col- 
lection, Weddell, xxii, 138 — crystals 
(oxalate of lime), xxxvii, 32 — cultiva- 
tion in India, xlii, 436 — in dysentery, 
substituted by mudar, Durant, xxxix, 
62 — living plant in Philadelphia, 
xxviii, 287 — percolating with water, 
plucking, Soubeiran, viii, 225 — powder, 
adulteration (biscuit), xxxv, 511 — 
(sarsaparilla), vii, 12 — loss, i, 138 — 
Covell, xxxix, 116 — Redwood, xxi, 31 
taste removed. Gay (ether), xi, 82. 

VARIETIES, Griffith, iii, 181. 

annulated, Griffith, iii, 183, 184, 196. 

bastard, Hamilton (W. & B., 1466), 

xix, 19. 

, brown, Griffith, iii, 189. 

Carthagena, Procter, jr., (W. & B., 

482), xxv, 474. 

■ false, iii, 183; grossa, iii, 189, 

196 ; of Jamaica, iii, 195. 

, gray, Griffith, iii, 188 — analysis, 

Pelletier (W. & B., 482), iii, 188. 

, red, analysis, Barruel and Richards ; 

Pelletier (W. & B., 482), iii, 187. 

del rey ; rust colored; of St. 

Paul, iii, 195, 196 ; of St. Thomas, 

iii, 194; de la Serra, iii, 195. 

striated, Griffiith, iii, 183, 189, 196— 

analysis, Pelletier (W. & B., 483, 
note), iii, 190. 

— true, iii, 183 ; undulated, iii, 196; 

of Villa rica, iii, 195. 

white, ditlerent varieties, Griffith, iii, 

190—195. 

of Zoazeiro, iii, 195. 

. Compare Callicocca ; Psychotrta; 

Viola. 

lPOM.rEA BRAOiiYPODA, xxiv, 84. 

DIS8ECTA contains hydrocyanic acid, 

Nicholson, v, 173. 

JALAPA, D. B. Smith, ii, 22 — (re- 
marks, Guibourt, v, 339) — descrip- 
tion, Nuttal, ii, 29— Griffith, vi, 119— 
Carson, x, 28. Compare Jalapa. 

MAORORRiiiZA, ii, 23 ; V, 339. 



MECHOACANA, crystals (oxalate of 

lime), xxxvii, 32. 
ORizABEXsis, xvii, 23. Compare Con- 

VOLVULUS ORIZABBNSIS. 

scHiEDEANA, xvii, 23. See Convol- 
vulus JALAPA. 

siMULANS, Hanbury (source of Tarn— 

pico Jalap), xlii, 332. 

. Compare Convolvulus ; Jalapa. 

IRIDACE^E, dehiscence of pollen, 
dridge, xiii, 216. 

IRIDESCENCE, Reinsch (film of resin on 
water), xxiv, 374. 

IKlDWisl preparation, Deville and Debray^ 

xxxv, 122 — Fremy, xxviii, 186 — 
Wcehler, vi, 261 — separation from 
osmium, Quesneville, jr., iii, 89. 

IRIS plobentina, crystals (oxalate of 
lime), xxxvii, 32 — as emetic, iv, 285 — 
in perfumery, Piesse, xxvi, 464 — loss 
in powdering, Covell, xxxix, 116 — 
Redwood, xxi, 31. 

GKRMANiCA, yields blue color, vi, 72. 

lutea, juice for toothache, Etmuller^ 

V, 170.' 

PSBUDACORUS Contains iodine, Mc- 

Adam, xxv, 67. 

TUBEROSA, acrid principle, Landerer,, 

xxiii, 384. 

VERSICOLOR, as cmetic, iv, 285. 

IRISH MOSS. See Chondrus. 

IRON. Compare Ferrum. 

action on benzoic acid at high tem- 
perature, d'Arcet, x, 176 — on iodide of 
ethyl andof methyl, Cahours, xxxv,10t 
— ac?Aes/ow to mercury, Guyton vi, 306, 
— behavior to alkaline polysulphidese 
Schilf, xxxiii, 264 — to weak alkaliug^ 
solutions, Vogel, xi, 81 — to ammon. ^ 
Despretz, i, 318 — to fused chlorate 
potassa, Boettger, xxx, 70 — browninffy. 
Sauerwein, xxxv, 251 — cast-iron so 
dered to wrought iron, xxi, 312 — 
copper-plating, Wells, xl, 415 — cry*- 
tallized, Haldat (heating in aqueous 
vapor), vi, 82 — Woehler (subject to 
white heat for a long time), v, 352 — 
with aluminium, Michel, xxxiii, 220. 
— double salts, Hemingway, xvi, 96 — ^ 
estimation (volumetric), Mittentzwey,. 

xxxvi, 318 — improved \n quality, Weiss 
(rusting in the earth), v, 88 — fabri- 
cated by insects, Sjogren, xxxix, 84 — 
manufacture, Bessemer (W. & B., 390),. 
xxviii, 561 (compare Steel) — oleagin- 
ous matter, Reynolds, xxxiv, 74 — oxh- 
ide, see below — converted mio plum- 
bago by seawater, Eudes, x, 81 — limit 
of reaction with copper, Hastings, xiii^ 
204 — protection against r?/s/!, Althaus- 
(zinc), iii, 86 — Mulder (coal tar), xl, 
258 — Stenhouse (paraffin varnish), 
xxxi, 320 — Vogel (white wax in ben- 
zine), xxxiii, 319; (weak alkaline; 



126 



SALTS, SEE UNDER L. 



,ATIN NAME OF BAHE ; 



-IPwON [Continued). 

solutions), xi, 81 — Zeni (brickdust 
and oil varnish), iv, 350 — reaction 
with salicylic acid more intense than 
with sulphocyanide of potassium, 
Dollfus, XXV i, 65 — sesqui-salts^ beha- 
vior to sulphurous and hyposulphur- 
ous acids, SchiflF, xxxii, 442 — desox- 
idation, Scha?nbein, xvi, 260 — on 
ship bottom^ coating (plumbago, arse- 
nite of copper, asphalt varnish), 
xxviii, 371 — pig-iron contains crys- 
tallized silicon, Richter, xxxv, 184 — 
Woehler, xxxiii, lib— smeUing in Glas- 
gow, Thomson, xiii, 206 — f.olubility 
in fixed oils, Vezu, xxix, 561 — and 
stone cement^ xxxix, 87. 

alloy: alumituum, Calvert, xxviii, 

174 — crystallized, Michel, xxxiii, 22C 
—manganesium, Prieger, xxxviii, 377 
— potassium^ xxviii, 174. 

ALUM, Blyth, xxvi, 159. See Febki 

KT AMMOXI^'] SULPHAS. 

and AMMONIUM compound. Meidinger, 

xxxiv, 332. 

HYDBATE. decoloriziug properties. 

Filhol, xxiv, 239. 
and HYDROGEN, Klein, xlii, 560 — De- 

ville and Troost, xxxvi, 326. 
and xiTEOGBN, Briegleb and Genther, 

xxxv, 33. 

OXIDES : PROTOXIDE, limit of reaction 

with tincture of nut-galls and ferro- 
cyanide of potassium, Hastings, xiii, 
204 — preparation^ Liebig (from pro- 
toxalate), xxvii, 527 — Weehler (melt- 
ing chloride of iron with dry carbon- 
ate of soda), iii, 356. 

, SESQUioxiDE, behavior to fused 

chlorate of potassa, I'oettger, xxx, 
70 — limit of reaction with tincture 
of nut-galls, and ferrocyanide of po- 
tassium, Hastings, xiii, 204 — separa- 
tion from oxide of manganese. Barker, 
viii, 82 — Liebig, iv, 259 — from oxides 
of cobalt and nickel, Liebig. iv, 259. 

PIPES (cast-iron), action of water, 

Payen, vi, 234. 

PYRITES, utilization of residue for 

manufacture of sulphuric acid, Bar- 
ruel, XV, 78. 

SAXD from New Zealand, analysis, 

Mushet. xxxiii. 330. 



TANKS, superior for keeping water 

fresh, Prel. No. 32. 

VARNISH. See Varnish. 

WOOD in Birmah, xl, 275 — of Borneo, 

Motley, xxix, 561. 

ISATIS TiNCTORJA, yields blue color, vi, 
72. See Woad. 

ISINGLASS, account, D. B. Smith, iii, 17 
— adulteration, Redwood (W. & B., 
464), xxii, 235 — analysis, xvi, 59 — be- 
havior io water; caustic potassa. Red- 
wood, xxii, 239. 

, American, manufacture. Smith, vi, 

12— New England, Carney (W. & B., 
464), xxix, 513. 

, Canadian, Owen, xxviii, 133. 

, FALSE from Para, xxv, 144. 

, Japanese, Hanbury (W. & B,, 465, 

note), xxxii, 354. 

from Polynemus sele, xvi, 58. 

in United States. See Isinglass, 

Ameiucan. 

Samovy. Pereira, xviii, 54. 

ISOCAJEPUTENE, Schmidt, xxxiii. 546. 

ISOCETAMIDE, Bonis, xxvii, 144. 

ISOLYSINE (from senega), Peschier, ii, 
107. 

ISOMORPHISM of organic nature, Wicke, 
xxvi, 61. 

ISONANDRA outta. See Gutta pkrcha. 

ISOPHLORETIN, Rochleder, xli, 419. 

ISOPHLORIDZIN, Rochleder, xli, 419. 

ISOTOMA axillaris, xxviii, 73. 

ISSUE peas, suppurative, ix, 349. 

ITCH remedies : carbolic acid, xxxiii, 
550— chlorinated lime, xiii, 172 — sul- 
phuret of lime, vii, 263 — oil of tur- 
pentine (W. & B , 603), xxix, 312— 
half-hour cure, Bourguignon (W. & 
B., 1607), xxix. 82. Compare Liquor 
Hehba; Vleminckx. 

ITEMS. See Notices. 

IVORY, bleaching, (sunlight), xxxii, 180— 
(sulphurous acid), xxiii, 377 — engrav- 
ing, xxiii, 87 — colored red, Keller- 
mann, xxix, 262. 

, artificial, Havemann, xxxv, 332 — 

for photography, Mayall, xxx, 84. 

, VEGETABLE, Hooker, xxii, 362 — ana- 
lysis, Phipson, xxxvi, 160 — charcoal, 
absorption of carbonic acid j cyano- 
gen. Smith, xxxv, 563, 



^JACCA nuts, Mayer, xxxvi, 292. iJALAPA, account, D. B. Smith, ii, 22— 

JACKSON'S pectoral syrup; peo-I (remarks on Smith's paper, Guibourt, 

TORAL lozenges; AMMONIA LOZ- | V, 339) — history, Griffith, vi, 118 — 

enges. See Lozenges ; Syrup. | arfwZ/m^^/on (deprived of resin), Frank,, 

■JAQUINIA armillaris, used for intoxi- I xxxiv, 330 — Squibb, xl, 65 — analysis: 
eating fishes, v, 160. \ Cadet (W. k B., 488), ii, 33 ; x, 225 i 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



127 



•/ALA PA ( Continued) . 

xiv, 292— Duhamel, Ellis, Ecky (W. 
& B.. 49J, note), xiv. 289, 291— Ger- 
ber, i, 160; (W. & B., 489), xxxiii, 

-487 Guibourt. xiv, 294 Henry, 

xxxiii, 487— Ledanois (W. & B., 490, 
note), ii, 35 ; xiv, 292 — a.ssof/, Squibb, 
xl, 67 — comme?-cinl, Southall (pric^ 
and yield of resin bear no relation), 
xl, 62 — cultivation, Hanbury (strongly 
recommended), xxxix, 352 — entitled 
to entn/, xxv, 302 — alkaline extract 
(see ExTR/^CTUM jalap^e alkalinum) 
— volatile o<7, Bonastre, iii, 143 — poiv- 
der, adulteration, Thomson (barley 
•meal; guaiac), xi, 169 — loss, i, 138: 
'Covell, xxxix, 116; Redwood, xxi. 
31 — i'esin (see below) — and scojnmont/, 
identity of active principle, Osborne, 
XV, 26 — deprived of nauseous taste 
(ether), xi, 83. 

, FALSE, Currie (W. & B., 490. note), 

xxiv, 149— Maisch, xl, 390— Procter, 
jr., xl, 389 — analysis, Duhamel, xiv, 
291. 

, MALK. See Convolvulus orizabkn- 

SIS ; IPOMiEA ORlZABENSia. 
MIRABILIS, Vii, 117. 

RESIN, behavior to camphor, Planche 

(W. & B., 195, note), x, 214, 215— 
chemical examination, Kaiser (W. & 
B., 488), xvii, 23— Mayer, xxv, 352— 
difference between that from Convol- 
vulus oriznbensis and Convolvulus 
officinalis, Planche, x, 226. 

— . Compare Resina jalaps:. 

, Tampico, Umney, xl, 144 — analysis 

of resin, Spirgatis, xlii, 514 — origin. 
Hanbury (Ipomtea simulans), xlii, 
330. 

, TRUE, Carson (Ipomaea jalapa), x, 

28. 

VARIETIES, Andouard, xxxviii, 206. 

. Compare Convolvulus; Ipom.i<:a. 

JALAPIN, ic/irtu/or to sulphuric acid (cold; 
hot ; and with permanganate of pot- 
ash), Guy, xxxiii, b2Q— preparation, 
Gerber (Hume's jalapin is a mixture 
of resin and acetic acid), i, 160 — Her- 
berger (VV. & B., 488), iii, 237. 

JALAPINOL, xMayer, xxxv, 542. 

JAMBOSA AUSTRALTS. See Eugenia aus- 

TRALIS. 

NEUROCALYX yiclds perfume, xxxv, 

351. 

JAMES' POWDRR. See Powder, James'. 

JANIPHA MANiHOT. See Cassava ; Man- 
iHOT ; Manioc; Tapioca. 

JARS, ointment-. See Gallipots. 

JARAVE, Hancock (W. k B., 753 j, i, 303. 

JARDIN DES plantks, Procter, jr., xl, 231. 

JASMINUM grandiflorum ; zamba, 

xii, 349; paniculata; zam- 

ba, for scenting tea. xxvii. 531. 



in perfumery, Piesse, xxvi, 371. 

versus Gelskminum (mistaken iden- 

titv), Procter, jr., xl, 30. 
JATAMANSI. See Sumbul. 
JATROPHA cuRCAs, Prel. No. 61. See 

Oleum curcas. 

klastk'a. See Caoutchouc. 

MANIHOT. See Cassava; Mamhot; 

Manioc ; Tapioca. 
multifida; pa vdur.*:folia, Prel. 

No. 61. 

urens. poisonous properties, xxiv, 

274. 

JEFFER^ONIA diphylla, xli, 43l—anah/~ 
sis, Wayne (VV. & B., 1542), xxvii,* 1 
— contains Saponin, Mayer, xxxv, 99. 

JELLIES, Parrish and Bakes (W. & B., 
1543), xxxiii, 4. 

JELLY, CARRAGHEEN, Mouchou, xvii, 191. 

, COD-LIVBR OIL, Dufourmantel (W. k 

B., 588), xxxvi, 113. 

GLYCERIN, xxviii, 368. 

HARTSHORN, Ferrcz, i, 319. 

, ICELAND MOSS, Beral, iii, 267. 

, LICHEN, with protiodide of iron, Du- 

pasquier, xiii, 122. 

PECTORAL, of dog-grass, iv, 348. 

SPiGELiA, Bonnewin, xxviii, 182. 

JIPIJAPA (Panama hat plant), Seemann, 
xxiv, 175. 

JOANNESIA PBiNCEPs = Anda Gomesii^ 
iv, 25. 

JOMQUIL, extraction of aroma, Robiquetj 
viii, 53. 

JOURNALS, MEDICAL, exchange list, edi- 
torial, xxxi, 191. 

of PHARMACY. See Pharmacy, U. S. 

JUGLANS ciNKREA, as cathartic, v, 207. 

JUICES, fruit, preservation, Enz (Ap- 
pert), xxxii, 553 — Fayard (tied over 
with sheet caoutchouc), ix, 351 — 
Mayet (modification of Appert), xxv, 
185. Compare Succi expressi. 

, LEMON, adulteration, Stoddart, xli, 

13— analysis, Jones, xxvii, 474 — Evans, 
XXX, 365 — decomposition, Stoddart, xli, 
75 — oxalic acid, in presence of liquor 
potassse, Stoddart, xli, 19— preserva- 
tion, Symes (Appert), xxxvi, 36. 

, ARTIFICIAL, viii, 171. 

, SPURIOUS, Evans, xxx, 364. 

LIME, from Montserrat, xlii, 450. 

, ORANGE, ARTIFICIAL, viii, I7l. 

of POISONOUS plants preserved, Bou- 

chardat, Lepage (ether), xxxv, 314. 

SACCHARINE, clarification, Rousseau 

(plaster paris ; hydrated oxide of 
iron, W. &B., 728), xxxiii, 460 ; xxxiv, 
461. Compare SUGAR, CANE, uefining. 

JUJUBE. See Zizyphus. 

JULUS FOiTiDissiMUS, contains iodine, 
Holl, xxvi, 440. 

JUNC'iCE/E for paper-making, xxviii^ 
170. 



128 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OP BASE J 



JUNGERMANNIA albitans contaks io- 
dine, Marck, xxvi, 439. 

piNGUis contains iodine, Meyrac, 

xxvi, 439. 

JUNIPER, analysis of ash, Salm-Horst- 
mar, xx, 159— of crystalline resin- 
ous matter from berries, Henry, iii, 
241 — of wax like matter from berries, 
Henry, iii, 242 — of berries, Nicolet, 
iii, 239 — unripe berries contain more 
oil than the ripe ones, vi, 351. 



JUNIPERUS CHiNENSis, iii, 239, 

LYCiA, xiii, 12. 

SABiNA. See Sabina. 

viRGiNiANA, iii, 239 ; xiii, 12 — analysis^. 

Jenks (W. & B., 495), xiv, 230, 235 — 
twist fibre ^ Braun, xxviii, 67, 

JTJRIBALI, Hancock, v, 144. 

JUSTICIA PANicuLATA, xlii, 530. 

JUTE paper, Nash, xxviii, 468. 



K. Compare C. 

K^MPHERIA PANDURATA is Curcuma ro- 
tunda, V, 325. 

ROTUNDA yields zedoary, v, 329, 

KAHINCA, active principle, Franyois and 
Caventou, ii, 84 — analysis^ yranrjois 
and Caventou (W. & B., 1479), iii, 164, 
168 — percolating with water, packing^ 
Soubeiran, viii, 225. 

KAHININA is Kahinca, iii, 165 

KAKODYL. See Cacodyl. 

KALIMETHYL, xxxv, 3, 

KALIUM, See Potassium. 

KALI. See Potassa. 

KALLISTON, Burnett's, composition, 
Chandler, xlii, 366, 

KALMIA LATiPOLiA, analysis. Bullock (W. 
& B., 1543), XX, 260, 264— Stabler, 
xvi, 246. 

KAMEELA, analysis, Anderson (W. & B,, 

714) , xxxii, 325— Leube, jr. (W. & B,, 

715) , xxxii, 551, 

new kind (Mallotus philippinensis), 

Fliickiger, xl, 140. 

. Compare RoTTLBRA ; Rottlerin. 

KAMPTULICON, Walton, xxxv, 332— 

xxxvii, 309, Compare Campticon. 
KASSADAR is Convolvulus panduratus, 

xi, 179, 

KAT (herb^ from Aden, xxv, 231, 
KATALYSis, Berzelius, x, 220 — Hare, 
xix, 1. 

KAURIE RESIN. See Cowrie resin. 
KAVA, xxvii, 236— Morson, xvi, 105. 
KAVAINE, Procter, jr. (W. & B., 541, 
note), xxxii, 133. 

KAYA SENEGALENSIS, X, 72. 

KEKUNE oil (Aleurites) (W. & B., 1457), 

XXX, 397 — xxxiii, 62. 
KELP (Highland), analysis, Lamont, xxxi, 

461. 

KBRMES, animal, is Coccus ilicis, xii, 175, 
MINERALS, adulteration, i, 239 — anti- 
dote to strychnia, Thorel (W. & B., 

1356), xxiii, 84 constitution, Gay- 

Lussac, ii, 164 — Rose, iii, 177; xiii, 
55 — chemical history, Dublanc, xx, 
234 — preparation^ Biozi, v, 87 — Clu- 



zel, XX, 237 — Liance (with cyanide of 
potassium), xx, 233 — Liebig, vi, 344; 

vii, 285 — Musculus (by percolation), 

viii, 196— Rose, iii, 177— U. S. (60), 
remarks, Procter, jr., xxxvi, 300. 

KEROSOLENE, account, Parrish, xxxiii,. 
396. 

KID (leather), preparation, Calvert, xxxvi, 
408. 

KIESTEINE, xii, 347. 

KIGLIA AFRiCANA (Etna tree), xxxiii, 550». 

KINAKINA HUMiLis, xxii, 100, note. 

KINO, account, Guibourt, iv, 53 — Sim- 
monds, xxix, 377 — analysis, Hennig 
(W. & B., 497), xxv, 541, 545— Vau- 
quelin, i, 156; (W. & B., 496), xiv, 
261 — amount of tannin^ Bowman, xii, 
194. 

, East India, origin, Royle, xviii, 79.. 

from Eucalyptus resinipera, Proc- 
ter, jr. (W. k B., 499, note), xxxi,. 
226. 

of MouLMEiN, Christison, xxv, 239. 

from Tbnasserim, Mason (W, & B.,, 

496), xxi, 134. 

of West Africa, Daniell, xxvi, 513.. 

KINONE from different plants, Stenhouse,. 
xxvi, 252 — behavior to aniiin, Hoff- 
mann, xxxv, 542. 

KINOVIC bitter, analysis and properties,. 
Buchner, jr., viii, 202 — Winckler, viii^ 
205 — identical with salseparine, Pog- 
giale and Thubeuf, viii, 205. 

KINOVIN, composition, etc., Hlasiwetz. 
and Gilin (W. & B., 293, 294), xxxii,. 
143, 444. Compare Telsescin, xxxv,, 
290, note, 

KNEE SCAB of horse in epilepsy, Mettau- 
er, vii, 193. 

KNOWLEDGE, practical. Mill, xxxii, 12. 

KOHEUL of the Arabs (sulphuret of an- 
timony), Bertherand, xxviii, 59. 

KOHHL (is Koheul), Piesse, xxviii, 267.. 

KOKUM BUTTER, Pereira, xxiii, 362. 

KOLA NUTS, analysis, Attfield, xxxvii, 205- 
—origin, Daniell (W. & B., 1605)^ 
xxxvii, 148 — contain Theine, Daniell^ 
' xxxvii, 149. 



PREPARATIONS UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



129 



•KOLA. Compare Guka nuts. 

KOOSIA. See Kusia. 

KOOSSIN. See Kwoscin. 

KOOSSO (Brayera autbelraintica), iv, 
278 — account, Pereira, xxii, 319 — ana- 
li/sis^ Martin, xiii, 175; xxii, 322 — 
Wittstein (W. & B., 171), xxii, 322— 
for tapeworm, xxiii, 183. 

KORARIMA (cardamoms of Abyssinia). 
Pereira, xix, 134. 

KOUSSO. See Koosso. 

KRAMERIA ixina, account, Hamilton, 
xviii, 137 — Schuchardt, xxviii, 536 — 
as adulterant of Kraraeria triandra, 
Mettenheimer, xxiv, 272 — origin of 
Savanilla rhatany, Hanbury, xxxvii, 
103 — Schuchardt, xxviii, 536. 

TRIANDRA, adulter alioii (Cala^ula; 

Krameria ixina), Mettenheimer, xxiv, 
272 — behavior to animal charcoal, 
Weppen, xviii, 204 — percolation with 
water, packing, Sonbeiran, viii, 225 — 
percolation and maceration compared. 
Bouilla}^ and Guillermond, x, 10 — 



loss in poicdering, Redwood, xxi, 31 — ■ 

three states of tannin, Soubeiran (W. 

& B., 502), vi, 141— yield of tannin, 

Bowman, xli, 194. 

of Para, Fliickiger, xlii, 329. 

VARIETIES, Schuchardt, xxviii, 538, 

note. 

. See Rhatany. 

KREATININ (as index of putrefaction), 

Commaille, xli, 131. 
KREIS (Malay dirk), how poisoned, Yvon, 

xvii, 217. 
KROOSO (is Koosso), xiii, 173. 
KRYOLITE. See Cryolite. 
KUKUI OIL. See Kekune oil. 
KUNDA OIL, Clarke, xv, 122. 
KUMISS (of the Tartars), xxviii, 369. 
KUSIA (Momordica operculata), Hancock, 

ii, 144. 

KWOSCIN, Martin, xxii, 322. 

KYANOL (Runge), identical with anilin, 

Hoffman, xxxiii. 46. See Cyanol. 
KYSTINE. See Kiesteine. 



LABARRAQUE'S solution. See Liquor 
soD^E chlorinate:. 

liABELS, bronze, Philadelphia College of 
Pharmacy, xxviii, 90. 

for DAMP localities, Quevenne (adhe- 
sive plaster), xxviii, 167 — paper labels 
preserved, Ulex, xxv, 464. 

, DURABLE (lead pencil on zinc), xl, 

274. 

on GLASS BOTTLES, Boudct (enamel), 

vii, 54. 

for PHARMACEUTICAL Specimens, xxiii, 

96 for pharmaceutical students, 

Barbet, xxxiv, 509. 

, PASTE. See Paste, labels. 

LABELLING omitted, fine in Belgium, 
XXX, 402. 

LABORATORIES in Germany (Bunsen ; 

Erdmann ; Fresenius ; Liebig ; Rose ; 

Woebler), xxx, 177. 
LABORATORY instruction by London 

Pharmaceutical Society, Parrish, 

xxxi, 2. 

, Fowler's, New Lebanon, xxvii, 568. 

, Tilden's, New Lebanon, xxvii, 568, 

576. 

, Powers & Weiohtman's, fire, xl, 82. 

, High School of Sorbonnb, xli, 413. 

, U.S.A., N. York, destruction, xxxvii, 

234— Philadelphia, xxxv, 283, 373. 

, U. S. N., Green Point, xxvii, 570. 

LAC (Shellac), account, Simmonds, xxix, 

378 — Mackay, xxxiii, 440 — adhesive 

force. Draper, vi, 254, 293. 



. Compare Shellac. 

LAC CER^. See Milk of wax ; Varnish, 
wax. 

dye, Mackay, xxxiii, 441. 

magnesia, as antidote to phospho- 
rus, Landerer, xxvii, 538. See Mag- 
nesia, medicine. 

spirits (protochloride of tin), xxxiii, 

441. 

sulphur. See Sulphur pr^.ctpita- 

TUM. 

LACKER for tin, viii, 83. 
LACMUS. See Litmus. 
LACTATES, researches, Cap and Henry, 
xii, 149. 

LACTIDE, Engelhardt, xxii, 72. 
LACTUCA ELONGATA, and its juice, 

Maisch, xli, 145. 
SATivA, juice, organic acid, Koehnke, 

xvii, 34 — dialyzed, Attfield, xxxvi, 

530; xxxvii, 208 — composition^ ix, 208. 
viROSA. organic acids, Kcehnke, xvii, 

34. 

L ACTUC ARIU M, and Thridace, difference, 
Chevallier, v, 66 ; ix, 209 — analysis, 
Aubergier (W & B., 505, note), xxiii, 
237— Ludwig (W. & B., 506, note), 
XX, 59, 62 — contains glucose, Lahens, 
xxvii, "J 1 — oxalic and not succinic 
acid, Koehnke, xvii, 37 — preparation, 
(with boiling water), Mouchon, xviii, 
32 — purification, Hodgson, jr. (chloro- 
form), xxx, 116 — Parrish and Bakea 
(benzine), xxxii, 228. ^ 



130 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



LAC German and English, comparison, 

Parrish and Bakes (W. & B., 505), 

xxxii, 225. 

. Compare Tiiridace. 

LACrUCELilN, Ludwig (W. & B., 506, 

note), XX, 61 — Thieme; VValz, xx, 59. 
LACTUCIN (Aubergier's), Wa]/., XX, 62. 
LACTUCONE (Lenoir's). VYalz, xx, 59— 

Lenoir, xx, 6L 
LADENBEUGIA, Howard, xxxviii, 418. 
LAGAM OIL, Han bury, xxviii, 159. 
LA IT viKGiXAL, Piesse, xxviii, S3. 
LAKE-ORE (iron by insects), Sjogren, 

xxxix, 84. 

LAKES, prepared with chloride of auii- 
mony, Lampadius, xxv, 467. 

LAMINARLi bulbosa : digitata: 

SACC'iiAHiNA, xxii, 338. ( 

LAxMINAiUJ^, yield mannite, Stenhouse, 
xvi, 237 — Phipson xxix, 238, 

LAMP, INFLAMMABI,K AJB-. Volta, XXXiv, 

148. 

. ASBESTOS, Boettger. x. 239. 

, BLAST, Deville, xxix, 18. 

, I'ERi'UME, Piesse, xxvii, 470. 

, SAFETY, for laboratory use, Warren 

(W. k B., 880), xxxiv, 217. 

LAMP-BLACK, calcined with potash, de- 
colorizing power, Biifsy (\V. k B . 
212), i, 239. 

. Compare Soot. 

LAXQUAS major; minor, v. 323. 

324. 

LANTHANUM. Mosander. xi, 259. 
LANTHOPINA, Hesse, xlii, 395.: 
LAPAGENA rosea, substitute for sarsa- 

parilla in Peru, v. 259. 
LAPATHfN, Buchner and Herberger, 

xxxi, 153. 

LAPLS CALAMiNARis. See Calamina. 

■ LAZULI, blue coloring matter. 

Schweigger-Seidel, ii, 136. 

LAPLACEA QuiNODERMA, xxii, 104, note. 

LAPPA, proper time for coUecting, Nent- 
wich, XA-, 142 — percolating with wa- 
ter, pncklny^ tSoubeiran, viii, 226. 

LARAXIN, proposed name for larixinic 
acid, (which see). Stenhouse, xxxiv, 
559. 

LARD. Compare Fat : Grease. 

adulteration, Calvert, xxv, 2 49 — 

Maisch. xxxvi, 101 — a? mdidotQ to 
strychnia, Pindell, xxvii. '):)b—fu.'iijui 
and congealing point, Wimmel, xli, 
22, 431 — inodorous. Piesse (alum and 
salt), xxviii. 176 — purijled, Hills, 

xxxii, ^47— Procter, jr. (W. k B., 67, 
note), XXXV, 114— Ph. Dublin (50), 
xxiii, 14 (compare Grease; Fat) — 
rendered sejniff.uid by resin. Olmstead, 
xxii, 325 — solubility in chloroform, 
Lepage, xxiv, 147. 

balsamic, Procter, jr. i balsam Peru. 

and Tolu) xxxv, 115. 



benzoatbi) (benzinated), DeschampS;. 

XV, 260— Doliber, xxxix, 03; xl, 33 — 

Procter, jr., xxxv, 114. 
i'OPULInated, Descharaps, x-v;,, 2(>ft — 

Procter, jr., xxxv, 114. 
LARIX EUROi'.EA, conij'erin in cambial 

juice, Hartig, xlii. 220 — its tanniyi (is 

not a glucoside), Stenhouse, xxxiv, 

255, 256. 

LARKSPUR. Spc Delpiiinicm consolida. 
LARTIGUE'S pills, ( Parrish, 711), xxxiv, 
328. 

EASIONEMA, lestivation, Don, xi, 247.. 

LAToUR BARK, Landerer, xxxiii, 409. 

fjATUA VENENOSA. Chili, xxxviii, 104... 

LA i: DAM IN A, Hesse, xlii, 394. 

LANDANUM. See Tinctura opii. 

of Rousseau, vii, 128. 

LiQuiDUM Syoenhamt, drops and min-- 

ims. Bernouilly, xxxii, 441 ; Durand^ 
i. 169— diluted alcohol besl7;ie//«^rMi/m. 
Lade, xxxiv, 38 — by pereoktlion^ , 
Maisch, XXX, 13 — prcparatl(Dn, Lecanu, 
vii, 127. 

LAURACKvE, geographical relationSj 
.Meissner, xxxix, 356. 

LAUROCKRASUkS, peculiar acid (besides 
hydi-ocyanic acid). Peretti, iv, 349 — 
artiftu of leaves and i)reparations on 
Hromaiic sulistance?'. Mahier, ( W. &r 
B , 1 9), xviii. 209 — influence of rfr//- 
/////. Schoonbroodr. xli, 322. 

LAURUS CAMPiiORA. xvii, 220; x.xiv, o2&.. 
See Camphora. 

(^AMPUOifiFERA Japonensum, xii, 219, 

CASSIA, v, 299: xii. 217. See Uassia. 

CFNNAMOMUM, V, 299. See ClNNAMQ- 

MUM. 

— DULCIS, V, 300. 

GLOBOSA. root yields violet color, vT^ 

73. 

INVOLUCRATA, xii, 221 ; JAVAN- 

ENSIS, V, 299; MALABATIIRUM, V, 

299; MANILLENSIS, V, 300. 

PARviFOLiA. root vields violet color j. 

vi, 73. 

picHURiM. Sec Nectandra puciiury; 

PlCHURIM. 

LAVENDISR, cultivation in Mitcham, BeH^ 
xxiii, 30. 

WATER. Piesse, xxvi. 373. Compare 

Eau ; Water : etc. 

LAWRENCIA spicata, xxviii, 74. 

LAWSONIA iNERMis. See Henna. 

LEAD. Compare Plumbum. 

adhe.non to mercury, Guyton, vi, 306 

— behavior to sul{)huric acid, Calvert 
and .Johnson, xxxv, 358 — to Aveak al- 
kaline solutions, Vogel, xi, 82 — to 
steam, Lermer. xxxv, 507 — to dis- 
tilled and river water, Phillips, jr., 
xvii, 16 — ei-oaion by insects, xxxvii, 7 1 
— quantitative e-timalio/i, Locwe, xxxii, 
44 — use in eudiometry, de Saussurej 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER 



THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



131 



LEAD {Continued). 

viii, 321 — poisoning (wholesale, in 
, Walkill Valley), xxxviii, 366— Bick- 

ing (too large amount in phthisis), 

xii, 164 — prefsence in atmosphere of 
white lead manufactories, Dunn, vii, 
339 — in various artificial products, 
Chevreul and others, xvi, 303 — limit 
of reactions, Hastings, xiii, 204 — (with 
ferrocyanide and iodide of potassi- 
um), Ambr. Smith, xvii, 90 — (with sul- 
phuretted hydrogen), Reinsch, xi, 217 
— salts, behavior to alkaline polysul- 
phides, Schilf, xxiii, 264— amount in 
si.loer coin, Eliot and Storer, xxxiii, 
335 — comparative value of dift'ereut 
tests, Ambr. Smith, xvii, 90 — volatility, 
Riemsdyk, xli, 424. 

' COLIC, Gendrin (by muriatic acid), 

vii, 346 — Foucat (Ilaller's elixir, mag- 
nesia, etc.), vii, 349. 

DEUTOXiDE, preparation, Mayer (W. k 

B., 654), xxviii, 410— Overbeck (with 
ferridcyanide^ of potassium), xxviii, 
341— Woehler (W. k B., 654), xxvii, 
20 ; xxviii, 341. 

, OXIDE, anhydrous, crystallized, Bec- 

querel, v, 345, See Litharge. 

, RED, compositiisn, Dumas, iv, 349 ; 

xiii, 169-Phillips (W. & B., 664), vi, 
162 — preparation, xiii, 169, 170. 

, WHITE. See Plumbi oahbonas. 

LEADING (coating with lead), Weil (al- 
kaline bath), xxxviii, 176 — Ruolz 
(electro-), xv, 61. 

LEATHER, analysis of different kinds, 
Stenhouse, xxx, 354 — volumetric esti- 
mation of tannin, Mittentzwey, xxxvi, 
317 — glue from certain kinds, Sten- 
house, xxx, 352 — preparation, Preller, 
xxxvi, 410 — Calvert, xxxvi, 406 — 
yield of oxalic acid by potassa, Possoz, 
xxx,552 — oiprussiate o/potassa, xx,172 

, FANCY, preparation, Calvert, xxxvi, 

406. [enamel, 408 — gilded, 412 — glove, 
410 — kid, 408 — Morocco, 406 — oiled, 
409 — roan, 407 — Russia, 407 — skivers, 
iOl—tato, 4:08— wash, 409,) 

LEAVES, in the sun, evolve a mixture of 
oxygen and nitrogen, Draper, xvi, 91 
■ — Skeletonizing, xxxiii, 551. 

LECANURA esculenta, (manna of the 
Bible), Lindsay, xxxiii, 365. 

LECHE DE SANDE, Maisch, xli, 236. 

LECTURE, iNTKODLCTORY, W. R. Fisher, 

ix, 269 ; xiv, 1 — Procter, jr., xix, 241 
—Geo. B. Wood, vii, 286; xii, 298. 

LEECHES, account, D. B. Smith, iv, 265 ; 
Stearns, xxx, 464 — in Michigan, 
Stearns (VV. & B., 443. note), xxx, 
29 — make them hite, Martins, xv, 311 
— culture, xxxiv, 453 — again Jit for use, 
K(Bhnke (ashes, charcoal, calamus), 
JL\', 308 — in Himalaya, Hooker, xxix, 



84 — preservation, AUchin (W. & B.^ 
443, note), xxviii, 222 — Bevan (bi- 
noxide of manganese), xxxvii, 190 — - 
Frodsham (W. & B., 444, note, Vay- 
son's plan), xxxii, 323 — Roder (chlo- 
rine), xviii, 313 — Schiiller (wood 
ashes, charcoal), xxv, 128 — Vavson 
(W. k B., 444, note), xxxii, 323— in 
Turkey, xxv, 184. 

, aquarium, AUchin (W. & B., 443^ 

note], xxviii, 222^ — -Stearns (W. &, 
B., 443, note), xxx, 29. Compare 
Leeches, preserua t to n . 

, mechanical, Thomas', xxiv, 388. | 

. Compare Hirudo. 

LEGISLATION, pharmaceutical, Maisch, 
xiii, 303. 

LEGUMIN (Braconnot) is diastase, xi, 274. 

LEGUMINOS^E, dehiscence of pollen, Al- 
dridge, xiii, 216. 

LEMONADE, effervescing, in powder^ 
Dor vault, xxix, 50. 

lactic acid, Magendie, vii, 263. 

preservation, Lade (sulphite of mag- 
nesia), xxxvi, 421. 

, sulphuric, xiii, 105 

, TAHTRO-CITRIC, JeukiuS, XXX, 89 — 

Lawrence Smith, xxxii, 408. 
LEMONS, analysis, Cogswell, xxvi, 552 — 
preservation, Baudrimont (tin foil), xiii j. 
435 — Mee (shellac varnish), xxxviii > 
474. 

RIND, fresh, made friable, Maisch (by 

covering with alcohol), xxx, 14. 

, SWEET. See Citrus lumia. 

JUICE. See Juice, lemon. 

LENS PELUSiACA (Esau's lentils), v, 143. 

LEONTICE leontopetalum contains sapo- 
nin, xii, 215. 

THALicTROiDES. See Caulophyllum 

THAL[CTR0IDES. 

LEONTODtN. See Taraxacum. 
LEPDIUM, v, 142. 

LEPIDIN, blue color from, Williams, 
xxxii, 179. 

LEPIDIUM iiUDERALE, insecticide, Wille- 
mot, xxxvi, 66. 

LEPIDOLITE, as source of rubidium^ 
Bunsen, xxxiii, 571 ; xxxiv, 69. 

LEPROSY (Hydrocotyle asiatica recom- 
mended, W. k B., 1527), xxvi, 222. 

LEPTANDRA virginica, analysis, Wayne 
(W. & B., 511), xxviii,' 510— con- 
tains mannite, Wayne, xxxi, 557 — sap- 
onaceous principle, Mayer, xxxv, 298. 

LEPTANDRIN, preparation and proper- 
ties, Wayne ( W. & B., 511), xxviii, 511. 

(eclkctic), Parrish (Parrish, 291), 

xxiii, 334; xxvi, 505. 

LEPTOMERIA acerba ; pungens, 

xxviii, 74. 

LEROY, medicine curative, Prel. No. 120. 
LERP (insect manna), Hanbury (W. k B., 
533, note), xxxiv, 547. 



132 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



i:iETTERS from Beckert, xxxviii, 393— 
Bjoerkluad, xxxvii, 417 — Fliickiger, 

xxxii, 569. 
LETTUCE. See Lactuca. 
LEUCANILIN, Hoffmann, xxxv, 344, 

345, 348. 

fjEUCIN, behavior to Alloxan, Strecker, 

xxxv, 35 — to ozone, Gorup-Besanez, 

xxxvi, 166 — pj-eparation, Liebig (cas- 
eine and potassa), xviii, 129. 

LEUKOL (Runge) is quinolin, HoiFmann, 

xxxiii. 46. 
LEVULOS'AN, xxxix, 334. 
SjEWISIA REDivivA, tenacity of life, xxxviii, 

320. 

LIATRIS ODOHATissiMA, yields coinnarin, 
Procter, jr., xxxi, 556 — as iea, Proc- 
ter, jr., xxxviii, 443, note. 

LIBRAM, Redwood, xli, 381. 

LICHEN C'ONFiNis contains iodine, Dickie, 
xxYi, 439. 

DEALBATA, XV, 87. 

vuLPiNus, contains vulpuHne, Bebert, 

iv, 87. 

LICHENS, coloring matter (erythrin), 
Heeren, iv, 346 — what to observe, 
Lindsay, xxxiii, 364. 

LIFE and death in nature, relations, Dana, 

xxxv, 129. 

for the HAIR, Chevallier's, composi- 
tion, Chandler, xlii, 363. 

LIGHT, action on drugs and pharmaceuti- 
cal preparations, Hunt, xix, 144 ; 
Dumey, xxxiii, 411; Smith, xxxvi, 
76 — on plants, Leuchs, ii, 255 — evo- 
lution during crystallization, Rose, viii, 
157 — homogeneous, of great intensity, 
Talbot (salt and oxygen), vi, 347 — 
practical thoughts, Smith, xxxvi, 75. 

, Drummond's, preparation of cylin- 
ders, Phillips, xli, 240. 

■ , 'E'L'KCTRic, photometrical p*owers, Rog- 
ers, xxxv, 548 — invisible radiation, 
Tyndall, xxxvii, 216. 

, MAGNESIUM, Buuscn, xxxii, 424 ; 

xxxvi, 337; xxxviii, 181. 

, WHITE, for signals, viii, 85. 

, ZIRCONIUM, Tessi^ du Motay, xli, 

163. 

. Compare Fires ; Flames. 

LIGHTNING, effects, Becquerel, xl, 414. 
LIGNEA (oxide of lignin), Porret. xxi, 
294. 

LIGNIN, oxide (see Lignea) — hyponitrite 
of oxide is pyroxiline, Porret, xxi, 
294. 

LIGNITE, composition, Vaux, xxxiv, 539. 
LIGNOIN (humoid matter of Huanuco 

bark), Reichel, xxxiii, 171. 
LIGNUM NEPHRiTicuM (from Moringa pte- 

rygosperma), Hamilton, xviii, 41. 

PAPUANUM, is storax wood, v, 260. 

— — SASSAFRAS. See Sassafras, wood. 
viT.-*:. See Guaiagum. 



LIGUSTRIN, Potex, xii, 347. 
LIGUSTRUM vuLGARE, analysis, Potex, 
(W. & B., 1547), xii, 347— yields /«- 
none, Stenhouse, xxvi, 252 — mannite 
from leaves, Kromayer, xxxiii, 215. 
LILAC. See Syringa vulgaris. 

ESSENCE, Piesse, xxvi, 37 i. 

LILACIN, Meillet (W. k B.,160e), xiv, 139. 
LILIACEyE, dehiscence of pollen, Ald- 

ridge, xiii, 216. 
LILY WHITE, composition, Chandler, xlii, 
368, 369. 

, TIGER. See Tiger lily. 

LIME. Compare Calcium ; Calx. 

, action on concentrated solution of 

carbonate of potassa, Watson, vi, 166 
— behavior to antimoniate of potassa, 

Wackenroder, xvi, 38 deodorizing 

properties, Sutherland, xxvii, 518 — 
cstijnation, xxxiii, 314 — limit of reac- 
tion (with oxalate of ammonia), Has- 
tings, xiii, 203 — preserved dry in tin- 
foil, Baudrimont, xlii, 435 — ted (tung- 
state of soda), Sonstadt, xxxix, 416. 

, chloride. See Calx chlorinata. 

— — CYLINDERS for Drummond's light, 
Phillips, xli, 240. 

juice. See Juice, lime. 

STONE, crystalline, by heat, Rose, 

xxxvi, 84. 

WATER. See Liquor calcis. 

LIMONE, Schmidt (Parrish, 667), xvii^ 
32. 

LINARUN, Walz, xxxv, 295. 
LINEN, preferabie|to cotton for bandages 
and lint, Raspail, v, 345 — test for cot- 
ton, Boettger (anilin), xxxviii, 86 — al- 
tered by syrups, Dore, xxxv, 313. 

. Compare Lint. 

LING, furnishes isinglass, iii, 19. 
LINIMENTUM. Compare Lotio. 

aconite and chloroform, separatea 

when lard is employed, xxvii, 515 — 
but not with castor oil, Procter, jr., 
xxvii, 517. 

aconiti eadicis, Procter, jr. (W. & 

B., 1186, note), xxv, 293 ; xxxiii, 103, 
104. 

album. See Linimentum, Stokes. 

for ascites. Otto, ix, 175. 

for BURNS, iv, 258. 

■ CAMPHOR.E, relieves itching of cow- 

hage, Weichselbaum, xlii, 519. 

CANADENSE, XXX, 93. 

cantharidis, Ph. Dublin (50), xxiii„ 

13. 

of caoutchouc, xxxi, 389. 

of sulphuret of carbon, Wertzer, 

iv, 86. 

for CHILBLAINS, iv, 351 ; xi, 170. 

chloroformi in toothache (is gela- 
tinized chloroform, W. & B., 963), 
xxxiii, 338. 
cosmetic, vii, 351. 



r'KEPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR KESPECTIVE CLASi^. 



133 



IINIMENTUVI CROTOXis, Ph. Dublin (50), 
xxiii, 13. 

DiALYTic, bltamitious, Socquet aud 

Bonjean, xxix, .315. 

, ETHEREAL, 8ocquet and Bon- 
jean, xxix, 315. 

FoRESTiETi (tiair dye), viii, 260. 



11. 



liniment, chauges 
Hebra. xl. 



XXIX. 



xvu. 



85— 
Oom- 



lODiNii, i, 91— Ph. TJ. S. (30), 

— made with soap 

color, V, 201. 
for ITCH (aristocratic) 

253. 

of OIL OF E!{C:OT, xv, 320. • 

■ ., ETHERKAL, XV. 320. 

• POTASSiT lODiDi, Duhamel, xiv, 102 — 

Smith (glvceria and water instead of 
alcohol), xlii, 245 — Wiegand (Par- 
rish, 773), xxx, 406 Compare Opo- 
deldoc, lODlZEI*. 

for PILES, Stearns (tobacco), 

527. 

QUiNi^: VALERIA XATis, Devav 

72. 

St. John Long. Guthrie, ix 

Procter, jr., xxviii, 311, note, 
pare Liximexttai. Stokes. 

SAPOXIS CAMPIIORATUM, Ph. U. S. 

(30). additi(»n of water uecessaiy, iv, 
107_PA. f7. ,S'. (40), the same,"Car- 
son, xxi, 206 — Duhaniel, xv, 163 — 
Hallows, xxi, 178 — Ross (with castor 
oil and aramonia). xxi, 298 — Ph. U. 
S. (60), Moore (boiliag water), xli, 
121, 222 — Procter, jr. (separation of 
•margarate of soda), xlii, 270, note 
— Wood (almond oil, fulpharic acid, 
etc.), xlii, 268. 

SAPOXATO-onLOROFOKMATi M. See Op- 
odeldoc C H L O R O F li M A l' L' M . 

, Stokbs, xxviii, 310 — Baxley. xxviii, 

570 — Procter, jr., xxviii, 311, note. 
Compare St. Johx Long. 

succtxi coMPOsiTUM (ecleclic). xxxi, 

390. 

TURPENTIXE, ACETIC. See LlMMKX- 

TUM, Stokes. 
LINN, sweet gum (Nev.- Jersey), xxwiii. 
33. 

LINOLEIN. Mulder, xl. 259. 

LINOLEUM, mauuficture, xxxviii. 372. 

LINOXYN, Mulder, xl. 259. 

LINT. Compare Linkn. 

. ahsorbincj power, Kuscheuberger, 

XXXV, 161 — versus oaluin, Raschen- 
berger, xxxv, 160; Sayre, xxxiv, 411 
— .uihslitule.d by asbestos. Dumont, 
xxvii, 317 — by pinked cotton, Doug- 
lass, xxxii, 180 — by oakum, Sayre, 

xxxiv, 411; Rusclieaberger. xxw. 
160. 

, j»atknt, preparation, x xxiii. 3f)0 — 

xxxv. 41. 

— — vauiktiks, xxxiii, 35!) — Bell, xxiii. 



-Luke and Tusiin, xxiii. 162, 



LTNUM. See Flax. 

LIP-SALVE, vii, 349— Biinghurst, xxxix, 
348. 

, populinated, Deschamps, xv, 262. 

, ROSE, and white, Piesse, xxviii, 86. 

LTQU 1 D P E A R L . Laird , co mp os i t i o n , Ch an- 
dler. xlii, 367. 

LIQUIDS, hoili.ny (see Boiling) — purified 
in the state of vapor, Squibb, xxx, 1 — 
rate of flow through a injphon^ Ualletly, 
xxxvii, 376 — tramfcrrfd from carboys 
and casks to bottles. Hare, v, 338. 

LIQUIDAMBAR altixgia, v, 260. 

, ORiENTALis, V, 260— origin of 

liquid storax. Hanbur}-, xxix, 258. 

, STVRACIFLUA. Iv, 210; V, 260 — 

iiiedkdl pro)>erties, Wrigiit, xxviii, 413 

— remarks, Procter, jr., xxix, 261, note 

— resin contains vinmfinie acid. Han- 
bury, xxix, 478 — Procter, jr., xxxviii, 
33 — resin examined, Creecy (W. k B., 
1549), xxxii, 197. 

. Compare Styrax. 

LIQUOR, SALE l)y apothecaries, editorials, 

xxx, 91 ; xxxix, 284 — petition from 
Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, 
xxsix, 380. 381. Com[)are Alcohoi,, 

SALE. 

. Compare SoLCTfo. 

ACACiyK, Procter, jr.. xxiv, 221. 

ACiDi SLMiPHFRosf. Procter, jr., xxix, 

110. 

ALEMixis coMPOsrrrs, Ph. U. S, (30), 

ii, 327. 

AMMoKi-E ACKTATis, Bvrnes (dilution 

after neutralization), xxxvii, 38T — 
Maisch, xxxii, 52.3 — Pile (extempore 
from solutions), xxxix, 45— Ph. HeU 
verica (65), xxxix. 534 — inialm.^ and 
tluidrachm. Proctor, xxxv, 248. 

AMMONtr <;at:sti('!:s. fcee A(,>l'a am- 

MONI.E. 

AXTIMOXIf TERCHLOUIDf, dtCoiUpOSed by 

oxalic acid. Slater, xxviii, 3 15 — color 
of e-'<char, vii, 262 —for preparation of 
lake^i, Lamf)adius, xxv, 467 — precipi- 
tated by water, Baudrimont, xxviii, 
464 — prrparatio!), Cottereau, vii, 286 
— Larocque. xxii, 79 — Pli. Helveti<'a 
(65), xxxix, 534. 

AXTISEPTICLS, PciUlCS. XXxix. 4 i 7. 

ARSENIC! CHLoRiitf. medicinal value. 

Haselden, xxix, 3 15. 

ET HYDKAIMiVRI lOOIDI, Ph. U.S. 

(40), simplified, Procter, jr . xix, 9.'{ — 
Ph. Dublin (50), xxiii, 13 — itnprove<l, 
Pedrelli (with iodide of potassium), 
xxxix, 182 — medicinal value, Hasel- 
den. xxix. 316 — cause of red color, 

xxxi, 4 10. 

ftlSMCTIll ET AMMONr.K C;I I'):ATJS, Brtrt- 

lelt [\S.k B., 1028, note), xxxvii, 3 — 
Piluut (works with less acid and morn 
coiieeiitrated solutions), xxwii, 2S«i 



[10] 



.134 



SALTS, hKE UNDKK LATIN NAME OF BAHE ; 



LI Q COR [Coi,tin>ied). 

— Ebert (with citric acid and po- 
tassa), xxxviii. 1 — Markoe (assaj with 
Kiiipbide of sodium), xxxix, 141 — 
(subsiitntes carbonate of soda for 
caustic potassa), xli, 150 — Redwood 
(rf commends the formula of Ph. 
Britaunica (64) ),xl, 406 — Tichborue. 
xxxvi, liil — Wood (cr3Sta]lized ter- 
nitrate oi' bismuth), xl, 261 — discus- 
sion in I'harmaceutical Society, Lou- 
don, xxxvi, 163. 

KKOMLNir coMPOs-iTUs, Irawi-eucc 

Smith (W. *t B., 174), xxxv, 2(i2. 

(7ALC1S. hrliavior to animal charcoal, 

Graham, iii. 151 — prcparahon^ Ph. 
Helvetica (65) xxxix. 531 — Ph. Lon- 
don (24), Pre!. No. 11* — limit of /^(/f!- 
^w/? (phosphoric acid : arsenious acid), 
Hastings, xiii, 202. 

CHhoiuNAT.^'j, Chevallier: La- 

bai-raqnc ; Massuyer, i, 278 — Ph. Dub- 
lin (50). xxiii, 11. 

CAUi{()M> oKTBuaExs, xxxix. 4(57. 

cHiiiK')' iMN.K, Kemp, xlii, 535. 

Clll.OKo.MOKI'UIxE coMi'osrn s (----clilo- 

rodyne), Ldw. Smith, xlii, 2(S7. Com- 
pare CniiOiionYXK. j 

ciN'CHo.N.+:, Batiley, iv. 170; viii, 3't!t.| 

' FKIUU A( KTATI3. See LjIQl.OJi KKliCl 

PEUACKTATIS. 

KKUiii KT AMMOM.-?-; Ai ;KT ATis, Bcral, 

iv, 61. 

KKUUI CIILOKIOI. Sre L]QUOf! FEEKl 

PRKCUIiORIDI ; SESyL'Il,'HLOP.II)I. 

FRUR] ciTRATis, Fleurot, xxxvi, 438, 

note — Ph. U. S. (60), remarks, Proc- 
ter, jr., XXX vii, 329. 

FEliRl lODlDI, xxxi, 409 — T. dud H. 

Smith, xix, 101 — Squire (W. k B., 
1136, note), xiv, 57 — Thomson, xiv, 
59— 'I'izier, xxiii, 89 — Tozier, xxv, 56. 

, Ph. U. 8. (30), Durand 

(extfuipore from iodide of iron), iv, 
287 — Procier, Jr. (comparison of sac- 
charine substances, recommends syr- 
up, honey, fruit-sufrar), xii, 13, 17 — 
J'k. U. S. (40), Bridges (on dark co- 
lor), -xv, 71 — Procter, jr. (treatment 
of honey), xii, 323 ; (extempore), 
xviii, 174— 7 V*. U. S. (50). Battey 
(preserved by iron wire), xxxi, 205 — 
Chapman (filter into syrup) xxxi. 559 
— Crew (with iron V)y hydrogen), xxvi, 
8 — Fougera (iodine added in small 
quantities). xxxii, 22 — Maisch 
(changes and restoration, W. & B..| 
1370), xxvi, 408; (effects of sun-! 
light), xxvii, 218 — Mayer (hyposul-i 
phite of soda), xxxii, 171, 175 — Pile j 
(increased amount of sugar), xxxiv, | 
299 — Squibb (reduction of amount of! 
iron ; filtering into syrup), xxxi, 54 — ; 
Thayer (glycerin and sugar ). xxx. 390 | 



— Wayne (grape sugar formed ; W. 
& B., 1370), xxvii, 3d3—Fh. U. S, 
(60), see Sybupus fkrbi iodidi. 
. . Compare Syeupus fkiiri 

IODIDI. 

. NORMAL, Dupasquier, xiii,. 

117. 

xjTRATis, Kerr, xxxix, 171 — 

Procter, jr., xxiii, 312 ; xxix, 306 ; 
xxxv. 111 ; xxxvii, 328. 

PEUACETATis, Maisch, xxxix, 7 — 

Procter, jr., xxxii, 3o9. 

pKRCHLORiDi, Ph. Britaunica (64), 

antidote to hydrocyanic acid ; anti- 
mony and arsenic, T. and H. Smith,. 

xxxviii, 12, 16 — ??6w^'-m^and unaltera- 
ble, Adrian, xxxiii, 327 — exUmpore, 
Procter, jr., xxxvii, 327 — preparation, 
Beral, iv, 62; xxxvii, 21. Compare 

LltJUOR FERBI SESQUICHLORIDI. 

PHOSPiiATis. Procter, jr., xxxi, 

413. 

l'(»TASS]0-ClTnATIS, Todd. XV,. 

158. 

ET QT JXI.E I'DOSPHATIS, CaltelL 

xxiv, 173. 

SE.sQrjCHLoRiDi. Ph. Borussif-a 

(46). xxxiv, 21— Ph. Helvetica (65), 

xxxix, 534. Compare Lk^uor ferri 

PERCH LORIDI. 
ET SOD.E XlTKK'O-CnLOKIDI. XXVi, 

279. 

ET SDD.^': PYROPHOHPilATJS, 

Maisch, xxxix, 388, 395. 
sUBSULPHATis, Mousel , xxxi,.403 

— Procter, jr. (constitution), xxxi, 403; 

xxxvii, 328 — Squibb, xxxii, 33. 
TERSULPHATis, Procter, jr., xxv, 

105; xxxvii, 328— Squibb, xxxii, 29 

— Thompson, xxxiii, 266. 
ouTT.E PERCH.ii, XX, 254 — colorless, 

Hodgson, jr. (carbonate of lead), 

xxxiii, 201 — Maisch (with chloroform 

alone), xxviii, 208. 
Habxemanni (probatoriusj,i, 57, note. 

HYDRAR(;YRr NITRICI OXVDULATI. Ph. 

Helvetica (65), xxxix, 534, 

PEBNiTRA'i IS, Ph. Dublin (50), 

xxiii, 13. 

lODiNii, Coindet, i. 89 — Jackson, vi, 

116. 

ET AciDi carcot-k;!, Boniton,xl, 

329. 

KALI. See Liquor potassyK. 

MAGNESLU c hlobixat.e, Fairthornc, 

xl, 70. 

.magnesia: citrates, Allaire, xxxix, 

169 — Atkinson, jr., xl, 16 — Bardet, 
xix, 265 — Buck and Criswell, xxxix, 
112 — Maisch, xxxix, 1 — Parrisl) and 
Smith, xxiv, 117 — Procter, jr., xxii, 
113; xxiii, 214 — Rabourdin, xx, 255 
— Roge Delabarre, xix, 221, 222— 
Rother (with carl»onate of soda) xlii. 



PRErABATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



135 



LIQUOR {Continued). 

171 — Steai-DB (Parrish, 405), xx\, 31 
— Warner (with[ sulphate of magne- 
sia), xxxix, 397 — Watson, xxxiii, 121 
— proposed subslituled by tartro-citric 
leraoiuide, Lawrence Sraitl), xxx, 89; 
xxxii, 408. 

MAGNBSij') TAiiTKATis, Aviat, xix, 2(55. 

< MOKPiK.K ACETATis, Pli. Dublin (50). 

xxiii, 10. 

coMPOSiTUS, Bonsall, xxvi, 220. 

Mi;coxAi'i,s, Wajue, xxxix, 104 

— reniarlcs. Trocter, jr., xxxix, 104. 
Ml KiATis, Ph. Dublin (50) xxiii. 

I 0. 

Si LPUATis, Pluminer (wiib 

HottYnaiin's anodyne), xxvii, 30 1 — ■ 
Ph. U. 8. (30), iii, 83, 207. 

\ATKi. See Liquor j^iODyii. 

(tiTi (jOMPOsn'us, Sijuibb (W. k B., 

1404, note), xxxii, 120; xlii, 33 — re- 
marks, Zwick, xlii, 130^ 141. 

SEDATivns, Battley, viii, 3PJ — 

Pedwood, xxiii, 213, note — Procter, 
Jr., xxxviii, 304 — Southiill, x\xix, 550. 

OPH SIMPLEX, Squibb, xlii, 37, 5o. 

PLfJJ[RJ SUP.ACETATIS, I'll. U. S. (30), 

iii, S3— D. B. Smith, Prel. Xo. 42— 
(Iropti in drachm, Beriu)uilly, xxxi, 

41 j prepariiiloii^ Ph. Dublin (50), 

xxiii, 9 — Ph. Helvetica (05), xxxix, 
534 — Nerning- (cold })rocess), xlii, 467. 

POTA,ss.E, protected from carbonic acid. 

Mohr, xxvii, 511— as solvent for vm/zc- 
• resin.^j xxxvii, 30-1- — prevent .sfopj>er.'^ 
fi'om sticking; (paraffin ), xxxiii, 502 — 
preparation, iledwood (W. & B,, 1212, 

note), xxxiii, 241 Ph. Helvetica 

(65), xxxix, 534. 

APvSKXiTiH, Salles {on different 

formulas), ix, 116 decomposition, 

Jianiher, xxx, 233 — Canavaii (W. &j 
W . 1215), xxiv, 225 — drops in fluid- j 

drachm, Durand, i, 160 )iiedi,ci)iiil\ 

value, Haselden, xxix, 345 — Ph. Hel- { 
vetica (65). xxxix, 534. 

BBOMO-ARSKNiATis, Clcmens, 

XXXV, 100, 

pi.:i{m.vn(;anat[.s, Lecoute, xxxvi, 

40. 

looiDi, Magendie, i. 89. 

P0TA.S8H i(>i>ii>[ coMPOsiTus, Ph. Dub- 
lin (50), xxiii, 13. 

PROHATORUJ.S H A H N KM A X N f, i, 57, 

note 

SKDAT/VUS, BaTTLKY. SeC \j\(^{H)K 

OPfr SKIiATlVUH. 

soD.K. Ph. Dublin (50), xxiii, 17. 

APHKMTis, Ilasekicn, xxix, 346. 

CHf.oiM.NA'iM';, (johen (strictures 

on Durand's articles ''on the chlo- 
rides," i, 272; iv, 271), iv, 205; v, 
37 — behavior to charcoal, (iraham. 
iii, 152 — r.oitrpofHtiori. Kavaiiii}>'h, xvii, 



384), 
518), 
91— 



226 — Granville, Prel. No. 105— pre- 
paration, Faraday, i, 280 — Payen, x, 
282— Labarraque, i, 279. 

— TABTRATTS, Lawreiicc vSaiith, 

xxx, 89 ; xxxii, 408. 

— 8T1B1I MURIATIGI. See LlQUOB ANTI- 
MONII TERCHLORIDI. 

— van SwiETKN, xiii, 10 t. 
~ TAEiAXAor, (Jiles, xxvii, 129. 
~ TARTARX lo.METici, Ph. Dublin (26), 

iii, 329. 

— Vn-LACE, Houel, xxxix, 85. 

j VLKMfNnKX, xl, 523. 

I zixci CHLOR[i>r, I'll. Dublin (50), 

xxiii, 11 — drops in drachiQ, Bernou- 
illy, xxxi, 441. 

LIQUORICE, conijjHi'alive experiments, 
Zier, vi, 227 — statistic, Simmonds, 
xxxiv, 449. Compare Extractuii 

GLYCYRHHIZ.E. 

, REFINED, Geissler (W. & B., 

XXV iii, 225. 
LIRTODKNDRIN, Emmet (VV. k B., 
iii, 5. 

LIIUODENDRO.V tilipipeua, xiv, 

analysi.-t, Knnnet, iii, 5 — dcscrip/ ion Sind 

properlie?5, Benj. lOllis. iii, 11 as 

tonic^ V. 2h6. 
LITCHI FRUITS, Mayer, xxxvi, 295, 
LlTflAPtGE, behoKior to chmrcoal, Gra- 
ham, iii, 152 — rompo.Hition., Leblanc, 
xvii, 270 — decolorizinp j)ower, Filhol, 

xxiv, 239 — power of dissolving oxy~ 
(jcti when fused, Leblanc, x'vii, 270 — 
temperature o\' redui-iion by hydrogen, 
Mullor, xli, 3:55. Compare Lead, ox- 
ide. 

, LITHIA from lepidolite, Haner, xxix, 
167. 

, CARBONATE, as solveut for stone, Ure 

(W. k B., 517), XY, 227. 

, NITRATE, xxxiii, 77. 

, OXALATE, xxxiii, 77. 

, oxioK, preparation, Booth, xxxiii, 76. 

, PHOSPHATE, xxxiii, 76. 

, SULPHATE, xxxiii, 76. 

, URATE, Schilling, xxxv, 30. 

WATER. See Water, Lithia. 

LITHIUM, Bunsen, xxvii, 359 — in fertile 
soil, Salm-Horstmar, xxxiii, 222 — 
and its salts, xxxiii, 75. 

, BitoMiDE, Mayer, xxxiv, 295. 

, (MTLoniDE, xxxiii, 76. 

IODIDE, Mayer, xxxiv, 293. 

, suLPHURET, xxxiii, 76. 

LITHOGRAPHS by photography, Ramsey, 

xxviii, 173. 
LITHONTRIPTTCS, Bouchardat, xv, 145. 
LITMUS, behavior to boracic and car- 
bonic acids, Malaguti, xxv, 528 — col- 
oring matter, Pereira, xxl, 3.36 — pre- 
paratio", de Luynes, xxxvii, 2.37 — 
.Miiller, xxv, 81— preservation, Vogel, 
/xxvi, 340. 



136 



SALT8, iSJvi: UNJ>J<:R NAM JO OF P.ABK 



LITMUS PATKi!, Vucher, xl, 430. 
LITSEA zf:ylanic:a, xii. 221. 
LTXIVJATION, Compfu-e Pkrcolation. 

of onimal and vegptablc jjubstances, 

Soubeiran, viii. 221. 
LIZARI, xvi, 42. 

LOBELIA cAiiDiNAi IS, aiialy>i?. Procter, 

jr., xi, 280. 2«a. 
iNFLATA, leaves, Procter, jr. (W. Jv: 

B., 519). ix. 08, 108— as emetic, iv, 

282 — preitarations, Procter, jr., xiv. 

108. 

, SEED.-;. Procter, jr. (^V. k )».. 

519), xiii, 1. 

LONGiFLORA a«? emetic, iv. 282. 

SYPHILITICA, (Iriflltli, viii, 191. 

LOBELINA, behavior to iodohydrargy- 
rate of potassium and nitrate of sil- 
ver, Mayer, xxxvii, 211 — preparation 
and properties. Calhoun, v, :>00 — 
Procter, jr. [W.' k B., 519), ix. 105: 
xiii, 8 — salt.';, Calhoun, v. ;;00 — Proc- 
ter, jr. (lubeliate, ranriate. nitrate, 
oxalate, sulphate), xiii, 9. 

fiOCUSTS, poisonous nature, xl, 45.'!. 

LOCUST, SEVKXTKKX-YnAK, See Ck-ada 

SEPTEMDKCIM. 

. See Ckkatoxia siliqua. 

TPvKE. See RoiilNIA pskuoacacia. 

LOG WOOD, charcoal, absorption of am- 
monia, carbonic acid, and cyan<)^(>n. 
Smith, XXXV, 5(;.'). 

LONICER-i mai:ylax])ica is SpujEf.fA ua- 

KYLAXDICA. iv, 1. 

LOPEZ crystals are oxalate of lime. 

xxxvii, ;>2. 
LOTIO. Compare Liximextum. 
ALBA ROKACTS. Washington formula, 

xl, 239. 

for BURXS, iv. 258. 

CANTHAIUDES with glvccrin, xl, 52:>. 

FERPii lODiDi, Pierquin vi, 178. 

GLYCERiNi. See Glycerin lotion ; 

compare Glycerole. 

, Gowland's, Foy, xv'x, 320. 

, Granville ( Parrish, 746), xi, 174. 

HYDRASTIS COMPOSITA, XXvii, 110: 

xxxi, 390. 

, MOTH and F!;Ec;Kf,E, Perry's compo- 
sition, Chandler, xiii. 360. 

, NEURALGIA, RoUX, vi, 261. 

, PAPiiiAN, PhalonV", composition. 

Chandler, xiii, 300. 
for PUSTULAR ERUPTION ou the face. 

Siemerling, viii, 87. 
SEDATIVA Raspail, xiii. 262 ; xxviii. 

221. 

LOTOUPi P.ARK. See LATf>rR bark. 
LOUISVILLE chemical works, xxix, 478, 
LOYAGE root, .Lapanese, Mayer, xxxvi, 289 
LOZENGES. Compare Pastilles : Tro- 
cnisci — ailiing. Turner, xxxix, 206 — 
dryinq^ Wiegaud (quicklime), xxxv, 
1 17. ' 



-, alkalixk 
No. 84. 

-, AMMO.MA, 
xxiv, 36. 

-. ClIAUCOAL, 



DIG EST I VK, d'Arcet, Prel. 
Jackson (Parrish, 277), 



ii, 102. 

, CHOCOLATE and luox, Quevenne, xxvii, 

315 — Simes, xxvii, 315. 

, COLD in the head, iv, 172. 

. corciH, Tronchin, ii, 250. 

, MILK, iv, 174. 

.PECTORAL. -Jackson (Parrish, 277), 

xxiv. .35. 

. Si'J'I'ta's, iv, 172. 

lor thsrst, ii. 251. 

, AV)LD C1IERR.V. Wat'tifr. xxxi. 22. 

, WORM (Wlu^eler's ). Morse, xiii. .■'.14. 

LUBAN from Aden, xxv. 151. 
LUBRK.'ATING com])()und and oil. Hill, 

XX vi, 87. 

LUOERNK, yield of oxalic acid by j.otas- 
1 sa, l^-)?soz. XXX, 552, 
'LUCIFERS (matches), x.vxiv. 149. 
LrCULlA, vii, 334— DeCandolle. ii. 294 
— Wood. iii. 24 — a'^diutlioit. Don, xi, 
247. 

L U M 1 N ( ) S I'F Y . See i ' n s i ■ 1 1 < > rt k s c k n c f. . 

LUNAR CAT STIC, See Aitci-.NTi nfiras. 

LUPULIX, accoHiiL Tufts (W. X- B., 448, 
note). xx\iii.77 — hrhar,',)/- Ut chromaie 
of t>otas-^a and sulphuric aci:i. Eboli, 
xxix. 3*;9 — chfiniiral liistory, Pcr^onne, 
x.wii, 24 — where J'otrtid. Raspail, v, 
295 — examination of volatile "//. S'er- 
sonne, xxvi, 311 : xxvii, 25 — cotirains 
raferiaiiir acid. Person ne. xxvi, ;;11; 
xxvii, 25. 

LUPUfilNE. Personne's, xxvii, 27, 

LUTE for bottling, v, ir2. 

. Compare ( 't<:Mi;N r. 

LUTEOLTK (in white Ib.wcrs). FilhoL 

xxvi, 546. 

LUTIDIN (from coal far), xxxiii. 41. 
LUZURIAGA RADiCAXs, sutisti! ute Ibi' sar- 

saparilla in Peru, v, 25!*. 
LYCINA (W. & ]?.. 1551), llusemann and 

Marmc, xxxvi, 225. 
LY'CIUM BARBARUM, analysis. llusemann 

and Marm6 (W.& B., 1551 ), xxxvi, 225. 
LYCOCTONINA, lliibschmann, xxxviii, 

376 — Fliickiger, xiii, 23.5, 236. 
LYCOPERDON cfrvixum contains ergoti- 

nate of secalina, Winckler, xxv, 414. 
CRYPTUS LUPi for stupefying bees, 

xxvii, 376. 

GiGANTEUM, an oe.sth etic property due 

to carbonic oxide, Tferapath., xxvii, 
464 — for stupefying liees. xxvii, 376. 

HORRENDUM for stuifcfy ing bees. xxvii, 

376 

PROTKUS, antesthetic property due to 

carbonic oxide, flerapaih. xxvii, 464. 

, Compare Boletus, 

LYCOPERSICUM esculkxtum. See To- 
mato. 



PREFARATIONS, UNDEK THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



13T 



LYCOPUiJJUM, adulieration, Frank, xxxiv,, 

330 — collection in United States, 

Maisch, xlii, 70. 
COMPLANATUM, analjsis of ashes, 

Salm-Horstruar, contain alumina^ xx, 

159 ; fluoriih", xxxiii, 406. 
SPECIKS in United States, Maisch [alo- 

/u:curoides ; annotiimm ; carol 'mianum ; 

coinplanatum ; dendroideum ; inanda- 

lum ; lucidulum ; selayo)^ xlii, 70, 71. 
LYCUPUS, Griffith, Tii, 192. 
LYE, titration, Granger, xxxiii, 315. ! 
LYNOXYN. See Linoxyx. | 
LYTTA, different species, Durand, ii, 273 \ 



ADSPEUSA, Burmcister, xxxvii, 2G9. 

ALBiDA, ii, 278 ; athata, ii, 281 ; 

CINKREA, ii, 279. 

GiGAS, Jackson, Prel. No. 51. 

MARGINATA, ii, 280; XCTTALLIJ, 

Prel. No. 52 ; ii, 277. 

PUNCTATA, Burmeister, xxxvii, 269. 

RUFiPES, Carson, viii, 265. 

SYuiACA mixed with officinal canthar- 

ides, Batka, xvii, 79. 
viTTATA, ii, 278 — seat of vesicating 

principle Leidy (W.& B., 206), xxxii, 

157. 

, Compare C A. vTUAiiis ; Melob. 



-Ml. 



M. 1)., how to become, Maisch, xxxix, 
473. 

McMUNN^S KLixiR. See Elixir opii, 

MACAKANGA indjca, its gwm for taking 
impressions of coins, etc., xxix, 79. 

MACERATING apparatus. Giles, xxxix. | 
174. j 

MACEIIATION^, vaccum, Duffield, xli, 2, 
note. 

compared to percolatiox, BouUay 

and Guillermoud, X, 10. 
MACLUllA auraxtiaca not identical with 

Broussonetia tinctoria, Griffith, vi, 

22. 

MACRA zamia. xxix, 226. 

MACROTIN, Parrish, xxiii, 334— Procter, 

jr., xxvi, 106. 
MA(JROTYS RACEMOSA. See Cimicifuga. 
MADDER, account, Girardiu, xn, 42, 123 

— Gaulthier and Persoz, iv, 257 — 

adulteration^ xvi, 123. 

in Algeria, xxvii, 107. 

in Asia Minor, xxxii, 465. 

. Compare Rubia tinctobum. 

MJ^SA PICT A, vermifuge from Abyshinia, 

xxvii, 474 — seeds contain horacic acid, 

Wittstein and Apoiger, xxx, 159. 
MAGENTA, composition, HolFmann, xxxv, 

3 42 

MAGNESIA. See Magnesia, ('alcixed : 

, Hydrate. 

, ACHii.LEATK, Zanon, xix, 58. 

, ACETATE, cr3^slallized, Hauer, xxviii, 

245 — as purgative, Renault (W. & B.. 

1452), XX, 303. 
ALBA, Pattinson's, composition. 

Fownes, xvi, 113 — Ber/elius, xvi, 115 

— Phillips, xvi, 115. Comj)are 

CARBON AS. 

, BORATE, Wcehler, vi, 353. 

, BiTARTRATK, Ph. HaonovcrAn n , xxv, 

472. 

— and BROMINE. U(jewig, ii, 176. 



, CALCINED, on dili'crent kinds, Miaihe, 

xvi, 272 — adulteration^ Hart, vii, 10 — 
as antidote to arsenic^ Bussy (W. &B., 
30), xviii, 179; (remarks by Procter, 
jr., xviii, 180) — Christison, xviii, 287 
— Schrader, xxvii, 533 — influence of 
sugar, Carles, xlii, 510 — gives to as- 
■sajcetida mixtures a greenish color, 
iii, 199 — behavior to autimoniate of 
potassa, Wackeuroder, xvi, 39 — esii- 
niation, in presence of potassa and 
soda, Scheerer, xxxii, 445 — its hy- 
draalicity, Deville, xxxviii, 182 — turns 
solid in mixtures, iii, 290 ; Hodgson, 
jr., iv, 10 — due to sulphate of lime, 
Hart, vii, 10 — separation fi'om polais- 
■■sa and soda, Liebig, vii, 169 — prepa- 
ration, Vee (W. & B, 1223, note), 
xxxiv, 522 — from magnesit, Lacretaz, 
V, I — seawater, D. B Smith, Prel. No. 

6; iv, 188 — (compare light and 

heavy) — preservation, Cottereau, viii, 
169 — reaction, limit, Hastings, xiii, 
203 — solubility in water, Fresenius, 
xix, 52 — test for lime ; alumina, Vee, 
xxxiv, 525 — deprives Valeriana of 
smell, Planche, v, 349, 

, HEAVY, analysis, Barr (Ellis ; 

Henry; Husband), xxvi, 199 — Proc- 
ter, jr. (Ellis; Husband, W. & B.» 
1224, note), xxii, 383 — EUis\ remarks, 
Procter, jr. ( \V. k B., 1224, note), 
xxii, 383 — Henry's, remarks, Benj. 
Ellis ; Robiquet. i. 72 — Husband's, 
remarks, James, xxviii, 7 ; Procter, 
jr. (W. & B., 1224, note), xxii, 383— 
preparatiou : Barr (W. & B., 1224, 
note), xxvi, 193 — Colas, xvii, 132 — 
Dalpias, xvii, 131 — Durand. v, 9; xvii, 
132— Griffith, iv, 201— Planche, xvii, 
132 — Phillij)3, xvii, 117 — Robinet, iv, 
2 1 —We a ve r x xviii, 214. 

, LiGH'!', Durand, v, 8. Compare 

, /ire/'uration. 



138 



SALT3, SEE UNDER LA.TIN NAME OF BASE ; 



MAGNESIA, CARBON AT K, NATIVE, account. 
xxvii, ;>G4. 

, MANUB'ACTURE : from bittern. 

xxvii, 367 — from dolomite, Pattinson 
(W. &B.,524, note), xxvii, 368— Rich- 
ardson, xxrii, 36V — from epsorn sall.f. 
Henry, xxvii, 3G5 — from magnesite, 
Durand (W. & B., 523), v, 7— Lan- 
derer, xxiii, 275 — Richardson xxvii, 
370 — from sea loater^ D. B. Smith, 
Prel. No. 7: iv, 189—50//, Durand, iv, 
201 — tent for purity, Procter, jr., xxiii, 
319. Compare Magxeslv alba. 

, HKAVY. Pereira (W. k B., 

524). xxvii, 3G7~Phil]ips, jr. (W. k 
B., 1224), xvi, 117. 

, CATHARTATE, Groves, xli, 73. 

crrnATh^^comjjosiiion^lloge Delabarre, 

xix, 221 — preparation, Chas. Ellis (Par- 
rish, 407), xxvi, 306— Hager (W. 
B., 1208, note), xxxvi, 18 ; xxxix, 317 
-de Letter (W. &B., 1208,' note),xxxv, 
312 — Menier, xxxix, 317 — Plunimer 
and Kelly, xxxi, 407 — llobiquet (Par- 
rish, 406). xxvii, 317 — Roge Dela- 
barre, xix, 218. 

, CRYSTALi.T/]' 1) Morelli, xxxviii, 

300. 

, GRVNCLATKD, Archibald, 

xlii, 231 — Dorvault, xxiv, 114 — Lan- 
derer (Parrish, 407)^ xxxiii, 409— Mill, 
xxxix, 65 — Parrish and Aml>r. Smith 
(Parrish, 406; , xxiv, 115. 

, POWDER, Mill, xxxix, 65. 

, SOLUTION. See Liquor yjxG- 

^iESlM CITRATIS. 

CYLINDERS for Dniuimoud's light. 

Phillips, xli, 240. 

DiGiTALATK, Morin, xvii, 183. 

, Dinxkford's. Davy, xii, 324. 

draught, Gobley, xvi, 274. Com- 
pare MaGXESIA MEDIOINl!;. 

, EPFEKVESCENT, Moxox's. See Moxox. 

et PEKRI CITBA.S. See FeKRI ET MAUr- 

NESI-^'] CITRAS. 
, FERRI KT QUJNIvE SULl'HAS. See FeR- 

RI, QUJN1.10 ET MAGNESI.E SULPHAS. 

, FLfiD (Murray's), Antisel, xxvi, 364. 

, HYDRATE, as antidote in arsenic jioi- 

soning, Schuchardt, xxv, 462, (com- 
pare ilAGXESiA, OALCIXED, arsenic — 
^'acchari:;cd {Whhii's). Procter, jr., xxv, 
214. 

HYPOOHLORurE. Hot reliable as anti- 
dote to phosphorus, Sclirader. xxix. 
32. 

, MiLic. as antidote to phosphorus, 

Landerer, xxvii. 538. 

MEDICINE, Mialhe, xvi, 273, 280. Com- 
pare Magnesia draught. 

— , Moxox s. Soe MoxoN. 

, RiciNATE, xxxiii, 410. 

SULPHAS, afhillrratioit (snljjhate of 

soda), Bart, vii. 9 ; Aluhla, xl, 548 — 



(sulphate of zinc), Labarra(iue and 
Lecanu, i, 155 — mamtfacture from do- 
lomite, Gregson, xviii, 231 — from 
raagnesite (W, k B., 526), Durand, v, 
1 — from sea water, D. B. Smith, Prel. 
No. 6: iv, 188 — removal of iron and 
sulphate of lime, Wurtz, xxxi, 68 — 
reduction of temperature by solution, 
Rudorff. xli, 426 — bitter ^a.s'/fi removed, 
Combes (tannin), xix, 300 — Henry, 
(acid), vi, 174 — Plummer (coffee), 
xxrii, 306 — test for purity, Procter, 
jr.. xxiii. 1 10. 

— PURUS, Ph. Dublin (26), iii.327. 

suLPHurE. preparation, etc., Polli, 

xxxiv, 447 — Remington, xl, 97 — 
Sticht, xl, 32— Wittsteiu, xl, 97. 

suLPHO-CARBOLATE, Sansom, xli, 445. 

TARTRATE. See MAGNESIA BITAR- 

TRATE. 

MAGNESITE, in manufacture of magne- 
sia and its salts, Durand, v, 1. 
MAGNESIUM, action on iodide of ethyl 
and methyl, Cahours, xxxv, 106 — 
preparadoi) and properties, Bunsen, 
xxv, 346— Bussy, ii, 164: iv, 165 — 
Deville and Caron, xxix. 350 — Liebig, 
iv, 167 — Reynolds, xxxvii, 2iil~pw-i- 
fied by distillaiion in hydrogen atmos- 
phere. Sonstadt, xxxvii, 284 — in toxi- 
cology, Roussin, xxxviii, 455 — volati- 
lization, Deville and Caron, xxix, :'.59. 

and BROMINE, Loewig, ii, 176. 

, cnLf)RiDE, Bussy. iv, 165 — Lebert 

(W. &B., 1493), xvi, 157— Sonstadt, 
xxxvii, 282 — cylindprsUn Drummond's 
light, Phillips, xli, 2 40. 

LIGHT, See Light, Magnesium. 

and NITROGEN, Briegleb andGeuther, 

xxxv, 33. 

and THALLIUM allov. Mellor, xxxix, 

442. 

MAGNETS, artificial, Florimond, xxvi, 
165 — improved, Faraday, xxiii, 177 — 
in Philadelphia Museum, vi, 153. 
MAGNIUM. See Magnesium. 
MAGNOLIA glauca, analyyis, Harrison, 
xxxiv, 29 — contains neither tannin, 
nor gallic acid, xiv, 93 — as tonic, Y, 
286. 

GRANDiFLORA, analysis. Steph. Proc- 
ter (W. & B., 529), 'xiv, 89, 95. 

TRiPETALA, leavcs as dressing for 

blisters,Wilson (W.&B., 529), xxvi, 535 

in PERFUMERY, Picssc, xxvi, 460. 

MAGUEY. See Gum, Maguey. 
MALA iNSANA, xxi, 267. 
MALAMBO bark (Matias). analysii. Cadet 
( W. & B., 1551), xxix, 2— Dancy, xxix, 
215, 219 — A^auquelin. xv, 266 — origin^ 
Karsten, xxxii, 161 — properties, Par- 
rish, xxix, 103 — Ure, xv, 265 ; xxix, 
2 — as ppurioas Winf^rs Imrk, Wayne, 
xxix, 1. 



PREPAKATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



139 



MA LLOTUS I'MiLiPPixious is Rottlera tinc- 

toria, xl, 14 \ 
MALPIGfllA TUBEucuLATA, red dye from 

Peru, iii, 265. 
MALYA Behriaka, xxviii, 1?>. 
Malvaceae, for paper-makiog-, xxvii, 

169. 

MAMMOTH discovered in Siberia, xxviii, 
563. 

MANOHINEAL, jaice against cancer, vii, 
262. Corai)are Hippomank. 

'MxVNETTI coRDiFOLiA (ipecacuanha of 
Villa TJica), iii, U)5. 

MANGANESIUM, only one acid. Phipson, 

xxxii, 320 — asmt/. Lanning, xxiv, 
80; Mittentzwey,' xxxvi, 318; Price, 
xxvi, 72 ; Turner, iii, 153 — freed from 
rohalt, Voelker, xviii, 309 — its equiva- 
Itnt, Rawack ; Schneider, xxxii, 446 
separation from iron (in analysis). 
Barker, viii, 82 — preparation of metal- 
lic, Brunner (W. k B , 530), xxx, 174 
— preparations^ Procter, jr., xxii, 297 
(see under ditfereut heads), — saltsf, 
behavior to alkaline polysulphides, 
Schiff, xxxiii, 265 — red color of proto- 
salt (due to cobalt), Voelcker, xviii, 
306— found in iea, Boettger, xxx, 71 
—test, Boettger, xxx, 69, 569~I)ayy, 
xxvi, 472. 

■ ACETATE, yield of acetone and acetic 

acid, Thomson, xxiii, 55, 263. 

ALLOY, Prieger (copper; iron; tin), 

xxxviii, 377. 

ALUM, xxvi, 160 — crystalline, Michel, 

xxxiii, 220. 

BiNOXiDE, decoloriziuff power, Filhol, 

xxiv, 239 — regeneration from prepara- 
tion i»f chlorine. Dunlop, xli, 539 — 
Weldon, xl, 254 ; xli, 538 — in Glas- 
gow (St. Rollex). xli. 112. 

, BORATE, use in manufacture of dry- 
ing oils, Barrnel and Jean, xxvi, 266. 

and BROMINE, Lcewig, ii, 178. 

, CAKBONATE, ariaLyns, Kolbe. xxxiv, 

33 — preparation. Hannon (W. k B.. 
1553), xxii, 299 — Liverraore. xxiv, 10 
— Procter, jr., xxii, 297. 
, CARMiNATK, Luckow, xxxvii, 277. 

, CHLORIDE, Brunner, xxx, 173. 

, IODIDE, Laster, xl, 176 — Livermore, 

xxiv, 11— Procter, jr., xxii, 300. Com- 
pare PiLULvt; ; SvRUPi's. 

and IRON. See under Frrucm. 

, MALATi:. I'l-oi-ter, jr., xxii, 302. 

, PHOSPHATE, Hannon (W. <fe B , 1553), 

xxii, 30]~Livcrniore (W. k B., 1553), 
xxiv, 11. 

, PROTOXIDE. Liebig, xxvii, 527 — VV'a'h- 

ler, iii, 356. 

— — , HULPiiATK, preparation, Bussy and 
others, xxxv, 509 — Deltfs, xxxiv, 35 
— Diehl, jr., xxxix, 139 — Laster, xl, 
i!74 — Livpnnorf; (\V. k B , 531), xxiv, 



9 — Mahla, xli, 351 — Phillips, xviii, 57 
— Procter, jr., xxii. 299 — Raderaaker, 
xli, 216 — Semraes, xl, 174 — as purga- 
tive, Thompson (W. k B., 532), x, 88. 

, suLPHURET, soluble in oxalic acid. 

Slater, xxviii, 345. 

-, TANXATK, Marietta, xxxvii, 337. 

, TARTRATE, Livermorc. xxiv, 11. 

MANGHAS LACTESCENS fCerbera man- 
ghas), viii, 103, 

MANGOSTANA Cambogia, xiii, 25 ; 

iMORELLA, ix, 50 ; xiii, 25. Compare 
Garcinia. 

MANGOSTIN, Schmid, xxvii, 331. 

OIL. See KoKUM bi tter. 

MANGROVE yields red dge, Webster, vii, 

174 its tannin is not a glucoside, 

Sten house, xxxiv, 256. 

.MANIHOT UTJLissiMA, analysis of root, 
Eberhard, xli, 301. 

NfAXIOC, analysis of juice. Henry, (con- 
tains hydrocyanic acid. W. k B., 826). 
vii, 134, 139. Compare Tapioca ; ^ 
Cassave. 

MANIPULATTOX, chemical. F.araday, i, 
39, 119. 

MANNA, history, Hanbury, xiii, 162 — 'adul- 
teration (grape-sugar'), xi, 87 — analy- 
aiti, Backhaus, xxxiii, 26 — Bucholz, 
xvii, 276 — Buignet, xl, 401 — Leucht- 
weiss (W. .1^ B., 53 0, xvii, col- 
lection, xiii, 124— Stettner (W, & B., 

533) , xxii, 78 — Swinburne, xiv, 353 — 
entitled to entry, xxv, 303— power of 
protecting Liquor Jerri iodidi, Procter, 
jr., xii, 15 — purification and coo ver- 
sion into rtake manna, Dausse (W. k 
B., 534), ix, 45 — rotary power, Buig- 
net, xl, 401. 

— — ALHACJi, Hanbury, xxxiv, 547. 

, Arabian (from Cyperus esculentus), 

Landerer, xxxii, 266. 

from Australia (Eucnlyptus manni- 

fera), v, 86 — (Eucalyptus viminalis), 
xxxiv. 546. 

of DWARF-OAK, Hanbury, xxxiv, 546. 

, LKEP (Eucalj'ptns dnniosa), Han- 
bury, xxxiv, 546. 

, FALSE, Thomas, xxiv. 208. 

, FLAKE, artificial, l^ausse [ W. k B., 

534) , ix, 45— Histed, xiii. 348. 

of Sinai, Bcrthelot (\V. B. 532, 

note), xxxiv. 71. 

MANNITAN, composition, xxxii, 143 — 
preparation, Backhaus, xxxiii, 26. 

MANNITE, heharinr to alkaline solution 
of copper, Sclieibler, xli. 317 — ana- 
li/,n,H, Jjackhaus, xxxiii, 26 — in Canella 
alha, Meyer and Reich, xvi, 67 — in 

bulbous celery Payen, vi, 310 in 

conch-graiis, Pfaff (supposed to be a 
mistake), Stenhouse, xvi, 237 — conver- 
ffion into true sugar, lierthelot (by 
tissue of testicles) xxix, 450 — l/her- 



140 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BABE; 



MANNITK [ (JoH(inaed). 

mile (W. & B., 535), xxv, 32— iu ilia- 
Grf\bain, xxxiv, 315 — h'om gh(- 
cose by nascent hydrogen, Linnemaun. 

xli, 318 iu Laminaria saccharina^ 

Stenhouse, x\i, 237 in Leptandra 

virginica, Wayne (W. B., 511), xxxi, 
557 — in If^aves of lAgiutrmn indgare. 
Kfouiayer, xxxiii, 215 — in leaves of 
/<7(/r, lioustfiu, xxiv, 170 — as substi- 
tuie for niitimn, vi, 325 — in olives, de 
Luca ( W. & B., 590), xxxiv, 02 ; xxxviii. 
179 — prqjoratio7i. Bonsall (W. & B., 
535), XXV, 297 — in Scorzonera hispan- 
ica. Witting, xxxiii, 318 — iu .seaweed, 
J*hipson, xxix, 238 — from .sw^ar ( juice 
of beet root, submitted to yis'.ous 
fermentation), L'lierrnite, xxv, 33 — 
Linnemaun (sodium amalgiim), xxxv, 
32 — iu tarax'tnini, T. it H. iSmith (W. 
& B., 827). xxxii,'340. 

MANTEJGA (oil of turtle eggs), xxvi, 
175. 

MANUFACTURE. cberaical, Glasgow, 
Thomson, xiii, 20(J. 

MANURE, produced from the air, Margue- 
ritte and Sourdeval, xxxiii. 5 IG — }ire- 
paration of hovei^^ xxxiii. 463. 

, NASCENT, Htcwart, xxvii, 2 It;. 

, NiTiicGKNOUS, Boussingault. xxx, 155 

disinfection and jireservation. 

Breed, xxviii, 142. 

MARANTA .\i;und]nacea, v, 348 — analy- 
sis of root, Eberhard, xli, 301. ('oui- 
pare AKKOwnooT. 

GALAN(iA. V, 32'4, 

MARASCHINO, iv, 258. 
MARBLE, artifidal. Buisson, xviii 

production^ Rose, xxxvi, 84. 
, ur.AcjK. yields rotten-stoue. 

stone, xxxii, 4G3. 
MARBLING material, xxiii, 78. 
MARBLEIZING plaster casts, xxiii. 7S. 
M ARGARIN in mutton fat and iu lard, 

Lecanu, vi. 203. 
MARL, potash from. Scattergood, xxxvi. 

23G. 

MARMALADE of i'Kotjodidk of ikon, Ou- 

pasquier, xiii. 1 20. 
MARRIAGE, consaugnineou?, xxxix, 47 L 
MARROW, HKKF, analysis, Eylerts, xxxii, 

559. 

MARRUBFUM ooojiATJiiSiMCM supposed 
origin of patchouli, Wallich. ix, 199. 

VULCARK, mialgsis, McMakeu, xvii, 1 

— infiueuce of drying. Pchoonbroodt, 
xli, 321. 

MARSH'S arsenic test. See Auskxic ; 

AOIDUM A RSKX lOSr M. 

MARSHY districts, rendered less un- 
healthy by odoriferous plants, Man- 
tegazza, xiii, 558 — by preventing ac- 
cess of seawater, Daniel, xiii, 254. 

MASK, chemical, ilii, 283. 



MASTIC, account, Simmonds, xxix, 225 — 
adulteraiiou (sandarac), Planche, 
216 — behavior to different solvents^ 
Sacc, xiii, 242— to cnmphor, Planch& 
(W. & B., 195, note), x, 214, 215— 
collection at Chios, xxxiii, 61 — sohibil- 
iiy in chloroform, Lepage, xxiv, 147' 
— for carious tetth, vii, 87. Compare 

PlSTAGIA LENTISCUS. 

, PSEUDO, xxxiii, 62. 

MATA (Eupatorium incarr atnin), Wayne,, 
xl, 122. 

MATCHES, history of manufacture. G ore. 
xxxiv, 146, 241. 

CHEMICAL, xxxiv, 148. 

PKEPAKATiON, Wftguer, xxix, 311. 

SAFETY (LUCIFER ; WITHOUT PHOSPHO- 
RUS), vi, 88 — Canouil, xxxi, J 50, 46S 
— Fleck (with sodium), xli, 256 — 
Hierpe xxxvii, 72 — Lundstroem, xxix^ 
183; xxxiv, 241— -Poltzer. xxxvii, 73. 

Boettger, xviii,. 

See Ilex para- 



SULPHUR. 



;19- 



.loh 



WITHOU 

3^8. 

MATE (Paraguny tea). 

CUAYEXSJS. 

MATERIA ME DICA cabinet University of 
Edinhurgh, Parrish, xxxi, 103 — of ln~ 
! U rnaiional Exkihiii'jn, 1862, Hanbury,. 
I xxxiv, 545. 

j PROFESSORSHIP, Philadelphia College^ 

I Editorial, xxxvi, 284— Maisch, xxxix, 
278 — Parrish, xxxvi, 284. 

! of United States, history, Wood^ 

i xii, 298. 

jMATIAS BARK. See Malambo bark. 
iMATICIN (Hodges) is a salt of potassa,. 
I Wiegand, xviii, 178. 
'MATTCO, account, Carson, xvi, 73; Mar- 
I tius, XV. 156 ; Ruschenberger, vi, 286, 
i —analysis, Hodges (W. & B., 541), 
I xviii, 178 ; Stell, xxx, 392 ; Wiegand,. 
' xviii, 174 — in diarrhcea, xxv, 273 — iu 
! Iicinorrhage, xix, 60 — new kind (Arth- 
I ante adunca), Bentley, (W. & B., 542)^ 
j xxxvi, 118 — properties, Morson, xvi,. 
j 105. 

j MATRICARIA chamomilla, percolation 
witli water, packiug, Soubeiran, viii^ 
225. 

pariuemum, analysis, Knight, x, 20tl 

— contains hero-camphoric acid, ( hau- 
tard, xxvi, 167 — oil, Dessaignes and 
Chautard, xx. 325. 

MAUVAISE terres of Nebraska, Owen, 
xxv, 361. 

MAUVE, preparation, xxxii, 181 — Per- 
kins, xxxi, 568 ; xxxiii, 250 ; xxxvi^ 
171. 

MAUYEINE and its salts, Perkins, xxxvi^ 
171. 

MEASLES due to a peculiar fungus, Hal- 

Her, xH, 143. 
MEASURES, Benj. Ellis, ii, 111, 118— 

Felton, xxx, 35, 90 — Procter, jr., xx^; 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESFECTIYE CLASS. 



141 



MEASURES {Continued). 

90 — Proctor (recommends Taylor's 
octonary system), xxxvi, 495 ; xxxvii. 
119 — Squibb (wauts parts by weight 
substituted), xxxii, 26 — Squire (ob- 
jects to avoirdupois), xxxi, 3G9 — 
Stearns (minim as unit), xxx, 34 — 
Taylor (octonary system), xxxii, 92. 

of BiirrisH Phx^rmaoopgsa, xxxv, 90. 

DECIMAL, xxxv, 88 — xxxviii, 380. 

in PLn'rland, ii, 121, 122, 123— Proc- 
ter, jr., xxxv, 37G. 

in France, ii, 188, 194— Fesquet, xl, 

445. 

■ of the Greeks, ii, 118. 

of the Hebrews, ii, 117. 

relation of imperial and wine, Tay- 
lor (Parrish, 67), xxxiv, 326. 

INTERNATIONAL, xl, 184. 

METRICAL. See , decimal: 

France. 

of Pennsylvania, ii, 134. 

of the Romans, ii, 1 19. 

Swiss, xxxix, 208. 

graduated, Proctor, xxxv, 247 

MEASURING AVORM. See Wohm, mea- 
suring. 

MEAT biscuits. See Biscuit, meat. 

extract. See Extract of meat. 

good and bad appearance, Letheby, 

xxxviii, 265. 
infusion, Liebig's, must be filtered, 

xlii, 318. 

juice, preserved, Gillon (W. k B., 

1554), xxvii, 231.' 

PRESERVED (in fomi of flour), Has- 

sall, xxxix, 445 — Gamgee (carbonic 
oxide gas), xl, 240 — llamiltou (nitric 
oxide gas), xxvii, 18 — Redwood (par- 
affin), xxxviii, 341 — Trevithik (sul- 
phurous acid gas and nitrogen), 
xxxvi, 421. 

, salt, convertf'd into fresh. White- 
law (W. & B., 898, note), xxxvi, 372. 

MECHOACAN root, origin, Guibourt, 
xxxviii, 501 . 

MECONIDIN, Ilesse, xlii, 394. 

MECONIN, chemical history, Couerbe, v, 
52 — action on birds, Mitchell, xlii, 189 
— heliovior to bichromate of potassa 
test, Jenkins, xxxiii, 528 — to nitro- 
sulphuric acid, Couerbe, viii, 175 — 
to perchloric acid, Bullock, xxxvii, 
21 — to warm sulphuric acid, 
xxxiii, 526 — preparation^ Couerbe ( VV. 
k B., G23), iv, 262; v, 56 — sublutiing 
temperature, Guy, xl, 247. 

MEDEOLA viRGiMCA as emetic, iv, 280. 

MEDK'AGO SATiVA, root used as tooth 
brush, iv, 350. 

M E 1) I C A L c o N c R E s s , i n t c r n a t i o n a 1 , X X X V i i i . 
574. 

EDUCATION, ix, 56, 161, 248. 

LAW in Maryland, xxxix, 378. 



PURVEYORS U. S. A., Rittenhouse. 

xxxvii, 87 — Stevens, xxxvii, 91. 
STAFF U. S. A., reorganization,. 

xxxvii, 398, 

STATISTICS of U. S., xxvi, 505. 

.sTORj^KEEPERS. See Medical pdr- 

A EYORS. 

MEDICINE rendered agreeable, Stearns^ 
xxix, 518 — relation of chemical consii-^ 
i.utioii. and physiological action, 
Brown ; Crum ; Eraser, xl, 440 — co- 
operative trading, xlii, 477. 

in Bengal, xxx, 461. 

, CURATIVE, Leroy, Prel. No. 120. 

, domestic, Butler, xxvii, 285. 

, FEMALE students at Zurich, xlii, 470.. 

, HISTORY, Donovan, xl, 161. 

, Jewish physicians in Rome, xlii, 470., 

, white, Mialhe, xvi, 273, 280. 

. Compare Physicians. 

MP]DULLA SASSAFRAS. See Sassafras 

PITH. 

.MEETING of German Naturalists at Wies- 
baden, 1852, xxv, 177. 

MEL, Compare Honey; Mellita. 

despumatum, Caspari (Mohr's tan- 
nin process with gelatin and albu- 
men), xxx, 363 — Ilirschberg (blotting- 
paper, W. & B., 1226), xxii, 276— Hoft'-- 
mann (tannin and gelatin, AV. & B.,, 
1226), xxviii, 114 — Koehnke (animal 
charcoal), xix, 230 — Procter, jr. (alco- 
hol, chalk), xii, 323. 

KRAMBRIyE, xlii, 512. 

Ros.ii, viii, 87, 110 — Graham, xxxi^. 

443 — Mercein (adds glycerin), xxx, 
104 — Procter, jr. (with his fluid ex- 
tract), xxxv, ill. 

MELALEUCA cajuputi, iv, 140~differ- 
ence from Melaleuca leucodendron, 
Roxburgh and Colebrooke, i, 193. 
Compare Oleum cajuputi. 

HYPERiciFOLiA, oil similar to the offi- 
cinal, Stickel, ix, 247. 

LEUCODENDRoN, iv, 140 — diifereuce 

from Melaleuca cajuputi, Roxburgli 
and Colebrooke, i, 193. 

LiNARiFOLiA, Australian tea-tree^ 

xxxv, 452. 

MINOR, iv, 140. 

SPLENDENS, oil similar to the offici- 
nal, Stickel, ix, 247. 

Sf^uARKOSA, Australian tea-tree, xxxv^ 

452. 

VTRiDiFLORA (Niauli) xxxviii, 504. 

MELAMPYRIT (-in) (identical with 
Laurent's dulcit, and Kubel's euony- 
rait), Gilmer, xxxv, 35, 289 — prepa- 
ration, etc., Eichler, xxxi, 365. 

MELAMPYRllM arvense, yields blue co- 
lor, vi, 73. 

MELANORRIKEA hsitatissima (varnish- 
tree of Burma), xxix, 138. 
MiiLENE as lubricant, Monnet. xl, 522. 



142 



SALTS, SEE UNDER L.VTIN NAME OF BASK 



MELEZlTOrfE (larch sugar). Berthelot, 
xxxi, 61. 

MELIA AZKDARACH, description, etc., (Irif- 
fith, vii, 177 — yields gum, xxix. 77 — 
febrifuge properties of bark, Cornish, 
XXX, 126. 

MELILOTIN (Cadet's), is coumarin. Guil- 
lemette, vii, 258. 

MELITOSE (from Eucalyptus mannifera), 
Berthelot, xxviii, 156 — properties, 
Berthelot, xxxi, 63, 

MELLITES, Deschamps, yii, 338, 

MELLON, xxxviii, 61, 101. 

MELOE. Compare Lttta ; Caxthaius. 

analysis, Lavini ; Sobrero, xviii, 73 — 

distinction from Cantharis, ii, 275, 

. autimnalis, ii, 166; xviii, 73. 

ebenimiz, xxxvii, 269. fvcia. xviii, 

73. Klugii, xxxrii. 268. 

majalisj ii, 166; xviii, 73. mi- 

niaceo-maculatus. xxxvii, 268. 

punctatits, xviii, 73. purpureus. 

ii, 274. reticulatus. ii, 166, 

mnguinolentvd^ xxxvii, 269. i<ea- 

brosus ; va rie.gatm ; violacrus. 

xviii, 73. 

MELOLOXTIIA vrris, as adulterant of 
cantharides, Duhamel, xiii, 200. 

MEMBRANE (fibrous, mucous, serous ), co- 
lorea red by proto- and binitrate of 
mercurv, Lassaigne. iv. 175. 

MEMORIAL, Jacob BelFs, xxxii. 187. 

MENISPERMIA, analysis, Pelletier and 
Couerbe (W. k 6.^306), vi. 333. 

MEXiSPERMUM oanadensb, its alkaloi-ls, 
Maisch, (W.&; B., !555), xxxv. 301— 
source of Texas sarsaparilla, Thomas, 
xxvii, 7. 

coccuLrs, viii, 19. fexestra- 

TUM, XXVi, 189. HETERO-CLITUM. 

Yiii.20. MONADELPHicuM, viii, 20. 

Compare Cocculus, ixdicus, 
PALMATUM, vii, 191, Compare Ca- 

LUMBA. 

TUBERCIXATUM, viil, 279. VKR- 

RUCoscM, viii, 279; XA-ii, 219. See 

COCCI'LUS CRISPUS. 

MEXORRIIAGIA remedy (gallic acid), 
yimpson, xv, 319. 

MENTHA PIPERITA, ])lantations in Michi- 
gan^ Stearns, xxxi, 33 — in Mifcharn. 
Bell, xxiii. 239 — weed ia plantations, 
Maisch, xlii, 120, 

SATiA'A contains iodine, McAdam, 

XXV, 67, 

in PKRFVMEUY, Picssc, xxvi. 462. 

MENTITENE. Walter (Parrish, ' 574), xi. 
260. 

MENYANTHES tri^'Oliata. iafinence of 
drying, Schoonbroodt, xli, 321 — con- 
tains iodine, McAdam, xxv, 67 — yield 
of oxalic acid by potassa, Possoz, xxx, 
552 — tasiele.'<-s by animal charcoal, 
Weppea, xviii, 203 — as ionic, v, 290. 



MENYANTHIN, Brandes [W.k B., 1555), 
XV. 156. 

MEPHITIS AMERICANA, examination of oil, 
Swartz, xxxv, 81. 

MERCAPTAN. Zeise, viii, 258. 

MERCERISING cotton, Mercer, xl, 273. 

MERGURIALINA, Reichardt (W. & B., 
1556), xxxvi, 214 ; xli, 417. 

MERCURTALIS pebennis, yields blue co- 
lor, vi, 73. 

MERCURIAL compounds, Hamilton, xiv, 
46. 

preparations, report, xvi, 1. 

MERCURIUS SOLI BiLFS Hahnemanni, Ph. 

Gallica (28). i, 2 18— Mornheim, iv, 

262. 

MERCURY. Compare Hydra royrum. 

from Almaden, xxvii, 336 ; Hart, xxv, 

456 ; Lyman, xxi, 44 ; Ruschenber- 
ger, xxviii, 97 ; Sillinian, jr., xxxvi. 
516; statistics, xxxiv, 410 — Califor- 
nia, xxiii, 81 ; statistics, xxxiv, 156 — 
Corsica, xxiii, 384 — North Carolina, 
Wayne, xl, 76 — Spain, xxvii, 335. 
Compare Cinnabau. 

and ALUMINIUM, Chandler, xxxix, 184. 

adhesion of metals, Guyton de Mor- 

veau, vi, 306 — antidote, Buckler (gold 
dust and iron tiling), xi, 331 ; Astrie 
(sulphite of soda), xxvii, 537 — congela- 
tion in open air (Maine), Hall, jr., viii, 
351 — distillation, Violette (by super- 
heated steam. W. & B., 453), xxiii, 
153 — minute division, Bell, xiv, 239 — 
pquioalent, AUinson, jr., i, 86 — estima- 
tion, L(e\ve (as sulphide), xxxii, 44 — 
in ointment. Nickles, xxx, 456; Gust. 
Pile (specific gravity), xxxviii, 200 — 
purification, Faraday (powdered su- 
gar; sulphuric acid; etc.), i, 121 — 
Priestley (air), i, 123 — Ulex (solution 
of protochloride of iron, W. & B., 452), 
xix, 79 — in solirn, during ptyalism, 
Gmelin, x, 84 — salts, behavior to alka- 
line polysulphides, Schiff, xxxiii, 264 
— equivalents, AUinson, jr., i,86 — test, 
Morgan (iodide of potassium and 
bright copper, W. it B , 455) xxiv, 177 
— Procter, jr. (Morgan's test), xxvi, 
222 — Schneider (galvanic battery), 
xxxvi. 420 — transparency, Melseus, 
xviii, 75 — vapor, action, Biirensprung 
(W. & B., 1421), xxiii, 56— limits of 
its vapori/.ation, Brame, xxvii, 375 — 
with vapors of water, Mallet, xxxii, 
427, 

Ml-'ROXIDIC constituent;*. Rose, xxiii, 
365. 

M E S E M B R Y A N T H E M U M . i: q u i l a r e r a l k , 

xxviii, 74. 
MESENNA. See Mcsknna. 
MESITYL, CHLORIDE, Kane, x, 206. 

hydpvAted, oxide. See Acetone. 

iODrDK, Kane, x, 206. 



PKKPAKATIONS, UNDEK THKIK KKbPECTiTE CLABS. 



143 



MESfTYL OXIDE. See .EriiKR mksitic. 

MESITYLENE, behavior to nitric acid, 
Kane, xvii, 262 — cdmposition and pre- 
paration, Kane, x, 204, 20t>. 

• BIHYDRATK. See AOETONK. 

HYDRATE. See ^Ethbr. mesitjc. 

HyoRiODic. See Mesttyl iodide. 

hydrochloratk. See Mesityl. chlo- 
ride. 

METACHROMIC oxide, Freniy, .^xxvi, 
110. 

METAGELATIN, Lch, xxxvii, 372. 

METALEPSY, Dumas, xxx, 86. 

METAMORPHIA, VVittstein. preparation 
(W. &;B., 617, note), xxxiii, 24 — pro- 
perties, Fronmiiller (W. k B., 617, 
note), xxxiii, 408, 

METAMYLENE. Re^nault, xxv. 116. 

METAPEOTIN, Fremr, xxi, 15!. 

METALS known to " the Aborigi.ves of 
North America, Green, y, 182. 

-> coaled (in alkaline bath in presence 

of org'anic substances). W'eil, xxxviii, 
173 — electro-cliemical coloring^ Bec- 
qnerel, xxxiv,77 — -fudbiUti/. Riemsdyk< 
xli, 423 — oxidation prevented (with 
zinc). Draper, xxviii, 475 — oxides;, sol- 
uble in commercial ammonia, Pear- 
son, xxx, I63~p fa tinized. Church, xl, 
1 2 6 — trampa/rency w li e n m o 1 te n . S t e r- 
ry Hunt, xl,10 — volatiHtii. Riemsdyk. 
.xli, 423. 

, heayy, their polysuli'hides Schi ff", 

xxxiii, 264. 
Fu.siBLE (Wood's), Lipowitz, xxxiii. 

356— Wood, xxxiv, 219. 
XIETALLTC vessels, warning ag-ainst the 

vi.«e of those containing- more than 

one metal, Dulong. i, 74. 
WEALTH of United St^ites, Whitney, 

xxvi, 508. 

METHYL, ACETATE, boiling: point, xxxvi, 
153 — physiological action. Tiirnbull, 

xxvii, 31. 

-BRUCIA, Stahlschmidt, xxxii. 220. 

, IODIDE, Crnm, Brown, Frazer, 

xl, 442. 

, CHLORIDE, PERCfiLORiNATED. is bi- 
chloride of carbon, xxxviii, 171. 

CODEIA-AMMOiNH'M, llow, XXVi, 163. 

, IODIDE. Crnm. Brown. Fra/.er, 

xl, 442. 

IODIDE, Crum, Brown, Frazer, xl, 442 : 

TurnbuU, xxvii, 3 1 . 
, LACTATE, Lepage, xvi, 53. 

MORPHIA, flow, xxvi, 163, 

, NITRATE, Lea, xxxiv, 223. 

, STUYCiiMA, NiTUATK, Schrotl, xxxviii, 

505 — non-poisonous, Stahlschmidt 
(W. & B., 1356. notei. xxxii. 220. 

STiiYCHXiL'M, lODiDC. t'rutn, HrowQ, 

Frazer, xl, 441. 

THEBAiA, lODiot;, (.'riim. Brown. Fra- 
zer, xl, 4 42. 



. See Mkthylkxe. 

METHYLAMINA. Lea, xxxiv, 345. 
METHYLENE and its combinations, Du- 
mas and Peligot, vii, 65, 66. 

, ACETATE, vii, 69. 

BIHYDRATK, vii, 67. Compare Spiit- 

irUS PYROXILTCUS. 

, CARBONATE, isomcric with citric 

acid, vii, 70. 
, ciTHATE, isomeric with sugar, vii, 

70. 

, E0RMIAT13. i8r)raeric with acetic acid, 

vii, 70. 

, HYDBATE, vii, 67. Compare .Ether. 

METHYL IC. 

, HYDROOHLORATE, vii. 67. 

, HYDRIODATE, vii. 68. 

, INDIGOTATE, XV, 242. 

, MUCATE, Malagutii, ix, 85. 

, NITRATE, vii, 68. 

, OXALATE, vii, 69. 

, SALICYLATE, XV. 241. 

, SULPHATE, vii, 68. 

. See Methyl. 

METHYLTC alcohol. See Spikiti py- 

KOXILICUS. 

METHYLO-caprixXOl, Harbordt (W. k B., 
1 257), XXXV, 34. 

cixcHOXiDiuM, Gregory, xxix, 93. 

cixcHONinM, Gregory, xxix, 93. 

NAROOTix, xxxiv, 520, 

QUiNiFM, Grefforv, xxix, 9L 



METHYSTICIN, 



ter, 
1.33 



jr, (W 



Morson, xvi, 1 12 — Proc- 
& B.. 541, note), xxxii, 



METRICAL system of weights and meas- 
ures, Procter, jr., xxxviii, 380. 
METTAUER'S solutiox. See Solutio.v, 

METTAUKR'8. 

MEZEREON, Squire, xiv, 254 — analysis 
of flowers, Enz, xxxi, 351. Compare 
Daphne. 

MIASMA. Liebig's. views, xiii. 218. 

MICA as ornament, Puscher, xli, 206. 

MICE, catching (cliioroform), xli. 5. 

MICHIGAN, medical plants, Stearns, xxxi, 
28 — school of chemii<trii, instruction, 
Douglass, xxxix. 93. 

MTCROGEN, Exley. x, 346. 

MICROSCOPE, us'e in detecting adultera- 
tions, xxv, 45 — powerful^ xxxviii. 565. 

MTOHOZYMA cbet.e (chalk ferment), Be- 
chanip. xxxix, 56. 

MIGNONETTE, in perfumery, Piesse,xxvi, 
461. 

MIKANIA GUACo. See GuaTjo. 

.M1L!)P]W, nature, xiii, 36 — in papei- and 
parchment (cause and prevention), 
(iyde, xxiii, 41. 

MILITARY pharmacectist, xxxiv, 93.. 

MILK '~,')^ adulteration, Chev;illier, xvi, 
286 — Kletzinsky, xxxiv, 35 — anahiain^ 
Maisch, xxxii, 401 — Poggiale, xxi, 370 
h^hariorlo guaiac, xxiii, 184 — to proto- 



144 



SALTS, SEE UMDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



MILK {Coniinued). 

and bi-nitrate of mercury, Lassaifiue, 
iv, 175 — estimation of butter, Mar- 
chand, xxviii, 475 — Poggiale, \xi, 
■)70 — nature of fat substance, Roma- 
net, xiv, 25o — contains no iodine, Loh- 
mej^er. xxv, 520 — microscopic constit- 
uents, Nasse, xiii, 175 — Van d'Outre- 
pont, xiii, 261 — preaervalion, Augen- 
<lre (chloroform), xxiv, 149 — Dirclioff 
(in form of dry powder), iv, 351 — 
Moigno ( Apperi's method), xxvii, 18 
— ureij, normal constituent, Lefort, 
xxxviii, 377 — danger of keeping it in 
/-inc, XV, 76. 

— of ALMONDS, Piesse, xxviii, 82. 

, ASSES, compositiou, Peligot, ix, SI. 

, uoNDBKSKD, analysis, Kotier, xiii. 457. 

Compare Milk, JSolidified. 

of cuBUMBKU, Piesse, xxviii. 83. 

of DAXDELTox, Picssc, xxviii, 82. 

of ELDER, Piesse, xxviii, 82. 

, lODATED, Hager, xli, 405. 

PASTILLES, iv, 174. 

POWDER, Legrip, ir, 174. 

of ROSES, Piesse, xxviii, 31. 

, SOLIDIFIED, Blatchford, xxvii, 112, 

383. Compare Milk, Condensed. 

sr GAR. See Sugar, milk. 

TREES, vii. 116. Compare Galacto- 

DENDRON. 

of WAX, Koch, xiii, 562. Compare 

Wax VARNISH. 

MILL, DRUG- f Swift's), xviii, 255. 

MfLLEP'OLIUM. See Achillea mille- 
folium. 

MILLINGTONIA hortensis, analysis of 

bark, Hollaudt, xxxiii, 507. 
MIMOSA algorora, xvi, 151. 

arabioa, V, 348. 

farnesiana, vi, 202. 

PUDICA. actioti of cLloroforra. Mar- 

cet, xxii, 74. 

SOANDENS, XV, 313. 

I5ARK, amount of tannin : Miiller. 

xxxi, 429. 

MIMULUS MoscHATTS, as substitute for 
true musk, Hannou, xxvi, 120. 

MIMTJSOPS elengi, plant of ancient 
Egypt, y, 138. 

MINERALS, artificial, formation (electro- 
chemical action), Becquerel, xxv. 
81. < 

MINERAL WATERS. See Waters, min- 
eral. 

MINIMS versus drops. Proctor, xxxii. 428 
MINING statistics of Great Britain, xxxviii, 
378. 

MINIUM. See Lead, red. 
MINUTES of the College. See Phar- 
macy. 

MIRABILIS Jalapa, properties, Griffith, 

vii, 117. 
LONGIFLORJi. vi, 119. 



MIRACULUM CHEMicuM, (carbonate of 
magnesia), xxvii, 365. 

MISCELLANY, commenced, i, 26. 

MISTAKES, New York Medical Gazette 
versus Apothecaries, xxv, 472. 

fatal : aqua ammonisc for aqua cinna- 

momi, XXX, 468 — arscjiic for arrow- 
root, xxix, 319: for mercury, xxix,. 
316 — brlladonna leaves for balmony, 
XXX, 467 — belladonna root for comfrey. 
xxix, ?>\'s)— black drops for black 
draught, xxix, 186, 317 — cyanide of 
polasdura for carbonate of ammonia, 
xli, 461 ; for chlorate of potassa,. 
xxix, 186 — cj/aitide of silver (in solu- 
tion) for water, xxx, 276 — extract of 
belladonna for extract of taraxacum, 
xxxi, 187 — extract of mix vomica for 
sulphate of quinia, xxxix, 379 — fluid' 
extract of ac >nite for fluid extract ot^ 
valerian, xiii, 179 — nydrargyrum am- 
moniataiit for |)hosphate of soda, xi, 
329, note — In/drocyanic acid for castor 
oil, xxix, 318 — sulphate of morphia for 
sulphate of quiuia, xxxii, 90 — oil of 
rosemary for castor oil, xxiii, 286 — - 
<>piu)n for rhubarb, xli, 125 — strychnia' 
for James' powder, xxxvi, 502, 510 ; for 
Dover's powder, xxix, 320 ; for santo- 
nin, xxxi, 581 — corrosive sublimate for 
calomel, xxii, 377 — tartar emetic for 
cream of tartar, xi, 342, note — tine- 
lura a.coniti for tinctura cinchona; 
composita, xxxii, 237 — tinctura arnicot 
for Warner's gout cordial, xxxiii, VI 
— tinctura o/rii for tinctura rhei, xxix, 
316 — wax for vaccine virus, xxx, 567. 

MISTURA. Compare Mixtures. 

ACID! STLPiTURioi, Ph. Dublin (26). 

iii, 333. 

APiOLi, Procter, jr., xxxv, 85, note. 

AssAFQDTiDyE. ^loorc (with his puri- 
fied assafo3tid:i ), xl, 388. 

CA.IUPUT1 COMPOSITA, XXvI, 110. 

CAMPHOR.E ET MAGNESIA, Ph. Dublin 

(26), iii, 326. 
CARMiNATivA TOXICA, Donovan, xvii,. 

50. 

CASTOREl COMPOSITA, vlii, 259. 

CHBNOPODII COMPOSITA, XXxi, 390. 

COPAIK.E, Dublanc, i, 11. 

CORTICES RBASILIENSIS ADSTRINGBNTIS. 

Merrem, xii, 227. 

cRET-i] COMPOSITA, U. S. (60), Rau- 

stead (keeps the powder), xiii, 393 — 
Reynolds (glycerin for sugar), xiii, 
391 — Robinson (powder), xiii, 506. 

FERRi AROMATiCA, Ph. Dublin (26). 

iii, 336. 

FERRI COMPOSITA, Boud, V, 35 — Hodg- 

son, jr. (objects to myrrh in powder), 
V, 35 — Wilson (glycerin) xxxiii, 160 
— mislahe (sulphate of copper for sul- 
phate of iron). Plnmmer, xxvii, 193. 



PREPARATIONS, UNJJJ:R THKIR KESPECTIVK CLASS. 



145 



MISTljRA FERiu ooMPOsri'-v concbntrata, 

Wilson, xxxiii, 160. 
GLYCYRiiniz.'E co.vtPOSETA, DuhaiTiel, 

xi, 284 — bv percolation, Diibarael, xi. 

288. 

HiEMOSTATiCA (Wurreti's), Washing- 
ton formularjf, xl, 2. -JO. 

HASoiiiciN, Laneau, xxviii. ?>Q?,. 

for noopiNCi coltgu, Wacht, xv^, 275. 

for LKAi) cor.io, Gendrin. iv, 2r)8. 

MAGXESi.E. (lobley, xvi. 274 — Mialhe. 

xvi, 2Td. 

for MAR>iir-i''EVEU, Meirieu, xv. 155. 

NisuTUALis, Goodyear, ix, 189 — Scat- 

tergood, v, IG — iu poicder^ .Scatter- 
good, V, Hi. 

OLEI TEREBKVTIII.N.E, vii. 17fi; xi, 170. 

PUMPKIN SERD and male fern, Dehout. 

X xxviii, 255. 

RESINO-SAPONACEA, Plenk, ii. 342. 

81ID0RIP1CA (Smith's), Beral, ii. 08. 

suLPHURico-ACiDA. See Er.ixo: 

ACIDUM llALLERf. 

TEREBiNTiiiN-E, Ebriart, vii, 2f!l. 

MITCIIAM gardens, Bell, xxiii, 25, 150. 
239. 

MITCF-IELLA kbpbns, a dioecious plant, 

Meehfui. xl, 554. 
MiTHRIDATES, historical notices, xv, 53. 
MIXTURES, EXTRMPORANEOcs, Powers, v, 

99, compare Thspexsers, hints to 
with GUM RESINS (oil of almond.s and 

water), xxv, 270. 

. . Compare Mistttra. 

MOHITLEIN. Thomas, xxxviii, 3 )2. 
MOEASSES, rei?earcheg, Bouchardat. viii, 

119. 

CANE SUGAR, detection of starch sugar 

molasses. Fieich, xx, 4 5. 
soRGiiUM ill diarrh(Jtia. Rounsavllle, 

xli, 125 

MOLEOUIj AR DisYMMBTRv of Organic pro- 
ducts, Pasteur (correlation of herai- 
hedritv and rotary power), xxxiv, 1. 

.MOLYBDENUM, crystalline compound 
with aluminiuni Michel, xxxiii, 220 — 
in electroplating, Junot, xxv, 319. 

MOMORDICA ELATERiuM. See Elatkr- 

lUM. 

oPERCUfiATA, description and prop- 
erties, Flaacock, ii, 144. 

MO.VARDA DiDYMA. yields carmine, Bel- 
home, xxix. 311 . 

MONARDIN, Procter, jr., xvii, 86. 

MONESTA, account, St. Ange, xii, 53 — an- 
alyxis. Derosne and Henry; Payen (W, 
k B , 1557), xii, 54; xiii, 151," 162. 

MONESIN, Derosne ; Henry; Payen, xii, 
54; xiii. 158, 163. 

MO>fNliS'A POLVsrACHiA, .Mouchon, jr., viii, 
248. 

MONNLVm, MouchoQ, jr., viii, 249. 
MOiVODORA MYRiSTiOA, in Jamaica, vii, 
191. 



MONOFORMIX (formiateof glycerin), xli, 
302. 

MOXSEL'S SALT. See Ferri suBSULPiiAS. 
SOLUTION. See Liquor ferri scn- 

SULPIIATIS. 

MONSOXIA Burmanni, xxii, 151. 
MONTANIX (iu Cinchona montana), vaa 

Mons. iv, 352. 
MONTHS, names of French, ii, 198. 
MORIXGA PTERYGOSPicRMA, Hamilton, 

xviii, 41. 
MORISON, the hygeist, xxxi, 183. 
MORPHETIN^, Marchand, xvi, 199. 
MORPHIA, action on birds, Mitchell, 
xiii, 188 — n(l>ninislration (uncrushed) 
Stearns, xxix, 519 — adaUerafion (nar- 
I cotina), Berthemot. x. 321 — antagon- 
ism to atropia, Mitchell and others, 
xxxvii, 389 — Dowse, xiii, 440 — beha- 
vior to reagents, Fresenius, xxxviii, 
4 48 — to bichromate of potassa test, 
Jenkins, xxxiii, 528 — to bromine, 
Blengini, vi, 334-— to chloride of iron, 
Andre, viii, 213-~to chlorine, Pelle- 
lier, x, 168 — to chlorine and ammo- 
nia, Andre, viii, 213— to gallic acid, 
Henry, vii, 228 — to iodid« of cadmi- 
um and potassium, Marra6, xli, 18 — 
to iodohvdrargyrute of potassium, 
.Mayer ( W. k B., 1542), xxxv, 21, 
23 — 10 nitric acid, Guy, xxxiii, 526 
— to nitro-sulphuric acid, Couerbe, 
viii, 175 — to nascent oxygen, Mar- 
chand, xvi, 199 — to pentachlorid'e 
of antimony and phosphoric acid, 
Schulze. xxxii, 138, 235 — to bicar- 
bonate of soda in presence of tar- 
taric acid, Oppermann, xvii, 298 — 
to sulphuric acid, Arppe, xvii, 286 ; 
(hot , and with permanganate of po- 
tassa). Guy. xxxiii, 526 — to tannin, 
Henry, vii, 228 — Compare leds — c.oiu- 
positioa, xi, 219; xxxiii, 24; xxxvii, 
67 — spontaneous cry^lalUzaHon from 
mixtures, vii, 3 detection, see test 
— in dutlyser, Graudeau, xxxvi, 415 — 
enfimation, see Opium, assay — examin- 
ation of mother-water, Pelletier, viii, 
62 — detection of narcotina (fusing on 
paper over a candle), iv. 201 — separa- 
tion from narcotina, Berthemot, x, 
322; Hodgson, jr., v. 35 — its natural 
^s•^(/7e in opiutn (as meconate and the- 
bolactate of morphia), Procter, jr., 
xxxix, 104 — philological action, Ber- 
nard, xxxvii, 70. 

PRKPARATiov : conjptirisoii of Faure; 

Robiquet; Staples, iv, 16 — Blondeau, 
(fermentation, W. & B., 1234), i, 76, 
154; ii, 219; iv, 121; (report by Gui- 
bourtand Robiquet, ii, 221) — Desmedt 
(free from narcotina, W. & B , 1235, 
note), XXIV, 328 — Dmnenit{hon\ native 
green poppybeads), ix, 82 — Fnn-^,, ii, 



146 



SALTS, si:e under latin namp: of bask; 



MORPHIA {Continued), 

71, 222— Galvlni, iv, 260; v, ^i—OuU. 
krmondi W. & B., 1235), iii, 229; (re- 
marks bj Regimbeau), iii, 229 — Gre- 
f/on/^ xxxv, 268 — Girardin, ii. 222 — 
Jfohot, ii, 222— Mohr (W. & B.,' 1236), 
xiii, 60 — Mirck. xxviii, 535 — Rayndohr, 

xxviii, 535 — Staple-^ (W. k B., 1234). 
i, 15— PA. Dublin (50) xxiii, 10— 
Fh. Helvetica (65) xxxix, 3 J 5. 

.saZ^v, use proposed for opium Mialhe, 

xxiii, 83; adulteration (sulphate of 
quinia), iv, 15 — -.suhdniilu in alcohol. 
Cap and Garot, xxvii, 159 — iti chlu- 
roforra, Beruatzic, xl, 252 ; Peiten- 
kofer, xxxi, 232; ."Scblirapert, xxxii, 
160 — in glycerin, Adoiphus, xxxix, 
150; Klever, xiii, 222 ; Cap and Ga- 
rot, xxvii, 159 — in olive oil, Pettcn- 
kufer, xxxii, 185 — f;ahlimin<j temper- 
ature, Guv, xl. 247 — Hehvig. xxxvii, 
29; xxxix, 539 — incompatible with 
."ffi npus aUhixx^ Janota, xxxii i 4 09 — 
ifMs: iron test. viii,213 — Kboii (chro- 
niate of potassa ami sulphuric acid ). 

xxix, 369 — Fairtb')rnf' (chlorine, W. 
k B., 1232), x.xxviii, 9 — Froehde (sul- 
j>huric and molybdic acids), xli, 
299 ; (not considered reliaMe l)_v Al- 
nien, xli, 209 j — LepDrtf (iodic acid 
and ammonia, W. <fc B, \'1'.V.\. and 
note), xxxiv. 366 — PeUetici- fun iron 
test), V, 232. viii, 77-— Hcrnllas i iodi' 
acid), ii.oOl ; (not considered reliable 
bv Davidsoi), xiii, 171) — Valser (W. 



- MK CON ATE 
XVTK. 

- MURIATE, Of.viy 



See Morphia bimkco- 



k B., 1233, note), xxxv 



-139 — (com- 
pare hrJiavior — ijield. t^quibb, XXXii. 
117 — from East India opium, Iloyle, 

viii, 257 — from French opium. Aui)er- 
gier, xxiii, 238. 

— AOicTATE, Ph. Dublin ( 50). xxiii. 10 — 
(idaltcration, Rushton, vii. 30 — report 
on Rushton by Hull. Adau)son atsd 
Hart, vii, 1 19 — -^.^.v///, Mayer, xxxv, 392 
— examination of comraercial^ Heath- 
field, xxxvi, 496 ; xxxvii, 69 — ddection 
in the intestioes, Drantz and others. 

ix, 267 — rfiacllons^ Lassaigne, xiii. 62 
— solubility in chloroform. iSchlimjiert. 
xxxii. 160 — in j^lycerin, Adoiphus, 
xxxix, 150; Klever, xiii, 222. 

— ■ iMPUiirs, Ph U. S (30) ii, 334. 

— HiMKCOXATK, Squirc, xi, 166^ — .Meneri, 
Prel. Xo. 62 

— HIT ANNATE. Henry, vii. 230. 

JUTAETl! ATK. ArpDC, XXiv. 155, 

— oiJi-OBATE, Stnullas, ii, 302. 

— and coDEtA, donbic salt. Kajne. x, 83. 

— rxLUTA. Biroth, xl, 546. 

E015MIATK, Fell, XXX. 220. 

— HVDROCVANATE. vau (ler Corput; 
xxviii, 264. 

— loDiOB, Wir.ckler, xxiii. 356: xxv, 
126. 



Mayer, xxxv, 392 — 
examiiuition commercial., Heathfield, 
xxxvi 496 ; xxxvii, Qd— prep a ration y 
Brande, v, 260— Gregory (W. k B., 
1240), iii, 124— Michiels, xv, 239— 
Redwood, xxxi, 3 — Thomson (W. k 
B., 1211), xiv, 155 — solubility in alco- 
liol. Cap and Garot, xxvii, 159 — ia 
glycerin, Adolphns, xxxix, 150; Cap 
and Ga,rot, xxvii, 159, 160; Klever, 
xiii, 1;!22 — in oil and iu water. Cap. 
and Garot, xxvii, 159. 

oLKATr:, Attli Id, xxxv, 250-vIJermite^ 

xxvii, 72. 

I'RKfULOliATK, Bulloclv, XXXVii, 21. 

suivPiiATK. <v.v.v(///, Mayer, xxxv, 391 — 

behavior to iodoli vdrargyrate of po- 
tassium, Mayer (W. k B , 1542), xxxv,. 
23 — large crv-^/^/Av, Scatlergood, iv, 295- 
— roimi,' rrial less activetban theoffici^ 
I) a 1 .?=q nib b,xxxi . oit—poi-wrwiy^see Mis- 
T A ic K s — V ' ; / // /> // // // i II g 1 y c e r i H , A d o 1 p h us,, 
xxxix, 150— Ph. IT. ri. (30), iii, 83. 

TANNATK. .Se(=^ .MOHPTIIA BITANNATR.. 

TARTRATE. Arppc. xxiv, 155. 

MOnTUOJ-,K (from coal tar), Mansfield,, 
xxi. 18. 

M(.)Si^liCS. .SpcMi sk: mtsk dkkk. 

\l( »8QI;1TUK8, security against (tincture 

of insert powder ), Jager. xli, 15. 
MOSS, ( ■EYT;OX, S<'liacht, xvii, 146. 

lCKi-AM». See Cetu'ARIA. 

Irish. See CnoxDitus. 

— — for paper making. Terry, xxix, 84. 
MOSSING, of (Jinchona trees, Hanbnrr^. 

xli, 571 — *ie Vrij. xxxvi, 322. 
MOULD in syrup, its grow h, Balfour^ 

xxv, 186. 
MOFSSACHP:, Guibourt. ii. 47. 
MOXA, account, Duiand, ii, 206. 
of bichromate of polassa, Hodg.Mn^, 

jr., v, 2u:k 

from leaves of grape, Bridel, viii, 

348. 

MOXON'S KPFKiiVK.^cKXT ma(;nesia (Par- 
rish. 40»). ix, 292; xv, 16; xx, 24. 

MOZAMBRUN, from Aloe perforata, ir. 
49. 

MUi'lIjAGF, vegetable, and substance* 
allied thereto, Kiirzing, xxv, 37. 

MrClLAGIXOrS solutions purified by 
chlorine, Guerin (W. k B., 1242), iv, 
350. 

MU('ILA()IO aoaci.e. hr-havior to tinctuJ•^^ 
of gLiaiacum. xxiii, 384 — droj>.s in. 
draeJim, IbMiiouiily. xxxi, 441. 

SAEEJ', Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix, 535 

MUCOUS MEMiuiAXE. behavior to carboli*? 
acid. Leniaire, xxxv, 555 — to nitrate 
of mercury, Lassaigne, iv, 175. 

MU('UNA, itching .allayed, Weichselbaum. 
xiii. 519. . 



PKEFARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



147 



MUDAR, bark of root substituted for 
ipecacuanha in dysenterj, Durant, 
xxxix, 62. 

MUGIL CEPHALus, iii, 18. 

MUMMIES, medical use, Landerer, xxxiii, 
4U9. 

MUREX KiiANDAUis, and tkuxculus, 

purple color, Bizio, vi, 225. 

MUREXID iu dijeing^ Schlumberger and 
others, xxvi, 429 — prqyaration and 
l)roperties, Trout (W. k B., 1559), 
XXX, 269 — probable source of the 
color of feuthevH^ Schluoiberjrer, xxvi, 
430. 

MIJSA PARADisiACA for jiaper inakiug, 

xxvii, 40. 

MUSSICAPA GRisoLA, XXX. 321. 

MUSCLES of animals, composition, Va- 
lenciennes k Fremy, xxviii, :{4(>. 

suGAK, Ranke, xxxix, 4G9. 

MUSCULAR powEH, source, Frankland, 
xxxix, 31 . 

MUSCUS coKAi.MNU.s contains ioiline. xxvi, 
439 

MIJSENN A, y;?a///.s7'.v of bark (VV. k B., 714, 
note), Thiel, xxxv, 323 — for iape worm. 
Pruner-Bey, xxiv, 1<]9. 

MUSEUM, HiTNTKRiAN in Glasgow, Par- 
rish, xxxi, loT. 

PHARMACKUTTCAL, Philadelphia Col- 
lege, proposed, xxii, 384. 

BAXiTABY, American, at Paris, xxxviii, 

382. 

MUSHROOMS contain onil'm, Phipson, 
xxxv, 59 — evolution of amiaonia^ 
Borscou", xli, 558 — generation heat, 
Smith, xlii, 523 — the most innocent 
become poisonous under certain cir- 
cumstancFS, xxix, 112 

POISONOUS, antidote (tannin), Chau- 

sard, xxvii, 535 — made innocuous^ 
Gerard ( W. k B., 15(31), xxv, 274— 
poison (similar to curarin), Sicard & 
Schoras, xxxvii, 335— separated by 
acetate of lead, Apoiger, xxv, 275 — 
its nature, Buchncr, xxv, 275. 

MUSK, adiilteraiion, Biernat/ky, xxxiii, 
427; Goebtl, xv, 302: Pcreira, viii, 
81 — coikction, Peak, xxxiii. 259 — odor 
flestroyed by bitter almonds andcam- 
])hor, Hauin, xvii, 159 — Fleischmann, 
xxiii, 85 — in perfumery. Piesse, xwiii, 
70 — t/>>^t. Berzelius ; Geiger (corrosive 
subliraat(!), viii, 81. 

AUTJFK.'iAi,. Williams (W. & W.. 1562), 

viii. 14. 

Viath SU(JAH, Ganger, xv. 221. 

, VKGHTABLR, llauiiou ( W. k B., 553, 

note ), xxvi, 120. 
MUSK DEEiv. post-mortem examioation 

(Campbell, x, 148 — ncmimt. Markham, 

xxviii, 332— Pi;ak ( VV. k I!., 550), 
xxxiii. 25f). 

Ml'SK ROOT. Sec Snmbul. 



MUSSJENDA STADMANNJ, X, 48. 

MUSTARD, DussBLDORF, Artus, xxxix, 
319. 

PAPER, Rigollet, xl, 276. 312. 

PLASTER, Crew, xl, 285. Compare 

Sinapism. 

SEED, annhf.'^is, Henry and Garod 

(found sulplio-sinapic acid), ii, 340 — 
Pelou/.e (sulpho-sinapic acid is hy- 
drosulphocyauic acid),ii, 340 — exam- 
ioation, Robi([uet; Boutron-Charlard 
(Myrosin). iv, 318 — bleaches indigo 
solution, Rlummer, xxv, 401 — 
amount of f^tardi. Dragendorff, xxxv. 
139. 

MUSTELLUS vulgaris, its oil contains 
valerianic acid, Bertlielot, xxvii, 375. 

VIUTIS, strictures of Cuibourt, xxvi, 52;: 
xxix, 27. 

MVCOSE, Milscherlich (W. k B., 3G8), 
XXX. 346. 

MYLABRIS ("iCHORii, blistering fly of the 
andey).t.<<, ii, 271 — mh.itituted iov cantha- 
ria in Greece, Landerer, xxv, 31 — 
contains cantltriridin., Procter, jr., xxiii,. 
126— Warner (W. B.. 201 j. xxviii, 
193. 

('Vanks(^exs, ii. 1(!5. 

I — — MBLAXUKA, yield of cantliaridin, 
Bluhra, xxxviii, 247. 

VARIABILIS, ii, 165. 

vAiiiEGATA, substituted for cantharis 

in Greece, Lan<lerer. xxv, 31. 

MYNSICHT^S elixir of vitriol, xxxv, 544. 
Compare Acidum sulphuricum aro- 
matic um. 

MVOSOTIS PALUSTRis contains iodine, 

Macadam, xxv, 67. 
MVRCIA AGRis, source of bap rtini, Maisch 

(W. k B., 802), xxxiii, 290— 

Maisch, xxxiii, 296. 
MY RICA CKRiFERA, analpsls of root bark, 

Hambright (W. k B., 1562), xxxv^ 

193 — as emrtic. iv, 279 — tvax, see Wax, 

Myrtle. 

MYRICIN. Hambright, xxxv. 295. 
MYPJSTICA See Nutmeg. 

FATUA, origin of California nutmeg,. 

Carson, xxvi, 501. Compare vi, 21. 

malabarica, vi, 22. 

otoha, analysis of fat, Uricoechea. 

xxvii, 271. 

PHIL1PP15N si.s, vi. 22. 

■ SEiUPKRA. account, xxxii. 466. 

TOMENTOSA, vi, 22. 

MYRMICA MALEFAcinNS. accouiit, l)Uck- 

ley, xxxiii, 221. 
Texana, account, Buckley, xxxiii, 

221. 

MYROBALANUS, of the ancient h)/i//>t.^. 
V. 139 — origin and properties, GriBilh, 
vii. 192 — as source of tannin, llennig, 
xlii, 318 — natures of taunin, Stenhoiise 
(yields no gallic acid), xxxiv. 251. 



148 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASK ; 



MYROSIN, preparation, etc., Koyjiquet and 
Boutron, iv. 318 — Wittsteia, xli, 417. 

MYROSPERMUM pp.rxK.soENS, xxxii. 298. 
300; xxxvi, 451 — pods. If anbury, 
xxxiv, 545. 

MYRTIFOLIUM, Xxiii, "138. 

' PEDICKLLATUM, XXXii, 21)8. 

Perbum;, xxxii, 411. 

PEKUiFKiiuM, Car.son, xxxii. 306 — 

llanbury, xxxii, 411. CoQipare Bal- 
sam um, PerL'. 

pr'BESCEXs, xxiii, 138 : xxxii^ 208. 

puxcTATUM, xxiii-, 138. 

SANSONATK, xxxii, 411 — Pcreira, 

xxiii, 133. 

■ TOLUiFEUUM, its IVuit, Leroj. xix. 

il('>. Compare Balsam l'm tot-u. 

. Compare Mvkoxylon. 

MYROXANTII {hj carbazotic acid u[.on 

opium), iVhilier, xi, 88. 
MYROXOCAUPIN, Stenhousc, xxiii. 144. 
MYROXYLO.V pediokllatl-m. xxxii, 299. 

300. 

Pereika, composition of giim-resiti. 

Attfield, xxxvi, 143 — growth at Cey- 
lon, xxxvii, 152. 

PERUiFERUM. xxxii, 298, 300. 

TOLuu'Eiu-M, liattbury, xxxii, 411. 

Weir, xx wi, 449. 

. Compare MyRoaPERMUAf. 

MYRRH, analyds. Bouastrc, v, 140 — 
Bruckner." xl,' 31— Ruickoldt (W. k 



B., 559), xvii, 177— distiuclion from 
bdellium, Bley and Diesel (W. k R., 
559), xviii, 227 — behavior to camphor, 
Planche, x, 214, 215 — entitled to en- 
Irii, XXV, 303 — contains formic acid 
(W. & B., 559), Bley and Diesel, xviii, 
227 — in mixtures, Hodgson, jr. (with 
water only), iv, 13 — volatile oil, Bo- 
nastre, iii. 144 — yield of oil, Bley and 
Diesel (^Y. k B., 559), xviii, *227; 
Compare iMvRRHOLE — origin, i, 236 — 
powder, loss, Covell, xxxix, IIB — Red- 
wood, xxi, 31 — test, Bonastre (nitric 
acid), ii, 84 — Righini (muriate of am- 
monia, W. k B., 559), xvii, 239. 
VARIETIES, Plancne, xii, 333 — Ruick- 
oldt, xvii, 171 — Vaughan, xxv, 149, 
150.' 

MYRRHIN. Ruickoldt, xvii, 17(5. 

MYRRH OlD, Planche, xii, 334. 

MYRRHOIDIN, Planche, xii, 335, 338. 

MYRRHOLE, Ruickoldt, xvii, 175. Com- 
pare Myrrh, oil. 

MYRSINA AFRiCANA, vermifuge, xxvii, 
477. 

iMYRTLE of Australia. See Eugenia. 

AUSTBALLS. 

iu perfumery, Piesse, xxvi, 461. 

WAX. 8ee Wax, myrtle. 

MYTTLUS EDULis contains iodine, xxvi, 
440. 



isr. 



NAILS, br/urvior U> proto- a:id binitrate of 
mercury. Lassaigue, i\, 175— amount 
of sulphur, Biljra, xxix, 149. 

NAPELLINA, Hiibschmann ( W. & B., 65, 
note). XXX, 399— Fliickiger, xlii, 236, 
398. 

NAPHTHA (compare Bbnzolk : Benzin), 
in Caucassus, xl, 276 — explosive com- 
pound with potassium. Hare, v, 240 — 
rate of flow of Boghead naphtha, Gal- 
letly, xxxvii, 378 — poisoning, xxix, 84 
— purification (chromate of })0tassa). 
xvii. 78 —Calvert (sulphuric acid. W. 
k B., 1471), xxvii, 58 — as solvent i'ov 
resins, Sacc. xlii, 243 — its use, lire, 
xxi, 47 — igniting point oi' vapor, Hut- 
ton, xli, 253. 

. EuPioN, xxxiii, 367. 

, "woctD, (Dr. Hasting's) Bell ; Procter, 

jr., XV, 194. See Spibitus PYfiOXVLi- 
cus. 

NAPHTHALEIN, nitrite ov oxide, 
Kcene, xvii, 264. 

NAPHTHALIN,' formation of acetylene, 
Berthelot, xxxviii, 264 — behavior to 
permanganate of pota3sa, Cloez and 



Guigiiet. xxxi, 81 — to nitric acid, 
(luy, xxxiii, 526; Kcene, xvii, 263— 
to sulphuric acid, Guy, xxxiii, 526 — 
as source of benzoic acid, Castelhaz ; 
Ott, xl, 118; xli, 552 — colors derived 
from, Persoz, xxxiv, 236 — dissolves 
indigo, Vohl, xli, 552 — as insecticide, 
Markoe, xlii, 73 ; Pelouze, xl, 522 — 
preparation, d'Arcet, x, 177; Brooke, 
vi, 84 ; Laurent, iv, 352 ; Vohl, xli, 
hbO— -properties, Ott, xl, 119; xli, 550 
— solubililg in chloroform, liOpage, 
xxiv, 148.' 

OIL, preparation, Shand and McLean, 

xxvi, 124. 

NAPHTHYL, nitritk of oxide, Kwne, 
xvii, 263, 264. 

NAPHTHYLAMIN, preparation and col- 
ored derivatives, Roussin, xxxv, 157. 

NARCEIA, action, Bernard, xxxvii, 70; 
Line, xxxviii, 454; on birds, Mitch- 
ell, xlii, 189 behavior to iodine, 

Stein xlii, 221 — to iodide of cadmi- 
um and potassium, Marme, xli, 18 — 
to nitric acid, Guy, xxxiii, 526 — to 
nitro-sulphuric acid, Conerbe, viii. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



149 



NARCEIA {Continued). 

175 — to sulphuric acid (cold; hot; 
and with permanganate of potassa), 
Guy, xxxiii, 526 — composition^ v, 230 ; 
xxxiii, 24; xxxvii, 67; xxxviii, 472 
— preparation: Bebert, iv, 261 — Cou- 

erbe, xxxix, 112 Pelletier (W. & 

B., 622), iv, 263 ; v, 153, 227 ; viii, 74 
— Procter, jr., xxxix. 111 — its salts, 
Hesse, xxxviii, 472 — solubility in ace- 
tic acid, alcohol, water, Hesse ; Lie- 
big, xxxix, 112 — subliming tempera- 
ture, Guy, xl, 247 — test, Stein (potas- 
sio-iodide of zinc), xlii, 221 — thera- 
peutical use, Enbenberg, xxxix, 249. 

, PiCRATE, Hesse, xxxviii, 47 2. 

TANNATE, Hessc, xxxviii, 472. 

NARCISSUS poETicus, xiii, 110. 

psEUDONARCissus, analysis, Jourdain, 

xiii, 109. 
NARCITINE. Jourdain, xiii, 110. 
NARCOTEIN, Marchand, xvi, 200. 
NARCOTIC, TONIC, Jackson, xli, 389. 
NARCOTINA, identical w\th uconella, Jel- 
let, xxxvi, 341 — action, xvni, 17; Ber- 
nard, xxxvii, 70 ; on birds, Mitchell, 
xlii, 189 — assay, Mayer, xxxv, 393 — 
behavior to reagents, Fresenius, 
xxxviii, 450 — to bicarbonate of soda 
in presence of tartaric acid, Opper- 
mann, xvii, ^299 — to bichromate of 
potassa test, Jenkins, xxxiii, 528 — to 
chlorine, Pelletier, x, 1 69 ; Soubeiran 
and Henry, viii, 213 — to gallic acid, 
Henry, vii, 228 — to iodide of cadmi- 
um and potassium, Marme, xli, 18 — 
to iodohydrargyrate of potassium, 
Mayer (W. & B , 1542), xxxv, 21— to 
nitric acid, Guy, xxxiii, 526 — to ni- 
tro-sulphuric acid, Couerbe (W. & B., 
618), viii, 174 — to nascent oxygen, 
Marchand, xvi, 200 — to pentachloride 
of antimony and phosphoric acid, 
Schulze, xxxii, 218, 235 — to sulphu- 
ric acid, Guy, xxxiii, 526 — to tannic 
acid, Henry, vii, 228 — composition, v, 
232; xi, 219; xxxiii, 24; xxxvii, 67 
— constitution, Foster and Matthiesson 
(W. & B., 618), xxxiv, 521; Noad, 
xxxiii, 366 ; Robiquet, ir, 42 — decom- 
position, Noad, xxxiii, 366 ; Woehler, 
xvi, 136 — preparation, O'Shaughnessy, 
xi, 261 ; Staples (by oil of turpen- 
tine), i, 21 — remarks, Pelletier, v, 230 
— rotary power, Jellet, xxxvi, 341 — 
solubility in chloroform, Lepage, xxiv, 
148 ; Pettenkofer, xxxi, 232 — in olive 
oil, Attfield, xxxv, 250 — Pettenkofer, 

xxxii, 185 subliming temperature, 

Guy, xl, 248 — as substitute for quinia, 
xviii, 17, note — O'Shaughnessy (W. & 
B , 617), xl, 243 — test (potassio-iodide 
of zinc). Stein, xlii, 221. 
HKHrNATE, Faure, ii, 222. 

[11 



NARCOTISM, VOLTAIC, Richardson, xxxi, 
480. 

NARTHEX, botanical description, Falco- 
ner, xviii, 269. 
NASCAPHTUM (Storax bark), xxvi, 448. 
NASTURTIUM terrestre, xxviii, 74. 
NATRI bark, xxix, 5. Compare Copalchi 

BARK. 

METHYL, xxxv, 3. 

NATRIUM. See Sodium. 

NATRUM. See Soda. 

NATURAL HISTORY specimen preserved, 
Verrill, xxxviii, 232. 

NAUCLExi GAMBiR, xiv, 261 — cultivation, 
Young, xvii, 215. Compare (Cate- 
chu. 

NECROLOGY. See Obituary. 
NECTANDRA, alkaloid.^!, Maclagan and 

Gamgee, xli, 453 — properties, Halli- 

day, viii, 199. 

Rodiei, xix, 113. 

PUCHURY'^ major and minor. See Pr- 

CHURIM. 

NECTANDRIA, Maclagan and Gamgee, 

xli, 453 is identical with buzina 

(pelosina, Wiggers), Fliickiger, xlii. 
316. 

NEMASPORA orocea on bark of beech- 
wood, xxxi, 163. 

NEMOGNATHA .MGBJCORM!^, xxxvii. 270. 

NEPALINA,FIuckiger(Napellina,Hubsch- 
mann), xlii, 236, 398. 

NEPHELIUM LiTCHi,'xxxvi, 295, note. 

NERIUM ANTiDYSENTERJCUM, X. 48 — Stcn- 
house, xxxvi, 349. 

Oleander, poisonous principle. La- 
tour (W. k B., 1564), XXX, 171. 

TixcTORiuM, yields blue color, vi, 73, 

NEURALGIA, remedies, vi, 261 ; xviii 
235; xxviii, 367 ; xxxix, 417. 

NEW Lebanon gardens, xxiv, 88 — labora- 
tories, xxvii, 568. 

Zealand gold-fields, xxxvi, 270. 

NIAULI (Melaleuca viridiflora), xxxviii, 
504. 

NICKEL, analysis of commercial, Thomp- 
son, xxxv, 327 — behavior to weak al- 
kaline solutions, Vogel, xi, 81 — to 
alkaline polysulphides, Schiff, xxxiii, 
264 — equivalent, Schneider, xxxii, 446 
manvjacture, Thompson, xxxv, 327 — 
properties, Tissier, xxxii, 234 — salts, 
Broughton, xxvi, 402. 

and ALUMINIUM, crystalline com- 
pound, Michel, xxxiii, 220. 

, ACETATE, yield of acetic acid, Thom- 
son, xxiii, 263 — of acetone, Thomson, 
xxiii, 55. 

, CARMiNATK, Luckow, xxxvii, 277. 

, PORMIATE, Fell, XXX, 221. 

, IODIDE, combination with ammonia, 

Rammelsberg, xiii, 86. 
, NITRATE, behavior to ferroso-ferrlc 

oxide, Schober, xlii, 402. 

] 



150 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



NICKEL. sui-i'HATE, composition. Marig- 
nac. xxviii, 415 — as ■'<f dative. Palmer, xl, 
516! 

LiNx.iiiTE, Ua\ssler. xlii, 357. 

KLECTRO-PLATIXG, Paiol/, XV, 05. 

NICOTIA. behavior to reagents, Presenilis, 
xxxix, 27 — to iodide of cadmium and 
potassium. Marme, xli. 18 — to iodo- 
hydrargyrate of potassium, Mayer, 
XXXV, 21, 23; xxxvii, 211 — to penta- 
chloride of antimony and phosphoric 
acid, Schulze. xxxii. 138. 235 — e-fti- 
malion in tobacco.. Schiel. xxxii. 137 ; 

Schloessing, xix. 69 existence in 

green leaf and the seed of tobacco, 
Mayer, xxxvii, 200 ; Procter, jr., xxx. 
502 — in human viscera. Morin, xxxiv. 

510 quantity inlioled by tobacco 

smoke. Malapert (W. & B.. 821 j. 

xxvii, 119 — preparation^ Conwell, i, 105 
—Davy, viii. 82— Debi/e (W. & B., 
819), xxxii. 424— Schloessing (VY. A: 
B., 820, note), xix. 68— Turnpenny. 
V, 198 — properties, Urfila, xxir. 142 — 
Posselt an<l Roimann. iii, 175 — sob.i- 
bility in chloroform, xxiv. 148 — yield 
from different varieties of tobacco. 
Schloessing. xix. 70. 

ior)OiiYD«A)!r; viiA'i'i:, Bcrdeker : Wer- 

Iheim, xxxvii. 1 1. 

NIOOTFAN'Atab.vcum (see Tabaccm)— dif- 
ferent ^p'/cieii^ Le Conte, xxxi. 471. 

NICOTIANJX. Barval. xviii, 157. 

N[LE, EXPLORATjoN, PiSca^ rac de Lauture, 
xxix, 182. 

NINSf, KADiX, xxxvi, 292. 

NIPPLES of flexible ivory, xiii. 87. 

AVASH, Wdshi'.igton formula, xl, 23ft. 

NITRANILIX, composition, xxxiii, 249. 

NITRATEH. conversion into arnmoniaral 
saltii by nascent hydrogen, Kuhlmann. 
xix, 74 — distinction from ehloratea. 
iu minute quantities, Vogel, jr., xiv, 
304 action as vianure. Herapath, 

xxviii. 567 quantity in ivater and 

fioil, Boussingault, xxx, 158 te>it^ 

Braun (sulphate of anilin), xli. 20. 

NITRAZOPIIENYLAMTN, Kopp, xxxiii, 
249. 

NITRE. Com})are Potas.'^.f. nitras. 

-, uou(rf{ (= chloride of magnesia), 

xxvii, 365. 

NITRIC oxiDK, See Nitrocex. kixoxide. 

NITRIFICATION, MiUon. xxxiii. 212. 

NITRITES, test. Braun (sulphate of ani- 
lin), xli. 20. 

NITROBENZOLE, behavior to nascent hy- 
drogen, Geuther, xxxiii, 217 — to per- 
manganate of potassa. Cloez and 
Guignet, xxxi, 152 ; xxxiii, 329 — com- 
mercial (contains very little true nitro- 
benzole, W. & B., 1472), Mahla, xxxi, 
200 — physiological properties, Letheby 
(\V. k B , 1472). XXXV, 52d—poisomv(/^ 



xxxvii, 211— preparation., Kopp, xxxiii, 
133— Mahla, xxxi, 202— from oil of 
turpentine, Schiff, xxxii, 450 — test, 
Mahla (Maisch's caustic potassa test) 
xxxi, 202 — .Maisch (caustic potassa. 
AV. k B., 574, note), xxix, 544. 

NITRO-CINNAMATES. Kopp. xxxiv, 186. 

NITRO-CINXAMIDE. Simoii. xiv, 266. 

NITROGEN, absorption by alcohol and 
water. vSaussure. xxxi 116 — in the 
alkaloids^ under what form? .lohnson. 
vi, 33 — its assimilatinn by plants, Her- 
apath xxviii, 567 — and source. Lie- 
big, xiii, 2:{0 — percentage in coffefj 
Graham and others, xxix, 372 — con- 
densation by vegetable mould, Mulder, 
xvii, 40 — fstimation in organic analy- 
sis, Bunsen, xiii, 222 Varrentrap 

and Will, xiv, 141: (not free from 
error, Reizet, xiv, 316) — -.wnowni fixed 
by wheat, with different manures, ('al- 
vert, xxxvii, 261 — iu vtanures and soil, 
BoussingMult, xxx, 155 — metallie na- 
ture, Faraday, xvii. 22 — Hare, xv. 417. 
note — direct corabinaiion with melah. 
Briegleb and Geuther, xxxv, 33 — ob- 
tained [ivom. the air). Hare, vi, 183 — 
Marchand (chloride of lime and wa- 
ter of ammonia), x\ii, 80 — -Pelouze 
(nitric oxide, su!}>hiiric acid, etc.j, 

xiii. 260 (from urea). Cam*=ron, 

xxxi. 157 — conversion into saltpetre^ 
Cloe/- and Guignet {\\\- pe imanganate 
of potash ), xxxi. 1 51 — sf.Hcnie gravity, 
Arago : Blot; Berzeliii?: Delong: 
Thomson : Thenar.!: Exley. x, 341 — 
test, Desbassyus, xi. iM)!). 

, UTNOxiUK (nitric oxide), use \n endio- 

metrt/. Hjire. vi, ll9—-!io"ri''/elion, Far- 



aday, xvii, 22. 
-. IODIDE. Audi 

not dangerous 

cloves or glycerin, xl 
-, PROTOXIDE, antidotal j 

ler (W. k B., 15(;(;), 



, vui. 215 — iormation 
in presen<-e of oil oi' 
392. 

•v>pcrties. Zieg- 
vv. 183- 



is not 

decomposed hj plants, V^ogt-l. jr., xviii. 
300 — to be inh<flpd with oxygen, Lilly, 
xli. 126 — liquefaeiion. Biaiichi, xxxvii. 
275-- Dupretz, xxiii. 86 — Evans, xl, 
414 — Faraday, xvii, 21 — liquid, Evans, 
xl, 414 — preparation, xl. 448 — Serul- 
las, V, 86 — properties, Ziegler, xl, 411 
— specific gravity, Berzelius, x, 341. 

. suf.pUATK OF OXIDE, xvii, 205, note, 

268. 

, suLPHURET, Soubeiran. x, 84. 

NITROGLUOOSB, Carey Lea, xl, 345. 

NITROGLYCP]RIN, account. Senders, 
xxxviii, 314 — for blasting, (best made 
on the spot,) Kopp, xxxviii, 524 — com- 
position, de Vrij, xxviii, 48 — explosive 
nature, xxxvii, 479 — Ferris, xxxii, 524 
— explosions (Aspinwall ; San Fran- 
cisco), xxxviii, 316 — inhalation, Mer- 



PKEPARATJONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



151 



NITROGLYCERIN ( Continued). 

rick, jr. (W. k B. 420), xxxv, 564— 
noii-ezplomve, Nobel (with methjlic al- 
cohol), xxxviii, :>18 — physiological ac- 
tion, Jackson, xxi, 244 poiaonous 

character, Schuchardt, xxxix, 164 — 
preparation., etc , Kopp. xxxviii, 524 — 
Liebe, xxxiii, 3i:> — de Vrij, xxviii, 48 
— test, Werber (sulphate of anilin), 
xl, 449. 

"NITROLEUM (Shaffoer) is nitroglycerin. 

xxxviii. 567. 
NITRO-MANNITE, de Lucca, xxxviii, 179. 
-NITRO-NAPHTHALEISE, Laurent, xvii, 

264. 

NITRO-NAPHTHALLSE. xvii. 263, 264. 

NITRO-NAPHTHALIN and colored deriv- 
atives, Roussin. xxxv, 157, 158. 

'NITRO-PRUSSIDES. manufacture, etc.. 
Hadow, xxxix, 233. 

NITRO-SALICIDE. Piria. xi, 138. 

NITROSO-PHENYLIN, Church and Per- 
kins, xxxiii, 240. 

NITRO-TOLUENE. xxxiii. 47. 

MTRO-TOLUOL, boiling point and speci- 
fic gravity, xxxviii. 544. 

.NITROUS fumigations, powder, xxx, 374. 

, OXIDE. See Nitrogen, pnoTOxroK. 

NITRO-VERATROL, Merck, xxxiii, 115. 

NOBILTS coLOKEu Walter, xix, 319 

— Becquerel, xxxiv, 77. 

NOMENCLATURE, chemicai- (See Nota- 
Tiox), Bache, xxvii, 213 : Berzelius, 
ix, 5 ; HSire, v, 209, 257; ix. I ; Mor- 
ris, xxvii, 11 i. 388. 

in U. S. Ph. (63), Maisch. xii, 519: 

Taylor, xxxv. 416, 418. 

NOSEGAY. See Bouqukt. 

-NOSTOC COMMUNIS, coloring matter, riii. 
336. 

NOSTRUMS, report of Medical Societ}', 
New York. Prel. No. 114. Compare 

PATENT MEDIOIN !0S. 

NOTATION, criKMiCAi., Johnson, vi, 40. 

See NoMENCLAxr^RE. 
"NOTICES, CHEMICAL (Compare Notices, 

PlIAKMACKUTICAI.). DtEHL, L,, XXXIX. 

137. (Acidura hydrocyanicum dilu- 
tum, 141 — Acidum phosphoricum di- 
lutum, 138 — Amraonio-ferric alum. 
139 — iManganesii sulphas, 139 — Tinc- 
ture ferri chloridi. 140). 

. , Mai8('h, J. M., xxxii, 521. 

(Aluminte phosphas in uux vomica, 
524 — Ammonia" acetas, 523 — Iodine 
in aqueous ether, 524 — Iron from 
sulphate of co[)i)er, 523 — Paramor- 
phism of the chlorides of ammonium 
and potassium. 522 — Potassii chlori- 
dum, crystallization. 521). 

, MEDICO-BOTANICAL: Cai!son. J., 

VIII, 279. ( Achras s ipola, 280— Coc- 
culns crispus, 279 — Theobroma cacao, 
280), IX. 196 (Alhagi maurorum, 199 



— Coptis teeta, 196— Pucha pat. 198). 
X. 105 (Indian senna, 105 — Rhubarb, 
107). 

, , Griffith, R. E., V, 299 (Lau- 

rus cassia and cinnamomum). VI, 21 
(Madura aurantiaca, 22 — Nutmegs, 
21— Spikenard, 21) ;— 118 (Jalap), — 
199 (Aloes wood, 199— Benzoin, 200 
— Collinsonia canadensis, 200 — Hy- 
drastis canadensis, 201 — Mimosa far- 
nesiana, 202 — Petiveria foetida, 203 — 
Sarsaparilla, East Indian, 202). 284 
(Matico, 286 — Robinia pseudacacia, 
284 — Sagiitaria sagittifolia, 286 — ■ 
Spilanthus oleraceus, 285). VII, 115. 
(Guaiacum, African, 115 — Milk trees, 
116 — Mirabilis jalapa, 117 — Rhubarb, 
new, 1 1 5 — Tonka bean, 1 18 — Winter- 
bark, 115). 187, (Adansonia digi- 
tata, 187 — Cedrela odorata, 189 — 
Cerbera tanghin, 190 — Cocculus pal- 
matus, 190 — Monodora myristica, 191 
— Myrobalans, 192— Sago, 188— Xan- 
torrhcea hastilis. 189). 279, (Hera- 
cleum lanatum. 281 — Janipha mani- 
hot,279— Sandal wood, 280). VITI,19, 
(Coculus indicus, 19 — Hibiscus escu- 
lentus, 20— Simaraba, 21). 101, (An- 
acardium occidentale, 103 — Cerbera. 
102 — Coulteria tinctoria, 105 — loni- 
dium marcucci, 105 — Passiflora, 101 
— Rhus metopium, 104). 191, (An- 
grtecum fragrans, 194 — Lobelia syph- 
ilitica. 191 — Lycopus, 192 — Pareira 
brava, 193— Xanthoxylon, 195). 

NOTICES, PHARMACEUTICAL. (Cora- 
pare Notices, chemical). Bakes, W. C. 
XXXV, 228, (Elixir calisaya, ferro- 
phosphorated, 228 — Suppositories. 
228 — Wine of citrate of iron \nd 
quinine, 228). XXXIX. 5, (Balsam of 
Peru, 7 — Camphor-ice. 5 — Glycerine, 
perfumed. 6 — Prescription checks, 6). 
120, (Elixir of bismuth. 120— 
Glycerole of sumach, 120 — lodided 
opodeldoc, 120). Bakes axo Pakkish, 
see Parrish and Bakes. 

. , Banxvaut, Ch., xxxi. 18. 

(Compound extract of colocynth, 20 
— Glycerin water, 18 — Granules, 21 
— Podophyllin. 19— Powdering pills, 
18). • 

, ; Caxavax. B., xxiv. 224. (Li- 
quor potassa arsenitis, i525 — Mistura 
amygdalae, 225 — Pilula^ ferri com- 
positje. 224.) 

, , CoGGESiiAi.!.. G. D., xxiv. 220, 

382. (Mucilago acaci;e, 220— Spiri- 
tus lavandula- compositus. 221 — Sy- 
rupus acaciic, 22 ) ,382— Syrupus acidi 
citrici, 222 — Syrupus ipecacuanha\ 
222 — Syrupus scilla3 compositus, 223, 
382 — Tinciura aconiti radicis, 224— 



Tinctura card; 



amomi composita. 224). 



162 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE J 



NOTICE.S, PHARMACEUTICAL, Cum- 
MiNGS, H. T., xxviii, 397. (Colchicum 
seed, powdered, 397 — Percolation, 
398 — Soda water, poisonous, 399 — 
Syrupus scillae compositus, 397 — 
Tinctura ferri chloridi, 398). 

, , DiEHL, Jr., Lewis, Compare No- 
tices, CHEMICAL. XXXIX, 385, (Em- 
plastrum plumbi, 385 — Emplastrum 
saponis, 38G — Oleum limouis, adul- 
terated, 387 — Oleum terebinthinoe, 
containing copper, 386~Syrupus ferri, 
quiniae, etstrychnite phosphatis, 386). 
XL, 101, (Baryta chloras, 103— Cin- 
choniie chloras, 102 — Elixir calisayte, 
et ferratum, 104 — Quinia? chloras, 101 
— Quiniai bichloras, 102 — Quinite fer- 

rocyanas, 104 Quinidioe chloras, 

103). 

. , , DUHAMEL, AUGl'STIN, IX, 291 

(Iodine in aqueous solution, 292 — 
Moxon's magnesia, 292 — Onguent de 
la mere Thecle, 293— Opiates, 294— 
Prescribing, 295 — Tinctura saponis 
camphorata. 291 — Vinum ergotse, 291 
— Zinci chloridum, 294). X, 278, 
(Ferri iodidum, 280 — Hydrargyri ses- 
quiodidura, 278 — Syrupus digitalis. 
279 — Syrupus ipecacuanliaj, 283 — Un- i 
guentum hydrargyri, 282). XII, 182, | 
(Argenti cyanidum, 186 — Arsenici 
iodidum, 186 — Sod;y bicarbonas, 182 

— Syrupus morphia^ 187.) XIII. 
101 (Auri chloridum. 1C3 — Sulphuric 
lemonade, 105 — Lozenges, ofcatechu, 
104; of lactate of iron, 105 — Oleum 
hyoscyami, 106 ; hyperici, 106 ; phos- 
phori, 104 — Pills, dinner, 105 ; of 
protiodide of mercury, 105 — Sodse 
hyposulphis, 102 — Sulphur baths, 
105 — IJnguentum hydrargyri nitratis. 
101). 288, (Cantharides, adulterated I 
290— Copaiba, solidified, 228— Em- 
plastrum cicutae, 289 — Fluid extrac- 
tum sennit', 29 j). XIV, 99. (Argenti 
oxidum, 99 — Arsenic, detection, 103 
— Arsenic and antimony, distinction, 
104 — Linimentum potassii iodidi, 102 

— Lozenges of proto- carbonate of ■ 
iron, 100 — Senna, percolation, 103 — 
Turlington's balsam, 99 — Zinc, puri- 
fied, 105). 281, (Syrupus acacia, 282 
— Tar beer, 281 — Tinctura opii cam- 
phorata, 283). XVIII, 16, (Glass, 
writing, 20 — Laudanum, with and 
without narcotia, 16). 

. , , Dupuy, Eugene, xxiv, 219. 

(lilistering cerate, 219 — Unguentum 
stramonii, 219). 

, , DuRAND, Elias, IV, 201. (Ether 

in mixtures, 202 — Magnesias carbo- 
nas, 201). 293, (French morphia). 
V, 31, (Confections, 31 — Conserva 
rosse, 32 — Golden sulphuret of anti- 



mony, 32 — Syrups, 31 — Unguentum 
aquae rosae, 32). Ill, ( Acidum citri- 
cum). 

, , Ebert, a. E., XXXIX, 107. 

(Bibromide of mercury, 107 — Wheat, 
phosphates, 107). XLII, 540, (Pills, 
resin-coating, 541 — Pill machine, 
542 — Spreading plasters, 541 — Test 
tubes, 540). 

, , Ellis, Charles, vii, 283. ( Am- 

monii iodidum, 283 — Emplastrum 
plumbi, 284). 
, , Fisher, W. R., VII, 183 (Hy- 
drargyrum cum creta). VIII, 106, 
(Plumbi acetas, lt6 — Sodae carbo- 
nas, 108— Spiritus aetheris nitrosi,, 
109 — Zinci sulphas, 107). 

, , GiTHENS, W. H., xxxiii, 203. 

(Extractum cannabis indicae, resin of 
guaiacum, and balsam of Tolu in 
aqueous mixtures, 203-205 — Aqua 
anisi, deposit, 206 — Pills, sugar- 
coated, 206 — Pills of iron by hydro- 
gen ; of camphor, 206). 
, , Griffith, K. E., IV, 199. (Ar- 
genti nitras, 201 — Ferri carbonas, 199 
— Hydrargyri cyanidum, 200 — Hy- 
drargyri oxidum nigrum, 200 — Hy- 
i drargyri oxidum rubrum, 201 — Mag- 
I nesia,201 — Potassa.200 — Unguentum 
antimonii, 199). VII, 284. (Butter of 
antimony, 286 — Kermes mineral, 285 
—Resin of jalap, 284). VIII, 11, (Am- 
monite nitrosulphas, 11 — Musk, arti- 
ficial, 14 — Quinia; phosphas, 11 — 
Senna and prunes, 13 — Unguentum 
cantharidis. 13 — Uuguentnm hydrar- 
gyri rubri, 12). 110, (Charcoal, ac- 
tion on bitter extracts. 111 — Gold, 
peroxide, 110 — Tinctura opii, 112 — 
Waters, medicated, 111). 196 (Ker- 
mes mineral, 196 — Potassa, 198 — Po- 
tassii iodidum, 197 — Syrupus aspara- 
gi, 197). 

, , Gross, G. A., xxxvii, 249 (Ferri 

iodidum, extemporaneous, 251 — Ole- 
um peponis, 253 — Tinctura opii, 249 
— Tinctura opii camphorata, 250). 
, , BoDGSOxN, JR., W., IV, 10 (Cam- 
phor in aqueous solution, 13 — Emul- 
sions, 11 — Ether in wa'er, 12 — Mag- 
nesia, coagulating mixture, 10 — Ole- 
um terebinthinae in mixtures, 12 — 
Spermaceti emulsion, 13). V,34 (Em- 
plastrum assafoetidae, 36 — Extractum. 
jalapae, 34 — Mistura ferri composita, 
35 — Morphia, 35). 295 (Emplastrum 
antimonii, 295 — Moxa, 29.^ — Unguen- 
tum antimonii, 295). VI, 187 (Carba- 
zotic acid, 187 — Ferrocyanide of pot- 
assium as test for copper, 188 — Li- 
quidambar styraciflua, 190). XXX, 
113 (Ammonio-ferric alum, 115 — 
Lactucarium purificatum, 116 — 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER 



THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



15^ 



i^OTICES, PHARM. {Continued). 

Syrups, acetic, 113 — Tinctura canna- 
bis indicse, 115). 

, Laidley, J., XXII, 118 (Do- 
ver's powder, 122 — Pills of copaiba, 
121 — Unguentum glycerini, 118 — Un- 
guentam hydrargyri nitratis, 119). 
XXIV, 318 (Circulatory displace- 
ment). XXVI, 100 (Syrups, 100— 
Syrupus aurantii, 105; ipecacuaubae. 
103 ; senegce, 104 ; scillfe compositus, 
104; senna?, 105; tolu, 105: zingi- 
beris, 105). 

— - — , , Maisch, J. M., XXX, 12 (Extrac- 

tura opii, 13 — Syrupus acidi citrici, 
14— Tinctura bumuli, 14 — Tinctura 
opii, 12 — Tinctura opii acetata, 13 — 
Vinura opii, 13 — Sydenbam's Lauda- 
num, 13). 

, , Mayer, F. F., XXXVI, 289 

(Jacca nuts, 292 — Japanese lovage 
root, 289 — Litcbi fruits, 295 — Souari 
nuts, 294). XXXVII, 173 (Calabar- 
beans, 173 — Oabig bark, 178 — Sacred 
bark, 179). 

— , , Meroeix, J., XXX, 103 (Mel ro- 

spe, 104 — Syrupus aurantii corticis, 
103 — Unguentum bydrargyri nitratis, 
103). 

™— , , Parrish and Bakes, xxxiii, 1 

(Jellies, 4 — Pills, dispensing, 3 ; gold 
and silver coating, 1 — Suppositories, 
5 — Wafer envelopes, 4). 
, , Plummer, J. T., xxvii. 304 (Li- 
quor morphiae sulphatis, 304 — Magne- 
sias sulpbas, tasteless, 306 — Syrupus 
capsici, 306 — Syrupus morphije com- 
positus, 305 — Tinctura galbaui, 305). 

— , , Procter, JR., W., XIII, 183 

(Arrowroot, 188— Black ink, 189— Sal 
ammoniae, powdered, 189 — Saccba- 
rometer, J 87 — Syrups, fermentation, 
185 — Syrupus scillse compositus, 186 
— Vallet's protocarbonate of iron, 
183). XIX, 93, (Atropia, 95— Dono- 
van's solution, 93 — Syrupus aurantii 
"corticis, 96). 259 (Hydrocyanic acid, 
259— Fluid extract of rbubarb, 262 
— Citrate of magnesia, 264 — Tinctura 
aconiti, 262 — Vinum colcbici, 264). 
-XX, 85 (Glycerin, use, 89— Fluid ex- 
tract of bucbu, 85 ; of spigelia and 
senna, 87 ; of taraxacum, 86 — Tinc- 
tura aconiti radicis, 88). XXII, 108 
(Liquor magnesine citratis, 112 — Flu- 
id extract of rbubarb, ] 10 : of sarsa- 

parilla, compound, 108 Tar beer, 

no). XXV, 408 (Fluid extract of hy- 
■oscyamus, 410 — Cucumber ointment, 
409 — Succus taraxaci paratus, 408). 
XXIX, 108 (Fluid extractum antbe- 
midls, 111 ; jalapae, 108 — Liquor acidi 
Bulphurosi, 110 — Tinctura ignatise 
.^marae, 109). XXXIV, 136 (Colocyn- 



thin, 137 — Fluid extract of senega, 
136 — Albuminous coating of pills, 137 
—Syrup of senega, 136). 208 (I^m- 
plastrum ammoniaci, 209 — Emplas- 
trum opii, 210 — Extractum krameriae, 
209 — Tinctura ignatiae amaroe com- 
posita, 208). 318 (Coating pills, 319 
— Vesicating collodion, 323 — Granu- 
lation of medicines, 324). XXXV, 110 
(Colocynthin, 1 16 — Ferri sesquicblo- 
ridum, 110 — Fluid extractum casca- 
rilla?, 113; cocci, 113; cocculi, 112; 
leptandr{e, 112; rosae, 111 — Lard, 
114; benzoinated ; populinated, 114; 
balsamic, 115 — Liquor ferri nitratis, 
111 — Elemi in ointment, 115). XLI, 
388 (Extractum gallae compositum, 
390— Hufeland's powder, 391 — Pilulae 
terebinthinae composite, 389 — Syru- 
pus pruni virginianae compositus, 391 

— Tinctura kino composita, 389 

Tinctura rbei dulcis, 388 Tyson's 

antimonial powder, 390 — Tonic nar- 
cotic, 389 — Unguentum haemorrboi- 
dale, 391). 

, , Scatteugooi), J., IV,295 (Quer- 
ela, 295 Morpbiiie sulphas, 295). 

VIII, 113 (Rocbelle salts, 113— Soda? 
bicarbonas, 114). 

, , Shinn, J. T.. xxxiv, 306 (In- 

fusum gentiana? compositum, 307 — • 
Potassag acetas, 306). 

. , Smith, D. B., iv, 202 (Coxe's 

bive syrup, 202 — Distilled waters, 203 
—Plasters, 203). 

, , Stabler, R. H., XXI, 4 (Liquor 

ferri iodidi, 5 — Potassii iodidum, 4 — 
Tinctures, extemporaneous, 5). 
XXIII, 121 (Powdered drugs, 121— 
Tinctura ferri cbloridi, 122 — Tinctura 
kino, 123— Unguentum hvdrargyri 
rubri, 123). 

. , Taylor, A. B.. XXIV, 33 (Cas- 

tillon's powder, 34 — Jackson's am- 
monia and pectoral lozenges. 35 : 

pectoral syrup, 34 Syrupus zinci 

iodidi, 33). XXV, 206 (Fluid extract 
of serpentaria, 206 — Mitchell's aperi- 
ent powders, pills; tonic pills, 207). 

, _ Thompson, \V. S., xlii, 30 (Sy- 
rup of bromide of iron, 31 — Syrup of 
hypophospbite of iron. 32 —Vallet's 
protocarbonate of iron, 30). 

, , Warner, W. R., xxx, 315 (Fer- 

rated fluid extract of wild cherry 
bark, 315 — Cold cream, 316 — Cream 
syrup, 316 — Syrup of sarsaparilla for 
soda water. 317 — Arsenite of strych- 
nia, 315). 

, , WiEGAND,T. S., xxx, 406 (Lin- 
iment of iodide of potassium, 406 — 
Precipitated tartar emetic, 407 — Pre- 
cipitated deutoxide of mercurv, 
407). 



154 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



NOTICES, PlIAUMACEUTICAL, anony- 
mous, III, 196 (Testing acids, 199 — 
Oleum gaultheria,', 199 — Tinctura 
kino, 198 — Magnesia, 198). 2891 
(Tinctura kino, 291 — Pills of pow- i 
dered cubebs, 290 — Pills of camphor 
and opium, 298 — Solidified mixture 
of magnesia, 298). VI, 282 (James' 
powder, 282 — Extractum krameria^, 
282 — Ferri et potassse tartras, 283 

Ungueutum plumbi subacetatis, 

283). A., IV, 14 (Rochelle salts, 14 
— Argenti nitras, 14 — Morphia, 16 — ! 
Morphia? sulphas, 1 5 — Iodides of mer- ! 
cury, 15 — Tartaric acid, extempore, ; 
16). 121 (Morphia. 121— Iodides of| 

mercury, 122 Indelible ink, 123). 

203( Specific gravityof powders, 203 — 
Acetic acid, extempore, 204 — Morphia, ; 
204 — Labarraque's liquor, 204). i^.,V. 
291 (Iodine liniment, 291— Chameleon 
mineral, 292 — Sulphur precipitatum, 
292— soda water, 292). 6^, ,V, 294 (Ex- : 
tractum humuli ; Oleum tiglii; Oleum 
Valeriana?, 294 — Lupuline, 295). F., ; 
L , V, 293 (Crystals in extract of hy- ! 
oscyamus ; Adulteration of sulphate 
of quinia ; extracts of belladonna and 
hyoscyamus). S., W., IV, 197 (Tine- ^ 
lura saponis camphorata, 197 — Un- 
guentum hydrargyri nitratis, 197 — 
Coxe's hive syrup, 197). T., V, 291 
(Citrate of potassa, extempore, 29M 
—Coal, analysis, 292). Thuja, XXXI, \ 



409 (Liquor ferri iodidi ; Hydrargyri" 
iodidum rubrum, 409 Liquor hy- 
drargyri et arsenici iodidi, 41© — Vi- 
uum ergota?, 410 — Tinctura myrrhie^ 
410). IF., II. M., XLII, 207 (Aqua 
chlorinii extemporanea, 207; — Plasma 
for pills. 208 — Evaporation to dry- 
ness, 208— Frothy syrups, 209). 299 
(Keeping chlorinated lime, 299 — Ex- 
temporaneous drop machine, 300). 
504 (Syrupus tolntanus, Syrupus zin- 
giberis, Camphor* pulvis). 
NOTONECTA unifahcjata. Guerin. xxxi, 
76. 

NUT, CLEARING. See Strychnos potato- 
rum. 

NUTMEGS, cultivation in Bencoolen, xxiv, 
53 — powdering. Squibb, xxxix, 527. 

•, California, Carson, xxvi, 499 — Tor- 

rey, xxvi, 247. 

BUTTER. See Adbps MYRISTICtI^. 

Compare Myrtstica. 

NUX voj[ioA, acida. Corriol, v, 351 — alka- 
loids, Schutzcnberger (W. & B., 563 ; 
Parrish, 654), xxx, 534 — as aperient, 
xxviii, 116 — assay, Mayer, xxxvi, 218 
—cannot bear heating, Gille, xxvii, 
534 — contains phosphate of alumina, 
Maisch (W. & B., 562), xxxii, 524— 
test, Schlienkarap (diluted sulphuric 
acid, W. & B., 563), xxviii, 52— Viel- 
guth (W. & B , 563), xxviii, 220. 

. Compare Strychnaok,*: ; Stryoh- 

NOS NUX VOMICA. 



o. 



OABIG BARK, Mayer, xxxvii, 178. 
O^AK, Bartram, Buckley, xxxiv, 122. 
, POISON-. See Toxicodendron. 

, AVHITE. See QUERCUS ALBA. 

OAKUM, absorbing power for water, Rus- 
chenberger, xxxv, 161 — versus lint, \ 
Sayre, xxxiv, 411; Ruschenberger, 
xxxv, 160. 

OATS, contain bari/ta, Salm-Horstmar, 
xxxiii, 406 — behavior to tincture ofj 
guaiacum, xxiii, 185 — amount of si-' 
lica in different parts, Arendt, xxxv. 
164, 165 — of starch, Dragendorflf, xxxv, 
139 — microscopically examined, Ras- 
pail, xi, 22, 27. 

OBENTONIA is Galipea, ii, 55, note. ' 

OBITUARY :— 

Adamson, Constautin, xviii, 245, 248. 
At ago, xxv, 578. 

Bache, Alexander Dallas, xxxix, 288. 
Bache, Franklin, xxxvi, 276, 288. 
Bagel, xxviii, 192. 
Baden, ^'■^^ ^ i xxix, 384. 
Baillihre, Germ., xxxii, 480. 



Beck, Th. Romain, xxviii, 192. 
Beckett, Franz, xlii, 288. 
Bell, Jacob, xxxi, 5, 488, 582 ; xxxiij,. 
187. 

Benzinger, J. S., xlii, 484. 
Berard, J. E., xli, 480. 
Berg, Otto C, xxxix, 191. 
Berthier, Pierre, xxxiv, 389. 
Berzelius, J. J., xxi, 189. 
Bigelow, Fr. 0., xxxv, 486. 
Blair, 11. C, xxxiv, 560. 
Bolley, xlii, 576. 
Bonpland, Aime, xxx, 582. 
Bouillay, P. F. G., xlii, 93. 
Braconnot, xxviii, 192. 
Brande, W. Thos., xxxviii, 384. 
Buchner, Sen., xxv, 191. 
Brewster. David, xl, 287. 
Brown, Fred., xxxvi, 192, 280. 
Brown, Robert, xxx, 580. 
Canavan, Benjamin, xxix, 86, 49 L,. 
Carney, Chas. T., xxxv, 94, 384. 
Clark, Jas. (Sir), xlii, 480. 
Condict, Lewis, xxxiv, 575. 



rEEPASATlONS, UNDER THEIK RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



OBITUARY {Conliaiied). 
Copland^ Jas., xlii, 480. 
Coppuck^ P. v., xlii, 92. 
Corbidije^ J. E., xli, 192. 
Couriois^ Bernard, xi, 68, 
Coxe^ J. Redman, xxxvi, 2*75. 
Outlay Benjamin, xxxvi, 288. 
DanielL^ W. Freeman, xxxvii, 400. 
DarUnyion, W., xxxv, 479. 
Daubeny, xl, 192, 288. 
Davrj, John, xl, 287. 
Deschamps^ xxxviii, 576. 
Dilkes^ Theo., xxxvi, 283. 

XXV, 75. 
Dodge^ John P., xxxv, 486. 
Duhame.l^ Aug. J. L., xviii, 314. 
Dulong, xi, 64. 
Dunglison^ Robley, xli, 383. 
jDussance, H. E., xli, 480. 
IJ/lis. Benjamin, iii, 180, 345, 
Ummanvei, L. M., xli, 484. 
J^'ffp&f/, Jas. T., xxxii, 288. 
d'Fvern, Hy. G., xlii, 4S4. 
Faraday, M., xxxix, 476, 576. 
Fish, G. B., xxxviii, 388. 
Fisk, Hy. F., xl, 576. 
Fisher, W. R., xiv, 348. 
Fremy, Ed. Fr., xxxix, 192. 
Frichc, Chas , xxxii, 288. 
Fullerton, jr , Alex., xlii, 566. 
Gabaudan, A. W., xlii. 191. 
Garot, L. F. J., xli, 384. 
Gegaa, Tbos., xxx, 573. 
Geyer, Andr., xxvii, 483. 
Gilcfi, Richard B., xlii, 192. 
Gmelin, Leopold, xxv, 578; xxvi, 93. 
Gratfp, Albr. v., xlii, 480. 
Graham, Thos., xli, 576. 
Gregory, W., xxx, 476. 
Griffith, R. E., xxii, 287. 
Guibourt, N. J. B. G., xxxix, 563, 575. 
Guillermond, xxxvii, 400. 
Hare, Robt., xxx, 474. 
Henfrey, xxxi, 586. 
Herapath, W., xl, 288. 
Herapath, AY. B., xli, 192. 
Hill, Hy. E., xli, 484. 
Hitchcock, E., xxxvi, 288. 
Hollows, W. A., xxviii, 192. 
Hooker, W. J., xxxviii, 192. 
Hornr, W. E., xxv, 288. 
Huviboldt, Alex, v., xxxi, 392. 
Huraut, xxviii, 192. 
Jenkins, W. E., xlii, 483. 
John, F. L., xxxvii, 78. 
Johnston, J. F. W., xxviii, 192. 
Joubard, xxxiv, 389. 
Jussieu, Adr. de, xxvi, 94. 
Kirschleger, Fred., xlii, 288. 
Klelt, Fred., xxxi, 582. 
Klolzsch, J. F., xxxiii, 192. 
Knapp, E. E., xxxv, 486. 
Laidle.y, Jos., xxxii], 479. 
Lassoigne^ J. L., xxxi, 288. 



Laurent, Aug. xxvi. 94. 
Lchmann (Jena), xxxv, 288. 
Ijenher, Sl._, xlii, 383. 
Lrroux, xlii, 480. 
Lindley, John, xxxviii, 94. 
Locke, John, xxix. 384. 
McConnel, W., xlii, 576. 
Magnus, H. G., xlii, 384. 
Magendie, xxviii, 192. 
Marriott, W., xxx, 573. 
Martius, C. F. P. v, xli, 192. 
31a.rtius, Theo. W. C, xxxvi, 94. 
Matlhiessen, Aug. xlii, 576. 
Matteucci, xl, 480. 
Mayer, F. F., xlii, 483. 
Meakini, John, xxxv, 575. 
Meigs, Ch. D., xli. 384. 
MiUrr, Hugh, xxix, 382. 
Miller, W. Allen, xlii, 576. 
MilUngton, John, xl, 479. 
Milnor, W. H., xxxiv, 493. 
Mitscherlich, E., xxxvi, 94. 
Morin, P. L., xxxvii, 400. 
Morris, Warder, xxxv, 288, 567. 
.Morton, W. T. G., xl, 480. 
Midler, W. H , xlii, 484. 
Neergaard, jr., W., xlii, 384. 
Nickles, F.,\xli, 384. 
Notson, Ch. B., xlii, 382. 
Nuttall, Thos., xxxi, 586. 
Oliff, W. J., xxxviii, 388. 
Orfila, XXT, 384. 
I Orridge, B. B., xlii, 576. 
! Otto, Fr. Jul., xlii, 288. 

J'age, Chas. G., xl, 480. 
i Faris, J. Ayrton, xxix, 382. 
Farkcr, Herschell, xlii, 484. 
Peabody, Geo., xlii, 92. 
Felouze, Theoph. Jul., xxxix, 479. 
Penny, Fred., xlii, 92. 
Pereira, Jonathan, xxv, 192, 287. 
Persoz, J. Fr. , xl, 576. 
Plummer. J. T., xxxviii, 93. 
Porter, John T., xxxviii, 576. 
Procter, Stephen, xl. 287. 
Pry or, E., xxx, 572. 
Pyle, J. L., xxxviii, 388. 
Quevenne. xxviii, 192. 
Reakirt, Jos., xxx, 572. 
Redfield, W. C, xxix, 384. 
Redtenbacher, Jos., xlii, 288. 
Roberts, David, xxxv. 486. 
Robinet, Steph., xlii, 192. 
Robiquet, E., xxxii, 480. 
Rogers, Hy. D , xxxviii, 576. 
Rogct, P. Mark, xli, 576. 
Rose, Hy., xxxvi, 384. 
Roscngarten, Ad. J., xxxv, 192. 
Roux, xxvi, 384. 
Royle, J. Forbes, xxx, 287. 
Scamnion, Franklin, xxxvi, 191, 277 
Schaffer, Chas., xxviii, 277. 
SchoiTibein, C. F., xl, 576. 
Sembenitti, xlii. 480. 



156 SALTS, SEE UNDER 

OBITUARY [Contimied). 

Sheppard, S. C, xxxvi, 283. 

Shoemaker, S. P., xxx, 572. 

S/nimardj G. G., xl, 94. 

Silliman. Benj , xxxvii, 77. 

Simpson, Chas. Young, xlii, 383. 

/S'm?^//, Cbas. Aug.,xxxiv, 192. 

Smith, E. R., xli, 192, 484. 

Smith, Geo. W., xxxii, 480. 

SoubeiraUj xxxi, 191. 

Southall, Thos., xxxiii, 192. 

Southall, W., xxxviii, 384. 

Thenard, xxix. 479. 

Thomas, Robert P.. xxxvi. 191. 277. 

Thomaon, Thos., xxv, 94. 

Thompson, Lewis, xxxviii, 480. 

Troth, llv., xiv, 174. 

Tulhj, W"., xxxi. 288. 

Tuomey, M., xxix. 384. 

Vnger, Frz., xlii, 288. 

Ure, Andrew, xxx, 383. 

Vauquelin, ii, 159. 

Vogel, A. V., xl, 287. 

Wah, G. F., xxxiv, 575. 

Ward, Nath. B., xl, 480. 

Warrington, Robt., xl, 192, 288. 

Weymann, G. W., xxxvi, 470. 

Welter, J. J., xxv, 94. 

Wilson, Thoi. B., xxxvii, 320. 

Wylie, Jas., xxri, 384. 
OCOTEA LiTS.^A, i, 135. 

PKRSICA, i, 135. 

PICHURIM. See PiCHUIilM. 

OCTRAM, Retlwood. xli, 38o. 
OCUBA WAX. See Wax, ocuba. 
OCYMUM basiliclm, its oil. Bonastre. 

iv, 81. ' 
ODINA WODIKR yields gum, xxix, 77. 
ODONTALGIC drops, Copland, xxxix, 

418 — Righini, xxxix, 418. 
ODONTINE, composition, Winckler, xxxiv, 

333. 

ODORIFEROUS plants. ancient use, 

Mantegazza, x!ii, 557. 
ODOROUS principles, tb*ir absorption 

influenced by colors, Stark, vi, 69. 
Q5NANTHE crocata is innocuous near 

Edinburgh, xxxiv, 273. 
fistulosa, analysis, Gerding, xxi, 

68. 

(ENANTHINE, Gerding (W. & B., 1567), 
xxi, 68. 

CENENTHYLENE (?), (heptylene), from 
coal tar, xxxiii, 43. 

<ENOTHERA biennis, Griffith (W. & B.. 
1567), iv, 289. 

OIDIUM AURANTiACUM. cndurauce of heat, 
xxxviii, 319. 

TUCKERi destroyed by sulphide of cal- 
cium. Price, xxvi, 76 — poisonous ef- 
fects, Collin, xxxvi, 459. 

OIL. Compare Oi.ea ; Oleum. 

British f W. k E.. 602. note), v, 29 : 

xi, 74. ■ ' i 



LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 

] cakk, analysis by bisulphide of car- 

j bon, Tegetmeier, xxxvi, 265. 

I , CAMPHORiFEROUS, Proctcr, jr., x, 17. 

I CASKS, impermeable, viii. 257. 

I , COAL. See Coal oil; Petroleum. 

I , CRUCIFEROUS, detection, Mailho, 

i xxviii, 68. 

, DRYING, behavior to lulphuric acid, 

j Maumene, xxv, 254 — preparation, by 
j oxide of manganese, xxvi, 86 ; Wag- 
I ner, xxix, 168 — by borate of manga- 
I nese, Barruel and Jean, xxvi, 264. 

I EMULSIONS, by carbonates, Jeannel 

j and Monsell, xxx, 461. 

I , ESSENTIAL. See Oils, volatile. 

FILTER, Warner (W. & B., 883),. 

xxxiii, 13. 

, FIXED, acidification, Bouis, xxvii, 143 

— Pelouze (Parrish, 554), xxvii, 350 
j — adulteration with cruciferous oil, 
Mailho, xxviii, 68 — behavior to air, 
Cloez, xxxvii, 191 ; xxxviii, 86 — to 
; bromine, ii, 187 — bleaching, by per- 
i manganic acid, xx, 343 — by blowing 
air through, xx, 344 — by chromic 
acid, Watt, xx, 341 — by purple bot- 
tles. Hunt, xix, 148 — promotes pois- 
! onous action of cantharides, Schaff 
i (W. k B., 204), xxviii, ^Qb— decolor- 
izing power, when calcined with 
phosphate of lime, Bussy, i, 239 — 
dispensing bottle, xxx, 222 — dry- 
ing, see OIL, DRYING — filter, Warner 
(W. & B., 883), xxxiii, ]3—manufac- 
I ture, xxxvi, 498 — Hagner, vi, 56 — by 
I bisulphide of carbon, Heyl, xl, 549 — 
j by coal oil, Vohl, xxxix, 319 — oxida- 
tion, Cloez, xxxvii, 191 ; xxxviii, 86 — 
{ purification, Bancroft (caustic alka- 
lies), xviii, 297 — Keyser (ammonia), 
i xlii, 512 — Piussan (animal charcoal), 
I viii, 172 — Cassgrand (steam, W. & B., 
i 238, note), xxvi, 524 — rancidity pre- 
j vented, Wright (slippery elm, W. & B., 
! 843), xxiv, 180 — rotary power, Buig- 
I net, xxxiv, 140 — spontaneous saponi- 
\ fication, when in the sreds (W. & B., 
! 569), Pelouze, xxvii, 350 — (compare 
I acidification, oxidation) — test, Maumene 
I (sulphuric acid), xxv, 254. 

, HAIR. See Hair oil. 

, IODIZED (W. &B., 475), Berthe, xxvi, 

304 — Hougounenq, xxviii, 525. 

LAKE in Trinidad, xxxvi, 332. 

^ LUBRICATING, Boudet, xxiii, 183— 

Furck, xxv, 123. 

, PAINT-, chemistry, Mulder, xl, 258 — 

preparation, Furck, xxv, 122. 

, tanners'-, Furck, xxv, 122. 

OILS, VOLATILE, how obtained in organic 
analysis, Bonastre, iii, 143 — advltera- 
tion with alcohol; detection : Bernouil- 
ly (acetate of potassa, W. & B., 572), 
xxv, 82 ; (details by Wittstein, xxv, 



niEPARATIONS UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



157 



OILS {Conthiurd). 

82) — BorsarelJi (chloride of calcium, 
W. <fe B., 572), xii, 249— Dragendorff 
(sodium), xxxvi, 103 — Oberdrerffer 
(platinum black and litmus paper), 
XXV, 460 — Puscher (Fuchsin), xxxix, 
320 ; (not reliable, Zeise, xxxix, 320)— 
Wittstein (Bernouilly's acetate of po- 
tassa test), xxv, 82 — adulteration with 
castor oil, detection : Draper (i itric 
acid), xxxiii, 223 — adulteration with 
oil of turpentine, detection : lleppe 
{nitroprusside of copper, W. & B., 
572), xxix, 325— Maier (optical be- 
havior), xxxvii, 337 — Mero (oil of 
poppy seed, W. & B , 572), xvii, 236 
— Voget (sulphuric acid), xvii, 238 — 
behavior to bromine, ii, 187 — to chro- 
mic acid (at a distance), Plummer 
(W. & B., 571, note), xxviii. 197— to 
sulphuric and sulphurous acids, Hare, 
ix, 156 ; Procter, jr.. x, 23 — to iodine, 
Guyot, ix. 79 ; HashoflF, iii, 266 ; Pat- 
terson (W. & B., 1360), xxiv, 203— to 
litmus paper, Martius, v, 60 — to sul- 
phates in aqueous menstruum, Bastick, 
xix, 303 — bleaching properties, Fred- 
erking, xxxii, 46 ; Plummer, xxv, 398, 
508 ; Procter, jr. (due to ozone), xxv, 
401 — observations on comphoriferous 
oils, Procter, jr., x, 17 — coloring prin- 
ciple (W. & B., 570), Piesse, xxvi, 87; 
Sachse, xxv, 255 — decolorizing power, 
see bleaching — distillation^ about boil- 
ing point of water, Mialhe, ix, 178 — 
l)y incision, Guibourt, xviii, 240 — op- 
tical behavior, Mayer, xxxvii, 340 
(compare rotary power) — ozonization, 
Faraday, xxiv, 77; Plummer, xxv, 508 
— absorption of oxj/gen, Sau?sure,xxT, 
445 — reaction in painting, Kuhlmann, 
xxviii, 137 — preparation, Desmarest 
(in vacuo), v, 336 ; Soubeiran (addi- 
tion of salt not always necessary), x, 
75 — preservation, Menigaut (alcohol), 
vii, 276; Taylor (syringe bottles), 
xxxvi, 130 — recovery from watery so- 
lution. Groves (olive oil, W. & B., 
594), xxxvi, 247 — resins from action 
of sulphuric acid. Hare, ix, 156; Proc- 
ter, jr., X, 23 — resinifi.ed, purification, 
Curieux (W. & B.. 570, note), xxx, 
398 — rotary power, Buignet, xxxiv, 
140 (compare optical behavior) — spe 
•cific gravity, Chardin and Guibourt, 
' iv, 145 ; V, 59 — iWartius, v, 60 — com- 
parison of old and recent oils, Proc- 
ter, jr., X, 23 — table of yield, Recluz, 
i, 132 ; Volter and Darrn, ix, 83. 

of WINE. See OlKUM yiiTHHRKl M. 

OILED SILK. See Silk, Oiled. 
OINTMENTS. Compare UxauioNTA. ckr- 

A'l'A. 

.remarks, Powers, v, 109 — preserva-\ 



lion, Briughurst (yellow wax), xli, 59 
— Deschamps, XV, 260 — Doliber (ben- 
zoes), xl, 33 — Procter, jr., xxxv, 114 
— Thompson (keeping in glass), 
xxxvii 1, 151. Compare Cekata. 

with Fuller's earth, Smith, xxx, 

231. 

, AMMONIACAL BLISTERING, Gondrct 

(W. & B., 99), xviii, 160. 
, dissolving for beeasts, Jackson. 

xxxvi, 116. 
, CHALK, Spender's (Parrish, 768), 

xxix, 83. 

, CITRINE. See Unguentum hydrar- 

GYEI NITRATIS. 

, cowhage. See Unguentum mucun^b. 

, scrophulouscoNJUNCTiviTis (ray liver 

oil, cyanide of iron), vii, 260. 
, cucumber. See Unguentum cucu- 

MERIS. 

, fistula (soot), vi, 325. 

, falling off, of the haik. See Po- 
made. 

, Physick's issue, v, 112. 

, for itch, Bourguignon (glycerin, es- 
sential oils), xxxi, 580 — Emery (sul- 
phur, chloride of lime), vi, 264 ; viii, 
83 — de la Ilarpe (sulphate of zinc, 
hellebore), xiii, 8.5 — Lison (burnt 
lead plaster), viii, 174 — Meyer (salt- 
petre, sulphur), ix, 349. 

, Judkin's, Baxley, xxxix, 370. 

, mother, DuhameLix, 293. 

, for NIPPLES, Righini, xv, 159. 

for pimples, xxxiii, 116. 

for poRRiGO, Biett, vi, 178. 

for enlarged tonsils, Cerchiari, viii, 

83. 

, vulnerary, Perret, xxxix, 417. 

OKRA. See Hibiscus esculentus. 

OLDENLANDIA c^rulea, xli, 437. 

OLEA. Compare Oleum ; Oil. 

co("rA, preparation, L'hermite, xxvii, 

67 — Krause and Gerste, xxvii, 68 — 
Wenz€ll (suggests use of oleic acid), 

xxxv, 222— Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix, 
535. 

inpusa. See Olea cocta. 

OLEA FRAGRANS for scenting tea, xxvii, 
531. 

OLEANDER. See Nerium oleander. 
OLEATES. See under different bases. 
OLEENE (Hexylene) from coal tar, xxxiii, 
43. 

OLEFIANT GAS, liquefaction, Faraday, 
xvii, 20 — specific gravity, Thornson, 
X, 343. 

OLEIN, behavior to ozone, Gorup-Besanez, 

xxxvi, 167 — preparation from hydro- 
oleic acid, Fremv, viii, 342. 

OLEONE, Vohl, xxx," 517. 
OLEO-RESINS, preparation, Procter, jr., 

xxi, 114; xxxi, 548 — Rittetihouse ( use 

of benzin), xxxix, 24. 



( 



158 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



OLEO-RESINA capsici, Procter. jr..xxxi, 
548. 

CARDAMOMi, Procter, jr., xxxi, 548. 

CARYOPHYLLi, Procter, jr., xxxi, 548. 

cuBEB^. Procter, jr., xviii, 167 ; xxxi, | 

548 — (comparative results with alco- 
hol, ether, benzine), Procter, jr.,| 
xxxviii, 210. ] 

KiLfcis MAIMS, Procter, jr., xxxi, 548. | 

LUPDLix.E, Procter, jr., xxxi, 548. j 

pii'KRis NiGRi, Procter, jr., xxxi, 548. ! 

PYRETHiM, Procter, jr., xxxi, 548. i 

SAiux.K, Procter, jr., xxxi, 548. I 

XANTHOXYLi. Procter, jr., xxxi, 548. i 

ziNGiBERis. Procter, jr., xxxi, 548. j 

OLEUM (Oil). Compare'OiL : Olea. 

AB.siNTHii, adaitcration (chloroform,! 

alcohol, oil of turpentine). Bull, xxiii, 
233 — behavior to nitro-prusside of 
copper, riep'pe, xxix, 327 — refiin, by 
action of sulphuric acid, Procter, jr., 
X, 23 — roiarii power, Soubeiran andj 
Capitaine, xxxvii, 340 — spacijic gravi- 
ty, Marti us, v, 60. 

AcniLLR.i;. See Oleum millefolii. 

yKTHEREUM, vumufacture^ Diehl, jr.,! 

xxxvii, 126 — Maisch, xxxvii, 100 — ' 
Procter, jr., xxxvi, 299 — Squibb, xxix, 
193; xxxiii. 57 — Taylor, xxxv, 411 — 
on ImporUd, Kent, xxiv, 255. 

(oil ov wine), account^ etc., 

Hennel, ii, 73 ; Serullas, i, 227 — con- 
stilution. Hennel, Prel. No. 27— D. B. 
Smith, iv, 119. Compare yETHER. 
theory. 

ALEUKITIS TRILOBvK. See AlEI,"- 

RITES TRILOBA. 

ALLii, artificial, Tollens and Hen- 

nicger, xli, 302 — from oil of mustard, 
Gerhardt, xvii, 228. 

, ALLSPICE. See Oleum pimext.h. 

, AMBER. See Oleum succjxi. 

, AMYGDALAE AMAR.i;, adulteration with 

nitrobenzole detected, Bechamps 
(acetate of iron), xxvii, 451 — Dragfen- 
dortf (sodium and alcohol), xxxvi, 
419 — Maisch (caustic potassa, W. & 
B., 574), xxix, 544 — behavior to nitro- 
prusside of copi)er, Heppe, xxix, 328 
— constitution^ Jac. Bell, xiii, 350 — 
crystals are benzoic acid. Strange, iv, 
69 ; Stenhouse, xxvi, 267 — drops in 
drachm, Bernouilly, xxxi, 441 — does 
not pre-exist in the fruit, Robiquet; 
Boutron-Charlard, iv, 139 — formed., by 
distilling glue with sulphuric acid, 
Gugelberger, xix, 153 — by action of 
chromic acid on cinnamic acid, Si- 
mon, xiv, 266 — separation of hydro- 
cyanic ocid^ see ptirijicatioa — poisoning, 
xxiii, 382 ; xxix, 3i7 ; Gbavasse, xii, 
172; Mclagan, xxvi, 3 14 — purification., 
Blockey (oxide of mercury), xxxiii. 
435 — Grindley (oxide of mercury, 



protochloride of iron and lime) xix, 
315 — Groves (protochloride of iron 
and potassa), xxvi, 351 — Procter, jr.. 
(sulphate of iron and lime), xxxviii, 
295 — Tilden (chloride of calcium), 

xxxvii, 145; xxxix, 135; (bisulphite 
of soda), xxxvii, 145 — Whipple (ni- 
trate of silver, \v. k B., 573), xxvi, 
348 — resin, hy action of sulphuric 
acid, Procter, jr., x, 23 — rotary •^ovf&Yj 
Buignet, xxxiv. 140 — specific gravity, 
Ohardiu, iv, 146 — yield, Recluz, i, 132 
-— VoUeraud Darrn, ix, 83. 

DUiJJis, adult e rati on (oil of apri- 
cot). Ilager, xlii, 408 : Nickles, 

xxxviii, 299 — (oil of Arachis hypo- 
giea), linger, xlii, 409 — (drying oils), 
Wimraer. xxxv, 139 — (linseed oil), 
xxxi. 507 — (poppy-seed oil), Lipo- 
witz. xli, 132 — behavior to sulphuric- 
acid, F'remy. \\\\, 342 — drops and 
minims, Ijernouilly, xxxi, 441 ; Du- 
rand i, 169— in perfumery , Piesse,. 
xxvi, 2 75 — solubility in chloroform, 
Lepage, xxiv, 147. 

AXAGALLIDIS ARVENSIS. See AnA- 

o;allis arvexsis. 

AND.E GOME.'^ii. See Akda gomesii. 

ANETHi, behavior to nitroprusside of 

copper, Heppe, xxix, 327 — decolorizes 
indigo solution, Frederking, xxxii, 
46 — in perfuniery, xxvi, 367. 

AX GR lice, decolorizes indigo solu- 
tion, Frederking, xxxii, 46. 

ANGOSTUR.E. HeVzog (W. & B., 117),. 

XXX, 421. 

AM.MALE DippELii, Klauer, ix, 244. 

ANisi (niiXKNSis, adulteration, Proc- 
ter, jr.. xxvii, 513 — behavior to nitro- 
prusside of copper, Heppe, xxix, 328- 
— decolorizing properties, Plummer, 
XXV, 399, 511 — specific gravity. Char- 
din, iv, 146 — yield, Volter and Darrn, 
ix, 83. 

AXisi VULGARIS (German), adultera- 
tion : (soap) Dubail, v, 349 — (sperma,- 
ceti), Capdeville, xxvii, 472 — behavior 
to nitroprusside of copper, Heppe, 
xxix, 327 — composition of camphor^ 
Dumas, x, 21 — deodorizes tersulphide 
of potassium, Ruschenberger,xxxviii, 
321 — drops and minims, Bernouilly, 
xxxi, 441 ; Durand, i, 169 — in perfu- 
mery, Piesse, xxvi, 276 — resin, by ac- 
tion of sulphuric acid, Procter, jr., 
X. 23 — specific gravity, Chardin, iv,. 
146 — Martins, v, 60 — yield, Recluz, i, 
132 ; Volter and Darrn, ix, 83. 

and QuiNiA compound, Hesse, 

xxxv, 57 ; xxxvi, 20. 

of ANTS, artficial, Stenhouse, xvii, 55> 

155. 

ANTiiEMiDis, yield, Recluz, i, 132 — 

Schindler, xvii, 317. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



159* 



OLEUM of APPLES, Fehling, xxv, 156. 

of APRICOTS, as adulterant of oil of 

sweet almonds, Nickles, xxxviii, 299; 
Hager, xlii, 408 — behavior to hydrated 
lime, Nickles, xxxviii, 299. 

ARACHis HYPOG.'E,E, Winter (W. & B., 

1523), xxxii, 292 — behavior to hydra- 
ted lime, Nickles, xxxviii, 299 — as 
substitute for o//yi" o//, Ferrins, xxxi, 
415. 

armoraciyE, Hubatka, xvi, 76. 

asari, Procter, jr., xiii, 180. 

asphalti, from near Havana, xxxiv, 

189. 

AssAFoeTiD/ii, Hlasiwetz (\V. k B., 

147), xxiii, 130. 

AURANTii. Compare , orangk. 

coRTicis, behavior to nitroprus- 

side of copper, Heppe, xxix, 326 — 
decolorizes indigo solution, Freder- 
king, xxxii, 46 — in perfumerij, Piesse, 
xxvi, 463 — rotanj power, Buignet, 
xxxiv, 140 — specific gravity, Martius, 
V, 60. 

PLORUM See Oleum neroli. 

of BALSAM PERU, Kraut, xlii, 236. 

of BASIL. See OOYMUM BASILICUM. 

of BAY-LAUREL in perfumery, Piesse, 

xxvi, 276. 

of BAY (rum). See Oleum jfYRCi^ 

A ORIS. 

of BELA, Jackson, xii, 348. 

of BEN (moringa pterygosperma), ac- 
count, Hamilton, xviii, 41 — composi- 
tion, etc., Walter, xix, 78. 

of BENNE. See Oleum sesami. 

BERGAMOTTyE, bchovior to nitroprus- 

side of copper. Heppe, xxix, 328 — de- 
colorizing properties, Plummer, xxv, 
399, 511 — in perfumeri/. Piesse, xxvi, 
276 — resin bj action of sulphuric acid, 
Procter, jr., x, 23 — rotanj power, Biot; 
Capitaine ; Soubeiran, xxxvii, 340 — 
Buignet, xxxiv, 140 — specific gravity, 
Biot and others, xxxvii, 340 — Char- 
din ; Guibourt, iv, 146 — Martius, v, 
60— t/ield, Recluz, i, 132. 

betula) lent^, chemical behavior, 

Procter, jr., xv, 243. 

, BIRCH. See Oleum betul^k. 

, bubuli, solubility in chloroform, 

Lepage, xxiv, 147. 

■ CACAO. See Oleum Thbobrom.*:. 

(JADiNUM, account, Landerer, xxxiii, 

110. 

' CAJUPUTi, account, Guibourt, iv, 139 

— analysis, Schmidt, xxxiii, 545 — be- 
havior to nitroprusside of copper, 
Heppe, xxix, 328 — on its green color, 
(iuibourt (W. & B., 578), iv, 144; 
Stickel, ix, 246 — freed from copper, 
vi, 348 — experiments, Procter, jr., x, 
19 — origin, Iloxbuvgh and Colebrooke, 
i, 198 — resin, by action of sulphuric 



acid, Procter, jr., x, 23 — specific grav- 
ity, Guibourt, iv, 146 ; Martius, v, 60 
— (is no criterion, Planche, iv, 261.) 

, artificial, Mortier (W. & B., 

578), vi, 349. 

CALAMI, behavior to nitroprusside of 

copper^ Heppe, xxix, 328 — in perfum- 
ery, Piesse, xxvi, 368 — yield, Gray, v, 
209— Recluz, i. 132— Trommsdorff, v, 
269 — Volter and Darrn, ix, 83. 

CAMPHOR^-;, account, Lallemand (W. & 

B., 579), xxxii, 265 — cohesion figure, 
Tomlinson, xxxvi, 344 — composition^ 
Dumas, x, 21 — experiments, Procter, 
jr., X, 17 — resin by action of sulphuric 
acid, Procter, jr, x, 23 — specific gravity^ 
Brisson, iv, 146. 

cANELL.E albyE, analysis, ^[eyer and. 

Reiche, xvi, 68, 75. 

CAxxABfs. See of hrmp seed. 

iXDic^ infusura, Grimault, (W.. 

k B., 382, note), xxxv, 227. 
cANTiiARiDis viRiDE (ethereal ex- 
tract), Oettinger, xxii, 227. 

of CAXTiiARiDiN, Scattergood, iii, 210. 

of CAOUTCHOUC, Gregory, viii, 262, 

340. 

CARDAMOMi, Procter, jr., xxi. 116. 

CARUi, behavior to nitroprusside of 

copper, Heppe, xxix, 326 — decoloriz- 
ing property, Plummer, xxv, 399, 510, 
511 — drops in drachm, Bernouilly, 
xxxi, 441 — in perfumery, Piesse, xxvi, 
365 — resin by action of sulphuric acid, 
Procter, jr., x, 23 — rotary power, 
Buignet, xxxiv, 140 — Maier, xxxvii, 
340 — specific gravity, Chardin, iv, 146 
— Maier, xxxvii, 340 — Martius, v, 60 
— yield, Recluz, i, 132 — Volter and 
Darrn, ix, 83. 

CARY^ poRCiNyE (pignut hickory), 

Wayne, xxviii, 488. 

CARYOPHYLLi, adulteration (carbolic 

acid), Fliickiger, xlii, 522 ; Hager, 
xlii, 521 — behavior to nitroprusside of 
copper, Heppe, xxix, 328 — decolorizing 
property, Plummer, xxiv, 399 — drops 
and minims, Bernouilly, xxxi, 441 
Durand, i, 169 — manifacture, Crew's 
apparatus, Procter, jr., xxxiv, 27 — by 
superheated steam, Scharling, xxiv, 
235 — in perfumery, Piesse, xxvi, 366- 
— resin, by action of sulphuric acid, 
Hare, ix, 156, 211 — rotary power,. 
Buignet, xxxiv, 140 — specific gravity, 
Brisson ; Chardin, iv, 146 — Martius, 
v, 60 — old and recent, Procter, jr., x, 
23 — yield, Hees, xxiv, 237 — Recluz, i, 
132 — Volter and Darrn, ix, 83. 

CASsiyE, compare Oleum cinnamomi — 

aduUeration (alcohol), xxiii, 377 — (oil 
of cloves, W. & B , 581), Ulex, xxv, 
46.3 — behavior to nitroprusside of cop- 
per, Heppe, xxix, 328 — decolorizing;; 



160 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



OLEUM CASSiyE {Continued). 

property, Frederking, xxxii, 46 — 
Plummer, xxv, 399, 510, 511 — \n per- 
fumery^ Piesse, xxvi, 365 — rotary ipow- 
er Buignet, xxxiv, 140 — specific gT&v- 
itj, Brisson ; Chardin, iv, 146 — Mar- 
tins, v, 60 — of old and recent, Procter, 
jr., x, 23 — yield, Recluz, i, 132. 

■ CATAPUTi^j MiNORis, iv, 127. See 

Euphorbia lathyris. 

of cedar, specific gravity, Chardin, 

iv, 146 — Martins, v, 60. 

of cbdrat, in perfumery, Piesse, xxvi, 

365 — rotary power, Buignet, xxxiv, 
140 — specific gravity, Chardin ; Gui- 
bourt, iv, 146 — Martins, v, 60. 

• CER^, yield, Volter and Darrn, ix, 

83. 

CHAMOMiLLL^ (matricaria^), drops in 

drachm, Bernouilly, xxxi, 441 — pro- 
perties, etc., Bizio (W. & B., 542), 
xxxvi, 109 — rotary power, Buignet, 
xxxiv, 140 — specific gravity, Martins, 
V, 60 — spectrum, Brewster, xxxvi, 88, 
note. 

CHENOPODii, analysis, Garrigues, xxvi, 

404 — decolorizing property, Plummer, 

xxv, 399 — in mixtures, xxii, 306 — pre- 
paration in Baltimore, xxii, 303 — resin, 
by action of sulphuric acid, Procter, 
jr., X, 23 — superiority ^A\i\moYQ oil, 

xxvi, 503. 

cicuivE MAcuLATvE, properties, Young, 

xxvii, 291. 

viROSiE, identical with oil of 

cumin, Trapp, xxxi, 251. 

ciNNAMOMi (Ceylon), compare Oleum 

cassia: — properties of its camphor, 
Procter, jr., x, 21 — drops and minims, 
Durand, i, 169 — poisoning, Mitscher- 
!ich (W. & B., 581), xxii, 359— r^'sm, 
by action of sulphuric acid. Hare, ix, 
156, 211 — specific gravity, Brisson : 
Chardin, iv, 146— Martius, v, 60— 
yield, Recluz, i, 132. 

, ARTIFICIAL, Strecker (W. k B.. 

813), xxvii, 20. 

compound with iodine and 

IODIDE OP POTASSIUM, Apjohu, xi, 227. 

, LEAF, Stenhouse (W. & B., 302, 

note), xxvii, 163 — Pereira, xxvi, 182. 

• , WHITE, Meier and Reich e, xvi. 67. 

■ ciTRi. See Oleum limonis. 

lumitE, de Luca, xxxii, 543. 

ciTRONELL^, In perfumery, Piesse, 

xxvi, 366. 

cocHLEARi^, not identical with oil of 

mustard, Geiseler (W. & B.. 1499), 
xxxi, 416 — properties, etc., Hoffmann, 
xli, 464. 

cocos (coco nut), changes produced 

in the blood by its use, Thompson, 
xxvi, 421 — fusing point, Wimmel, xli, 
23, 431 — medicinal use, Pettenkofer 



(W. & B,. 1500), xxix, 331— soluhilily 
in chloroform, Lepage, xxiv, 147. 

- of COLZA, behavior to hydrated lime, 
Nickles, xxxviii, 299 — detected \n olive 
oil, Mailhe, xxviii, 68. 

- coPAiB.E (compare Oleum paraco- 
paibvE), physiological effects, Mit- 
scherlich (W. & B., 1250), xxii, 68— 
preparation without distillation, Ader, 
i, 117 — rotary power, Buignet, xxxiv, 
140; Soubeiran and Capitaine, xxxvii, 
340 — sjyecific gravity, Chardin, iv, 146 
— Soubeiran and Capitaine, xxxvii. 
340. 

- of copal, Schivler, xxxii, 448 — Vio- 
lette, XXXV, 141. 

- coriandei, properties, etc., Kawa- 
lier, xxv, 130 — yield, Volter and Darrn, 
ix, 83. 

- of cosTus DULCis. See Oleum cinka- 

MOMI, WHITE. 

- of COTTON-SEED, behavior to hydrated 
lime, Nickles, xxxviii, 299 — bleached 
by alkaline solutions, Lipowitz. 

xxxvi, 420 blue color, Kuhlmann, 

xxxiv, 188 — manufacture, etc., Wayne, 
xxviii, 487— Weatherly (W. & B., 424, 
note), xxxiii, 208 — purification, Duha- 
mel, ix. 297 — test, Reynolds, xxxviii, 
30. 

- CROCi, yield, Recluz, i, 132. 

- CROTOxis. See Oleum tiglii. 

- cubeb.'e, crystals examined, Miiller, 
V, 82 — decolorizing propertj, Plummer, 
xxv, 510 — properties, etc., Schmidt, 
xlii, 224 — resin, by action of sulphuric 
acid, Procter, jr., x, 23 — rotary power 
and specific gravity, Soubeiran and 
Capitaine, xxxvii, 340 — yueld, Recluz, 
i, 132. 

- cuMiM. behavior to nitro-prusside of 
copper, Heppe, xxix, 327 — identity 
with oil of Cicuta virosa, Trapp. 
xxxi, 251 — specific gravity, Chardin, 
iv, 146. 

- of CuKCAS PURGANS, Prel. No. 61 — 
analysis, Bonis, xxvii, 141. 

- of Curcuma, Gajewski, xlii, 466. 

- CYNyE (sANToxic^:), behavior to nitro- 
prusside of copper, Heppe, xxix, 327 
— properties, Voelckel, xxvi, 472 — spe- 
cific gravity, Martius, v, 60 — yield, Vol- 
ter and Darrn, ix, 83. , 

- of DIGITALIS. See Digitalis. 

- of dill. See Oleum anethi. 

- dracuxculi (esdragon), specific gra- 
vit}', Chardin, iv, 146. 

- of dugong, account, Fewtrell, xxxii, 
230 — as substitute for c&d-liver oiL 
Hobbs, XXX, 335. 

- blemi, medical properties, Mannkoff 

(W. k B., 365), xxxi, 424 specific 

gravity and rotary power, Deville, 

xxxvii, 340. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER 



THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 161 



OLEUM EMPYREUMATicuM Chabbbti, vi, 
351. 

ERECHTHiTis (firewecd), Duhamel, 

xvi, 8. 

ERGOTvE (ethereal extract), analysis^ 

Baker, xxiv, 102 preparation and 

properties, Duhamel, xiii, 95 — Wright 
(W. & B.,'367, 368), xii, 349. 

BRIGERONTIS CANADENSIS, PrOCtcr, jr. 

(W. & B., 1251), xxvi, 502— in uterine 
hemorrhage^ Wilson, xxvii, 319 ; xxviii, 
18. 

PHiLADELPHici, ji^ld, Johu and 

Procter, jr. (W. & B., 1251), xxvii, 
105. 

ESDRAGON. See Ol. DRACUNCULl. 

EUCALYPTI (globuli), examined, Clo- 

etz, xlii, 465. 

BUPHORBii (lathyris). See Euphor- 
bia LATHYRIS. 

FEBRi lODiDi, Gille, xxvi, 302. 

of FEVERFEW. See Oleum matrica- 

mM PARTHENII. 

of FIR, decolorizing property, Plum- 

mer, xxv, 399, 510. 
of FiREWEED. See Oleum erechthi- 

TIS. 

of PIRWOOL, xxxv, 274. 

FUNICULI, behavior to niiro-prusside 

of copper, Heppe, xxix, 327 — decolor- 
izing power, Plummer, xxv, 399, 511 
— drops in drachm, Bernouilly, xxxi, 
441 — in perfumery, Piesse, xxvi, 367 
— resin, by action of sulphuric acid, 
Procter, jr., x, 23 — rotary power, Bu- 

ignet, xxxiv, 140 specific gravity, 

Chardin, iv, 14^ — Martins, v, 60 — ot 
old and recent, Procter, jr., x, 23— 
yield, Recluz, i, 132 — Volter and 
Darrn, ix, 83 

FORMICyl-]. See , of ANTS. 

, FUSEL. See Alcohol, amylic. 

of garlic. See Oleum allii. 

GAULTHERiJB, 6eA(?w«o?-, Procter,jr., (to 

ammonia, (Cahours, xv, 242) ; xiv, 214 
— to baryta (Cahours, xv, 242); xiv, 
215 — to bromine, xiv, 219 — to chlo- 
rine, xiv, 218 — to chlorine and am- 
monia, xi-v, 219 — to oxide of copper, 

xiv, 216 to cyanogen, xiv, 219 — 

to iodine, xiv, 219 — to oxide of lead, 

xiv, 216 to nitric acid (Cahours, 

XV, 242) ; xiv, 220 to oxygen, xiv, 

217 — to potassa, xiv, 215 to soda, 

xiv, 215) — decolorizing power, Plum- 
mer, xxv, 399, 511 identity with 

salicylate of methylene, Cahours (W. 
& B., 1252), XV, 241 ; Procter, jr., xiv, 
211 — -/rom Betulalenta; Polygalapau- 
cifolia ; Spiraea, iii, 199 — in iaterinit- 
trnts, Heinitsch, xxiv, 210 — poisoning 
(W. & B., 409), vi, 289— Gallaher 
(W. & B., 1252), xxiv, 211— properties, 
f*rocter, jr., xiv, 212 — iperific gravity 



(as test for purity), iii, 199 — of old' 
and recent, Procter, jr., x, 23. 

GERANii (rose), ttccount, xxiv, 179 — 

Baur, xl, 135 — Hanbury, xxxi, 336— 
m perfumery, Piesse, xxvi, 368 — yield^ 

Recluz, xxiv, 179 Piesse, xxvi, 

367. 

GLAucii lutei. See Glaucium lute- 

UM. 

GOSSYPii. See , cotton-seed. 

, GRAIN, EMPYUEUMATIC, XXXiii, 110. 

, GRAPK-SEED, yield, Wagner, xxxiv^ 

89, 

, GROUND-NUT. See ARACHIS 

HYPOG^iE. 

GURJUN. See , WOOD. 

HASCHiciN, Laneau, xxxviii, 363. 

HBDEOM.ii, decolorizing power, Plum- 
mer, xxv, 399 — resin, by action of 
sulphuric acid, Procter, jr., x, 23 — 
rotary power, Buignet, xxxiv, 140 — 
yield, Reciuz, i, 133. 

, HEMLOCK, decolorizing power, Plum- 
mer, xxv, 399 — production, Stearns, 
xxxi, 29 — resin, by action of sulphu- 
ric acid, Procter, jr., x, 23. 

of HEMP-SEED, bcbavior to hydrated 

lime, Nickles, xxxviii, 299. 

, pig-nut HICKORY. See Oleum cary^: 

POKCINtE. 

HIPPOCASTANI. See , HORSE- 
CHESTNUT. 

of HOPS, analysis, Wagner, xxv, 442. 

, HORSE-CHESTNUT, for gout and rheu- 
matism, Genevoix (W. & B., 1454)^ 
xxxi, 231. 

HYOSCYAMi, xiii, ] 06. 

HYPERici, xiii, 106. 

, of JASMIN, Jackson, xii, 348 — resin^ 

by action of sulphuric acid, Procter,, 
jr., X, 23. 

jUNiPERi, behavior to nitro-prusside 

of copper, Heppe xxix, 326 — decolor- 
izing power, Frederking, xxxii, 46 — 
Plummer, xxv, 399, 511 — resin, by ac- 
tion of sulphuric acid, Procter, jr.,. 

23 — rotary power, Buignet, xxxiv, 
140 — Maier; Soubeiran and Capitaine, 
xxxvii, 340 — specific gravity, Martius, 
V, 60 — Maier; Soubeiran and Capi- 
taine, xxxvii, 340 — yield, Recluz, i, 
133 — Volter and Darrn, ix, 83 — ripe 
berries less than unripe, vi, 351. 

.lUNIPBRI EMPYREUMATICUM. See OlE- 

UM CADI NUM. 

KEKUNE (W. & B., 1457), xxxiii, 62.. 

See Aleurites triloba. 

, KOKUM. See KoKUM butter. 

, KUKiii (W. & B., 1457), xxxiii, 62. 

See Aleubites triloba. 

, KUNDAH. Clarke, xv, 122. 

, Lagam, Hanbury, xxviii, 159. 

of LARD, cohesion figure, Tomlinson, 

x,xxvi, 255. 



162 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



OLEUM LAURi (ethereal and fixed), extrac- 
tion by bisulphide of carbon. Lepage, 
xxviii, 446 — against flies^ iv, 351 — in 
perfumery^ Piesse, xxvi, 372. 

LAURKL, native (ethereal) (from Oco- 

tea pichurira by incision), Hancock 
(W. & B., 1584), i, 135— Procter, jr., 
xxiii, 1. Compare Oleum piCHUuiRf. 

LAVA\DUL.3J, adulteration, xxiii, 377 — 

behavior to nitroprusside of copper, 
Heppe, xxix, 327 — cohesion figiire/iioxn- 
linson, xxxvi, 344 — decolorizing pow- 
er, Frederking, xxxii, 46 — Plummer, 
XXV, 399, 510, 511 — rank odor due to 
stalks, Bell, xxi, 284 — absorption of 
oxygen, Saussnre, xxv, 445 — \x\ per furri- 
ery, ViQs^e, xxvi, 372 — re.iin, by action 
of sulphuric acid, Procter, jr., x. 23 — 
rotary power, Buignet. xxxiv, 140 — 
specific gravity. Brisson ; Chardin. iv. 
146 — Martius, v. 60 — yield, Recluz, 1. 
133. 

~ , LEMOx GRASS, in perfumery, Piesse, 

xxvi. 374. 

. LiMKTTvE. specific gravity. Martius, 

V, 60. 

LEMON, SWEET. Sce OlEUM CITRI 

LUMITli. 

LiMOxis. adulteration (mineral oil), 

Diebl. xxxix, 387 — artificial camphor. 
optical behavior, Biot, xxv, 446 — ca- 
pillary power, Frankenheim, xxxv, 
248 — decolorizing power. Frederking, 
xxxii, 46 ; Plummer, xxv, 399, 509, 
510, 511 — ozonization., Williams, xxv, 
547 — absorption of oxygen. Saussure. 
xxv, 445 — ixi perfumery J Piesse. xxvi, 
373 — preservation., Cobb (boiling wa- 
ter, W. k B., 582), xxv, 444— WW, 
by action of sulphuric acid, Procter, 
jr., X, 23 — rotary power, Biot; Maier ; 
Soubeiran and Capitaine, xxxvii. 340 
— Buignet, xxxiv, 140 — specific grav- 
itj-, Biot; Maier; Soubeiran and Cap- 
itaine, xxxvii, 340 — Chardin ; Gui- 
bourt. iv, 146 — .'/?>/(/, Recluz, i, 132. 

, hydrate, Deville, xv, 79.^ 

Lixi. behavior to hydrated lime, Nic- 

kles, xxxviii, 299 — composition and 
products of oxidation, Sacc. xviii, 76 — 
decolorizing ^o^^r. Plummer, xxv, 400 
— drying., Mulder, xl. 259; (without; 
heat), Liebig, xxiv, 269 — in piles., Vanl 
Ryn (W. & B., 583), xxiii, ^1—parifi-\ 
cation^ vi, 85 ; xvii, 78. j 

~ , BOILED, solvent action of resins j 

and gum resins, Sacc, xlii, 243. j 

MACiDis, adulteration., de Letter, xxxv, I 

508 — in perfumery., Piesse, xxvi, 460 | 
— specific gravity, Chardin, iv, 146 — ' 
Martius, v, 60 — yield., Recluz, i, 133 
— Volter and Darrn, ix, 83. 

majoran;e, behavior to nitroprusside 

of copper, Heppe, xxix, 327 — in per- 



fumery, Piesse, xxvi, 460 — yield., Vol- 
ter and Darrn, ix, 83. 

-, MANGCSTEEN. See KoKUM BUTTER. 

- MATico, yield, Wiegand, xviii, 176. 

- MATRiCARivK. See Oleum chamomil- 

PARTHENii, analysis, Dessaignes 

and Chautard, xx, 325. 

- MELiss.E, behavior to nitroprusside 
of copper, Heppe, xxix, 327 — in per- 
fumery., Piesse, xxvi, 276 — specific gra- 
vity,Mariius,v,60 — yield., Recluz, i, 133. 

- MEXTH.ii CRfSP.?;, behavior to nitro- 
prusside of copper, Heppe, xxix, 327 — 
decolorizing power, Frederking, xxxii, 
46. 

- PIPERITA, adulteration (oil of 

fireweed). Bullock, xxxi, 552 — (oil of 
erigeron), Maisch, xlii, 120 ; Procter, 
jr. and Hotchkiss, xxvii, 221 — (sul- 
phate of magnesia), Gorup-Besanez. 
xxxiv, 32 — behavior to nitroprusside 
of copper, Heppe, xxix, 327 — compo- 
sition., Walter, xi, 260 — its camphor, 
Dumas, x, 21 — decolorizing power. 
Frederking, xxxii, 46 — Plummer, 510. 
511 — distillation by steam, Ortlieb, 
xxvii, 473 — drops and minims, Ber- 
nouilly, xxxi, 441 ; Durand, i, 169 — 
manufactore in Michigan, xxix, 312 — 
Stearns, xxxviii, 68 — resin, by action 
of sulphuric acid, Procter, jr., x, 23 — 
rotary power, Buignet, xxxiv, 140 — 
so//f/, Gorup-Besanez, xxxiv, 32 — spe- 
cific gravity, Chardin. iv, 146 — Mar- 
tius, V, 60 statistics (Michigan). 

Stearns, xxxviii, 68 — examination of 
tests for purity, Maisch, xxxii, 105 — 
yield, Hotchkiss, xxvii, 222— Recluz, 
i, 133— Volter and Darrn, ix, 83. 

viRiDis, resin, by action of sul- 
phuric acid, Procter, jr., x, 23. 

- MiLLEFOLii, behavior to nitroprusside 
of copper, Heppe, xxix, 327 — optical 
properties. Brewster, xxxvi, 88, note. 

- MOXARD.*:, composition, Arppe, xix, 28 
— resin, by action of sulphuric acid, 
x, 23 — stearopten, its nature, Arppe. 
xix, 26— Bonsall, xxv, 200, 201— Proc- 
ter, jr., xvii, 86. 

- MORPHiTi:, St. Lager, xxvi, 121 — Le- 
page, xxvi, 301— Soubeiran, xxvi, 301. 

- MORRHUJK, account, Pereira, xxi, 136 
— administration (carbonate of potas- 
sa, and flavor), xxiv, 172— Adolphus 
(lime water, bitter almonds), xxxix, 
273 — Jeanel (cherry laurel water, W. 
& B., 588), xxxiii, 339— Maisch (car- 
bonate of magnesia or of potassa : 
flavor), xxviii, 1 — Procter, jr. (porter 
or sarsaparilla), xxiii, 104 — de Rud- 
der (in air bladder of fish), xx, 310 — 
Sauran (yolk of eggs, bitter almonds), 
xxvi, 472*^ — change of blood under its 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



16a 



OLEUM {Covtinued). 

use, Thompson, xxvi, 421 — contains 
bromine^ de Jongh, xxi, 144 — cohemon 
figure, Tonilinsou, xxxvi, 344 — compo- 
sition and constituents, de Jongh (W. 
& B., 583), xxi, 140, 143 ; xxxviii, 

142 deodorized, Murray (carbonic 

acid), xxvi, 82 — compared with io- 
dized fii<h 0^7, Champouillon, xxiv. 178 
— contains iodiiie, de Jongh, xxi, 144 

estimation of iodine, Chevallier 

and Gobley, xxi\-, 171 — Neininger, 
xxxiv,331— Rabourdin (W. k B., 471), 
xxiii, 161 — percentage of iodine, Gr*- 
ger and Wackenroder, xxvi, 440 — in 
phthisiti^ Dnclos. x'xiii, 86 — preparatioiv. 
Procter, jr. (W. k P.., 584), xxiii, 97 
— Allen and llanbury, London, xxxi, 
12 — Donovan (VV. k B., 584), xiii, 86 
— at Lofoden, Norway, Howden, xl, 

147; Soubeiran, xxxviii. 215 in 

Newfoundland, xlii. 522 — in Nova 
Scoiia, Robinson, xxvi, 1 — at Ports- 
mouth (N. IL), Procter, jr., xlii, 214 
— preservation, Procter, jr. (avoid pro- 
longed contact with air), xxiii, 105 — 
properties^ de Jongh (W. P., 585). 
xxi, 139 — yield?. prop?/ta win, Winiiler 
(W & B., 586). xxiv, ?A'd—wlubiiU>j 
in chloroform, Lepage, xxiv, 147 — 
statistics, xxxi, 500 — .substituted by 
cream, Fonssagrives. xxxiv, 189 — by 
dugong oil, Hobbs, xxx, 335, (com- 
pare Oil, iodized)- — test of puiity, 
Jacobsen (Rosanilin), xl 336 — test, 
Pereira (sulphuric acid, W. k B.. 
586), xxi, 150 — Pettenkofers bile test, 
xxi, 149 — use, vi, 327. 

, ETHKRTZRD. Foster. xli. 

176. 

, CHOCOLATE, xxxix. 84. 

, CREAM, xlii, 247. 

, FERRATUM. xxxiii, 317. 

■ , JELLY, Dufourmantel (W. k B., 

588), xxxvi, 1 13. 
, with QuixiA, Bastick (W. & B., 

588), xxvii. 319 — Lymau k Co.. xxviii, 

28. 

, SYRUP. See SvRUPCs olei 

MORRHUtE. 
of MUSTARD. See OlEUJ[ SINAPIS. 

MYRCi^: ACRis, ^taisch, xxxiii, 296. 

MYRisTic^ in perfumer//, Piesse, xxvi, 

463 — physiological effects, Mitscher- 
licb, xxiii, 128 — rotary power, Buig- 
net, xxxiv, 140 — specific gravity. Char- 
din, iv, 146 — yield, Recluz, i, 133. 

EXI'RKSSUM. See Adeps mvris- 

of MYRRH. See MVRRHA, OIL. 

, NAPHTHALix, Sliand and Mclean, 

xxvi, 124. 

, NEATSFOOT. SeC OlEUM BURULI. 

NEROLi, behavior to nitroprusside of 



copper, Heppe, xxix, 326 — contains 
hesperidin, "Gaubius, iv, 261 — in perfu- 
mery, Piesse, xxvi, 462 — purification, 
Dannecy, xxvi, 65 — resin, by action of 
sulphuric acid, Procter, jr., x, 23 — 
rotary power, Buignet, xxxiv, 140 — 
Soubeiran and Capitaine, xxxvii, 340 
— .s;^ec///c gravity, Soubeiran and Capi- 
taine, xxxviii, 340 — yield, Recluz, i, 
133 — possible product of British Colo- 
nies, de Vrij xxxvii. 476. 

— of NUTMEGS, See Oleum myristic^:* 

— OLivyE, adulteration, Chevallier, xvi, 
291 — with cotton-seed oil, Reynolds, 
xxxviii, 30 — with drying oils, Wim- 
mel,xxxv, 139 — with lard oil, Carson. 
XV, 234 — with poppy-seed oil, Gobel, 
xvi, 24 : LipowitK, xli, 132 ; March- 
and (W. & B., 591 ). xxvi, 431 ; Nick- 
les, xxxviii, 299 ; Poutet (W. k B., 
591), xvi, 24; Diesel (W k B., 591), 
xix, 76 — rape-seed oil, Mialhe, xxviii, 
68 — behavior to hydrated lime, Nick- 
les, xxxyiii, 299 — to sulphuric acid, 
Fremy, A'iii, 342 ; Maumene, xxv, 254 
— cohesion figure, Tomlinson, xxxvi, 
347 — drops and minims, Durand,i, 169 
— extraction by bisulphide of carbon, 
Loutsoudie, xxx, 402 — as solvent for 
alkaloids (W. k B., 590. note), Pet- 
teukofer, xxxii, 185 — solubility in 
chloroform, Lepage, xxiv, 147 — in 
strychnia poisoning, Shaw, xxviii. 244. 

— opiATUM, Neuber. ix, 175. 

— opii, ETHEREAL, Bouastre, iii, 143. 
, FIXED, Pelletier. v, 236. 

— ORAxaE FLOWERS, See Oleum 

NKROLI. 

— ORANGE, RixD. See Oleum auuaxtii. 

— ORANGE, CHINA, dc Luca (W, & B., 149. 
note), XXX, 136. 

— oRiGANi, decolorizing power, Plum- 
m er ,xx V , 3 9 9 , 5 1 1 — proper ties, etc. , Han - 
bury, xxii, 367; xxiii. 167 — resin, by 
action of sulphuric acid, Procter, jr., 
X, 23 — substituted by oil of thyme. 
Hanbury (W. k B., 605). xxii, 367. 

— palm.'E, behavior when heated, Pohl, 
xxvii, 345 — bleaching (ammonia), vii, 
83 — Englehart (chromate of potassa 
and muriatic acid), xl, 333 — Michaelis 
(peroxide of manganese and sulphuric 
acid), vi, 85— Pohl (heating, W, k B., 
1577), xxvii, 346 — commercial, proper- 
ties, Guyot, xlii, 459 — fusing point. 
Wimmel, xl, 23, 430 — purification, see 
bleaching^ 

— PAPAVKRis, account, Allen, v, 169 — 
cohesion figure, Tomlinson, xxxvi, 347 
— detection in olive oil, see Oleum 
OLiv^io — solubility in chloroform. Le- 
page, xxiv, 147. 

— PARACOPAIVA, Posse! t, xxi, 261. 

— , I'ARAPKiN. See I*AR,AF1'IN (ML. 



164 



8ALT8, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



OJ^EUM, PATCHOULY in perfumerj, Piesse, 
xxvi, 465. 

, PEAOH-KERNKLS (fixed), Procter, jr., 

xiv, 343. 

• , PEAR, Fehling, xxv, 156. 

pEPOXis, Gross, xxxvii, 253 — Hand, 

xli, 196 — for tapeworm^ Patterson, 

xxvi, 167. 

• PETiTGRAix, rotary power, Buignet, 

xxxiv, 140. 

PETROLEi. See Petroleum. 

PETROSELixr, yield, Volter and Darrn, 

ix, 83. 

PHOSPHORATUM, Magcndle, xiii, 104 — 

iMehu, xl, 403 — phosphorescence pre- 
ventod by ether, Mehu, xl, 404. 

PK'HURiM, source, Carson (W. & B., 

1584), xxvii, 387. Compare Oleum, 

LAUREL, NATIVE. 

PIGNUT HICKORY, Wayne, xxviii, 488. 

piMEN'T.E, in perfumery^ Piesse, xxvi, 

275 — specific gravity, Chardin, iv, 147 

— il'ield^ Recluz, i, 133. 

of PINE. See ROSIN. 

of P[NB APPLE, Fehling, xxv, 155. 

pixi PUMiLio, Milcolasch, xxxiii, 453. 

— — - Pii'ERis NiORt, decolorizing property. 

Plummer, xxv, 399 — yidd^ Recluz. i. 

133. 

— — PiSTACi^ LBXTLSCi,Leprieur,xxxii,319. 

of PITCH. See Pitch oil. 

of POPPY-SEED. YELLOW. See Glau- 

« M M LUTEUM. 

PORTUGAL, in perfumery^ Piesse, xxvi. 

463 — specific gravity, Chardin, iv, 146. 
of POTATOES, Cahours, ix, 263. See 

Alcohol, amylic. 
pffUNi vrRGiNiAN.*:, discovered by S. 

Procter, vi, 8 — chemical behavior, 

Procter, jr., ix, 298; x, 197. 

of PUMPKIN-SEED. ScC OlEUM PE- 

PONIS. 

of RAPE SEED, Ichavior to sulphuric 

acid. .Maumene, xxv, 254 — detection in 
olive oil, Mailho, xxviii, 68 — Diesel, 
xix, 76 — solubilitif in chloroform, Le- 
page, xxiv, 147. 

of raspberry (irue, volatile), Bley, x, 

254. 

of RAY LIVER coutains iodine, Girardin 

and Preissler, xxvi, 440 — rotary pow- 
er, Buignet, xxxiv, 141. 

RKSIN.^i. See , ROSIN. 

auoDii, in perfumery, Piesse, xxvi, 555. 

RiciNi, its acids^ Bussy and Lecanu, 

l^rel. No. 79 — administration, Jeannel 
(bitter almonds, W. & B., 596), xxxiii, 
339 — Martin (eggs), xxxvi, 105, 110 — 
behavior to hydrate of lime, Nickles, 
xxxviii, 299— cohesion fiy are, Tomlin- 
8on (W. & B., 595, note), xxxvi, 248, 
253, 345 — detection in essential oils, 
see Oils, VOLATILE — drops and minims, 
i, 169 — fit for eating, Favrot, xxx, 397 



— emulsions, iii, 291; iv, 11; Manne^ 
XX, 309 — as lubricating oil, Chaplin, 
xxviii, 184 — nmnufactare in IllinoiF,. 
Procter, jr., xxvii, 99 — in Italy, Phil- 
ippi, xxxviii, 488 ; Groves, xxxix, 5T 
— purification, Paves i (W. & B., 596^ 
note), xxx, 274 — rotary power, Buig- 
net (W. & B., 595, note), xxxiv, 141 — 
solubility m chloroform. Lepage, xxiv,. 
14 7 — statistics, xxxi, 500 — test (alco- 
hol), not reliable. Pereira (W. & B.,. 
595) xxii, 218; xxxvi, 249. 

alcoholicum, Buchner, xx, 156. 

concentratum, xxxvi, 249. 

, ROCK-. See Petroleum. 

RORiSMARiNi. See Oleum rosmarini.. 

iWfiM,adulteralion,Ba.\iv,x\, 129; Han- 
bury, xxxi, 335, see test — chemicaB 
examination, Gobel, iv, 82 ; Hanbury, 
xxxi, commercial ( no chemical test 
is reliable), Mackay, xxxi, 252 — drops 

in drachm, Beniouilly, xxxi, 441 

production in the Balkan district, xxv, 
262; xxxii, 66; Baur, xl, 129; Han- 
bury, xxxi, 333 — in India, Jackson^ 
xii, 253 — at Kissanlik, Lawrence 
Smith, xxxi, 324— by dry distillation,. 
Landerer (W. k B., 597). xxiii, 335— 
in perfumery, Piesse, xxvi, 468 — dif- 
ferent qualities, xxiv, 1G3 ; xxxii, 67 — 
resin, by action of sulphuric acid,. 
Procter, jr., x, 23 — specifi,c gravity^ 
Chardin iv, 147 — test: (chemical un- 
reliable), Mackay, xxxi, 252 — (iodine: 
nitrous acid ; sulphuric acid), Gui- 
bourt, xxi, 3 18 — (sulphuric acid and 
alcohol), Hager, xxxvii, 490 — yield^ 
Recluz, i, 134, compare production. 
rose geranium. See Oleum gbranii.. 

ROSE. 

, R0SIN-, manufacture. Furck, xxv,, 

119, llQ—purifimtion, Melsens, xxx,. 
408. 

rosmarini, decolorizing power, Plum- 
mer, 399, 510 — in perfumery, Piesse^ 
xxvi, 554 — poisoning, see Mistakes — 
resin, by action of sulphuric acid. 
Procter, jr., x, 23 — rotary power,. 
Buignet, xxxiv, 140 — specific gravity,. 
Chardin ; Guibourt, iv, 147 — yield^ 
Recluz, i, 133. 

RUT.E, behavior to nitroprusside of 

copper, Heppe, xxix, 328 — chemical 
examination, Harbordt(W. & B., 1256),. 
XXXV, 34 — resin, by action of sulphuric 
acid, Procter, jr., x, 23 — yield, Recluz, 
i, 134. 

ARTIFICIAL (from cod liver oil),, 

Wagner, xxi, 372. 

SABINE, behavior to nitroprusside of 

copper, Heppe, xxix, 326 — decolorizing' 
power, Frederking, xxxii, 46 — Plum- 
mer, xxv, 401, 510 — resin, by actioa 
of sulphuric «.cid, Procter, jr., x, 23 — 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 165 



OLEUM (Continued), 

specie gravity, Martius, v, 60 — yield, 
Recluz, i, 134. 

SALVIA, behavior to nitroprusside 

of copper, Heppe, xxix, 327 — decolor- 
izing property, Frederking, xxxii, 46 
— in perfumery^ Piesse, xxvi, 555 — 
rotary power, Buignet, xxxir, 140- 
specific gravity, Guibourt, iv, 147- 
yield, Recluz, i, 134. 

SAMPHiRK, Herouard, xxxviii, 301. 

SANTALi, in perfumery, Piesse, xxvi, 

555 — rotary power, Buignet, xxxiv, 

140 specific gravity, Chardin, iv, 

147. 

SANTONiCyK. See Olbum CYN^]. 

' SASSAFRAS, accowit, etc, Procter, jr., 

xxxviii, 484, 491 — as adulterant of co- 
paiba, Hager, xlii, 520 — behavior to 
nitroprusside of copper, Heppe, xxix, 
328— camphor, Faltin (W. & B , 1257), 

xxvii, 166; Procter, jr., xxxviii, 491 
— as solvent for caoutchouc, Mitchell, 
i, 312 — composition, Grimaux and Ru- 
otte, xli, 429; xlii, 176 — decolorizing 
power, Plummer, xxv, 399, 511 — ac- 
tion on lead, Wayne (W. & B., 1257), 

xxviii, 520 — in perfumery, Piesse, xxvi, 

556 — production, Sharp, xxxv, 53, 
(compare Procter's account) — resiji, 
by action of sulphuric acid, Hare, ix, 
157, 210 — rotary power, Buignet, 

xxxiv, 140 — specific gravity, Chardin, 
iv, 147 ; Martius, v, 60 — prevents in- 
jurious effect of tobacco, Shelby, xli, 
451 — yield, Recluz, i, 134 ; Sharp, 

xxxv, 53. 

SASSAFRAS, NATIVE, Proctcr, jr, (W. 

& B., 1584), xxiii, 1. 

' SATUREJyE, decolorizing power, Fre- 

derking, xxxii, 46. 

SENECA, Allinson, jr., ii, 35. 

of SENNA. See Senna, oil. 

SBRPENTARiyi-;, yield, Recluz, i, 268. 

SERPYLLi, behavior to nitroprusside 

of copper, Heppe, xxix, 327. 
' SESAMi. behavior to sulphuric acid, 
Maumene, xxv, 254 — cohesion figure, 
Toralinson, xxxvi, 347 — properties, 
Fliickiger, xxxix, 219 — test, Fliicki- 
ger, xxxix, 219. 

siNAPis (essential), behavior to nitro- 
prusside of copper, Heppe, xxix, 32{ 
— composition, xi, 10 — conversion into 
oil of garlic, Gerhardt, xvii, 228- 
formation (from the seed), Will and 
Koerner, xxxv, 323 — preparation, xi, 9 
— Faure ; Hesse, viii, 259 — contains 
sulphur, Deyeux and Thiberge, ii, 340 
— test (sulphuric acid), xxxvii, 285- 
use, iv, 64 ; xi, 10 — yield, Bertram and 
Robiquet ; Dann ; Aschoif, xi, 9 — 
Volter and Darrn, ix, 84. 

, ARTIFICIAL, Berthelot and de 

[12] 



Luca (W. & B , 781, note), xxvii, 52 1 
— Tollens and Henninger, xli, 302. 

, FIXED, detection in olive or 

linseed oil, Mailho, xxviii, 68. 

— of SKUNK, analysis, Swartz, xxxv, 81. 

— SPERM, analysis, Squibb, xxviii, 3. 

— sPiCyE (spike), rotary power, Buignet, 
xxxiv, 140 — yield, Recluz, i, 133. 

— of SPRUCE, production, Stearns, xxxi, 
29 — properties, Gottschalk, xvi, 75. 

— of SQUALE LIVER, rotary power, Buig- 
ne% xxxiv, 141, 

— of STARCH, Payen, xix, 136. 

— STiLLiNGL^K (cclectic), Saunders, xli, 
149, 

— of STRAWBERRIES (true Volatile), 
Martin, xxvii, 313. 

— Qt STYRAx LiQUiDA, Bonas^rc, iv, 211. 

— succiNi (crude), examination, Dcep- 
ping, xvii, 313 — specific gravity, Mar- 
tius, V, 60. 

RECTiFiCATUM, adulteration, Eb- 

ert, xxxviii, 146 — behavior to various 
reagents, - Ebert, xxxviii, 149 — deco- 
lorizing property, Plummer, xxv, 509, 
510, 511 — for piles, Procter, jr., xxxviii, 
217 — specific gravity, Martius, v, 60 — 
yield, Ebert, xxxviii, 148. 

— SULPHURATUM, Ph. Helvetica (65). 
xxxix, 535. Compare Balsamum 

SULPHURIS. 

— of Tallicoonah, Clarke, xv, 122 — 
Pereira, xv, 124. 

— of TALLOW, behavior to sulphuric 
acid, Maumene, xxv, 254. 

~ TANACETi, behavior to nitroprusside of 
copper, Heppe, xxix, 327 — decolorizing 
property, Plummer, xxv, 399, 510, 
511 — resin, by action of sulphuric 
acid, Procter, jr., x, 23 — specific gra- 
vity, Martius, v, 60 — yield, Recluz, i, 
134 — Volter and Darrn, ix, 84. 

— TARRAGON, spscific gravity, Chardin, 
iv, 146. 

— of TEA (fixed, from seeds), Thomp- 
son, x, 85. 

— TEREBiNTHiN.i:, accouut, Simmouds. 
xxix, 135 — formation of acetylen, 
Berthelot, xxxviii, 264 — administra- 
tion, vii, 176 — behavior to nitric acid, 
Kopp, XX, 121. note — to nitroprusside 
of copper, Heppe. xxix, 326 — camphor, 
composition, Wiggers, xviii, 286 — as 
solvent for caoutchouc, Bouchardat, 
xvii, 225 — capillary power, Franken- 
heira, xxxv, 248 — cohesion figure, Tom- 
linson, xxxvi, 255 — congelation, Fara- 
day, xvii, 22 — commercial contains 
copper, Diehl, xxxix, 386 — spontane- 
ous crystals, Durand, i, 309 ; Ambrose 
Smith, XV, 71 (compare Oleum tere- 
binth in ^ , H Y D R A T E D ) dccoloriz in g 

power, Faraday, xxiv, 77 ; Frederking, 
xxxii. 46; Plummer, xxv, 399,510, 51 L 



166 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



{Contiiuuid). 
— di'tection in naphtbaaud oil of amber, 
BoUej, xxvi, 119: Saladin, xxvi, 120 
— drops in drachm, Bernouilly, xxxi, 
4 41 — rate of fow^ Galletly, xxxvii, 
378— for //'-A, Amselmeier (W. k, B., 
603), xxix, 3 1 2 — in mixtvres^ Hodgson, 
jr., iv, I'J — yields nitiobenzole, Schiff, 
xxxii, 450 — absorption of oxygen^ 
Saussure. xxv, 445 — ozonization, Wil- 
liams, XXV, 547 — vapor counteracts 
slow combustion of/*//o.^/to/«s, Lethe- 
by, xix, 120 — an antidote to phos- 
phorus, Vigla, xli, 175 — poisoning^ 
xxviii, 533; xxix, 84 — resin, by action 
of sulphuric acid, Procter, jr., x, 23 
— rotary power, Biot ; Soubeiran ; 
Capitaine ; Meier, xxxviii, 340 — 
Buignet, xxxiv, 140 — mlnhility (from 
kStorer's Dictionary), xxxv, 573— as 
nolvi'Dt for resins and gum-resins. 
Sacc, xlii, 243 — specific gravitj^, Biot; 
Soubeiran ; Capitaine ; Meier, xxxvii, 
340 — Brisson, iv, 147 — Guibourt, 
iv, 147 — Martins, v, 60 — stearoplen. 
Brandes, x, 179, (compare camphor; 
hydratrd) — igniting point of vapor,^ 
Hutton, xli, 254. 

, HYDKATED, Deville ; Wiggers, 

XV, 79, compare Olkum terekinthix.^-;, 
crystals, s tear opt en e. 

TUEOBROM.i:, See Cacao bus'ter. 

TiiYMi, composition, Lallemand, xxvi, 

281 — compared to oil of origanum, 
Hanbury (W. & B., 605),' xxii, 367— 
in perfumery , Piesse, xxvi, 557 — rotary 
power, Buignet, xxxiv, 140 — specific 
gravity, Guibourt, iv, 147 — yield^ Re- 
cluz, i, 134. 

TiGLii, volatile acids, Genther, xlii, 

318 analysis, Dublanc (W. & B., 

607), XXV,' 55— Schlippe (W. k B, 
607, note), xxx, 409 — cohesion-figure, 
Tomlinson, xxxvi, 255, 347 — decolor- 
izing ])ower, Plummer, xxv, 51) — 
ilrops in drachm, Bernouilly, xxxi, 
441 — in mixtures, Nimmo, v, 294 — ob- 
servations, Frost, Prel. No. 61 — manu- 
facture (in Kiigland), xxxvi, 348 — 
Soubeiran, vii, 257 — by bisulphide of 
carbon, Lepage (W. k B., 606, note), 
xxviii, 446 — sohihiHty in chloroform, 

Lepage, xxiv, 147 test, xMaisch ( VV. 

& B., 608, note), xxxii, 306— Pereira 
(alcohol test not reliable, W. ^te B , 
607), xxii, 218 — Warrisigton, xxxvii, 
191. 

■ VALEBIAX.+:, behavior to uitroprusside 

of copper, Heppe, xxix, 328 — cAem/- 
caZexaniination.Pierlot ( W.&B.,1 259), 
xxxi, 414; xxxii, 138 — conversion into 
oxalic acid, Trommsdorflf, i, 134 — re.s- 
i/i, by action of sulphuric acid, Proc- 
ter, jr., X, 23 — ."pecific gravity, Mar- 



tius, V, 60 — thtrapeulically considered,. 
Barailer ( W. & B , 849), xxxiii, 239— 
yield, Mayer, xxxiv, 329 — Recluz, i, 
134 — Volter and Darrn, ix, 84 — pro- 
])ostd to be added to the U. S. Ph., 
V, 294. 

\ ERBEN^ in perfumerv, Piesse, xxvi, 

374, 559. 

VESiCANS, Dupuy, xxv, 127. 

of WALNUT, behavior to hydrated 

lime, Nickles, xxxviii, 299. 

of v/Ax. See Oleum cbr-e. 

of wixE. See Oleum ^thekeum. 

of Winter's bark, yield, Recluz, i, 

134. Compare Ol. canell-E. 
of wintergrkkn. See Oleum, gaul- 

THERI.T":. 

, WOOD (gurjun balsam), account, Sim- 

monds, xxix, 139 cohesion-fi^gurty 

Tomlinson, xxxiv, 257 properties, 

Hanbury (W. k B., 325, note), xxviii, 
159. Compare Lo3we, new balsam of 
copai\ a(W. k B., 325, note), xxvi, 537. 

of woRMSEED. See Oleum chenopo- 

Dii, and CYX^:. 

of YARROW. See Oleum millefolii. 

zingiberis, Papousek (W. k B., 

871), xxv, 129— yield, Recluz, i, 133. 

OLIBANUM, behavior io camphor, Planche 
(W. k B., 195, note), x, 214, 215— in 
perfumery, Piesse, xxvi, 464 — solubi- 
lity in chloroform, Lepage, xxiv, 147. 

from Aden, Vaughau, xxv, 151. 

from Africa, Kempthorne (W. & B.. 

1569), xvi, 187. 

OLIVES, formation of fatty matter de- 
pends on mannite, de Luca (W. k B., 
590), xxxiv, 92 ; xxxviii, 179. 

OLIVE-TREE, agaric, Delille, vi, 261 — 
febrifuge property (of leaves), Mai- 
tass, xxvi, 221 — gum resin, Giadorou 
(W. k B., 589), iv, 169— yields man- 
nite, de Luca, xxxiv, 92 ; xxxviii, 179. 

OLIVILLE, ii, 168. 

OLIVIN, Piesse, xxviii. 79. 

OLLA PODRIDA, Piesse, xxvii, 373. 

OMALANTHUS fedicellatus, xxxv, 35©. 

OMPHALTA TRiANDRA, xxvi, 208. 

ONGUENT de la mere Thecle, ix, 293. 

ONCOCARPUS ViTiEXSis, xxxv, 351. 

ONCOSPERMA pilamentosum, xxiv, 339. 

ONOBRYCHYS tragacanthus, xli, 434 

ONONJN, behavior to bichromate of pot- 
assa test, Jenkins, xxxiii, 528. 

ONONIS ANIL, Yields blue color, vi, 72, 

OPAIDLY, Liodley, xxiA^ 380. 

PH ELI A angustifolia; dejisifolia; 

(legans; chirayta; multi flora, 

xlii, 529, 531. Compare Ciiiretta. 

OPHRYS anthropophora; apifera; 

! arachnitis, xii, 24. 

|OPIAM,MON, Woehler. xvi, 137. 

jOPIANINA, Hinterberger. xxiv, 80 — com- 

! position, xxxiii, 24. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTITE CLASS. 



167 



OPIATE. Compare Confkctio ; Er;ECTU- 

ARIUM. 

, ANTiBLKNNORHHAaio, Beyraud, xxviii, 

371. 

OPIUM, adulterations : Christison, x, 125 — 
Dabail, x, 261 — Fluckiger, xi, 524— 

King, xli, 1 Landerer (W, & B., 

612), XV. 238: xxiii, 280 Maisch 

(lead bullets), xxxvi, 100— Mialhe, 
xxiii, 83 — Morson, xvii, 94 — Thomson 
(piece of iron, extract of senna), xi, 
169 — altered by t/r/s, Guibourt, xxxiv, 
397 — in Alabama^ xxix, 181 — in Al- 
fjpria, cultivation, xvii, 12G ; perccnt- 
Hge of morphia, xxvii, 22 — alkaloids, 
Hes°e, xli, 394; (homologous series, 
396) — Staples, i, 12 — anali/.si.^. Ander- 
son, xxxiv, 519 — Fliickiger, xl, 524 — 
Haines, xxxv, 266, 337 — Pelletier, v, 
158, 227 — O'ShauglineStiy, xii, 141 — 
//M?/c/o^e(atropia ), Budd, xl, 5J 1 — (caf- 
fein). Campbell, xxxii, 321 (nut- 
galls), Orfila, ii, 83 — in Armenia, Gaul- 
tier, (W. & B., 611, note), xxi, 13— 
in Asia Minor, Maltass, xxvii, 251 ; 
Befter, xl, 362; Texier (W. k B., 
610), vii, 253. 

— — , ASSAY (compare morphia, prepara- 
tion) : review of different processes 
Haines, xxxv, 340 — Berthemot,\, 318 — 
Erdniann (fusel oil), xxxv, 30 — Fordo:- 
(W. & B ,^ 624, note), xxx, Aa — GuU- 
krniond (W. k B., 624), iii, 229 — 
Haines (modification of O'Shaugh- 
nessy), xxxv, 337 — Kie.ffer (ferridcy- 
anide of potassium), xxxiii, 218 — 
Mayer (caustic baryta, iodohj^drargy- 
rate of potassa), xxxv, 384, 390, 394 
—Mohr (lime, W. & B., 1236), xl, 514 

Reich (carbonate of ammonia), 

xxiii, 86 — RoussiUe (modification of 

Guillermond), xxxviii, 512 Hacc 

(chloride of calcium), xxv, 460 — 
Schneider (chloride of sodium), xli, 

21, 369 aShanghnessif, xii, 141— 

Squibb, xlii, 40, 47, 53 — Tkiboumery, 
X, 328— Zw-'toA;, xlii, 140. 

in Australia, Hood, xlii, 550 — beha- 
vior to nitroxanthic acid, Muller, xi, 
88 — from Benares, Eatwell, xxiv, 118, 
compare East India — from Berlin, 
Marz, xli, 311 — action on ^//rrfs, Mit- 
chell, xlii, 188 — testing in China, 
Fortune, xx, 76 — corrt'Hive (sulphate 
of soda), I'uchet, vii, 346 — from Con- 
.'^tantinople, Guibourt, iv, 58 — con- 
stituents Le Canu, vii, ]26 — crystalline 
principles, Haines, xxxv, 266, 337 — 
East India, Guibourt, iv, 59; vii, 259; 
Carson, xxi, 193— analysis, O'Shaugh- 
nessy, xii, 138, 145 — culture, xli, 477 ; 
Katwell, xxiv, 118 — yield of mor- 
phia, Royle, viii, 257 — Egyptian, Ber- 
themot, X, 314; Guibourt, iv, 57; 



Evans, jr., vii, 1 ; Scattergood, v, 296 
— culture, Allen, xxxv, 60; Gastinel, 
xxxvii, 334 — entitled to tidry, xxiv, 
24; xxv, 303 — in Frame, analysis, 
Pelletier (no narcotin*^), viii, 72 — pro- 
duction, xvi, 60 ; xxxiii, 52 ; Lepage, 
xxxiii, 457 ; Roux, xxxi, 564 — yield, 
Aubergier. xxiii, 238 — contains glu- 
cose, Lahens, xxA'ii, 69 — from Illinois, 
Procter, jr., xlii, 68 — frora Indi'j,see 
E'ist India — morphia strength of com- 
mercial, Bedford, xli, 159; Squibb, 
xxxii, 117 — oil, Bonastre, iii, 143; 
Pelletier, v. 236 — Persian, Epps, v. 
175 — lleveii. xxxiii, 48 — physiological 
action. Bernard, xxxvii, 70 — poisoning, 
xxviii, 49 ; xxix, 320. see Mistakes — 
powdering. St^ibltr, xxiii, 121 — adul- 
terated (biscuits), xxxi, 511 ; (choco- 
late) Parrish. xv, 315— loss. Covell, 
xxxix. 116; Redwood, xxi, 31 — ob- 
servation on prepanrtions, Lecanu, 
vii, 123 — table of preparations, Du- 
hamel, ix, 294 — quality depends on 
soil; state of atmosphere, when col- 
lected, etc.. Texier, xvi. 122 — of poor 

quality, xfii. 164, ;;07 different 

qualities, xxiv, 161 — rfsin, analysis, 
Pelletier (contains nitrogen), v, 235 
— smolfing in China, Fortune, xx, 76: 
xxi, 204 — mnuygling, Foitune. xx, 74 
— frora Smyrna, Berthemot, x, 314 — 
Guibourt, iv, 57 — Landerer, xxiii, 
251 — statistics, xxxii, 465 ; xxxvii, 393 
— Beij Ellis, Prel. No. 110— Biddle, 
xix, 18 — trade betv/een India and 
China, Allen, xxv, 267 — uniformity 
in strength of preparations, Procter, 
jr., xxii, 210 — Squibb, xxxii, 115 — 
from Tennessee, Wayne, xl, 77 — test-- : 
Everitt (meconate of iron, W. & B., 
o26), xi, 262 ; xii, 88— Hare (meco- 
nate of lead, W. k B., 625). Prel. No. 
85— culture in United States, Procter, 
jr., xli, 120 — Robertson, xli, 210, note 
— Weiss, xxxviii, 473 — from Vermont, 
Procter, jr., xl, 513; xli, 23; xlii, 124 
— Wilson, xli, 217 — frora Virginia, 
Grahame, xxxix. 50 — Procter, jr., xli, 
209 — cilture in Wiirtnnberg, Jobst, 
xlii, 563. 

— oKODORi '.Ki», p]ljert (Ben/.iue), xxxix, 

196. 

oiLUTKO, Biroth. xl, 5 46. 

FACTITIOUS, Berthemot, x, 318 — 

Batka, xix, 291 — Aiken, xxxi. 374. 

in MQUOi! POTASS.^^, xxxvii, 305. 

, MURIATE, Nichol, XX, 107. 

SOLUTION treated with watery solu- 
tion of lettuce, Mouchou, jr., iv, 217. 

TITRATED, Zwick, xHi,. 139. 

OPODELDOC, Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix. 
535 — Steer's, v, 29 ; xi, 73. 

CHUOROKORMATUM, Hftger. xK 312. 



I* 



168 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



OPIUM IODIZED, Bakes, xxxix, 120— Ph. 
Helvetica (65), xxxix, 535. Compare 

LiNIMENTUM POTASSIl lODIDl. 

, LIQUID, Giseke. xvi, 317. Compare 

LiNIMKNTUM SAP0NI8 CAMPHORATUM. 

OPOPONAX, behavior to camphor (W. 
& P>, 195, note), Planche, X, 214, 215. 

ORANGE (anilin), poisonous equalities, 
Crookes, xli, 14. 

COLOR (kind of sulphuret of anti- 
mony), vi, 86. 

• FLOWERS, best distilled with salt, 

Martin, xxxi, 258.- 

JUICE. See Juice, orange. 

ORAYDRI, Hancock, li, 50. 

ORCEINE, xxi, 337. 

ORCHELLA weed from Aden, Vaughan. 
XXV, 336. 

ORCHID tea, Jackson, xxxviii, 441. 

ORCHIS conopsea, xi, 26 ; xii, 24. 

fusca, xii, 24. hircina^ xii, 24. 

latifolia^ xi, 26 ; xii, 24 : size of 

fecula, Raspail, xi, 28. longi- 

fiora^ xxii, 231. maculata^ xi, 

26; xii, 24; xxii, 231. mascula^ 

xi, 26 ; xii, 24 ; xxii, 231. morio, 

xi, 26 ; xii, 24 ; xxii, 231. nigra^ 

xxii, 231. pyramidalis^ xi, 26: 

xii, 24; xxii, 231; sambucma ; 

undulat'i folia ; variegaia^ 

xxii, 231. 

. Compare Salep. 

ORCINA, behavior to ammonia, xiii. 231 

— preparation of litmns, de Luynes. 

XXXV ii, 227. 
ORDEAL bean of calabar. See Calabar 

BEAN. 

of Madagascar. See Cerbeba 

Tanghin. 

OREIDE (alloy), Mourier and Valient, 
XXX, 150. 

OREODON, Leidy, xxv, 362. 

OREOSELIN forms peucedanin, Wag- 
ner, xxvii, 167. 

ORGANIC BODIES, metamorphosis, Berzeli- 
us, xxxi, 114 — determination of water, 
Winckler, xxxvi, 536 — in water, effect 
of temperature, Frankland, xxxix, 126. 

RADICALS, history, Cahours, xxxv, 1, 

102, 213, 304. 

ORGANISM, production in closed vessels. 
Child, xxxvii, 492. Compare Gener- 
ation, spontaneous. 

ORGEAT, vi, 353 , vii, 261. 

ORIGANUM dictamnus, (dittany of the 
ancients), xi, 104. 

ORLEANS. See Annotta. 

ORPIMENT. See Arsenici sulphuretdm. 

ORPIN (artilicial realgar), xxiii, 74. 

OSBORNE'S syrup. See Syrupus, Os- 
borne. 

OSCILLARIA gratcloupi contains iodine, 

xxvi, 439 ; Umosa, viii, 337 ; 

nigra, viii, 336 ; vivida, viii, 337. 



, color formed on decomposition, Neea 

d'Esenbeck, viii, 334. 

OSHA (Daucosma laciniata), Durand, xl, 
106 — Procter, jr. ,xl, 106, note — Krum- 
meck ; Durand ; Procter, xxxix, 202. 

OSMAZOME glacek, Brady, xxxviii, 77. 

0SMIT0P8IS AST eriscoides, analysis of 
oil, Gorup-Besanez, xxvi, 313. 

bellidiastrum, xxvi. 313, 

OSMIUM, from ore of platimim, Freray, 
xxviii, 186 — Woehler, vi, 261 — sepa- 
ration from Iridium, Quesneville. iii, 
89. 

OSSEINE, composition, xxxvii, 257. 
OSTREA BDULis contains iodine, xxvi, 
440. 

OSTRICH, acclimatization, xxxiii, 415 — 
in France, xxxviii, 182 — bone, compo- 
sition, Fremy, xxxvii, 256. 

, giant, of Madagascar, xl, 276. 

. South American, gizzard in dyspep- 
sia, Wayne xl, 123. 

OSTRYA yirginica, and vulgaris. 

twist of fibre, Braun. xxviii, 6.7. 

OTOBITE, analysis, Uricoechea, xxvii, 272. 

OTTO. See Oleum. 

OX-GALL. See Bile. 

OX-MARROW, analy,^i^-, Eykrts, xxxii, 
559. 

OXACIDS, behavior to hydracid?, Le- 
comte, XX, 78. 

OXAMETHANE. composition, xii. 50, 

OXAMIDE, Dumas, iii, 134. 

OXIDE, FERROso-FERRic, actiou on cer- 
tain salts, Schober, xlii, 402. 

OXIDES, temperature of reduction by hy- 
drogen, Muller, xli, 335; xlii, 219. 

, NITROUS. See Nitrogen, protoxide. 

OXYACANTHIN, Waclser (V\ k B., 169). 
xxxiii, 455. 

OXYCARPUS cocHiNCHixE.N.-^iH, xiii, 25: 
INDICA, xiii, 29. 

OXYCINCHONIA, Streckr'r (Farrish, 647). 
xxxv, 58, 511 ; xxxvi. 359. 

OXYCOCCUS macrocarpus, analysis, El- 
dridge, xxxv, 205. 

OXYFLUORIDES, Prat, xi, 124. 

OXYGEN, absorption by alcohol : water, 

Saussure, xxxi, IIG the state in 

which it exists in the blood, Liebig, 
xxiv, 270 — in accidents from chloro- 
form, Duroy, xxiii, 175 — preparation, 
Balmain (bichromate of potassa). 
xvii, 75 — Boettger (peroxide of lead 
and barium), xlii, 217 — Bridges (per- 
oxide of potassium), i, 74 — Deville 
and Debray (sulphate of zinc ; sul- 
phuric acid), xxxiii, 145 — Fleitmann 
(chloride of lime, peroxide of cobalt), 
xxxvii, 073 Hare (nitrate of pot- 
assa), vi, 271 (compare oxygennesis) 
— specific gravity, Arago, Berzelius, 
Biot, Dulong, Exley, Thenard', Thom- 
son, X. 341. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



169 



OXYGEN, NASCExNT, Houzeau, xxviii, 74. 
OXYGENATED bases, synthesis, Wurtz, 
xxxii, 268. 

OXYGENATION, various phenomena, 

Kuhlmann, xxviii, 136. 
OXYGENNESIS, Robbins, xxxvi, 241. 

Compare Oxygen, preparation. 
OXYGIA RENiFORMis, xli, 434. 
OXYLANTHOPINE (= cryptopia), Hesse, i 

xlii, 397. 

OXYMEL coLCHici, Ph. Dublin, (26), iii, 

331 Ph. Helvetica (65), ,xxxix, 

535. 

sciLL.E, Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix, 

535. i 

SIMPLEX, Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix, j 

535. 

OXYPHORON (= absorber of oxygen), | 
Doebereiner, vii, 322. 



OXYSTRYCHNIA, Schiitzenberger (W. 

& B., 1356, note), xxxi, 134. 
OZONE, action on organic substances, 
Gorup-Besanez, xxxvi, 166 — as pre- 
ventive against pythogenic diseases, 

Moffat, xxxv, 143 as disinfectant, 

Crookes, xxxviii, 431 — restores faded 
engravings, Gorup-Besanez, xxxiii, 
539 — estimation, Mittentzwey, xxxvi, 
318 — in minerals, Schroetter, xxxiii, 
222 — action on volatile ozY^, Plummer, 
XXV, 508 — preparation, Boettger, xxXv, 
185 — Day, xl, 444 — Schoenbein, xxiy, 
75; xxxv, 185 — produced plants, 
Daubeny, xxxix, 221— properties, Fara- 
day, xxiv, 74 — applied to manufacture 
of sulphuric acid, Bell (W. k B., 54), 
XXV, 255 — use, Day, xl, 444. 
)NOMETER, Schcenbein, xxiv, 74. 



PACKFONG (== Argentan ; German sil- 
ver ; British plate), xlii, 358. 
P^TININE (from coal-tar), xxxiii, 41. 
PAGLIARI'S hajmostatic. See Aqua 

H-EMOSTATICA, PaGLIARI. 

PAINT, improvement, Bink, xxvii, 175 — 
chemistry, Mulder, xl, 258 dry, re- 
moved by chloroform, Groves, xxxviii, 
183. 

, IODINE, ADHESIVE, xxviii, 476. 

, RED, Piesse, xxviii, 272. 

PAINTING in water colors, size, viii, 173. 
PAKOE DiDAXG. See Pexghawar Djambi. 
PAL^OTHERIUM Proutii in Mauvaises 

terres, xxv, 263. 
PALEA ciBOTii. See Pexghawar Djambi. 
PALESTINA, flora, Post, xli, 433. 
PALLADIUM, absorption of hydrogen, 

Graham, xxxviii, 511 ; xli, 144, 177. 
PALM LEAVES for paper-making, xxviii, 

169. 

PALMACE^, useful products, xxviii, 129. 

PALMIN, Boudet, vi, 84. 

PALO ARMAGozo (bitter tree of Texas). 

Puteguat ; Procter, jr., xl, 15. 
DB VA(LA, examination of juice, Bous- 

singault and Rivero, ii, 343. 
PAMELLA CRUENTA, viii, 336 
PANACON, Garrigues (W. & B., 636), 

xxvi, 512. 
PANAMA DRUGS, Maisch, xli, 230. 
PANAQUILON, Garriguea (W. & B., 636), 

xxvi, 511. 

PANAX cochleatum; fruiicostm ; 

pinnatum, xxxvi, 291. 

QUiNQUEFOLiuM. See Ginseng. 

PANCRATIUM maritimum, as emetic, iv, 

285. 

PANCREATIC emulsions, Dobell, xxxviii. 
143. 



PANIS LAXANS, xxxiii, 115. 

PANSPERMIA, Pasteur, xxxiii, 341. 

PAPAL BULL, permitting use of balsam 
of Peru, xxxiii, 263. 

PAPAVER. See Poppy. 

RH(EAs. See Rhceas. 

PAPAVERINA, behavior to bichromate of 
potassa test, Jenkins, xxxiii, 528 — to 
nitric acid; sulphuric acid (hot, and 
followed by permanganate of pot- 
assa), Guy, xxxiii, 526 — composition: 
xxxiii, 24; xxxvii, 67; Hesse, xlii, 
396 ; Merck,xx,311 ; xxii, 260.— prepa- 
ration, {Rohiquet,\, 175?!) — Anderson 
and Haines, xxxv, 272 — Merck (W. & 
B., 621), XX, 311 ; xxii, 260— physiolo- 
gical action, Ludersdorf and Bress- 
lauer, xlii, 161 — Bernard, xxxvii, 70 

Hoffmann, xl, 536 properties, 

Hesse, xlii, 396 — subliming, tempera- 
ture, Guy, xl, 247. 

PAPER (compare Papier), symptoms of 
decay, Gyde, xxiii, 42 — manufacture, 
removing iron stains, Gelis, xxv, 364 
— materials from India, Royle, xxvii, 

39 from various plants, Claus- 

sen, xxviii, 168 — distinction between 
linen and cotton, Cesareca, xxiii, 178. 

, ALTHAiA, Aiken (W. & B., 90, note), 

xxxi, 367. 

, anti-actinic, Obernetter, xxxviii, 

474. 

, ANTI-ASTHMATIC, XXXVi, 113. 

, ASBESTOS, xxxiv, 226. 

, ATROPIA, Streatfield (W. & B., 1020), 

xxxv, 175. 

, BLISTERING (Parrish, 758), xxxiii, 380. 

, Brazil, limiis as test for various 

substances, Hastings, xiii. 201, 202, 

203. 



170 



SALTS, SEE UNDEE LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



PA.PER, red cabbage, limits as test, Hast- 
ings, xiii, 201, 202. 

, CHARCOAL filtering, Pichot and Mal- 
apert (W. & B., 881), XXX, 536. 

, containing clay, Pennv, xxxiii, 377. 

, COLLODION, Thompson, xlii, 116. 

, DAHLIA, xxiv, 170. 

, FILTERING, Contains mlphate?:, Kru- 

ger, xl, 332 — charcoal, Pichot and 
Malapert (W. & B., 881), xxx, 53G. 
Compare Filter. 

, FUMIGATING, Picsse, xxvii. 471. 

, GELATIN, Dobell, xxviii, 86. 

, GEORGINA, xxiv, 170. 

, GOUT, Buchner, xxi, 172. 

, GRAY, contains arsenic^ Vohl, xxviii, 

220 — colored red by proto- and bi- 
nitrate of mercury, Lassaigne, iv, 175. 

, GUAiAcuM, behavior to ammonia, 

Greiner, xlii, 322. 

from HOP stems, xlii, 318. 

, HYDROGRAPHIC, vi, 347. 

from Indian corn, xxxiii, 232. 

IRIDESCENT, Wagner, xxii, 276. 

from JUTE, Nash, xxviii, 468. 

, LITMUS, preparation, Pereira, xxvi, 

168 — Vacher, xl, 450 — limits as test 
for alkaline and acids, Hastings, xiii, 
201, 202, 203. 

from MOSS, Terry, xxix, 84. 

, MUSTARD, Rigollot, xl. 276, 312. 

, OILED, as substitute for oiled silk, 

and gutta percha. McGhio (W. & B., 
583, note), xxxi, 272 ; xxxiv, 365. 

■ . PARCHMENT, Gaine, xxix, 423 — Hoff- 
mann, xxxii, 446 — as preserving cover, 
xl, 360. 

PYROXYLIN, electrical properties, John- 
son, xxxvi, 268 ; xxxvii, 293. 

TEST. See under different headings. 

TUBING, bitaminized,Jaloureau, xxxii, 

276. 

, TURMERIC, limits of reaction, Hast- 
ings, xiii, 203. 

, VeATERPROOF, XXXli, 276. 

, WAX, Koch, xlii, 563. 

PAPIER EPiPASTiQUE, Wisliu, xvii, 279. 

, Fayard and Blayn, xxxiv, 189. 

MACHE, substituted by a straw pulp, 

Warren, xxviii, 168. 
PAPYRUS BoNAPARTEA for paper-making, 

Claussen, xxviii, 168. 
PARACAJEPUTIN, Schmidt, xxxiii, 546. 
PA RACE LLU LOSE, Fremy, xxxii, 74. 
PARACIN (= aricin). xxxvlii, 417. 
PARADISE NUTS Jacca nuts), xxxvi. 

292. 

PARAFFIN, analysis, Filipuzzi, xxviii, 531 
— Gay-Lussac, v, 66 — applied to stop- 
pers for alkali bottles, xxxiii, 502 — in 
Boghead slate, Merz, xxxiii, 219 — not 
... found in coal tar, Bolley, xxxiii, 219 
— as lubricant, Monnet, xl, 522 — man- 
ufacture, Young, xxvii, 551 — as wieaf 



preserver, Redwood, xxxviii, 341 — 
ji??/n^('c?(sulphuric acid, W. & B., 1498), 
xxxiii, 44 — from peat, Paul, xxx, 533 
— Reichenbach, xxvi, 235 — oxidize.shy 
fusion, Bolley and Fuchschmidt, xlii, 
321 — solubility in chloroform, Lepage, 
xxiv, 148 — in bisulphide of carbon; 
benzole; chloroform, Vogel, xxxviii, 
47 1 — for protecting crystallizing vessels, 
Stolba, xl, 522 — as substitute for wax 
in cerates, Carney, xxxiii, 72 — Proc- 
tor, XXXV, 527 — from West Virginia, 
Wayne, xxviii, 489. 

OIL, rate of flow, Galletly, xxxvii, 378 

— mamifacture. Young, xxvii, 551 — ig- 
niting point of vapor, Hutton, xli, 252. 
254. 

PARAGUAY TEA. See Ilex paraguayen- 
sis. 

, Roux, vii, 349. 

PARALLELS, golden, xxxvi, 28. 
PARAMENISPERMIN, analysis and pre- 
paration, Pelletier and Couerbe (W. 
& B., 306), vi, 333. 
PARAMORPHIA (Thebaia), behavior to 
nitro-sulphuric acid, Couerbe, viii, 
174 — to iodide of cadmium and po- 
potassium, Marme, xli, 18 — to nitric 
acid; sulphuric acid (hot, and with 
permanganate of potassa), Guy, xxxiii, 
526 — action on birds, Mitchell, xlii, 
\8S —composilio7i, xxxiii, 24 ; xxxviii, 
67— Hesse, xlii, 395— Pelletier, viii, 

72 physiological action, Bernard, 

xxxvii, 70 — modified by iodmethyl, 
Brown ; Frazer, xl, 442 — preparation 
and properties, Pelletier (W, & B., 
621), viii, 70, 331— solubility in oil, 
Attfield, XXXV, 250 — siibliming temper- 
ature, Guy, xl, 247. 
PARAMYLENE, Reffnault, xxv, 116. 
PARANAPHTHALIN, Koene, xvii, 263. 
PARANILIN, Hoffmann, xxxv, 346. 
PARA PECTIN. Fremy, xxi, 151. 
PARARHODEORETIN, Kaiser, xvii, 30, 
31. 

PARCHMENT, manufacture, xli, f)53. 

, VEGETABLE. ScC PaPER, PaRCHMENT. 

PARE IRA BRAVA, botanical history, etc., 
Griffith, viii, 193— alkaloid, Pelletier; 
Peretti (W. & B., 638), xii, 141— crys- 
tals (oxalate of lime), xxxvii, 32. 
PAREGORIC, CHLOROFORM-, Hartshorne 

(Parrish, 167), xxviii, 19; xl, 238. 
PARICINA (identical with buxina; pelo- 
sina ; bebeerina, which see), Fliicki- 
ger, xlii, 404 — must be regarded as a 
distinct cinchona alkaloid, Hesse, xlii, 
404. 

PARILLINA, Pallota, i, 156— (identical 
with salseparillin ; smilacin ; paril- 
linicacid, which see), Poggiale, vii, 37. 
PARIS QUADRiFOLiA, crystals (oxalate of 
lime), xxxvii, 32. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



171 



PARKESINA (artificial India rubber), 
XXXV, 331. 

PARKINSON E A aculeata for paper- mak- 
inof, xxvii, 42. 

PARHELIA ooRONATA, lichen on Loxa 
bark, xi, 552. 

PERLATA, orchella weed from Aden, 

XXV, 336, note. 

PARMENTIERA cereifera (candle tree), 
Seemann, xxiv, 83. 

EDULis, xxiv, 84. 

PARSLEY, BUTTER, Jorel and Homolle, 
xxviii, 45. 

. See Petroselinum. 

PASSALUS interstitialis (beetle of My- 
roxylon), xxxvi, 146, note. 

PASSIFLORA foRtida ; quadrongn- 

laris ; rubra, properties, Grriffith, 

viii, 101, 102. 

PASSIFLORIN, Madianna, viii, 101. 

PASTA . Compare Pate. 

GUMMOSA ALBA, Ph. Helvetica (65), 

xxxix, 535. 

PASTE, AOiD SULPHATE OF ZINC, Thomp- 
son, XXX, 275. 

■ ALMOND, ii, 342 ; iv, 347 — Gray's Sup- 
plement, XX, 24— Piesse, xxviii, 79. 

, AMBROSE PARE, viii, 261. 

, CAMPHOR, Piesse, xxviii, 86. 

, CARRAGHEEN, Mouchon, xvii, 191. 

, GLYCERIN, Groddard (Parrish, 798), 

xxiv, 269. 

for the HANDS. See Paste, Almond. 

, HONEY and almond, Piesse, xxviii, 

79. 

, JUJUBE, ii, 251. 

for LABELS, see Paste, Glycerin — 

preservation of gum and starch paste, 
Maisch, xxxvi, 97— white glue and 
sugar, Stearns (Parrish, 798), xxviii, 
320. 

, LIME, for preparation of lubricating 

grease, Serbat, xxv, 124. 
, MARSHMALLOW. See Pasta gummosa. 

— v, 173— (Parrish, 270), xxviii, 17. 

, PHOSPHORUS. See Phosphorus paste. 

, tooth. See Tooth paste. 

, tragacanth, Mouchon, jr., iv, 172. 

, ziMARA, viii, 261. 

PASTINACA OPOPONAX, v, 322. 
PASTILLES. See Lozenges ; Trochisci. 
, FUMIGATING (W. & B., 166), ii, 341— 

Piesse, xxvii, 469 — Oorbel-Lagneau, 

xxxiv, 510, 511 {belladonna ; benzoin; 

camphor ; cinnabar ; digitalis ; iodine ; 

opium; poplar buds; strammonium ; 

sugar ; sulphur iodide', tar ; 7. 'nc oxide.) 
MENTHA PIPERITA, Ph. Helvetica (65), 

xxxix, 535 

de SANTE, Delvincourt, vi, 264. 

de VICHY, d'Arcet, Prel. No. 84. 

PATCHOULI plant, xxii, 154— Carson, ix, 

198. 

PATE. Compare Pasta. 



d'amanob au miel Piesse, xxviii. 79, 

de GuiMAUvE, Cules, v, 173. 

lODiFERE, composition, Leimbach, 

xxxir, 329. 

PATENT GUM. See Gum, Patent. 

PATENTS in relation to pharmacy, Par- 
rish, xxxiii, 141, 

PATENT medicines. Compare Nostrums. 

, discussion in American Phar- 
maceutical Association, xxv, 497 — 
importation, xxv, 87 — labels not patent- 
able, xxviii, 377 — report, Dr. Edwards, 
xxi, 287 — sale, in violation of the law, 
xxviii, 377 — tax, xxii, 287 ; Taylor, 

xxiii, 186. 

, report and formulas, v, 19 ; vi, 

60 ; xi, 67. 
PATRONAGE of physicians, xxix, 86. 

Compare Prescription ; Percentage. 
PAU pereira, xvii, 86. 
PAULLINIA africana; asiatica, xii, 

207 ; cupana, xii, 207 ; xlii, 560; mezi- 

cana ; pinnata; serjania, xii, 

207. 

soRBiLis, xii, 207, 341 ; xvii, 83 ; xlii, 

558. 

. Compare Guarana, 

PAUPER'S diet. Smith, xxxix, 464. 
PAVINARIUM LAURiNUM, XXXV, 351. 
PAVONIA contains iodine, Davy; Sar- 

phati; Balard, xxvi, 439. 
PAYTINA, Hesse, xlii, 470. 
PEAS contain cholestearin, Beneke, xxxv, 

223 — amount of starch, Dragendorff, 

xxxv, 139. 

, suppurative, ix, 349. 

PEA-PODS, juice, dialysed, Attfield, xxxvi, 

530 ; xxxvii, 207. 

PEACH leaves, contain amygdalin, Crous- 

seille, iii, 216. 
PEA NUT. See Arachis hypog.«a. 
PEARS, ripening accelerated by packing 

in wool ; retarded by cotton. Ranch, 

xxxvi, 65 — sugar. Brazier, iii. 277. 
PEARLASH. See Potash. 
PEARSON'S SOLUTION, See Li^uok sooyis 

arsenitis. 

PEAT, analysis of Hannoverian, Paul, xxx, 

531 — composition, Regnault ; Vaux, 
xxxiv, 539 — products of distillation, 
Paul, xxx, 530, 531. 

GAS. See Gas, Peat. 

ta«, Paul, xxx, 532. 

PEAU d'espagne, Piesse, xxvii, 374, 467. 
PEBRINE (disease of silk worm), Pasteur, 

xlii, 462. 
PECTASE, Fremy, xxi. 151. 
PECTIN, Braconnot ( W. & B., 220), ir, 147. 
PECTORAL, cherry, Ayer's, xxvi, 282. 
PECTOSE, Fremy, xxi, 151 ; xxxii, 71. 
PEKEA hutyrosa, xxxvi, 295, note. 

tuberculosa, xxxvi, 294, note. 

PELARGONIUM odoratissimum, its oil, 

xxiv, 179. 



172 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



PELIGOT'S salt, xvii, 266. 

PELLETS. Sep GraxNULes. 

PELOSLVA (Wigger's, = Buxina ; Be- 

beerina: Nectandra), Fliickiger. xlii, 

316. 

PELOUZE'S acid, xvii, 266. 
PENGHAWAR-DJAMBI, Hanbury, xxix, 

159 — Vinke, xxxiii, 54. 
PENICILIUM GLAUCUM. fungus in paper, 

xxiii, 42. 

PENNSYLVANIA hospital, resignation 
of Dr. Conrad, xlii, 573. 

PENTEDESMA butyracka, xxvii, 339. 

PEPO, active principle, Dosch, xlii, 200 — 
oil, see Oleum peponis — vermifuge pro- 
perties, Ingals, xxxvi. 428 — Bouvier 
and Desnos, xxxviii, 253. 

PEPPER, account, Jackson, xxxviii, 23 — 
adulteration, xxiii, 274 — Schroeder. 
xxxvi, 106 — cultivation in India, Royle, 
xiii, 134. 

, BLACK, of Western Africa. See Cu- 

BEBA CLUSir. 

, CAYENNE. See Capsicum. 

, Japanese, Stenhouse (W. & B., 864, 

note), xxix, 444. 

, TAILED. See OUBEBA CLUSII. 

PEPSIN, account, Payen, xv, 284— Squire, 
xxix, 263— jjreparation, Boudault (W. 
& B., 1591), xxix, 263; xlii, 379— 
Bruke, xxxv, 118 — Wasmann, xii, 
192 ; XXV, 478 — tefst and use, xxxix, 
469 — comparative value of different 
kinds, Scheffer, xlii, 99. 

, LIQUID, Schelfer, xlii, 99. 

PERCA, iii, 20. 

PERCENTAGE of prescriptioa- Caldwell, 
xlii, 312— Procter, jr , xxxix, 89. 

PERCH, isinglass made from skin, iii, 20. 

PERCHLOROFORMENE (bichloride of 
carbon), xxxviii, 171. 

PERCOLATION, compare Fluid extracts 
— Boullay^ y, 318 — Campbell, see Fluid 
i&y.TKkQr&, preparation, Campbell — Cum- 
ynings, xxviii, 398 — JDautise, viii, 225 — 
Duhamd, x, i ; xi, 189 — Guillermond, 
vii,308 — Harris (stop-cock), xxii, 306 
Fh. Britannica (64), xxxvi, 382 — Proc- 
ter, jr., xi, 189; xxxi, 317 — Signoret 
(forcing pump), xxxiii, 319 — Souhei- 
m/i, viii, 221 — Squibb, xxix, 99; xxx, 
97 — Vielguth and Nentwich (suction 
pump), xxxi, 234. 

point of exhaustion determined, 

Mayer, xxxv, 66. 

funnel recommended, Duhamel, x, 

7 — Grahame, xxxi, 354 — Mouchon, x, 
6 — Parrish, xxxi, 327 — mounting a 
funnel, Squibb, xxxix, 410. 

compared to maceration, Boullay 

and Guillermond, x, 10. 

of resins, Duhamel, x, 15. 

table of results, Squibb, xxxviii, 

127. 



, FRACTIONAL, Dichl, xH, 337, 343 — 

Procter, jr., xli, 296 — Squibb, xxxviii,, 
109 ; xxxix, 133. 

PERCOLATOR, cheap. Sharp, xxvii, 220. 

compound, Bassford, xxx, 81. 

for ethereal extraction, Mohr, xxi,. 

117. 

. Compare Displacer. 

PEREIRA bark, Carson, xvii, 86. 
PEREIRINA, PfaflF (Parrish, 654), xvii, 86. 
PERFUMES of the ANciENTS,Martin,xl,330. 
— — , French, statistics, xxix, 548 ; xxxii,. 
183. 

, lamp, Piesse, xxvii, 470. 

, odors. Chevreul, xxxii, 76. 

PERFUMERY, Piesse, xxvi, 272, 365, 460, 
554; xxvii, 74, 176, 273, 371, 467,. 
558 ; xxviii, 78, 175, 267. See under 
different headings [Eau, Bouquet, Es- 
sence, Extrait, etc ) 

in Cannes and Grasse, xxix, 548. 

PERGULARIA tinctoria yields blue col- 
or, vi, 73. 

PERICLYMEN yirginiana (Spigelia Mary- 

landica), iv, 2. 
PERIPLOCA GB.ECA, adulterant of senna,, 

viii, 268. 
INDICA, vi, 202 ; xv, 298. 

SECAMONE, XX, 6. 

PERROPIN. See Pirropin. 

PERSIAN berries, xxxii, 465. 

PERSIMMON. See Diospyros. 

PERU balsam. See Balsamum Peru. 

PERUVIN, Fremy (W. & B., 156), xi, 87. 

PESSARIES, medicated. Proctor, xi, 52. 

PETIVERIA FffiTiDA, cure for drunken- 
ness, vi, 203. 

PETROLE, Bussenius and Eisenstiick, 
xxxii. 447. 

PETROLENE, Boussingault, ix, 84. 

PETROLEUM, account. Hunt, xxxiv, 527 
— formation of acetylen, Berthelot, 
xxxviii, 264 — analysis, xxxiv, 539 — • 
E]isenstiick, xxxii, 446 — Wayne (Penn- 
sylvania petroleum, W. & B., 1581), 
xxxii, 451 — behavior to nitroprusside 
of copper, Heppe, xxix, 326 — con- 
tains bisulphide of carbon, Hager, xxxix, 
318 — decolorized without distillation, 
Bcettger, x, 258— deodorized, xi, 277 
— as disinfectant, Crookes, xxxviii, 

427 drops in drachm, Bernouilly, 

xxxi, 441 — r&teofflow, Galletly,xxxvii,. 
378 — as fuel, xxxiii, 378 — gas, Mar- 
lius, xlii, 326 — for destruction of m- 
sects, xxxix, 466 — origin, Hunt, xxxiv, 
538 — specific gravity, Martins, v, 60 — 
igniting point of vapor, Button, xli, 
252, 254. 

, Canada, contains the benzole series, 

Schorlemmer, xxxvii, 311. 
, Pennsylvania, analysis, Wayne (W. 

& B., 1581), xxxii, 451 — account, xxxiij 

562. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 173 



PETROLEUM ether. See Benzine. 

PBTROSELINUM (compare Parsley), 
seeds^ analysis, Jorel and Homolle 
(W. & B., 640), xxviii, 45; xxxv, 84 
— root^ percolation, packing, Soubei- 
ran, viii, 226. 

PEUCEDANIN, behavior to bichromate 
of potassa test, Jenkins, xxxiii, 528 
— identical with imperatorin^ Wagner 
(W. & B., 1535), xxvii, 165. 

PEUCYL, Blanchet and Sell (W. & B., 
600), viii, 44. 

PH^URETIN, de la Rue and Muller, xxx, 
368. 

PHALANGIUM pomaridianum, bulbs sub- 
stitute for soap in California, xxxii, 
245. 

PHALARIS CANARiBNSia. See Canary 

SEED. 

PHARAOH'S SERPENTS, Procter, jr., 
xxxviii, 92, 99 — Wood, xxxviii, 61. 

PHARMACEUTICAL preparations. See 
Preparations. 

PHARMACIAN proposed for pharmaceu- 
tist, XXV, 484. 

PH ARM AC IE CKNTRALE, Parrish, xxxi, 
212— Procter, jr., xli, 9. 

PHARMACOLOGY, inquiries and deside- 
rata, Hooker and Hanbury, xxxii, 49. 

, Chinese, xxix, 563. 

. Compare Materia medica. 

PHARMACOPCEIA, copyright, xxiii, 280. 

, the FIRST (Scribonius Largus), vii, 

287. 

, Austria (1869), xli, 475. 

, Belgium (I860), xxxii, 317. 

, British, xiv, 179 — national, pro- 
posed, vii, 77 ; xxvii, 11 — (1864) xxxi, 
189 — xxxii, 431 — xxxiii, 477 — xxxiv, 
379— xxxv, 376— xxxvi, 181, 285, 381 
— weights and measures, xxxiii, 89; 
xxxv, 90. 

, Dublin (1826), iii, 322; xiv, 179— 

(1850) xxiii, 6. 
— — , Edinburgh (1830), iii, 250 ; iv, 33— 

(1841) xiv, 179. 
, France, Prel. No. 67— i, 59— (1837) 

X, 285— (1861) xxxiv, 286. 

, Great Britain. See , British. 

, Helvetica (1865), xxxix, 207, 312, 

529. 

, India, xxxvii, 312. 

, Italica, xli, 477. 

, London (1824), Prel. No. 17— (1836) 

ix, 319 ; xiv, 179 — and Pharmaceutical 

Society, xxvi, 567. 

, Spain, first pharmacopoeia, xxi, 273. 

, Suecica (!869), xlii, 87. 

, United States, account, Bache, 

xxxii, 396. 

, (1830), New Fork revision, 

reviewed, ii, 316 — Washington revision 
approved by College of Pharmacy, ii, 
314 — reviewed^ iii, 64 — D. B. Smith, iv, 



27— Geo. B. Wood, iii, 200, 297 ; iv, 
94 — committee on examination, ap- 
pointed, iii, 342 — report, v, 75 — com- 
mittee on conference with physicians 
about introduction as standard, iv, 76, 
78. 

, (1840), National Medical Con^ 

vention for revision, xi, 345 ; xii, 76, 
86; xiii, 79 — report, xiii, 265 — revieWy 
xiv, 179 — Carson, xiv, 122. 

■, ■ (1850), remarks on revision, 

Procter, jr. (suggests formation of lo- 
cal pharmaceutical associations), 
xviii, 1 — convention for revision, xxi, 
375, 379 ; xxii, 283 — review, xxiii, 194,, 
292. 

-, (1860), on participation of the^ 

American Pharmaceutical Association. 
in the revision, xxix, 496 — convention 
for revision, xxxi, 282, 283 ; xxxii, 
1#6, 187— report, xxxii, 279, 370— 
editorials: xxxii, 187, 376 ; xxxiii, 383 ; 

xxxv, 282, 375, 476 nomenclature, 

Maisch, xli, 519 — speedy publication 
wanted, Parrish, xxxiv, 512 — revieiv^. 
Procter, jr., xxxvi, 209, 298, 393 ; 

xxxvii, 326 — Taylor, xxxv, 401. 
(1870), its authority, Procter, 

jr., xli, 289 — convention of revision, 
xli, 375; xlii, 278, 280, 289 — careless. 
reporting, xlii, 377 — suggestions, Swe- 
ringen, xlii, 110. 

UNivERSELLE, abbreviations, i, 312. 

, VETERINARY, Tuson, xlii, 91. 

PHARMACY, general: 

sestheiical, Stearns, xxxvi, 220. 

apprentice, selection of, vi, 279 ap- 
prenticeship and early training, Ba- 
den-Benger, xlii, 543. 

business management, Stearns, xxxix, 
33 — the pharmaceutist as a merchant, 
Stearns, xxxvii, 198. 

charges exorbitant, xx, 273. 

co-operative trading, xlii, 477. 

eclectic, xxvi, 108. 

extemporaneous, Powers, v, 99. 

history, Bell, xx, 265 Cap, xv, 41 

Donovan, xl, 161. 

International Congress. See below, after 
responsibility. 

manufacturing, Procter, jr., xxx, 514. 

percentage, system, Caldwell, xlii, 312 
— Procter, jr., xxxix, 89. 

old/?Ay6iC and young pharmacy, xxvi,381. 

physicians and pharmaceutists, their 
relations, Maisch, xxviii, 25, 111, 202 
— Ordronaux ; Procter, jr., xl, 473. 

responsibility of physician and phar- 
maceutist, Prescott, xlii, 285 — Deane,, 

xxxvi, 539. 

, international congress, Brunswickj 

xxxviii, 278 — Pans, xxxviii, 381 ; 

xxxix, 280, 286, 561, 566; xl, 382 — 
Vienna, xli, 373, 572. 



174 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



PHARMACY in DIFFERENT COUN- 
TRIES : 
. Africa, Landerer, xix, 125. 

Argentine Republic, xxxv, 382 — 
xxxviii, 102. 

Adstralia, xxix, 479. 

Austria, xxvii, 472 : xxxvii, 494. 

Belgium, xxxii, 317. 

Oanada, xxvii, 186 — xxx, 281 — xxxii, 
476 — xlii, 159 — (botanical prizes), xli, 
126. 

Ohili, xxix, 85. 

China, xix, 129, 320— xxvi, 97. Com- 
pare Pharmacology. 
"Cuba, xxxviii, 477. 

England, compare Grkat Britain — 
pharmacy act, xxv, 312 — census re- 
turns, xxxvi, 333 — graduates of Apo- 
thecaries' Hall, xxxi, 8 — Pharmaceu- 
tical Chemists, xxxi, 9 — provincial 
pharmacy, xxxv, 377 — Liverpool^ xxxi, 
97, 98 — London^ Apothecaries' Com- 
pany versus Greenough, xiii, 322 — 
Allen and Hanbury's establishment, 
xxxi, 9 — inspection, xxix, 568 ; xxx, 
436 — poison sale, xxv, 448 ; xxxi, 5 : 
xl, 397. 

France, i, 248; ii,296; ix,279,281; xlii, 282, 
284— bon de rabais, xxxix, 361 — eighth 
pharmaceutical congress, xxxvi, 462 
— comparison with English pharma- 
cy, xxx, 431 — inspection, xxx, 437 — 
Pharraacie centrale, xxxi. 212 ; xli, 9 
— religious pharmacy, xxx, 432 — se- 
cret remedies, xxx, 440 — school at 
Paris, i, 78 ; iii, 355 ; xxxi, 209 — sta- 
tistics, ii, 296 ; xxv, 90 — poison sale, 
xxv, 488; xxxiii, 176. 

CrBRMANY, Compare Austria ; Prussia ; 
Saxony. — i, 245, 254; ix, 279; xli, 
371; xlii, 304— Bussy, xxv, 323, 425 
— Garrigues, xxv, 107, 403 — Kane, ix, 
309 — statistics of universities, Garri- 
gues, xxv, 107— North German Asso- 
ciation, xxxvii, 495 — poison sale, xxv, 
448. 

<jIibat Britain, compare Canada ; 
England; Scotland, and the differ- 
ent COLONIES. — XX, 265 ; xxii, 1 ; xxv, 
385; xxxvii, 317; xl, 391 — British 
Pharmaceutical Conference^ xxxv, 569 ; 
xxxvi, 461, 538 ; xxxvii, 74, 189, 318, 
494; xxxviii, 380, 569; xxxix, 505; 
si, 91, 572 ; xli, 92, 474, 571; xlii, 
-571 — English versus French pharma- 
cy, xxxi, 431— Juries bill. xxxiv, 565 — 
pharmaceutical education, xli, 86 — 
Pharmaceutical Journal^ xlii, 473 — 
Pharmaceutical Society, xiii, 292 ; xlii, 
472 ; (prizes), xxviii, 287 (resolution 
at death of J. Bell), xxxi, 485 — testi- 
monial to J. Mackay, xli, 476 — to G. 
W. Sanford, xli, 378 — registration, 
xxxvi, 284. 



Holland, xlii, 283 — female assistants 
and apothecaries, xxxix, 465 ; xU 
372. 

Hungary, xxii, 46. 

Italy, xli, 379 — Piedmont, xxxii, 546 
— Tuscany, xl, 522 — Pharmaceutical 
Society, Turin, xxv, 275. 

Jamaica, xxxvi, 351. 

Mexico, xviii, 70. 

Norway, xii, 201. 

Persia, xi, 12. 

Poland, xviii, 126. 

Prussia, iii, 264; xxv, 323, 425; xli, 
474 — tine for adulteration, xl, 523. 
Compare Germany. 

Russia, xii, 343 ; xxxi, 165; xxxvi, 362; 
xli, 87 — Siberia, xlii, 283. 

Scotland, xxxi, 106. 

Spain, i, 206; xix, 208; xxi, 272— 
fine for adulteration (fifteenth cen- 
tury), xxi, 274 — secret remedies, xli, 
477. 

Sweden, xxiv, 67 ; xlii, 22. 
Switzerland, xlii, 283. 
Turkey, xxiii, 228. 

United States, General : (Fischer) 
viii, 271; ix, 280 — (Parrish) xxvii, 
115, 21 1, 289— (Faber) xli, 398; xlii, 
8 4 — through English spectacles, Proc- 
ter, jr., xxxvii, 159 — in U. S. Army. 

xxxiv, 93; xxxvii, 74, 107, 156,398; 

(Fell) xxxvii, 107 convention of 

colleges about education, xlii, 281, 
500, 566 — Queries, xxvi, 89, compare 
Education — druy inspectors, see Drug 
iniSPECTOHS — drug law, see Drug law — • 
legislation, Maisch, xlii, 303 — pharma- 
cy bill, see Drug law — sale of poisons, 
see Poisons, Sale — influence of revenue 
law, Procter, jr., xxxvii, 315 — practi- 
cal school of pharmacy, Procter, jr., 
xxxviii, 187, 479; xlii, 311— text 
books, report, xxviii, 490. 

AMERICAN PHARMACEUTICAL AS- 
SOCIATION: suggested, David Stew- 
art, xviii, 5 — Procter, jr., xviii, 7 — 
origin, xxv, 90 — organization, xxiv, 
22, 26, 85— (E. Parrish) xxiv, 133. 

Address: W. A. Breioer, xxv, 483 

— S. 31. Colcord, xxxi, 498 ; xxxii. 
4:86— Charles Ellis, xxx, 481— F'. 
M. Gordon, xxxvii, 408— 7". Kiersted, 
xxxii, 502 — H. W. Lincoln, xxxvii, 
415; xxxviii, 390 — /. Meakim, xxxii, 
512— J. 3Iilhau, xl, 486— J^. F. Moore, 

xxxv, 493; xxxvi^ 471 — E. Parrish, 
xli, 487 — W. Procter, jr., xxxiv, 475 ; 
xxxv, 481— E. A. Sargent, xli, 491 ; 
xlii, 485 — F. Stearns, xxix, 485 ; xxxix, 
484. 

Constitution : xxv, 13, note ; xxviii, 
501. 

Exhibition, xxvii, 492; xxix, 504; 
xxxi, 527; xxxii, 508; xxxiv, 486; 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



175 



eHARMACY. 

Am. Pharm, Asso'n. {Confmued). 

xxxviii, 403 ; xxxix, 470. 568 ; xl, 
376, 466, 569 ; xli, 569 ; xUi, 568. 

Letters, Beckert, xxxviii, 393 

Bjoercklund, xxxvii, 417. ''"^ 
JMiNtTTES, xxiv, 22 ; xxv, 1. 481 ; xxvi, 
385; xxvii, 481; xxviii, 481; xxix, 
481 ; XXX, 477; xxxi, 491; xxxii, 481 ; 
xxxir, 472; xxxv, 481; xxxvi, 465; 
xxxvii, 401 ; xxxviii, 385 : xxxix, 481 ; 
xl, 481 ; xli, 481 ; xlii, 481. 
Notices, xxiv, 85, 133, 186, 281, 389; 

xxv, 86, 281, 282, 369, 473, 575 : xxvi^ 
89, 169, 286, 378, 471. 565 ; xxvii^ 
185, 283, 379, 476, 479, 568; xxviii, 
187, 274, 372. 381. 477, 478, 573; 
xxix, 283, 370, 379, 471, 477, 572; 
XXX, 379, 381, 462, 464,' 575; xxxi, 
382, 383, 483, 484,' 583 ; xxxii, 381, 

468, 571, 574; xxxiii, 287, 377, 382; 
xxxiv, 93, 190. 285, 286, 378, 491, 
565; xxxv, 2 79, 282, 372, 373, 477, 
571 ; xxxvi, 284, 380, 461, 541 ; 
xxxvii, 313, 314, 395, 396, 492; xxxviii^ 
378, 379, 475 ; xxxix, 375, 469, 470, 
472, 567 ; xl, 375, 466, 467, 567 ; xli, 
371, 378, 468, 469, 569 ; xlii, 376, 471, 
568. 

Officers, xxiv, 22 ; xxv, 3, 482 ; 

xxvi, 386; xxvii, 482; xxviii, 485; 
xxix, 487 ; xxx, 483 ; xxxi, 497 ; xxxii, 
495; xxxiv, 474; xxxv, 492; xxxvi, 
475 ; xxxvii, 414 ; xxxviii, 391 ; xxxix, 
488; xl, 491; xli, 489; xlii, 488. 
Proceedings, review of, xxviii, 192; 

xxix, 93 ; xxx, 90 ; xxxi, 88 ; xxxii, 
91, 575 ; xxxiii, 191 ; xxxv, 92 ; xxxvi, 
188 ; xxxvii, 159 ; xxxviii, 190; xxxJx, 
188 ; xl, 90 ; xli, 189 ; xlii, 183. 
Prizes, xxv, 485 ; xxvi, 396 ; xxvii, 

493 ; xxviii, 483 ; xxxiv, 490 : xxxvi, 

469, 484 ; xxxvii, 439. 

■Queries (suggested by Procter, jr ), 
xxvi, 287 — xxviii, 483 ; xxix, 507 ; 

xxx, 497 ; xxxi, 523 ; xxxii, 514 ; 
xxxiv, 487 ; xxxr, 501; xxxvi, 485; 
xxxvii, 435; xxxviii, 404; xxxix. 502; 
xl, 505 ; xli, 508 ; xlii, 490. 
Queries Answered : xxix, 492, 502 ; 
xxx, 486, 489, 492; xxxi, 513, 517, 
520 ; xxxii, 497. 501, 505 ; xxxiv, 
478,' 481. 486; xxxv, 496, 498, 499; 
xxxvi, 479, 486, 491 ; xxxvii, 419, 
423; xxxviii, 394, 399; xxxix, 494, 
498, 501 ; xl, 496, 497, 499, 502; xli, 

494 ; xlii, 494, 495, 490. 

the Stearns controversv, xli. Ill, 
512. 

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHAR- 
MACY : about want of activity in sub- 
scribers, xl, 468 advertising sheet 

monthly, xlii. 381 — arrearage of sub- 
scribers, xlii, 81 — commenced vf'iWx Jari- 



Am. Jour, of Pharm. {Continued). 

uary^ xx, 1 duplicating numbers, 

xxxix, 90 —financial condition, xli, 274 
— introduction, Frel. No. 1 — issue of 
numbers yearly, xxv, 86 — W. Procter, 
jr., wants to retire from editorship, 
xlii, 572 — subscribers in the South and 
the mail, xxxiii, 384 — prospect, i, I — 
title changed, vii, 78. 
Editors : Benj. Ellis, i, 1— R E. Grif- 
fith, iii, 172 — J, Carson, viii, 1 — R. 
Bridges, x, 1 — W. Procter, jr., co- 
editor, XX, 253 — sole editor, xxii, 1. 
Editorials : commenced, xx, 253. 
Empirical formula, insertion de- 
clined, xxxir, 664. 

Queries and answeb list proposed, 

xxv, 475, 

scientific tendency, xxxix, 87. 
— in different STATES: 
California (Simmons), xxvi, 394; 

xxx, 280; xli, 473, 674; xlii, 187— 
poison sale, xxv, 491. 

District Columbia, xxviii, 189, 285, 573. 
Illinois, xxxii, 89 ; xxxix, 285 ; xl, 

283 ; xlii, 281. 
Indiana, xlii. 380 — poison sale, xxv, 305. 
Kansas, xl, 188. 
Kentucky, xxiv, 116; xlii, 475. 
Maine, xl, 88. 

Maryland (Baltimore), reorganiza- 
tion, xxviii, 188, 285 — code of ethics, 
xxviii, 374 — graduates, xxix, 283 ; 
xxxii, 283 ; xxxvii, 396 — distinction 
between apothecaries and druggists, 
xxxix, 476 — Journal uluA transactions, 

xxxi, 287; suspended, xxxiv, 288 — 
minutes, xxviii, 374, 569 ; xxix, 276, 
473; xxx, 280; xxxiii, 576; xxxvii, 
396; xli, 186, 37d— officers, xxviii, 
570 ; xli, 186 — abortion, sale of secret 
remedies prohibited, xxxix, 378. 

Massachusetts (Boston), xxiii, 91, 
191, 275; xxv, 22 — alumni associa- 
tion, xlii, 381, 475 — graduates, xli, 
374; xlii, 381— lectures, xxv, 187; 

xxvi, 92, 473; xl, 87, 88 — liquor sale, 
petition, xxxix, 380 — minutes, xxxix, 
471 ; xl, 574 ; xlii, 381, see officers — 
officers, xxiii, 276; xxv, 285, 368; 
xxvi, 92, 473 ; xxvii, 286 ; xxxiv, 287 ; 
xxxv, 284 ; xxxvi, 2^5; xxxix, 377 — 
Sunday closing, xxxviii, 89. 

Michigan, xli, 474, 575 ; xlii, 85. 

Missouri (St. Louis), Medical Soci- 
ety versus Apothecaries, xxvi, 379 — 
Association: chair of botany, xxxyu, 
234, 316 — officers: xxvi, 381 ; xxx, 88, 
185; xxxii, 188; xxxiv, 191; xxxv, 
284; xxxvii, 157; xxxviii, 574; xl, 
89 — notices, xxxi, 485 ; xxxiii, 382 ; 
xli, 470. 

New Hampshire, poison sale, xxv, 304, 
490. 



176 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



PHARMACY. 

New Jersey, xlii, 282, 379. 

New York, reciprocity with Phila- 
delphia College of Pharmacy, ii, 314 ; 
iii, 343 — abvaes in retail trade, xxvii, 
187 — actio regulate, xi, 80; xli, 376 
— address at College, xvii, 244 ; xxvi, 
201 — adulteration of drugs, circular, 
xix, 305 ; xx, 299 ; standard, xxiv, 
181 — pecuniary grant, xxiii, 191 — 
graduates, xxii, 244; xxxiv, 287 ; xxxv, 
284; xxxvi, 285; xxxviii, 383; xl, 
281 ; xli, 286— Journal, xxiv, 91, 188, 
382; XXV, 476; xxvi, 92, 288; xxvii, 
186 — honorary members, xi, 79 — officers, 
xi, 79 ; xxxiv, 287 ; xxxvi, 285 ; 

xxxviii, 383; xl, 281 ; xli, 2H6—]jre- 
scription, carelessness in writing, 
xxvii, 480 — report on blue mass, xvii, 
4, 148 — on opium, xvii, 164 — resolu- 
tion, death of C. Adamson, xviii, 245 
— B. Canavan, xxix, 86 — W. H. Minor, 

xxxiv, 491 — of King's County Medical 
Society, xxxv, 477 — School of Pharma- 
cy, xxiii, 391 ; xxxiii, 575 ; xxxv, 91 
— German apothecaries pharmaceuti- 
cal society, statutes, xxviii, 82— cor- 
rection of J. Faber's essay on Ameri- 
can pharmacy, xlii, 84 — Chinese ^^hixv- 
macy in New York, xlii, 380 — poison 
sale, XXV, 490. 

Ohio (Cincinnati), xxii, 96 ; xxiii, 391 ; 

xxxii, 284 ; xli, 83, 184 — poison sale, 
XXV, 489. 

Pennsylvania (Philadelphia). 

College, Prel. No. 2 ; xxxi, 6 ; xli, 97 ; 

Pharmacy in Philadelphia, i, 255. 
Address, F. Bache, vii, §9; J.Carson, 

xi, 89 ; xviii, 81 — W. Procter, jr., xxx, 

193 — D. B. Smith, i, 241; ix, 89— Hy 

Troth, ii, 257. 
Alumni, xxxvii, 157; xxxviii, 186, 286; 

xxxix, 380; xl, 286; xli, 186; xlii, 
183, 474. 

Botany (Herbarium), xxxii, 566, 569 ; 

xxxiii, 283, 285, 572 ; xxxiv, 561 ; 

xxxv, 567 ; xxxix, 376. 

Cabinet, xix, 311; xx, 144,345; xxiii, 
80 ; xxiv, 388 ; xxxi, 284 ; xxxiv, 284. 
Compare Museum. 

Certificate not to be used as business ad- 
vertisement, xxvi, 283 — design, xxvii, 
485 ; xxviii, 187. 

Charter and laws, xxviii, 278, 280. 

Class (Catalogue), xxiii, 196 ; xxiv. 
97 ; XXV, 95 ; xxvi, 95 ; xxvii, 95 ; 
xxviii, 95 ; xxix, 95 ; xxx, 95 ; xxxi, 
95; xxxii, 95; xxxiii, 95; xxxiv, 95; 
xxxv, 95 ; xxxvi, 95 ; xxxvii, 79 ; 
xxxviii, 95 ; xxxix, 94 ; xl, 94 ; xli, 
94; xlii, 94. 

Commencement. See Graduates. 

Donations, v, 256; xxx, 574; xxxi, 84, 
85; xxxii, 278 (by several) — from 



Pennsylvania [Continued). 

R. Alsop, vii, 76 — Faraday, vi, 74 — 
Gruibourt, vii, 343 — Haubury, xxix, 
283 ; xlii, 567 — McKeaa & Co., xlii^ 
567— G. W. Merchant, xv, 72— R. Pe- 
ter, viii, 167 — Powers & Weightman, 
xxxix, 278— Robiquet, iii, 343— D. B.. 
Smith, xxxix, 278 — Fr. R. Smith, vii, 
75— J. M. Turner, viii, 343— Wayne, 
xlii, 567 — P. Williamson, xxxii, 278- 
— Geo. D. Wood, vi, 74. 
Code of Ethics, xx, 147, 346. 

Graduates, reciprocity with the New 
York College of Pharmacy, ii, 314 ; 
iii, 343— catalogue, i, 80, 240; ii^ 
313; iv, 255; v, 255; vi, 255; vii, 
77 ; viii, 165 ; ix, 171 ; x, 171 ; xi, 78; 
xiv, 167, 173; xvi, 153; xvii, 73; 
xviii, 156; xx, J 52; xxi, 377; xxii,. 
185 ; xxiii, 193 ; xxiv, 192 ; xxv, 277 
xxvi, 285, 565 ; xxvii, 282 ; xxviii, 
274; xxix, 274; xxx, 278; xxxi, 281;; 
xxxii, 277,565; xxxiii, 282; xxxiv^. 
274; xxxv, 280; xxxvi, 273; xxxvii,. 
231; xxxviii, 275; xxxix, 276; xl,. 
278 ; xli, 273, 561 ; xlii, 277. 

Hall, purchase of lot, iii, 344 — stock 
relinquished, xix, 155 — new building,^ 
xl, 85, 89, 188, 281, 378, 467, 571 — 
contributions to building fund, xl^ 
376, 466, 565; xli, 88, 182, 287. 

Laboratory , xxxvii, 233, 239. 

Legislation, xli, 182, 280. 

Library, xxiv, 387 ; xxx, 383 (fire) — 

xxxi, 284, 289. 

Loan to apparatus, etc., i, 22. 
Meetings (pharmaceutical), xiv, 169,. 
341 ; XV, 69, 234, 312 ; xvi, 70, 309; 

xvii, 306 ; xxiv, 389 ; xxxviii, 88 % 
xxx, 573 ; xxxi, 84 ; xlii, 568. 

Members (list), viii, 88, 166. 

Corresponding, xlii, 275. 

Foreign and Honorary, ii, 159; 

iii, 344 ; iv, 76, 255 ; viii, 256, 343 ; 

xiv, 167, 171, 346; xxv, 85, 280; xli, 

561. 

Minutes, i, 22, 240, 305; ii, 159, 312; 
iii, 171, 342; iv, 76, 255 ; r, 75, 255; 

vi, 74, 255 ; v, 75, 255 ; vi, 74, 255 ; 

vii, 75, 343; viii, 165,254,343; ix, 
171, 347: X, 171; xi, 75; xii, 74; 
xiii, 79, 166; xiv, 167, 346; xvii, 73; 

xviii, 144, 314; xix, 154, 309; xx, 
142, 344 ; xxi, 185, 377 ; xxii, 90, 184 ;. 
xxiii, 79, 282; xxiv, 181, 288; xxv, 
85,278,561; xxvi, 283, 565; xxvii, 
279, 566; xxviii, 275, 568; xxix, 274, 
569; xxx, 278, 571; xxxi, 280, 581 ; 

xxxii, 277, 565; xxxiii, 281, 572 ; 
xxxiv, 274, 560; xxxv, 280, 566 ; 
xxxvi, 180, 273, 537; xxxvii, 230, 
491 ; xxxviii, 276, 568 ; xxxix, 276, 
561; xl, 85, 277, 565; xli, 273, 561 ; 
xlii, 275, 375. 564. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



177 



PHARMACY. 

Pennsylvania [Continued). 

Museum, xix, 312; xxii, 384; (fire),xxx, 
383. Compare Cabinet. 

Officers and Trustees^ Pre]. No. 5 ; i, 24, 
309; ii, 160, 313 ; iii, 171, 343; iv, 80, 
256; Y, 255,256; vi, 256; vii, 75, 
79, 343 ; viii, 166, 256 ; ix, 172. 347 ; 
X, 172: xi, 76, 77; xii, 85; xii'i, 8» ; 
xiv, 168, 171, 346; xvi, 74; xvii, 74; 
xviii, 145, 147; xix, 159;' xx, 146; 
xxi, 187; xxii, 188; xxiii, 8'J, 285; 
xxiv, 280 ; xxy, 85, 280, 562 ; xxyI, 
284, 566; xxvii, 281, 567 ; xxviii, 277, 
569; xxix, 276, 571; xxx, 279, 579; 

xxxi, 283, 583; xxxii, 282, 5':0; 
xxxiii, 286, 574; xxxiY, 276, 564; 
XXXV, 280, 568 ; xxxvi, 274, 538 ; 
xxxvii, 233, 491; xxxviii, 278, 568; 
xxxix, 279, 565; xl, 280, 567; xli, 
278, 561 ; xlii, 279 567. 

Poison, sale, xxxiii, 116, 185. 

[Residents, W. Lehman, 1825— D. B. 
Smi'h, 1829-53— Chas. Ellis, 1854-68 
— Dilhvyn Parrish, 1869, '70. 

Frofessorkliip of theoretical and prac- 
tical pharmacy, xviii, 147, 148. 

•School of rharmacy, xxiii, 391 ; xxiv, 
292; XXV, 373; xxviii, 377; xxix, 
477 : xxxii, 285 ; xxxiii, 288 ; xxxviii, 
479 '; xli, 85. 

Sunday closing, xxxii, 473, 491, 574. 

Master of Pharmacy, conferred by the 
University of Pennsylvania, xli, 99. 

Irish opinion of Philadelphia reform- 
ers, XXV, 188, 

Rhode Island, abortion, sale of se- 
cret remedies prohibited, xxxix, 378. 

Vermont, poison sale, xxv, 207, 490. 

Virginia, Portsmotith, xxiv, 386 

Richmond, xxiv, 185, 292, 385, 386; 
xxvi, nO—Weit Virginia, xlii, 380. 
PHASEOLUS VULGARIS, its sugar, Vohl, 
xxix, 41. 

PHASEOMANNITE, Vohl, xxix, 41. 
PHELLANDRIUM aquaticum, analysis of 
seeds (W. & B., 1567), Fronefield, 

xxxii, 211. 

PHENOL, xli, 260. See Acid, carbolic. 
PHILLYRIA latifolia, its alkaloid, Ja- 

chelli, XX, 327. 
PHILLYRENA, sulphate, Jachelli, xx, 

327. 

PHILOCOME, Piesse, xxviii, 180. 
PHLOBAPHENE, composition, xxxiii, 172 

— in Cupido bark, Mauch, jr., xli, 

417. 

PHLORIDZIN, behavior to ammonia, xiii, 
231 — bichromate of potassa, Jenkins, 

xxxiii, 528 — to nitric acid; sulphuric 
acid (cold, hot, and with permanga- 
nate of potassa), Guy, xxxiii, 526 — 
composition, Petersen, viii, 242 — Kon- 
inck, viii, 241 — preparation, Bouillier 



(W. & B., 1583), X, 51; xiv, 352— 
Koninck, viii, 239 — not found in Pru- 
71US virginiana, Perot, xxiv. 111 — use, 
Ricci (W. & B., 1583), xxxvi, 85. 
PHLOROGLUCIN, composition, Hlasi- 
veetz, xxxii, 443. 

PHCENIX DACTYLIFERA, V, 143. 

PHUKMIUM TENAX, for paper-making, 

xxviii, 169 — resin for sealing letters, 

xxix, 2 28. 

PHOSPHATES in urinary deposits, detec- 
tion, Landerer, xxxiii, 411. 

PHOSPHOGLYCERATES, Pelouze, xxv, 
358. 

PHOSPHORESCENCE, Reichenbach, 
xxxiv, 246 — o{ phosphorus, Marchand, 

xxiii, 374 — Moffat, xxxv, 142. 
PHOSPHORUS, discovered in the 14th cen- 
tury, xxi, 273 — history. Gore, xxxiv, 
49, 145 — antidote (l&c magnesiae), Lan- 
derer, xxvii, 538 (hypochlorite of 

magnesia), Duflos, xxix, 32 ; (is un- 
reliable, Schrader, xxix, 32) — (oil 
of turpentine), Letheby, xix, 120; 

Vigla, xli, 175 behavior to fused 

chlorate of potassa, Boettger, xxx, 

70 to aromatic principles of tar, 

Deschamps (prevent action of air), 

xxxiii, 412 — contaminated with ar- 
senic, viii, 331 ; amount, Rademaker, 
xlii, 607 — in cod-liver oil, de Jonghe, 
xxi, 145 — combustion in chlorine gas 
and in nitric oxide gas (apparatus), 
Hare, v, 195 ; vi, 185 ; counteracted 
by oil of turpentine, Letheby xix, 120 

detection (compare test), Herzog 

(search for phosphorus, phosphorous 
and phosphoric acids), xxxiii, 126 — 
Hoffmann (modification of Mitscher- 
lich), xxxii, 1 53— Mitscherlich (W. & 
B., 644), xxviii, 323— Scherer (modi- 
fication of Mitscherlich), xxxii, 461 
— Vielguth (after six months), xxix, 
29 — as disinfectant, Moffat, xxxv, 143 
— luminosity (see Phosphorescence) — 
oxides, red and white, Muller, ix, 243 
phosphorescence (see Phosphores- 
cence) — poisoning (avoiding fatty mat- 
ter), Mialhe, xl,457 — preparation, Rob- 
ert Boyle (from urine), xxxiv, 52 — Cari 
Montrand (W. & B., 642), xxvi, 551 ; 

xxxiv, 415 — Donovan (on small scale), 

xxiv, 168; (on large scale), xxiv, 167 
— Gentele (combined with manufac- 
ture of glue, and of muriate of am- 
monia), xxx, 49 — Woehler (from ivory 
black), iii, 178 — properties a,3 compared 
to amorphous, Gore, xxxiv, 145 — puri- 
ficatio7i, Liebig, viii, 333 — (with bi- 
chromate of potassa), xlii, 524 — pow- 
dering, Casaseca (alcohol), ii, 340 — 
solubility in benzole, Mansfield, xxi, 
330— in bichloriae of tin, Gerardin, 
xxxiii, 214 — chloroform, Lepage, xxiv, 



178 



SALTSj sp:e under latin name of base ; 



PHOSPHORUS {Continued). 

147 — glycerin, Adolphus, xxxix, 150; 
KlevtT, xlii, 222 — fixed oils, Mehu, 
xli, 208 — liquid anhydrous sulphur- 
ous acid, Sestini, xli, 328 — substituted 
by fiodinm in manufacture of matches, 
F'leck, xli, 256 — test (heat with mag- 
nesium filings), Schoenn, xli, 298 
(compare detection) — determines value 
of wines ^ Kletzinsky, xxviii, 114. 

• amorphous: is not poifionous, Reynal 

and Lassaigne (W. & B., 643), xxviii, 
323 — crt/staU/ized, Blondlot, xxxix, 83 
— nature, Puttfarcken, xxvi, 149— /re- 

jaration, Schroetter, xxxiv, 58 in 

vacuo; in hydrogen, Vogel, xvii, 212 
— proper liex^ SchrcBtter, xxiii, 374 — 
compared to white phosphorus, Gore, 
xxxiv, 145 — purificativn., Nickles (W. 
k B., 643), xxviii. 439. 

BLACK, Blondlot, xxxvii, 385. 

and BKoy.ixK, Loewig, ii, 101. 

HYDRATE, IVloUZe, V, 88. 

IODIDE, Duhamel, vi, 101. 

PKRcHi.ORjDE, Commercial. Mailer, 

XXXV, 448. 

PA,STE (W. k B.. (344, note), xxvii, 

473 — Simon, xix, 235. 

RED. See Phosphorus, amorphous. 

SULPHIDE, in Mitst heilich's a})p.-(ra- 

tus, Dankwortb, xxxiii, 316. 

WHITE is Ph03PH()K[ S 

PHOTOGLYPTIC engraving, Talbot, xxxi, 
478. CompHre Photography, enrjrav- 
inq. 

PHOTOGRAPHY, conditions of mcctiit^, 
and causes of failure, Babo, xxviii, 
440 — calotype, T>ilbot, xiii, 247 — fixa- 
tion of colons, Niepce, xxv, 368 — en- 
graving, Baldus. xxvi, 549 — Martin, 
xxv, 459— Ramsey, xxviii, 174 — Tal- 
bot, xxxi, 478 — on glass, Cutting, 
xxvii, 548 — Pucher, xxiv. 378 — fac i- 
tious ivory, Mayall, xxx, 84 — on linen. 
Moigno, xxvi, 165 — magic, xxxviii, 371 
— on paper (preservation) Gaudinet, 
xxxi, 279— on steel, Niepce, xxvii, 374 
— on stone, Barreswii and Lemercier, 

xxv, 467 — Ilamsey, xxviii, 173 — imr- 
nish (see Varnish) — vitrified, Plant. 

xxvi, 165 — on wood. Langton. xxvi. 
84. 

PHOTO-LITHOGRAPHY. See Photo- 
graphy on stone. 

PHRAGMITKS communis, contains iodine. 
Macadam, xxv, 67. 

PHTHISIS, remedies : gallic acid, xxvi. 
470 — iodoform, Righini, xxv, 472. 

PHYSALIN, Dessaignes and Chautard 
(W.&B., 1583), xxv, 135, 136. 

PHYSALIS alkekengi, in intermittents. 
xxiii, 181. 

PHYSICIANS (history of medicine), 
Donovan, xl, 161 . 



and their relations to pharmaceu- 
tists, Maisch, xxviii, 25, 111, 202. 

. Compare Medicine. 

PHYSOSTIGMA venenosa. See Calabar 

BEANS. 

PHYSOSTIGMIA, experiments, Haigh, 
xxxvii, 177 — nature, Vee & Leven, 

xxxvii, 204 preparation, Jobst & 

Hesse (VV. & B., 1480), xxxvi, 334, 
365 — Mayer, xxxvii, 173. 

PHYTELKPHA^ m-«crocarpa, xv, 37— 
Hooker, xxii, 362 

PHYTOLACC^A decandra, analysis, Donn- 
elly (VV. & B., 646), XV, 165, 169— as 
cathartic, v, 208 — as emetic, iv, 281. 

PICAMAR, Reichenbach, vi, 69 

PICEA ex(;f:l.sa. twist of fibre, Braun, 
xxviii, 67. 

PICHI'rHM bark, source, Carson (W.&B.,. 
1584). xxvii, 387 — beans, source, Car- 
?,o\\ (W. & B., 1584), xxvii. 385. 

PICOLIN, xxxiii, 41. 

PICR.ENA excblsa, xxi, 1. See Quassia.. 

PICR.ENA amara, xxi, 1. See Quassia.. 

PJCRIN lin Digitalis). Radig, xxxv, 292. 

PICROLICHENIN. Alm.«, xvi, 262. 

PlCliOPIN. Potex', xii, 329. 

PICROTOXIN is no alkaloid, Casaseca, 
Prel. No. 64 — behavior to bichromate 
of potassa test, .Jenkins, xxxiii, 528 

— to heat. Guy, xxxiii, 526 — io sul- 
phuric acid ; and with permanganate 
of polassH. Guy, xxxiii, 526 — detec- 
tion, Langley (W. & B., 307 note), 
xxxiv, 454 — Kocihler, xli, 369 — sola- 
hihfy in chloroform, Lepage, xxiv, 
148 — .iubliniing temperature, Guy, xl,. 
247. 

PICROXANTH, Muller, xi, S8. 

PKJTURES, restoration, Pettenkofer, 
xxxvi, 446. 

PIGEONS, not poisoned by opium, Mit- 
chell, xlii, 188. 

PILES, remedy (flaxseed oil), van Rhyn. 
(W. k B., 583). xxiii. 87— (rectified 
oil of iimber), Procter, jr., xxxviii^ 

217 (tobacco liniment), Stearns, 

XX ix, 527. 

PILLS, M.\KixG, Mohr, Redwood, Procter,, 
xxi, 216 — Powers, v, 105 — remarks 
on IT. S. Ph. (60), Taylor, xxxv, 414 

— on large scale, Parrish, xxxix, 12. 
COATING, objected to, xxxix, 467 — re- 
marks on different processes. Proctor 
(Parrish, 804), xxxiv, 318 — with al- 
bumen, Turley (Parrish, 804), xxxiv,. 
137 — case<n, .Jo/eau, xxii. 77 — collo-- 
dion, Durden (\V. B., 1264), xxi, 
X'd'i— gelatin, Garot (W. & B., 1263), 
x, z2d — Vee, xiii, 77 — Cauhape &Co.,. 
-xli, 476 — gold, see silver — gum arabic, 
Dorvault, xx, 160 — flaxseed mucilage, 
C;tlloud (W. & B., 1263), xxvi, 9 — 
mastic better than tolu, Stearns, xxix., 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



PILLS {Continued). 

524 — resin, Ebert, xlii, 541 — ailver, 
Parrish & Bakes (Parrish, 802), 
xxxiii, 1, 3; mass made with plasma 
needs no moistening, xlii, 208 — sugar, 
Archibald, xxxix, 199 — Collins (ex- 
tempore), XXX, 514 — Githens (ex- 
tempore), xxxiii, 206 tragacanth, 

Calloud (W. k B., 1263), xxvi, 303. 

DUSTING, Bannvart, xxxi, 18 — Stearns, 

xxix, 524. 

ExciPiENTS (plasma), xlii, 208 — Ba- 
den Benger (glycerin), xxxvii, 66 — 
Proctor (glycerin and tragacanth), 

xxxii, 248 — Wiegand (inspissated 
honey; extract of gentian, etc.), xlii, 
195. 

FINISHER, Mohr, xxi, 222. 

MACHINE, Bnshby, xli, 62 — Lewis, 

xxvi, 1 18 — Pond & Morse, xxiv, 315 ; 

XXV, 30. 
TiLDBNS, XXX, 470. 

PILULtE (pills), adstringent, tonic, 

Walch, xii, 351. 
ALOES (addition of magnesia), Boett- 

cher, xvi, 235. 

ET ASSAF(ETID.«, U. S. (60), 

(with purified assafoetida), Moore, 
xl,'^89. 

ANESTHETIC, Meigs, xli, 91. 

Anderson, Scot. (W. & B., 1266, 

note), r', 25 ; xl, 69. 

ANODYNE, COMPOUND, xli, 91. 

ANTiBiLious, Lee's, xi, 74. 

antichlorotic, Blaud's. See Pilu- 
le, Blaud's. 

antidyspeptic, Mclntyre, xxviii, 476. 

antiepileptic, Leurier ; Recamier, 

XV, 319. 

ANTiMONii composite, Plummers', ix, 

122 Thatcher's dispensatory, ix, 

123. 

ANTiNEURALGic, Rayer, xxxix, 417. 

antispasmodic, Rayer, xxxix, 417. 

aperient (Mitchell's), Taylor, xxv, 

207. 

for ascites, Otto, ix, 175. 

atropie, Bouchardat, xxii, 88. 

Blancard's. See Pilule feuri lo- 

didi, Blancard's. 
Blaud s (W. k B., 1270), vi, 264 ; xi, 

55 — remarks by Guibourt, xi, 55, 61 

— Soubeiran, x, 245. 
caffeine, CITRATE, Hannon, xxiii, 

158. 

CALCI8 CHLORINATE, Graefe, viii, 86. 

cALOMELANoa COMPOSITE, Ph. Lon- 
don (24), Prel. No. 24. Compare 
Pilule antimonii composite. 

CAMPHORE, excipients, (plasma) , xlii, 

208 (soap and honey), Githens, 

xxxiii, 200. 

ET opii (soap aF excipient), iii, 

290. 



CATHARTICE CONPOSITE, Ph. U. S. 

(30), iii, 207 — improved, Tilden, xxx^ 
474. 

for CHOLERA, Eager, xxxviii, 43. 

COD nvER EXTRACT, Garreau, xxxiii, 

503. Compare Extractum, cod liveRo. 

COLOCYNTHIDIS COMPOSITE, Ph. U. S. 

(30), ii, 311 — improved, Bannvart 
(podophyllin substituted for scam- 
mony and extract of jalap), xxxi, 21. 

coPAiBE, Ph. U. S. (30), iii, 83— ex- 
cipients (wax; W. &B., 1269), Maisch, 
XXXV, 13. 

for CRAMPS. See Pilule, antispas- 
modic. 

CREASOTE, in acute rheumatism 

Reich, viii, 88. 

CUBEBE ET BALSAMI COPAIBE (sOap a& 

excipient), iii, 290. 

DiALYTic, Socquet and Bonjean, xxix, 

314. 

DINNER, Lady Webster's (W. & B., 

1265. note), xiii, 105— 3farshaU Halt 
(Parrish, 827), xxx, 92. 

for DYSPEPSY, Mclntyre, xxviii, 476^ 

for EPILEPSY, Leurier ; Recaraier-g 

XV, 319. 

of oil of ERGOT, XV, 320. 

ferei, excipients (tragacanth and 

honey), Githens, xxxiii, 206. 

CARBONATis, Ph. U. S. (60), re- 
marks, Bedford, xxxvii, 183 — Proc- 
ter, jr., xxxvii, 327 — Thompson, xliij. 
30. Compare Pilule, Blaud's ; Pi- 
lule, Vallet's. 

COMPOSITE, Canavan, xxiv, 224 

— eclectic, xxvi, 109. 

lODiDi, Blancard, xxviii, 39 ; re- 
marks, Procter, jr., xxviii, 39, note 
xxix, 87 — Calloud, xviii, 171 — Dupas- 
quier, xiii, 121 — Loines-, xxv, 138 — 
Worthington, xv, 71 — Wright, xxvi, 6; 
xxviii, 515— PA. U. S. (50), remarks 5, 
Procter, jr., xxxii, 201— FA. U. S. 
(60), remarks, Bedford, xxxvii, 183 
— Dorsey, xl, 109 — Gross, xxxvii, 
252 ; xxxix, 183. 

— lactatis. Cap (W. k B., 1138), 

xii, 229. 

ET MANGANESII CARBONATIS^ 

Burin, xxv, 174— Hannon, (W. & B., 

1553), xxii, 303. 

lODiDT, Burin, xxv, 175. 

FERRUGiN0!^E, Hretonueau. xxviiL 

181. 

GALBANI COMPOHITE, Ph. U. S. (60),. 

remarks, Moore, xl, 389. 

GAMBOGIE COMPOSITE. Ph. LoudoU 

(24), Prel. No. 23. 

GOLD CYANIDE, Pourche, vii, 82. 

Hooper's female (W. k B., 1265,. 

note), V, 24 ; xi, 68. 

hydbargyri, state of mercury, Allin- 

t son, jr., i, 101; Hamilton, xiv, 48 — 



180 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



PILULE {Continued). 

adulteration [blue slate), Procter, jr., 
xviii, 257 ; xix, 306 — machine, Gordon, ; 
xxi, 6 — poisoning, xxxv, 475 — prepara- 
tion, Durand, i, 101 — Beatson (W. & 
B., 1273, note), xxiv, 204— Squibb, 
xxix, 385— Stoddart (W. & B., 1272), 
xxviii, powdered, Bullock (W. & 
B., 1274, note), xxxi, 260, 270— Rit- 
tenhouse, xxxi, 477 — Thompson (Gra- 
hame. Sharp), xxix, 473 — reports, xvi, 
1 ; xvii, 5 — Smith and Bridges, (W. & 
B., 1273, note), xvii, 309 — separation 
of mercury when mixed with ox-gall or 
extract of rhubarb, xvii, 306 — strength 
ascertained, Reid' (W. & B., 1273, 
note), xvi, 7 ; xvii, 151. 
FERRUciiNOSiE, CoUier, XV, 138. 

lODiDi, Biett, iv, 171 ; xiii, 105. 

' Lady Webster's. See PiLULiE, din- 
ner. 

' Lee's. See Pilule antirilious. 

Lee's. 

' manganese and iron. See Pilule 

ferri et manganesii. 
MANGANESII lODiDi, Hannou (W. & B , 

1552), xxii, 301. 
TANisiATis, Marietta, xxxvii, 337. 

■ METALLORUM ET AMARUM, Peakc, 

xxxix, 68. 

" Mitchell's. See Pilul^^ aperient 

and TONICS, Mitchell. 

• Morrison's, poisoning, vii, 70 : viii, 

347. 

for neuralgia. See PiLULJi;, anti- 
neuralgic. 

• PAULLiNi^E, Dechasteles, xiii, 54 — 

Gavrelle, xii, 208. 

■ Plummeri. See Pilul.^) antimonii 

composite ; Pilul.e calomelanos 

COMPOSITyE. 

■ podophyllini COMPOSITE, eclectic, 

xxiv, 109 — Squibb, xl, 11 — Washington 
formulas, xl, 239. 

PROPHYLACTICiE ANTICHOLERIC^, Ea- 
ger, xxxviii, 43. 

QUINI^ carbolatis, xl, 449. 

suLPHATis, excipieuts (tartaric 

acid, Parrish, 705), Atkinson, xli, 30 
— (glycerin) Creecy, xli, 7 ; Jenkins, 
xli, 119 — (plasma), xiii, 208 — (aro- 
matic sulphuric acid (W. &B., 1274), 
Parrish, xxv, 291. 

SILVER, NITRATE, With tannin (reduc- 
tion of silver), Copney, xxvii, 413. 

■ TEREBINTHIN^ COMPOSITE, PrOCtcr, 

jr., xli, 389. 
TONICS, Mitchell's, Taylor, xxv, 207. 

, ADSTRINGENTES, Walch, xii, 

351. 

Vallet's, X, 247, 250 — remarks, xx, 

351 — Soubeiran and others, x, 244. 
Compare Pilule ferri carbonatis. 

zinci lactatis, Herpin, xxix, 428. 



zinci valerianatis, Devay, xvi, 300, 

PIMENTO, collection and statistics, xxxviii, 

261 — adulteration of powder, Schroe- 

der, xxxvi, 107. 

false, Guibourt, xxxviii, 503. 

PLMILODES, iii, 20. 
PIMPLES, pomade, xxxiii, 116. 
PINCKNEYA, DeCandoUe, ii, 293— Wood 

iii, 24 — estivation, Don, xi, 247. 

PUBENS, as tonic, v, 289. 

PINE BARK, amount of tannin, Miiller, 

xxxi, 429. 

wood, obtain all products in one op- 
eration, Newton, xxxviii, 530. 

PINGHAWAR djambi, Hanbury, xxix, 
159 — Vincke, xxxiii, 54. 

PINITE (Parrish, 511), Berthelot, xxviii, 
157— XXX, 154. 

PINK SAUCERS, xxvi, 183 — Piesse, xxviii, 
272. 

PINOLIN, Vohl, xxx, 517. 

PINUS ABIES, xii, 126— oil, Gottschalk, 

xvi. 75. 

AUSTRALis, xii, 136. 

CANADENSIS, properties, etc., Chaa. 

Ellis, ii, 18. 
CEMBRA, coniferin in cambial juice, 

Hartig, xiii, 220. 
piCEA, xii, 126 — amount of silica in 

leaves, Schulze ; in wood-ashes, Hert- 

wig, xxxv, 163. 

piNEA (of ancient Egypt), v. 142. 

puMiLio, its oil, Mikolash, xxxiii, 453. 

STROBUS, contains coniferin, Hartig, 

xiii, 220. 

SYLVESTRis, xii, 130 — twist of fibre, 

Braun, xxviii, 61— fir-wood and fir- 
wood oil, xxxv, 274 — source of Eiga 
balsam, Keller, xiii, 467 — amount of 
silica in wood-ashes, Levy, xxxv, 163. 

PIPER aduncum, xxxvi, 122. 

AUGUSTiFOLiUM. See Matico. 

ARBORESCENS, XXXVi, 122. 

CANiNUM, xxii, 153. 

CUBEBA. See CUBEBA. 

INEBRIANS, xvi, 106, 

LANCEOLATUM, XXXvi, 122. 

METHYSTICUM, xvi, 106 j xxvii, 236. 

Compare Kava. 

SCABRUM, xxxvi, 122. 

PIPE RATES, V. Babo and Keller, xxx, 

140. 

PIPERTDINA, preparation and properties, 
V. Babo and Keller, xxxiii, 218 — Ga- 
hours (W. & B., 648, note), xxv, 118. 

, piPERATE, V. Babo and Keller, xxx, 

140. 

PIPERINA, adulteration (ferrocyanide of 
potassium), xxxi, 511 — behavior to bi- 
chromate of potassa test, Jenkins, 
xxxiii, 528 — to chromate of potassa 
and sulphuric acid, Eboli, xxix, 369 
— to iodide of cadmium and potas- 
sium, Marme, xli, 18— to nitric acid, 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 181 



FIPERIN (Continued). 

Guy, xxxiii, 526 — to pentachloride 
of antimony and phosphoric acid, 
Shulze, xxxii, 138, 235 — to sulphuric 
acid, Guy, xxxiii, 526 — preparation. 
Clemson (W. & B., 648), ii, 249— Ma- 
gendie, Prel.No. 107 — Tonery, iii, 176 
solubility in chloroform, Lepage, xxiv, 
148— in oil, Attfield, xxxv, 250. 

from Schinus mollis, Landerer,xxxv, 

157. 

PIPEROf^AL, Fittig and Mielck, xli, 427. 
PIPETTE (=Spritz) Levol, xi, 84. 
PIRROPINE, Potex, xii, 328. 
PISCICULTURE, ascertain the maturity 

of eggs, Fremy and Valenciennes, 

xxvii, 376. 

PISCIDIA ERYTHRiNA, Hamilton (W. & B., 

1585), V, 159; xvii, 46. 
PISTACIA LKNTiscus, its oil, Leprieur, 

Xxxii, 319. Compare Mastic. 
NARBONENSis, Its galls, Guibourt, xvi, - 

34. 

• TEREBiNTHus (Chian turpentine), 

Guibourt, xii, 67 — its galls^ Guibourt, 
xvi, 33 — products^ Maltass, xxx, 321. 

PISTACHIO-NUT meal, Piesse, xxviii, 80. 

PISUM coRDATUM, fruit presented to Phil- - 
adelphia College of Pharmacy, Proc- 
ter, jr., XV, 313. 

PITAYA bark, description and analysis, 
Folchi and Peretti, vii, 332, 335. 

PITAYNA, Peretii (W. & B., 283, note), 
Tii, 336. 

PITAYm, xli, 421. See Conchinin. 

PITCH oil, igniting point of vapor, Hut- I 
ton, xli, 254. 

of maritime pine, Guibourt, xii, 137. 

Burgundy, Guibourt, xii, 132, 137 — 

Hanbury, xxii, 261 — true and facti- 
tious^ Han bury, xxxix, 544. 

PITONIA, ii, 292 ; vii, 334. 

PITTOSPORUM ACACioiDES, xxviii, 73. 

UNDULATUM, yields essential oil, the - 

odor resembling jessamine, xxxv, - 
453. _ 

PIX. See Pitch. 

LiQuiDA. See Tar. 

PLANORBIS coRNEus, best water snail - 
for leeches aquaria, Allchin, xxviii, F 
223. 

PLANTAGO MARiTiMA, contains no io- 
dine, Fyfe ; Dickie ; Sarphati, xxvi, 
439. 

PLANTS. Compare Herbs, Vegetables. 

absorption and assimilation of car- 
bonic acid, Boussingault, xxx vii, 394 
(compare digestion) — active principles 
obtained by charcoal process, Lebour- - 
daia (W. & B., 1035), xxi, 87 (com- 
pare cultivation, below) alumina 

found in certain plants, Salm-Horst- 
raar, xx, 158 — proximate anahjsis, 
Rochleder, (see Analysis ok plants) 

[13^ 



— influence of cultivation and soil on 
; medicinal value, Bruce, Warren, 
, xxxviii, 45 — Timbal, Lagrave, xxxiv, 
; 268 — Bentley, xxxiv, 272 — digestion 
, explained, Draper, xvi, 95 (compare 
absorption, above) — dried for herbaria, 
i see Herbarium, drying — influence of 
, drying on medicinal value, Schoon- 
broodt, xli, 318 (compare narcotic, 
, below) — of ancient Egypt, Bonastre, 
V, 137 — growth in closely glazed cases. 
Ward, XXV, 458 — in various gases, 
Gladstone, xxiv, 84 — impregnation^ 
Aldridge, xiii, 216 — eff'ects of light, 
Leuchs, ii, 255 — distribution of min- 
eral substances in individual organs, 
Vogel, xvi, 264 — narcotic, see below 
— nutrilio?i, examination of Liebig's 
view, Seller, xvii, 192 — common salt, 
poison to plants, Randall, xxi, 73 — 
origin of varieties, Decaisne, xxxvi,33. 

, AIR-, Walsh, ix, 87. 

medicinal, Australia, Miiller, xxviii, 

72 — Georgia, Battey, xxix, 59 — Mi- 
chigan, Stearns, xxxi, 28 — North 
America, earliest notice (1739, Clay- 
ton's Flora virginica), xii, 306. 

NARCOTIC, drying, Archer (hot air ap^ 

paratus), xxiii, 172 — Battley (revives 
them in water, then dries in the dark, 
in baskets), ii, 253 — comparative 
value of European and American, 
Jones, xxiv, 106. 

odoriferous, ancient use, Mante^ 

gazza, xlii, 557. 
PLASMA, Baden-Benger (prefers Toua 
les mois), xxxvi, 530 ; xxxvii, 64 — 
Schacht, xxx, 253 ; xxxviii, 554 — 
Startin (tragacanth), xxx, 256 — as ex^ 
cipient for pills, xlii, 208. 

CANTHARiDis, Schacht, xxx, 254. 

HYDRARGYRi, Schacht, xxx, 254. 

NiTRATis, Schacht, xxx, 254. 

PBTROLBi, iSchacht, xxx, 255. 

PHOSPHORi, Rother, xlii, 170. 

PLUMBi, Tilyard (Parrish, 784), 

xxxiii, 256. 

POTASSii lODiDi, Schacht, xxx, 255. 

ziNci, Rollet, xxxix, 418. 

PLASTERS. Compare Emplastrum. 

remarks, Chevallier, i, 107 — Powers, 

T, 109 — movldiness prevented, Hirsch- 
berg, xxxiii, 314 — spreading, Ebert, 
xlii, 541 — apparatus, Martindale, xli, 
455 — stickiness prevented (Ij'copodi- 
um), xxxiv, 38 — new kind, Fasquier, 
(gutta percha leaves with peroxide of 
iron), xxxii, 183. 

BLISTERING, wUh canthavides, Beral, 

ii, 166 — Houdbine, xvi, 159 — without 
cantharides, Beral, ii, 167. Compare 
Ceratum CANTHARIDIS ; Blister ; 
Vesicating taffetas ; Unguentum 
cantharidi8. 



182 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



PLASTERS, BREAST, Dewees, (Parrish, 
119), xxxvi, 115 — Parrish (Parrish, 
781 j, xxxvi, 114 — Washington for- 
mulas, xl, 239. 

, CHAMOIS AND FELT, Wright and Evr- 

ing, XXV, 84. 

, CORN, xxxiii, 408. 

. COURT, ii, 250 — substitute. For (gum 

arabic and glycerin), xxxvii, 254 — 
Lidia rubber J Rowland, xv, 38. 

-, ELASTIC, Nickel (woven fabric), 

xxvi, 11, 287. 

, for EXCORIATIONS, Beral, ii, 167. 

, FELT AND CHAMOIS, Wright and Ew- 

ing, XXV, 84. 

, GAUTHIER, i, 38. 

, ISINGLASS, Liston's, xiii, 320. Com- 
pare Plaster, court. 

, issue, Beral, ii, 66. 

, LINEN (Gauthier's), i, 38. 

, Mahy's (W. & B., 1074), i, 39. 

, mustard. See Mustard plaster; 

Sinapism. 

, spice. See Emplastrum aromati- 

CUM. 

in WHOOPING COUGH, Corsin, vii, 262. 

PLASTER PARIS. See Gypsum ; Calcis 

SULPHAS. 

PLASTIC MASS, Sorel, xxx, 327. 

PLATES. Compare Wood-cuts. Acidum 
gelseminicum, xlii, 1 — Acorus calamus, 
V, 265 — Allium sativum (hybrid), xxxii, 
537 — Aristolochia serpentaria, i, 262 — 
Asarum canadense, x, 181 — Cantharis 
(albidus ; atratus ; cinerevs ; margina- 
tm; nuttalii ; vittatus), ii, 274 — Cheno- 
podium anthelminticum, v, 177 — Convol- 
vulus panduratus, xi, 177 — Cornus-fior- 
ida, vii, 265 — Drimys chilensis, xix, 81 ; 
Winteri, xix, 161 — Ergot worm, x, 
269 — Eupatorium perfoliatum, vi, 1 — 
Fraaera W'alteri, vii, 269 — Geranium 
maculatum, iv, 89 — Gillenia Irifoliata, 
iv, 177 — Hebradendron cambogioides, 
xiii, 19 — Ilelleborus niger, xx, 161 — 
Hirudo decora; medicinalis, iv, 265 — 
Ipecacuanha [brown; gray; striated; 
undulated; vihite of Peru; white of St. 
Paul; white of Brazil), iii, 181 — Ipo- 
moea Jalapa, ii, 22 — Liriodendron J.u- 
lipiferum, iii, 5 — Lobelia injiata, ix, 98 
— Lytta, see Cantharis — Lytta rufipes, 
vii, 265 — Melaleuca cajuputi; leucaden- 
dron,i, 193 — Meloepurpurens, ii, 274 — 
Myrospermum peruiferum, xxxii, 296 — 
Poly gala senega, ii, 105 — Quassia am- 
ara, XX, 257; excelsa, xxi, 1 — Sab- 
batia angularis, ii, 231 — Sanguina7'ia 
canadensis, iii, 93 — Spigelia maryland- 
ica, iv, 1 — Starch granules, xi, 16 — 
Tacca oceanica, ix, 305 — Tilden's labo- 
ratory, xxvii, 576. 

PLATE, British (= Packfong ; German 
silver; Argentan), xlii, 358. 



PLATINIZING, glass, porcelain, etc., Boett- 
ger, xlii, 328 — Eisner, xxxiii, 571 — 
metals, Church, xl, 126— Melly, xi, 112 
— Rnolz (electro-) xv, 63. 

PLATINUM, analysis of Borneo platinum, 
Bleekrode, xxx, 417 — casting, Deville 
and Debray, xxxii, 467 — cleaned^ 
xxxiii, 164 — extraction in Russia, So- 
bolewsky, vii, 237 — separation from 
gold in analysis, Kemp, xiv, 135 — 
malleable, Wollaston, i, 70 — metallur- 
gy, Deville and Debray, xxxv, 119 — 
purification, Sonstadt, xxxviii, 268 — 
limit of reaction of sulphuretted hy- 
drogen, Reinsch, xi, 217 — recovery 
from coating, Boettger, xlii, 328 — vola- 
iilization, Deville, xxv, 363 — waste, in 
manufacture of sulphuric acid, pre- 
vented, Scheurer — Kestner, xxxix,32. 

AMALGAM, Mushiu Puskiu, vii, 84. 

ammonio-chloride, solubility in al- 
cohol, Fresenius, xix, 50. 

BLACK, behavior to fused chlorate of 

potassa, Boettger, xxx, 70 — prepara- 
tion, Brunner, xxxi, 344. Compare 
Platinum, spongy. 

and BROMINE, Lo3wig, ii, 186. 

CHLORIDE, behavior to alkaline poly- 
sulphides, Schili, xxxiii, 265 — 'limit of 
reaction as test for potassa, Hastings, 
xiii, 203 — temperature of reduction by 
hydrogen, Miiller, xli, 335. 

CRUCIBLES^ incompatibles, Hager, 

xxxv, 226. 

oxiDB, Wittstein, xv, 32. 

poTASsio-CHLORiDE, soluliility in al- 
cohol, Fresenius, xix, 50. 

SPONGY, preparation, xxxix, 185 — 

Doebereiner, vii, 321. Compare Pla- 
tin.um, black. 

SULPHIDE, temperature of reduction 

by hydrogen, Miiller, xli, 335. 

and tin, compound, Kane, viii, 81. 

tubes, porosity, Deville and Troost, 

xxxi, 445. 

PLAYFAIR'S SALT = nitroprushide of 
sodium, xxv, 415. 

PLEURONECTES flkxua, contains io- 
dine, xxvi, 440. 

PLOBAPHEN. See Phlobaphen. 

PLUMBAGO. See Graphites. 

PLUMBODIETHYL, Loewig; Frankland; 
Buckton, xxxv, 221, 304. 

PLUMBODIMETHYL, Cahours, xxxv, 305. 

PLUMBUM(l) (LEAD.) Compare Lead. 

acetas, yield of acetone, Thomson, 

xxiii, 54, 263— Matteui, iii, 308— of 
acetic acid, Thomson, xiii, 54, 263 — 
behavior to charcoal, Graham, iii, 160 
— manufacture, Bell, xxiii, 258 — 
Schnedermann, xxiii, 78 — Berard ; 
Runge, xxiii, 261 — Ph. London (24), 
Prel. No. 21 — poisoning by long con- 
tinued use, Bridges, xii, 166, Bicking, 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



183 



PLUMBUM (I) Continued. 

xii, 164 — limit of reaction as test for 
phosphoric and sulphuric acids, Hast- 
ings, xiii, 202 — aoluhility in glycerin, 
Klever, xlii, 222. 

, , BASIC, preparation, Rochleder. 

xxxi, 280. 

■ and BROMINE, Loewig, ii, 181. 

CARBONAS, action on birds, Falck, 

xxviii, 321 — adulteration^ ii, 243 ; viii, 
347 — behavior to fused chlorate of 
potasf=a, Boettger, xxx, 70 — manufac- 
ture, Booth, xiv, 6^ (Bonsdortf, 68— 
Button and Dyar, 72 — Clark, 80— 
Cory, 73— Dutch method, 75, 128— 
Gardner, 67 — Gossage and Benson, 
73, 74— Hagner, 66— Hemmings, 81— 
Holland, 67 — Leigh, 82 — Richards, 
67, 80 — Roard and Brechoz, 72 — 
Stratingh, 83— Thenard, 71— Toras- 
sa, Muston and Wood, 67 — Watt and 
Tebbutt, 81) — solubility in water, Fre- 
senius, xix, 52 — theory, Pelouze, xir, 
128. 

' CHROMAS, adulteration^ ii, 244 — deco- 

lorizing power, Filhol, xxiv, 239 — de- 
composed by oxalic acid. Slater, xxviii, 
345. Compare Chrome red. Chrome 

YELLOW. 

CYANiDUM, Williams, xl, 260. 

DiGiTALAS, Morin, xvii, 184. 

lODiDUM, behavior to ether, Vogel, 

xiii, 197 — composition, Denot, vi, 136, 
140 — preparation, Boudet (W. & B., 
1276), xix, 298— Denot, vi, 134— Du- 
hamel, vi, 108 — comparison of differ- 
ent methods, Huraut (W. & B., 1276), 
xxi, 228 (with iodide of potassium, 
228 — iodide of sodium, 229 — iodid« 
of calcium, 230 — iodide of zinc, 231 
— double iodide of potassium and 
lead, 231)— Thevenot, xxi, 231— PA. 
Helvetica (65) xxxix, 315 — toxicological 
effects, Paton, ix, 356. 

NiTRAS, antiseptic and disinfecting 

power, Procter, jr., xix, 296 — behavior 
to ferroso-ferric oxide, Schober, xlii, 
402 — to charcoal, Graham, iii, 150. 

oxALAS, solubility in water, Frese- 

nius, xix, 53. 

oxiDUM. See Litharge ; Lead, ox- 
ides. 

RDBRUM. See Lead, red. 

PYROLiGNiTB ( = acclate of lead) 

xxiii, 258. 

— SULPHAS, behavior to carbonate, ci- 
trate, muriate, nitrate, oxalate, succi- 
nate and tartrate of ammonia. Smith, 
xvi, 269, 27©, 271 — quantitative sepa- 
ration from sulphate of baryta, Loewe, 

xxxii, 44 — decolorizing power, Filhol. 

xxiv, 239 — solubility in sulphuric acid, 
Struve, xlii, 319 — in water, Fresenius, 
xix, 53. 



PLUMBUM SDLPHO-CARBOLAS, Proctcr, jr., 
xlii, 135. 

SULPHIDE, crystallized, Becquerel, vf, 

86. 

' TANNAS (bi-), Autenrieth (W. & 3 , 

1610), ix, 261. 

(basic), ix, 261. 

(neutral), ix, 261. 

HUMiDus, Ph. Helvetica i65), 

xxxix, 315. 
PLUMERIA lanoifolia, yields agonidine, 

Peckolt xlii 470. 
PODOPHYl'lIN.' Compare Resina podo 

PHYLLI. 

behavior to reagents. Bullock and 

Parrish, xxxiv, 114 — contains berhe- 
rina, Maisch (W. & B., 665, 1327), 
XXXV, 303 — distinction from resin of 
jalapa ; scammpny ; gamboge. Bul- 
lock and Parrish, xxxiv, 117 — effects^ 
Bannvart, xxxi, 19 — preparation, xU^ 
418 — Abernethy, xxxiii, 303 — Cad- 
bury (W. & B., 1327), xxx, 301— ec- 
lectics, xxiii, 332 — Hodgson, jr., iii, 
273; xxxiii, 301— Lewis, xix, 169 — 
Stabler, xxx, 508 — Manlius Smithy 
xxiv, 306 — claims of priority in behalf 
of J. R. Lewis, Procter^jr., xxx, 509^ 
note — solubility, Bullock and Parrisb^ 

xxxiv, 114 — as substitute for scam- 
mony and resin of jalap^ Bannvart, 
xxxi, 20. 

PODOPHYLLUM peltatum boot, analy- 
sis, Lewis (W. & B., 665), xix, 1(55, 
172; Tilden, xxxii, 94 — contains berbo-^ 
rina, Mayer, xxxv, 98— 6iV/<?r principle^ 
Hodgson, jr. (W. & B., 665), iii, 27ar 
xxxiii, 301 — as cathartic, v, 206 — losg 
in powdering, Covell, xxxix, 116 — me - 
dicinal valu« of alcoholic and ethe 
real resins, Allen (W. & B., 1327), 
xxxi, 266 — Cadbury, xxx, 303 — Lewis, 
xix, 169 — contains saponin, Mayei*, 

xxxv, 98. 

, LEAVES, analysis, Plusband, Jr 

xli, 200. 

, ROOTLETS and KHizoMA, relati?# 

value, Saunders, xl, 74. 

POGOSTEMON patchouly, xxii, I5f 
Compare Patchouli. 

POISONING. Compare Mistakes; aact 
see under the respective poisons. 

accidental (suggestions by Britisii 

Pharmaceutical Conference), xxxvi, 
533 — by Lgon's rat pills, xxviii, 50. 

POISONS, mode of action, Liebig, xiii, 218? 
— antidote to vegetable poisons (frui<; 
of Feuillia cordifolia), Drapiez, 
172 — when the poison is unknown/ 
XXV, 468 — Chinese, Macgowan, xxx, 61 
— detection, Bowman, (dialysis), ^:xxt, 
383 — Flandin, xix, 294 ; xxv, 448— 
Stass (Parrish, 627; W. & B., 1233/ 
! note) xxv, 49— Uslar and Erdmann^ 



184 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



POISONS Continued. 

(Parrish, 627), xxxiv. 354 — in urine, 
Letheby, xix, 118 — t/2a/;«/ze(/. Bowman, 
XXXV, 383 — dispeming, Procter, jr., 
xxviii, 479 — elimination. Orfila, xxiv, 
274 — arrangement for keeping and dis- 
pensing in Allen and Hanbury'a es- 
tablishment, xxxi, 10. 

SALE, report of committee from Amer- 
ican Pharmaceutical Association, XXV, 
488 — appeal to pha- raaceutists of the 
United States, xxv, 187 ; xxix, 490 — 
legislation. Procter, jr., xxxii, 376 — 
in California, xxv, 491 — England ^ y.x\ , 
488 ; xxxi, 5 ; xl, 397 — France, xxv, 
448; xxxiii, 176 — Germany, xxv, 488 
— Indiana, Plummer, xxv,Jj305 — Neic 
Hampshire, Parker, xxv, 304, 490 — 
New York, xxv, 490— Ohio, xxv, 489 
— Pennsylvania, Bonsall, xxxiii, 116 
— Bullock, xxxiii, 116 — Procter, jr., 
xxxiii, 185 — Vermont, Peck, xxv, 207, 
490. 

MELTING and SUBLIMING polnt, Guy, 

xl, 241. 

POISON-OAK. Sec Toxicodendron. 

, RAT-. See PwAT POISON. 

, SNAKK-, and antidote, Brainard, 

xxvii, 182— Higgins, xlii, 452. See 
Rattlesnake. 

distinciion from virvf., Crookes, 

xxxviii, 357, note. 

POLARIZATION, as a means to distin- 
guish between different kinds o^ sugar, 
Biot, vi, 51 — by refraction through a 
metal, Biot and Rollraann, xxvi, 164. 

POLES, forbid their own language, 
xxxviii, 383. 

POLLEN and impregnation, Aldridge, 
xiii, 216. 

POLYGALA AMARA, percolation with wa- 
ter, packing, Soubeiran, viii, 226 — as 
tonic, V, 288. 

bracteata, yields blue color, vi, 72. 

QLANDULOSA, as cmetlc, iv, 281. 

PAUciPOLiA, root yields oil of winter- 
green, iii, 199. 

POAYA (white ipecacuanha of St. 

Paul), iii, 195 — as emetic, iv. 281. 

RUBELLA, as tonic, V, 288. 

SANGUiNEA, as cmetic, iv, 281. 

SENEGA, as cathartic, v, 207 — as 

emetic, iv, 281. Compare Senega. 

tinctoria, yields blue color, vi, 72. 

VERONICA, xxviii, 72. 

POLYGALINA, Peschier, i, 156. 

POLYGONATUM, crystals are oxalate of 
lime, xxxvii, 32. 

POLYGONUM AvicuLARE, yields blue co- 
lor, vi, 73. 

barbatum yields blue color, vi, 73. 

bistorta, percolation with water, 

packing, Soubeiran, viii, 225 — amount 
of tannin. Bowman, xli, 194. 



CHiNENSE, yields blue color, vi, 73. 

FAGOPYRUM. See Buckwheat. 

POLYNEMUS SELE, yields isinglass from 

Tenasserim, xvi, 58. 
POLYPHEMA jacca, xxxvi, 293, note. 
POLYSULPH IDES of heavy metals, Schiff, 

xxxiii, 264. 

POMA soDOMiTiCA, xxi, 267. 

POMATUM (pommade). Compare Ungu- 

ENTUM, etc. 
I , Piesse, xxviii, 175. 

benjoin, Piesse, xxviii, 177. 

{ , CASTOR OIL, Piesse, xxviii, 179. 

j , CASTOR OIL and glyxerin, Procter, 

I jr., xli, 398. 

I DIVINE, Gray's supplement, xx, 24 — 

I Piesse, xxviii, 85. 

j , FRECKLES, xxxiii, 116. 

, against falling out of hair, Auber^ 

gier, vi, 178 — Dupuytren (W. & B., 
1418), viii, 84 ; xxvi'i, 83— Cap ; Re- 
cluz, xi, 263— Kallhofert, xvii, 160. 

, HELIOTROPE, Picssc, xxvi, 369; 

xxviii, 179. 

DE Lyon, Deschamp (ointment of 

red oxide of mercury), xv, 262. 

, MARROW, Piesse, xxviii, 179. 

MiLLEFLEURS, Picsse, xxviii, 179. 

, STICK-, Piesse, xxviii, 180. 

TONQUiN, Piesse, xxviii, l77. 

, VANiLLE, Piesse, xxviii, 178. 

, VIOLET, Piesse, xxviii, 179. 

POMBALIA IPECACUANHA (white ipecacu- 
anha of Brazil), iii, 192, 195. 

POMEGRANATE. See Gp.anatum. 

POPLAR. See Populus. 

BUDS, wax, iv, 351. 

POPPY. Compare Papavek. 

cultivation, in Asia JMinor. Texier, vii, 

253 — in India, Royle, xiii, 145 — com- 
pare Opium — yields succinic acid, Walz, 

xxxiv, 329 — poisoning by capsules, 
Winckler, xxxix, 415. 

POPULIN, complex body, Piria (W. & 
B., 1587), xxiv, 239; xxviii, 259— 
preparation, etc., Braconnot (W. & B., 
1586), iv, 87. 

ARTIFICIAL, Phipson (W. & B., 1587) 

XXXV, 173. 

POPULUS angulata, twist of fibre, 

Braun, xxviii, 67. 
GR^CA, contains salicine, Braconnot, 

iii, 174. 

grandidentata, xiv, 275. 

pyramidalis, twist of fibre, Braun, 

xxviii, 67. 

tremula, analysis, Braconnot, iii, 

174. 

tremuloides, analysis, Turnbull, xiv, 

275, 279— as tonic, v, 287. 
PORCELAIN, analysis of various kinds, 

Miiller, xxxi, 570 — platinizing, Boett- 

ger, xlii, 328 — dmdsilvering, Rousseau, 

XX, 57. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



185 



PORCELAIN BATHS, xxiii, 379. 

CEMENT, iv, 352. Compare Cement. 

Chinese, Julien^ xxviii, 467. 

, HOT CAST, E. T. Ellis, xl, 72. 

VESSELS, action of boiling acids and 

alkalies, Emraprling, xli, 428. 
POROUS bodies, action in inducing chem- 
ical combinations, Corenwinder, 
xxxiv, 92. 

PORPHYROPHORA hamelii (cochineal 
of Ararat), ix, 82. 

PORT(wine). See Wine, Port. 

PORTLANDIA grandiflora, analysis^ 
Rochleder, xxv, 242 — source of Quina 
nova, iii, 116. 

POTAMOGETON dexsus, contains iodine, 
McAdam, xxv, 67. 

POTASH. Compare Potass^ carbonas, 

analysis of American, Mayer, xxxii, 

132 — of commercial, Beck, viii, 38, 
49 — adulteration with soda detected, 
Anthon, xvi, 203— presence of bro- 
mine accounted for by the addition of 
salt to the ashes, Procter, jr., xxv, 67 
— manufacture^ Beck (in New York), 
viii, 28 — Becquerel, v, 86 — from fel- 
spar, Fuchs (W. & B., 672), vi, Si- 
Meyer, XXX, 375. 

POTASSA(^). Compare Potassium. 

(caustica), action on organic sub- 
stances, Gay-Lussac, vii, 85 — crystal- 
lized, Walter, ix, 177 — action in pro- 
duction of cyanides, Possoz, xxx, 551 
— color of eschar, vii, 262 — estimation 
(bitartrate of soda), Plunkett, xxx, 
429— Gladisz and Balo, xli, 239— in 
presence of magnesia and soda, 
Scheerer, xxxii, 445 — in the soil. Pot- 
ter, xiv, 317 — solidifies raw gypsum, 
Emmet, v, 48 — how kept in bottle, 
Cottereau, viii, 198 — action in pro- 
duction of oxalates, Possoz, xxx, 551 
— preparation, Bizio, xvii, 77 — Griffith, 
iv, 200— Liebig, v, 83— Mohr (W. k B., 
1213), xxix, 131— Scattergood (from 
marl), xxxvi, 236— Woehler (W. &B., 
1212,) xxvi, 164 — limit of reaction 
with testpap'-rs, Hastings, xiii, 203 — 
distinction from soda, Serullas, iii, 
264 ; iv, 86 — transparent, Ducatel, v, 
81. 

ACETAS, Ph. London (24), Prel. No. 

18— Ph. U. S. (30), ii, 231— to be 
kept in solution, Shinn, xxxiv, 306 — 
fi?eco^ormn^ power of its charcoal, Bus- 
sy (W. <fe B , 212), i, 238. 

, achilleate, Zanon, xix, 58. 

ANTJMONiAS (compare PoTASs-^i; bi- 

antimonias) — behavior to salts of ba- 
ryta, strontia, lime, magnesia, alu- 
mina, Wackenroder, xvi, 37 — prepa- 
ration, xxx, 71 — Reynoso, xxxiii, 111. 

4RHENIA8, limit of reaction with ni- 
trate of silver, Hastings, xiii, 205 — 



io/MieVi/y in glycerin, Adolphus, xxxix, 
150— K'lever,"xlii, 222. 

BBNZOAS, solubility in water, Otto, 

XXXV, 30. 

BiANTiMOXiAS, Figulcr (W. & B., 

1510), xl, 297— Ph. Gallica (37), xi, 
297, note. Compare Potass^ anti- 

MONIAS. "-'"^ 

BiCARBONAS, solidifics raw gypsum, 

Emmet, v, 48 — preparation, Woehler 
(W. & B., 1286), X 82— test for purity, 
Procter, jr., xxiii, 317 — reaction with 
sweet spirits of nitre, Raderaaker, xiii, 
106 — amount dissolved by saturated 
solution of bicarbonate of soda, An- 
thon, xvi, 208. 

BicHROMAS, action in dyeing, Blocklej 

and Sugden, xxxi, 131 — manufacture 
in Glasgow, Thomson, xiii, 212. 

BiMANGANAS, Phipson, xxxii, 320. 

BiNOXALAs (compare Potassve oxa- 

LAs), manufacture, Firmin, xxvi, 329 
— swiZmm^ temperature, Guy, xl, 249. 

BJSULPHAS, solidifies raw gypsum, 

Emmet, v, 48. 

BiSULPHis, Polli, xxxiv, 447. 

bitartras, xxxi, 509 adulteration, 

Blengini (sugar of milk), xxvii, 451 — 
Grant, xxi, 182 — Maiseh (tartrate of 
lime), xxvii, 204 — Procter, jr., xxiii, 5 
— adulterator. Bullock, xxxi, 486 — be- 
havior to fused chlorate of potassa, 
Boettger, xxx, 69 — manufacture, xxiii, 
337— Firmin, xxvi, 329 — Price, xxvi, 
320 — from Catawba wine, Wayne, xl, 
75 — report on cream of tartar from 
Cincinnati, Wayne, xxvii, 494 (com- 
pare Tartar) Ph. Helvetica, xxxix, 

315 — loss in powdering, i, 138 — Co- 
veil, xxxix, 116 — purification. Tenner, 
xxxiv, 39 — test for purity, Procter, 
jr., xxiii, 5 — solubility in acids. Ten- 
ner, xxxiv, 39. 

boro-tartrate, Vogel (W. & B., 

786), iii, 312. Compare Boron and 
POTASSA tartrate ; Tartarus borax- 
atus. 

and bromine, Loewig, ii, 173. 

bromate, behavior to nitric acid. 

Penny, xiii, 226. 

bromg-arsenfas, Clemens, xxxv, 100. 

cadmias, Meunier, xxxviii, 504. 

cum calce. See Vienna caustic. 

et calcis sulphas, Phillips, xxiii, 

343. 

, camphorate, xxxi, 81. 

CANTHARiDAS, Delpech, xiii, 240, 241. 

CARBAZOTAS, as Vermifuge, Friedrich, 

xxxvi, 86. 

CARBONAS (compare Potasr) — solidi- 
fies raw ^9,y/?.sMm, Emmet, v, 48 — prepa- 
rationand purification, xvii, 80 — Bloch, 
xxvii, 266— Riekher (W. & B., 1282), 
xxxvi, 21 — Wirsching, xxxvi, 107 — 



186 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



POTASSA {M) {Continued). 

Ph. London (24), Prel. No. 19— test 
for purity^ Procter, jr., xxiii, 316 — 
limit of reacfion with sulphuric acid, 
Hastings, xiii, 202 — amount of ivaier 
in composi ion, Pohl, xxxiii, 532. 

CAUSTICA. StePoTASSA. 

CHLORAS (compare Potass.^ per- 

CHLORAs), adulteration (chloride of 
potassium), ii, 244 — behavior to nitric 
acid, Penny, xiii, 225 — decomposition 
at a low temperature in presence" of 
peroxide of manganese ; platinum 
tlack ; oxide of copper ; binoxide of 
lead, Wiederhold, xxxv, 354 — in foetid 
breath, xxxiii, 570 — oxidizing action, 
Bcettger, xxx, 69 — loss in pov:derivg^ 
Covell, xxxix, 1\ 6— preparation, Ga- 
nassini, V, 176 — Graham (W. & B., 
674), xiii, 346— Vee, v,350~solubilitij 
in glycerin, Adolphus, xxxix, 150 — 
Klever, xiii, 222 — snbstitnted by chlo- 
rate of soda, Gueneau, xxx, 569. 

■ CHROMAS, adulteration, ii, 245 — Zuler, 

i, 319; V, 264— Erdmann, xvi, 156— 
behavior to animal charcoal, Weppen, 
xviii, 205 — in moxas, Jacobson, vi, 
259 — preparation, Tighlman (felspar, 
lime, chrome ore), xx, 189 — limit of 
reaction with lead and silver, Hast- 
ings, xiii, 204. 

'• ciTRAS, adulteration, Hodgson, jr., 

ix, 19. 

CROCONATE, XXV, 379. 

CYANAS, Liebig, xiv, 298. 

, DiGiTALATE, Morin, xvii, 183. 

, HYDRATE. See POTASSA. 

, HYDROXANTHATE, ZeiSC, vii, 67. 

HYPOPfiosPHis, Procter, jr. (W. & B., 

1532), xxx, 120. 
HYP08DLPHia, Plessy, xvi, 190 — Polli, 

xxxiv, 447. 
lODAS, behavior to nitric acid, Penny, 

xiii, 226 — preparation, Stas, xiii, 217 

— therapeutical use, Demarquay, xxx, 

33. 

lODO-HYDRARGYRATK, SeC UUdcP PO- 
TASSIUM. 

ET MAGNESI.E BORO-TARTRAS, Gue- 

rard and Garot (Parrish, 408), xx, 
302. 

, TARTRAs, as purgativc, Maillier 

(W. & B , 1290), XX, 302. 

, MELANATE, Piria, xi, 147. 

, MYRONATE, Thielau '(W. & B., 780), 

xxx, 539 — Ludwig and Lange, xxxiii, 

236. 

NiTRAS, adulteration, Procter, jr., xxiii, 

5 — cold produced by solution, Hana- 
mann, xxxvi, 105 — Rudorff, xli, 426 — 
by solution of mixtures with sulphate 
of soda, muriate of ammonia, nitrate of 
soda, chloride of sodium, Hanamann, 
xxxvi, 105 — entimation of commercial, 



Persoz, xxxiii, 543 — in Hyoscyarmuty 
Mahla (W. & B., 460), xxxi, 402— iu 
Hungary, Szabo, xxiv, 164 — India, 
Palmer, xl, 436 — in different parts of 
the world, xxxv, 186 — manufacture, eco- ^ 
. nomical, Swinddels, xl, 120 — artifi- 
cial, Cloez and Guignet, xxxi, 151 — 
Reichenbach, xxv, 522— from beet- 
root salts, Schwartz, xxxiv, 508 — 
mountain in Nevada, Harrison, 
xxxviii, 87 — contains nitrite oj potassa, 
Boettger, xli, 20 — test ioT purity, Proc- 
ter, jr., xxiii, 5 — in quassia wood, 
Planche, x, 36 — in solution for pre- 
scription purposes, Biroth, xl, 546 — 
in South America, Forbes, xl, 437 — 

Spam, Forbes, xl, 437 Sweden^ 

Forbes, xl, 437. 

NiTRis, formation, Woehler, xxxviii, 

474 — preparation, Feldhaus, xxxvi, 
313. 

oxALAS (compare Potass/E binoxa- 

LAs), formation, Gay-Lussac, vii, 86. 

PKRCHLORAS, BuUock, xxxvii, 20. 

PERMANGANA8 for dcodorizing alco' 

hoi, V, 85 — in alkaline solution with- 
out reduction, Mohr, xiii, 322 — com- 
position (is bimanganate), Phipson, 
xxxii, 320 — as deodorant, tscharotic, 
and stimulant, Gird wood, xxx, 141 — 
in diabetes, Sampson, xxv, 276 — liquid, 
Leconte, xxxvi, 40— as oxidizing agent, 
Cloez and Guignet, xxxi, 78 — prepa- 
ration, Bussy and others, xxxv, 510 — 
Chevillot and Edwards, xxv, 450 — 
Gregory, xxv, 451 — Squibb (W. & B., 
682), xxxvi, 385 ; xxxvii, 22— Sticht 
(on large scale), xxxix, 320 — Woeh- 
ler, V, 352 ; xxv, 450 — use, Rand, xiii, 
547 — for staining wood, xxxvi, 313, 
379 — as test for bromioe, chlorine, 
iodine (not reliable), McDonald, xli, 
393 

piCRONiTRAS, See Potass^ carba- 

ZOTAS. 

PRUSSiATB. See Potassii febrocy- 

. ANIDUM. . 

bhodizonate, Loewig, xxv, 379. 

SILICAS, solidifies raw gypsum. Em- 
met, V, 48, 

ET SODJK CARBONAS, Fehling,xxxvi,419. 

ET SOD^ NITRAS, Loolc, xiii, 86. 

ET soDyK TA.^TUA9, adulteration, Mahla, 

xl, 548 — Scattergood, viii, 13 — in dye- 
ing, Benckiser, xviii, 157 — solidifiei 
raw gypsum, Emmet, v, 48 — prepara- 
tion : xxiii, 345— Coxe, iv, 14 — Reb- 
ling, xxi, 256 — from Catawba wine, 
Wayne, xl, 75. 

STEARATE, XXxi, 81. 

SUCCINATE, from sebacic acid, Cloei 

and Guignet, xxxi, 81. 
SULPHAS, adulteration, Hodgson, jr., 

(sulphate of copper), x, 27 — Moritz 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 187 



POTASSA {JE) {Continued). 

(sulphate of zinc, ( W. & B., 685), xv, 
318 — co/g? produced by solution, Han- 
amann, xxxvi, 104 — Rudorff, xli, 426 
— solidifies raw gypsum, Emmet, v, 48 
— manufacture, xxiii, 343 — Tilghman, 
XX, \^%—Ph. V. S. (30), ii, 332— poi- 
soning, XXIX, 320 — solubility in glyce- 
rin, Adolphus, xxxix, 150 — amount 
dissolved in saturated solution of bi- 
carbonate of soda, Anthon, xvi, 208 — 
Redwood and others, xvi, 27. 

' suLPHis, PoUi, xxxiv, 447. 

' SULPH0-CARB0LA8, Crookes, xli, 445. 

' SULPHO-CETATE, Dumas and Peligot, 

vii, 337. 

TETRATHIONATE, PleSSy, Xvi, 193. 

TRiTHiONATB, Plessy,. xvi, 192. 

XANTH08ANTALATE, Plummer, xxvii, 

117. 

POTASSIUM(n). Compare Potassa. 

cryA'/a/feec?, Becquerel, iv, 348 — explo- 
sion by. combustion, Duvivier, xvii, 
221 — explosive combination with 
naphtha, Hare, v, 240 — how filled 
into glass tubes. Hare, v, 241 — how 
kept without naphtha, Hare (in hydro- 
gen atmosphere), v, 22^— preparation, 
Brunner, xxv, 70 — Hare, v, 237 — Ma- 
reska and Donny, xxv, 70. 

ET ANTiMONii lODiDUM, Schaeffer, 

xxxii, 559. 

AURO-CYANiDUM, Kemp, xix, 237. 

' BiNiODiDUM, Baup, vi, 113 — existence 

doubted by Baudrimont, xxxiii, 212. 

— BROMiDDM, in epilepsy, Close, xxxviii, 

323 — impurity (iodine), Garrod, xxx, 
preparation, Buchner, xxxii, 45 — 
Loewig, ii, 172 — Mayer, xxxiv, 294 — 
Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix, 315 — purifi- 
cation, Robifere and Herbelin, xlii, 174 
— solubility in glycerin, Klever, xlii, 
222. 

CHLORinuM, cold produced by solu- 
tion, Hanamann, xxxvi, 104 — Rudorff, 
xli, 426 — with nitrate of ammonia ; 
nitrate of soda, Hanamann, xxxvi, 
105 — form of crystals, Maisch, xxxii, 
52 1 — paramorphism with chloride of 
ammonium, Maisch, xxxii, 522 — pre- 
paration, Stromeyer (carnallite), xl, 
314— Tilghman (felspar), xx, 189— 
amount dissolved by saturated solu- 
tion of bicarbonate of soda, Anthon, 
xvi, 208. 

■ CYANiDUM, antidote, T. and H. Smith, 

xxxviii, 15, 16 — in external poisoning, 
(protosulphate of iron in raw linseed 
oil), xl, 82 — conversion (in cbncen-'- 
trated solution), into ammonia and 
formiate of potassa, Pelouze, v, 45 — 
estimation of commercial, Herapath 
(W. & B., 1296), xxviii, bbh— forma- 
tion by smoking belladonna cigarettes, 



Marchand, xxxi, 415 — poisoning, xxxi, 
482; xxxiii, 217 ; xxxix, 84; xli, 137, 
see MiSTAKE8--/>re/>«?-a?zor/.; Chevallier, 
iv, 85 — Clark, iii, 31 1 — Laming, xviii, 
277— Liebig, xiv, 295— Tilloy, iv, 24 
— Woehler, xviii, 274; xxviii, 234 — 
purification, Robiquet (W & B., 1295), 
iv, 24 — as reducing and separating 
agent, Liebig, xiv, 299 — solubility in 
glycerin, Adolphus, xxxix, 150; Kle- 
ver, xlii, 222 — therapeutically consid- 
ered, Boudet, vii, 34 — not reliable, 
David Stewart, xv, 134. 

— PERRiDCYANiDUM, desoxidation, Schoen- 
bein, xvi. 252 — preparation, Girardin, 
i, 159 — Rcichardt (chlorine substi- 
tuted by bromine), xlii, 320 — Reindel, 
xxxiii, 217 — Riegel, xviii, 318. 

— FERBOCYANiDUM, action ou tartrate 
and citrate of iron, Calloud, xviii, 
310 — behavior to diluted sulphuric 
acid, Everitt (W. & B., 923), vii, 160 
— to permanganate of potassa, Cloez 
and Gui^net, xxxi, 151 — as reducing 
fiux, Davy, xxxiii, 351 — constitution 
of ^hnelt,'' Reimann, xxvi, 232 — prepa- 
ration: Brunnquell (W. & B., 686), 
xxix, 112 — Laming, xviii, 277 — Lie- 
big, xviii, 78— Newton, xvii, 231 — 
Ambrose Smith, xx, 170 — in Glas- 
gow, xiii, 211 — Watson, xxvii, 162 — 
limit of reaction with copper, Hast- 
ings, xiii, 204 — removing rust from 
linen, Runge, xxix, 454 — yield, from 
horn, rags, blood, etc., xx, 172 — Lee 
and Richardson, xxxvi, 78. 

— BT FERRi suLPHiDCM, Preiss, xlii, 447. 

— ET HYDRARGYRI BINIODIDUM, AmbrOSe 

Smith, xii, 265— Procter, jr., xii, 270. 

— lODiDUM, adulteration : Adarason, vi, 
289 (reply, vii, 27)— Christison, x, 118 
— Destouches, xvii, 136, 239 — Pereira, 
iii, 49 — Procter, jr., xxiii, 3 — Erd- 
mann, (bicarbonate of soda), xxvi, 
210 — Personne (bromide of potas- 
sium W. & B., 1299), xviii, 217, 253 

behavior to ether, Vogel, xiii, 

197 — to muriate of amraonin, Vogel, 
xiii, 195 — to nitrous ether, Juncadella 
(W. & B., 1299), xxxi, 438— Procter, 
jr., xxix, 191 — to direct sunlight, 
Loew, xlii, 80 — to various reagents, 
Ubaldini, xxxiii, 170 — cold, by solu- 
tion, Rudorff, xli, 426 — commercial, 
purity, Clayton, xxxvi, 530 — detection 
of carbonate, and iodate of potassa, 
xxi, 75— Copney (W. & B., 1299), 
xxviii, 357^ — high dose, Duville, xVi, 

. 316 — incompatibles, Dorvault, xxiii, 66. 

* — ^with preparations of mercury, Proc- 
ter, Jr. (W. & B., 1299), xxvi, 222— is 
no reliable test iovleadxn salts of po- 
tassa or soda, Ambrose Smith, xvii, 
91 — combination with oil of cinnamon. 



188 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



POTASSIUM {Continued). 

and iodine, Apjohn, xi, 227 — prepara- 
tion: Barruell, viii, 197 — Baup and 
Caillot, vi, 111 — Beizelius, vi, 111 — 
Buchner, xxxii, 46 — Duhamel, vi, 110 
— Everett, v, 175 — Ferguson, ix, 324 — 
Fuchs, xxxviii, 267 — Guyot (with hy- 
driodic acid, from iodine and oil of 
turpentine), ix, 80 — Henry, i, 201— 
Hockley, ix, 109 — Huskigson, jr. (sul 
phate of potassa and iodide of calci 
um), xxxvii, 367 — Lyte, xxvi, 314 — 
Maroseau, vi, 112 — Mayer (Parrish, 
337), xxxiv, 292— Overbeck, xxvi, 
319— Pypers, xix, 239— Phillips, jr., 
xvi, 301 — Reade (from residue |of 
Reade's blue ink), xx, 66 — T. and H. 
Smith (W. & B., 1297), xv, 287— 
Squire, xxxiv, 437 — Stabler, xxi, 5 — 
Ph. Dublin (26), iii, 337— Ph. Helve- 
tica (65), xxxix, 315— Ph. U. S. (30), 
iii, 84 — purUn, see test — limit of re- 
action with silver and starch, Hast- 
ings, xiii, 200, 205 — solubility in alco- 
hol, Cap and Garot, xxvii, 159 — in 
glycerin, Adolphus, xxxix, 150; Cap 
and Garot, xxvii, 159; Klever, xlii, 
222 — water. Cap and Garot, xxvii, 
169 — test for purity, Maisch, xxvi, 293 
— Procter, jr., xxiii, 3 — Turner, vi, 
112. 

and ARSENious acid compound, 

Harms, xxvii, 270. 

, lODURETTED, vi, 114. 

, lODO-HYDRARGYRATB, Chanuiug (W. 

& B., 1541 ),vi, 53— Duhamel, vi, 107 

— test for alkaloids, Mayer (W. & B., 

1541), XXXV, 20. 

and IRON ALLOY, Calvert, xxviii, 174. 

, PEROXIDE, Hare, i, 74. 

, PLATiNocHLORiDE, solubility.Crookcs, 

xxxvi, 144. 

, SALiciDE, Piria, xi, 142. 

suLPHiDUM. See Potassii tersul- 

PHIDUM. 

, SULPHOCYANIDE, cold, by solutiou, 

Rudorff, xli, 426 — with ice, Reissig, 

xxxvi, 112 preparation^ Babcock, 

xxxviii, 306 Fresenius (W. & B., 

1607), xxxviii, 306 — Froehde, xxxvi, 
126 Lowe, xxvi, 363 Stoddart, 

xxxvii, 45. 

TERSULPHiDUM, deodorized by oil of 

aniseed, Ruschenberger, xxxviii, 321 
preparation.^ Ph. Helvetica (65), 

xxxix, 315 — ioluhility \w glycerin, and 
water. Cap and Garot, xxvii 159 — in 
glycerin, Adolphus, xxxix, 150. 

TRiTiODiDE, Baup, vi, 113. 

POTATOES, behavior to tincture of guai 
ac, xxiii, 185 — native country, Wed- 
dell (Chili), xxxii, 181 — disease^ Hera- 
path, xxvi, 75 — juice of tops dialj-sed, 
Attfield, xxxvi, 530; xxxvii, 206 — 



amount of starch., Dragendorff, xxxv^ 

139 economical manufacture, An- 

thon, xxxii, 184 microscopical ex- 
amination, Raspail, xi, 16,27; Per- 
eira, xv, 224 — detection in rice flour, 
and in arrowroot, Scharling (W. & B.^ 
537), XV, 76. 
SUGAR. See Glucose. 

POTHOS FCETiDA ; PUTORiA, viil, 2.. 

See Dracontium fcetidcm. 
POTIO anticholerica, Lovignac, xxxviii,, 

44, note. 
POTPOURRI, Piesse, xxvii, 373. 
POTTERS of the aborigines of North 

America, Green, v, 302. 
POUDRE. Compare Powder ; Pulvis. 

DE Caucase (insect-powder), xxvii, 

314. See Insect powder. 
POWDERING, effects on properties of 
bodies, Dorvault, xxv, 79 — of drugs 
(see Dr.vq,&^ poiodering.) 
POWDERS, remarks, Powers, v, 108— in 
Ph. Suecica (69), xlii, 88— Ph. U. S. 
(60), physical character and percent- 
age of fineness, CI. Parrish, xl, 20^ 
— specific gravity (W. & B., 877), iVj. 
203. 

POWDER. Compare Pulvis. 
, Algaroth's. See Algaroth's pow- 
der. 

, baking, xxvi, 46. 

, Castillon's (W. & B., 1534), Tay> 

lor, xxiv, 34. 
, Cosme's, ix, 76. 

, countess' (powdered cinchona), ii^ 

235. 

, depilatory. See Depilatory. 

, disinfecting, Keist, vi, 85 — Morfit,, 

xxvii, 501. 

, Dover's. See Pulvis ipecacuanha 

COMPOSITUS. 

, effervescing, Maisch, xxix, 49 — 

Dorvault, xxix, 50 — with bicarbonate 
of ammonia, Maisch, xxix, 50, 54, 56 
— -ferruginous, Colombat, xxix, 51 — 
Maisch, xxix 55 — Meurer, viii, 348 — - 
with carbonate of magnesia, Maisch^ 

xxix, 54 with sulphate of guinia,. 

Meirieu, xv, 155; Maisch, xxix, 51, 

55 granulated, Bedall, xxxvi, 312 

(compare Granulated powders). 

- — , egg. See Powder, baking. 

, face, Piesse, xxviii, 271. 

, fever and ague, i, 270 — Meirien, xv, 

155; xxix, 51, 55 — Parrish (Parrish^ 
737), xxviii, 19. 

, FUMIGATING, NITROUS, XXX, 374. 

of CYANIDE OP GOLD, PoUT 

- for gonorrhosa, vii, 351. 

-, GRANULATED. See GRANULATED 
POWDERS. 

-, Gregory's, xxx, 93. 
-, James's (compare Pulvis antimoni- 
A lis) composition, McLagan ; Pearson j 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 18& 



POWDER (Continued). 

Berzelius ; Chenevix; Phillips (W. & 
B., 1308), X, 153, \b*l— history, Dono- 
van, xli, 529 — original formula, Un- 
zicker, xxxvii, 98 — preparation, Coxe, 
y, 270 — Donovan, xli, 535 — McLagan, 
X, 152— Robinson, vi, 282— PA. Dub- 
lin (50), xxiii, 14 — medicinal effects, Os- 
borne (W. & B , 1309), xxvii, 126. 

, iNDiao (for epilepsy), Ideler, viii, 86. 

, INSECT. See Insect powder. 

, NITROUS, fumigating, xxx, 374. 

, Count Palma's {= carbonate of 

magnesia), xxvii, 365. 

, SACCHARATED medicinal, Becker, 

XXV, 271 ; xxvi, 158. 

, SCAMMONY, Wimmer, xix, 239. 

, Seidlitz (with sulphate of magne- 
sia), Robinet ; Benj. Ellis, Prel. No. 81. 

in tinea capitis, Zollikoffer, vi, 4. 

, toilet [perle; violet), Piesse, xxviii, 

271. 

, tooth. See Tooth powder. 

for destroying warts. Hunter, xxxix, 

418. 

, WASH, Parisian (rice flour), xxxi, 

478. 

of LACTATE OP ZINC, Herpin, xxix, 

428. 

, WHITE, found in horse-troughs, ana- 
lysis, Fisherand Tyson, viii, 105. 

POWELL'S pectoral balm, xv, 316. 

POWER, Mrs., and aquaria, xxx, 181. 

, MUSCULAR source, Frankland, xxxix, 

31. 

PRECIPITATE, WHITE. See Hydrargy- 
rum AMMONIATUM. 

PRECIPITATES, drying (brick tiles). Zip- 
pel, xxxii, 235 — weighing of moist, 
F. F. Mayer, xxxii, 356 — solubility in 
quantitative analysis, Fresenius, xix, 
50. 

PRECIPITATION of metals by sulphu- 
retted hydrogen, from solutions, acid- 
ulated with muriatic acid, Reinsch, 
xi, 215 — of various salts from their 
solutions, Margueritte, xxix, 43. 

PREPARATIONS, pharmaceutical, un- 
certainty, Chapman, xxvi, 154 — want 
of honesty, Procter, jr., xxxiii, 93. 

PRESCRIBING, Hanbury, xxxix, 340— m 
grains, xxxvi, 359. 

PRESCRIPTION, blanks, Parrish, xx, 254, 
351 — checks, Bakes, xxxix, 6 — duties of 
physicians and apothecaries, report, 
xxiv, 27; xxv, 91 — in English, Hull, 
xxiii, 385 — to whom does it belong? Proc- 
ter, jr., xxxvii i, 204; Maisch, xxxix, 473 
— East River Medical Asso'tion, xxxix, 
473 — percentage, Procter, jr., xxxix. 89 
— Caldwell,xlii,312 (compare Patron- 
age) — renewal, Procter, jr., xl, 186, 
469 — Ordronaux, xl, 470 — American 
Pharmaceutical Association, xl, 498. 



PRESERVATION of animal substances 
(corrosive sublimate and muriate of 
ammonia), Baldaumik, xviii, 317 — 
(acetate of alumina»nd gelatine), xxxi^ 
156 — Pagliari (benzoin; alum), xxxvi, 
365 — Burnetti (tannin and drying)^ 
xl, 83 — Pigne (creosote water), xvi, 
159 — Suquet (injection of sulphate 
of zinc), xxv, 212 — Reboulet (chlo- 
rine; alum),vii, 350 — (hydrochlorate 
of tin), Tauflfier, vi, 265. 

of insects, Leprieur (arseniuretted 

alcohol), xxxiv, 245. 

of MEDiciNAL PREPARATIONS and drugs, 

Duhamel, vii, 268 Enz (Appert's 

method), xxxii, 553. 

of natural history specimens, Ver« 

rill, xxxviii, 232. 

of VEGETABLE SUBSTANCES. See VEGE- 
TABLES. 

PRESS, BOTANICAL, Petcrs, viii, 99. 

, Filter, Real's, Boullay, v, 318. 

, LEVER, xxix, 19. 

PRESSURE at the bottom of the Atlantic^ 
XXXV, 468. 

PRICKLY ASH, Southern, origin. Bridges 

xxxvii, 134. 

. See Xanthoxylum. 

PRINOS verticillatus, as emetic, iv, 282 

— as tonic, v, 288. 
PRINCIPLES, VEGETABLE, are theyeducts 

or products? Johnson, vi, 34. 
PRINTANIERS, Piesse, xxvii, 467. 
PRIZES, France, Academy of Science,, 

xxx, 179; xxxiii, 415, 505 (perios- 
teum) — M6nier, xxxii, 384 — Soci^te 
d'Encouragement, xxvi, 7 7 — Germany: 
Goettingen, xlii, 322 — Halle, Petro- 
leum industrial society, xlii, 323 — - 
Munich University, xlii, 514. 

PROMETHEANS (matches), xxxiv, 149. 

PROPAGATION of fruit trees, Chinese 
method, Murray, ix, 52. 

PROPYLAMINA, formation of acetylen, 
Berthelot, xxxviii, 263— found in cod 
liver oil, Winckler, xxiv, 345~in Cratae- 
gus oxyacantha, Wicke, xxvii, 110 — in 
ergota, Winckler, xxiv, 172, 346 — in 
h erring-pickle, Wertheim, xxxii, 316 — 
in flowers of Pyrus communis; Sorbus 
aucuparia, Wittstein, xxvii 110— pre- 
paration, Procter, jr. (W. & B., 1588), 

xxxi, 125, 222— properties, Buchner, 
xxiv, 349 — Procter, jr., xxxi, 125 — in 
tic douloureux, Eaton (W. & B , 1588), 
XXXV, 277 — use, Stabler, xxxii, 111. 

. Compare Seoalia. 

chloiudb, commercial, analysis, Wen- 

zell, XXXV, 101. 

IODIDE, Crew, xxxii, 398. 

PROPYLONARCOTIN, xxxiv, 520. 
PROSOPIS DULCis yields mesquite gum, 

xxvii, 17. 

HPICIGERA. xxix, 77. 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



PROTEIN, therftpeutically considered, 
Hupp (Parrish, 519), xxxi, 402. 

, FERRAT,ED, XXX, 374. 

PROTIDB (of Mulder), Liebig, xviii, 130. 

PROTONITRO-BENZIN, Kopp, xx, 119. 

PROUT'S law, xxxii, 385. 

PRUNES and SENNA.' viii, 13 

PRUNUS AVIUM, amount of silica in bark, 
Hoffmann, xxxv, 164. 

LAUROCERASus. See Laurocerasus 

PADUS, flowers yield hydrocyanic acid^ 

Geiseler , xxxiii, 217 — crystals (oxal- 
ate of lime), xxxv.ii. 32. 

— PROSTRATUS, xH, 434. 

viRGiNiANA, bark^ analysis, Stephen 

Procter (W. & B , 690), vi, 8, 11 — 
proper seasons for collecting, Perot, 
xxiv, 109 — Procter, jr., xxviii, 411 — 
leaves proposed as substitute for cher- 
ry-laurel leaves, Procter, jr., xxxi, 
423 — does not contaio phloridzin. Pe- 
rot, xxiv, 111 — as tonic^ v, 287. 

PRUSSIAN BLUE, behavior to oxalate of 
ammonia, Duncan, xxxiii, 363 — to 
fused chlorate of potassa, Boettger, 
XXX, 70 — composition^ Gay-Lussac and 
Robiquet, iii, 218 — F. F. Mayer, xxxi, 
395 — presence of cyanide of potassium. 
explained, v, 347 — preparation^ Lowe, 
vii, 87 — Brucke, xxxviii. 505. 

PSEUDACONITIA, Fliickiger ; Hiibsch- 
mann, xli, 314; xlii. 233, 236. 398. 

FSEUDOMORPHIA, composition, Pelletier 
(W. & B., 623), vii, 331, 332 ; viii, 78 ; 

xxxiii, 24 : xlii, 396 — preparation, Pel- 
letier (Parrish, 638) viii, 76, 

" PROPYLAMiA (=Trimethylina),xxxvii, 

210. 

SYCOMORUS (=Melia azedarach), vii, 

177. 

PSORALEA. GLANDULOSA, leaves as substi- 
tute for tea in Mexico, iv, 251 — analy- 
sis of leaves, Lenoble, xxiii, 182 — 
supposed source of Paraguay tea, 
d'Orbigny, xxiii, 182. 

PSORALEIN, Lenoble, xxiii, 182. 

PSYCHOTRIA EMETiCA, analysis of root, 
Pelletier (W. & B., 483, note), iii, 190. 

PTELEA TRiFOLiATA, analysis, Smyser, 

xxxiv, 198 — contains berberina, Speer, 
xxxix, 337 — as substitute for hops, 
XXX, 485. 

PTELYL, Kane, x, 206, 209. 

, CHLORIDE, Kane, x, 206, 209. 

, HYDRATE, X, 219. See Aldehyd, me- 

SITIC. 

, hyduret, X. 209. See Mesitylene. 

• , HYPONiTRiTE, Kaue, X, 206, 210. 

' , iodide, Kaue, x, 206, 210. 

PTEROCARPUS adansonii, xxvi,516,note. 

AFRICANUS, XXVi, 516. 

Dalbergioides, xxi, 135, 

. ERINACKUS, iv, 54 — description, Dan- 

iell, xxvi, 517. • ■ ' . 



INDICU8, xxi, 135. 

MARSCPIUM, origin of East India Kino, 

Royle, xviii, 79— xxi, 135. 

SANTALINUS, vii, 280. 

SENBGALENsis, xxvi, 516, note. 

Wallichii, xxi, 135. 

PTERY(iIUM TERES (= Dryobolanops 

Camphora), v, 176. 
PTYCHOTIS AJowAN, composition of 

stearopten of oil, Stenhouse,xxvii,150. 
PUCCIN from Sanguinaria, Wayne (W. & 

B., 741), xxviii, 522. 
FUCCINIA MENTHA, parasitical fungus, 

xxiii, 241. 
PUCHA Pat. See Patchouli. 
PULICARIA, flowers as adulterant of 

saffron, xxxviii, 226. 
PULSATILLA, influence of drying, 

Schoonbroodt, xli, 321. 
PUNCH, viii, 174. 
PULVIS. Compare Powder. 

algarothi. See Algaroth's Powder. 

antimonialis. See Powder, Jambs'. 

, Tyson's, Procter, jr., xli, 390. 

APERiENS, Mitchell's, Taylor, xxv, 207. 

AROMATicus, Ph. U.S. (60), improved, 

Squibb, xxxix, 527 — substitute, see 

Saccharum aromatigdm. 
atropi.'E, Bouchardat, xxii, 88. 

, DOVERI. See PuLVIS IPICACUANHiB 

COMPOSITUS. 
EFFERVESCENS CITRATCTS, Ph. Dubliu 

(50), xxiii, 15. 

ECCOPROTICUS, XXX, 92. 

FERRI ET MAGNESIJB CITRATIS, Oorput, 

xxii, 314. 

hupelandi, Procter, jr., xli, 391. 

ipecacuanh/E ET QPii (eclcctic), xxvi, 

110. 

COMPOSITUS, statistic of powder- 
ing, Covell, xxxix, 1 16 — improved 
manipulation, Laidley, xxii, 123 — Tan- 
nehill, xxviii, 515 ; (remarks by Proc- 
ter, jr., xxviii, 515, note) — French 
Codex, ii, 250 — German, xxviii, 372. 

PAULLiNi^:, Dechasteles, xiii, 55 ; 

Gavrelle, xii, 209. 

rhei COMPOSITUS, Ph. Dublin (50), 

xxiii, 15. 

Seidlitz. See Powder, Seidlitz. 

stypticus, Bonnafoux, iv, 172. 

VANiLL.E, Soubeiran, xiii, 194. 

ziNCi valerianatis, Devay, xvi, 300. 

PUMPKIN. See Pepo. 

SEED and male fern mixture, xxxviii, 

255. 

PUNICA GRANATCM. See Granatdm. 
PURGATIVE for children, vii, 174 ; viii, 
85. 

PURGING NUT OIL. See Oleum .curcas 

PURGANS. 

PURPLE, Cassius, composition^ Besseyre, 
vi, 219— preparation, vi, 85 — Fisher, 
iii, 262 — Besseyre, vi, 215. 



FttEP A RATIONS, UNDEI^ THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 191 



l:*URPLE COLOR fiirnisbed by Murex Bran.- 

daris and TrimculuSj Bizio, vi, 

225. 

DYE, permanent (anilin), Perkins, 

xxxi, 568. 

• for COTTON and silk, Malegue, xxvii,! 

84. ' • ■" ■ ■ ' " 

fURPURHOLCIN (from Sorghum seed), 

Hetet, xxx, 398. 
iPURREE, Schmid (W. & B., 1535), xxvii, 

333. 

PURVEYING, medicar, U. S. army, Sat- 

terlee, xxxviii, 27 I. 
PURVEYORS, medical, U. S. army, Ste- 

yens, xxxvii, 91. 
-PUS, analysis^ Giesecke, xxxiii, 403 — blue 

color due to phosphate of iron, Schiff, 

xxxi, 482. 

'PUTREFACTION, volatile alkaloids, Cal- 
vert, XXXV, 312 ; xxxvi, 41— at 31° F. 
below zero, Phipson, xxx, 232— indi- 
cated by kreatinine, Commafilles, xli, 
131 — prevented^ by cotton-filtered air, 
Schroeder & Dusch, xxvii, 113 ; xxxvi, 
41 — by filtering air through finely 
divided substances, previously heated, 
Pemberton, xxvii, 457. 

PYRENE (from coal tar), xxxiii, 41. 

PYRENULA, lichen on silver gray cin- 
chona bark, xi, 252. 

fPYRETHRUM, analysis of root, Koene 
(W. & B., 691), viii, 175. 

~- PARTHENiUM. See Mateigaria pab- 

THENinM. 

BOSEUM, tincture against mosquitoes, 

Jager, xli, 15. 



PYRETHRUM, Willemoti (source of in- 
sect powder), xxxvi, 69. 

PYRITES, yield of sulphur, xxxvi, 142— 
Mactear, xl, 43 1 — [Belgian, 434 ; Cleve- 
land, 435 ; Cornish, 435 : Itolian, 435 ; 
Irish, 435^ Norv)egian, 434: Spanish, 
433 ; Swedish, 434.) 

PYROCATECBIN (of Zwenger) = oxy- 
phenic acid, Stenhouse, xxxiv, 559. 

PYRODEXTRIN, Gelis (W. & B., Ill, 
note), xxx, 235. 

PYROGALLIN = pyrogallic acid, Sten- 
house, xxxiv, 559. 

PYROGUAIACIN, Ebermayer, xxvii, 46, 

PYROLUSIT as test for claret, Facen, xli, 
418. 

PYROPHORUS, Boettger, ix, 268— Eisner, 

xvii, 77 — Romberg, xxxiv, 148 — from 

tartar emetic, xviii, 78. 
PYROPHOSPHATES, chemical history, 

Maisch, xxxix, 388. 
PY'ROTA yiTTiGERA, Burmeister, xxxvii, 

270. 

PYROXANTHIN (in impure pyroligne- 
ous spirit), Gregory, ix, 317. 

PYROXYLIN. See Collodium ; Gun- 
cotton. 

PAPER. See Paper ; Pyroxylin. 

PYRROL, Runge, vii, 251 • xxxiii, 41, 
PYRUS COMMUNIS, flowers contain propy- 

lamin, Wittstein, xxvii, 11©. 
spectabilis, analysis of ashes of 

trunk, leaves and fruit, Vogel, xvi, 

265. 



^. Compare Ch ; K. " 

<Juack MEDICINES. See Patent medicines. 

-Quackery, xxxiii, 191 — ancient (Massa- 
chusetts), xxx, '274 professional 

(specialiies) xxv, 370 — (Norwood's 
tinctuie), xxvi, 90 — in England, xxy'i, 
84 — in Virginia (opposition of drug- 
gists), xxvi, 169. 

<QUANTIVALENCE, xl, 190, 191. 

QUARTZ, artificial, diaphanous, Ebel- 
men, xvii, 318. 

QUASSIA. Compare Simaruba. 

wood, pharmacological history, 

Planche, x, 35 — asheit, examination, 
Planche, x, 38 — behavior to animal 
•charcoal, Weppen, xviii, 203 — con- 
tains nitrate of potassa, Planche, x, 
36 — percolation with water, packing, 
Soubeiran, viii, 225. 

BARK, Parrish (W. & B., 693, note), 

xxix, 104. 

AMARA, description, Carson, xx, 257. 

KXCELSA, description, Carson, xxi, 1. 



POLYGAMA, xxi, 1. 

SIMARUBA, viii, 22. 

QUASSIN, Thomson, xxi, 3— Winckler 
(W. & B., 693), viii, 258. 

QUASSIT, Wiggers (W. & B., 693), x, 42. 

QUERCETIN, composition, Hlasiwetz, 
xxxii, 443 — in buckthornberries, Bol- 
ley, xxxiii, 219. Compare Querci- 

TRIN. 

QUERCIA, Scattergood, i, 97; iv, 295. 

QUERCIT, combination with tartaric 
acid, Berthelot, xxx, 154. 

QUERCITRIN. Compare QuERCBTiN—com- 
position, Bolley; Hlasiwetz; Rochle- 
der, xxxii, 443, 444 — colors from it 
(yellow; brown; green; blue; ried ; 
violet), Hlasiwetz, xxxii, 444 — rela- 
tion to colors of flowers, Hlasiwetz 
(W. & B., 696, notr^), xxxii, 222— pro- 
ducts of decomposition, Hlasiwetz, 
xxxii, 443 — found'm (Aesculus hippo- 
^castanum; Capparis spioosa; Quercus 
tinctoria; Reseda luteola; Rhamnus 



192 



SALTS, SEE UNDEB LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



QUERCITRIN {Continued). 

tinctoiius; Rata graveolene; Sophora 
japonica; Thuja occidentalis), xxxii, 
444 — relation to rutin and robinin, 
Zwenger & Dronke, xxxv, 32. 

QUERCITRON, in diali/ser, Graham, xxxiv, 
315 — preparation of pigments, Schaef- 
fer ; Schliimberger, xxix, 353. 

QUERCUiS iEGiLOPS, tannin of acorns, 
Stenhouse, xxxiv, 254. 

ALBA, yield of tannin, Bowman, xli, 

195 — Mittentzwey, xxxvi, 317 — Miil- 
ler, xxxi, 429 — amount of silica in 
leaves, Henrici, xxxv, 164. 

cocciFERA, habitat of Coccus ilicis, 

xxiv, 376. 

FALCATA, analysis of bark. Scatter- 
good, i, 99 ; iv, 295. 

HETEROPHYLLA, description, Buckley, 

xxxiv, 122. 

ILEX, yields kinone, Stenhouse. xxvi, 

252. 

iNFECTORiA (yields Mecca galls), xxi, 

266. 

PEDUNCULATA, resin, Lemaire, ii, 344 

— tannin, Stenhouse, xxxiv, 254. 

PHELLOS, xxxiv, 122. 

KOBUR, twist fibre, Braun, xxviii, 

67 — yields kinone, Stenhouse, xxvi, 
252 — resin, Lemaire, ii, 344. 

TiNCTORiA, contains Quercitrin, 

Chevreul, xxxii, 444. 

QUICKSILVER. See Mercury; Hy- 
drargyrum. 

QUILLAYA SAPONARiA, analysis, Henry & 
Boutron, xii, 209, 215 — description, 
etc., Rochleder, xii, 211, note — Par- 
rish, xxix, 104 — Raymond (W. & B., 
1601), XXX, 31 — crystals in bark (ar- 
ragonite), Bleekrode & Martins, xxxvii, 
31 — (tartrate and oxalate of lime), 
P'liickiger, xxxvi, 110; xxxvii, 31 — 
(sulphate of lime). Berg, xxxvii, 31 
— properties of extract, Bleekrode, 
xxxii, 241 — contains lithium And rubi- 
dium, xxxvii, 32. 

8MEGMADERM0S, xii, 210. 

QUINA. Compare China ; Cinchona ; 
Quinquina ; Bark ; etc% 

[amarilla, ii, 238 ; iii, 32, 33 ; xi, 322 ; 

xxii, 42 ; astoposa, xxii, 40; 

azahar de Sta. F4, iii, 1 16 ; xi, 325 ; 

blanca, iii, 36 ; carrasquena, xxxviii, 

426 ; colorada, xi, 325 ; crts- 

pilla, xxxviii, 426 ; jior de azahar, 

ii, 239 ; iii, 35 ; fina de Loja, 

xxxviii, 426; xi, 314 Maracaibo 

xlii, 449 ; do mato, ii, 293 ; na- 

ranjada, xi, 322 ; nova, iii, 115, 

116; xi, 329; primitiva, xxxYin, 

424 ; de Remijo, xvii, 85 ; 

roxa, ii, 239 ; iii, 14, 1 16 ; xi, 325, 329 ; 
de serra, xvii, 85.) 



QUINCES, acid (malic), Lancaster, xxx^^, 
198 — exhalations, poisonous, xli, 15. 

QUINETINE, Marchand, xvi, 199. 

QUINIA. Compare Quini^ sulphas. 

Gregory's chemistry, xxix, 91 — as^ 

antiseptic, Geiseler, xxxviii, 45 — teha^ 
vior (compare tests) to acids, Andr4 
Soubeiran ; Henry, viii, 208 — to. 
ammoniacal salts at diflFerent de- 
grees of temperature, Magonty, xit^ 
264 — to bichromate of potassa test., 
Jenkins, xxxiii, 528 — to bromine,. 
Blengini, vi, 334— to chlorine and 
ammonia, Andre, viii, 211, 212, 2l3i 
— Brandes, xi, 36 — to chlorine, PeS- 
letier, x, 167 — to nascent hydrogen,. 
Rochleder. xxxix, 319 — to iodide of" 
cadmium and potassium, Marm6, xli,. 
18 — to iodohydrargyrate of potassa,. 
Mayer (W. & B., 1542), xxxv, 21, 2^. 
— to nitric acid, Guy, xxxiii, 526 — to 
nascent oxygen, Marchand, xvi, 198' 
— to perchloric acid. Bullock, xxxvii,. 

21 to permanganate of potassa^ 

Cloez & Guignet, xxxi, 151 — topenta- 
chloride of antimony and phosphoric- 
acid, Schulze, xxxii, 137, 235 — to- 
reagents, Fresenius, xxxviii, 451 — to» 
bicarbonate of soda in presence of tar- 
taric acid, Oppermann, xvii, 299 — to- 
sulphuric acid, Guy, xxxiii, 526 — to> 
tannic acid, Henry, vii, 228, 230 — • 
found in blood, Landerer, xiv, 352 — 
from East India Cinchona, Howard,. 

xxxv, 455 Cinchona succirubra,, 

Howard (W. & B., 255, note), xxxv, 
513 — composition, Laurent, xxvi, 185. 

— Regnault, xi, 219 constitution^. 

Strecker (W. & B., 287, note), xxrii,, 
241, 321 — (a kind of resinate of am- 
monia), Andre, viii, 209 — three kinds 
{tt — , /3 — , y — ), Heijningen, xxiv, 262: 
— forms with aricinia and cinchonia 
three grades, Pelletier, v, 259 — de^ 
composition of the salts by acetates,. 
Maisch, xxx, 385 — detection, see test 
— estimationin cinchona, see Cinchona. 
BARKS, ASSAY — in solutions, Sestini,. 
xli, 'iii)— formation, Howard, xxxv,.. 
516; xxxvi, 127 — fusing ^o'mt, Duflos^ 

vi, 82 — Kiessling, xxxi, 567 — mother^ 
waters deprived of resinous matter by 
oil of turpentine, Henry & Delondre,. 

ii, 162 preparation: (avoiiance of" 

bright light,) Pasteur, xxv, 538 — Cal- 
vert (soda, W. & B., 1315), xv, 199 — 
Clark (stearic acid, W. & B., 1317, 
note), xxxiv, 139— Gregory (lime and? 
alcohol), xxix, 91 — Henry (tannin)^ 

vii, 233 — Henry & Plisson (without 
alcohol), iii, 305 — Williams (benzole),, 
xxvi, 338 — Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix„ 
313— (compare quini^ sulphas, prep- 
aration) — polarizing power, Howard^. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



193 



<QUINIA [Continued). 

xxxviii, 4 1 9 — properties^ Kerner, xxxiv, 
419 — distinction from quinidia, van 
Heijningen, xxx, 242 — Howard, xxvi, 
453 — review of all tests, Stoddart, 
\xxvii,42 — (Bouchardat, 42; Brande, 
-43; Herapath ; Liebig, 43; Pasteur, 
42 ; Pelletier, 43 : Stokes, 42 ; de 
Vrij, 45) — (compare cinchona barks, 
ALKALOIDS, discrimina (ion) — solubilify 
an alcohol, Cap and Garot, xxvii, 
159;Schwabe, xxxiii, 174 — benzole, 
Mansfield, xxi, 330 — chloroform, Le- 
page, xxiv, 148 ; Pettenkofer, xxxi, 
232; Schlimper, xxxii, 160; Schwabe, 
xxxiii, 174 — ether, Schwabe, xxxiii, 
174 — glycerin, Adolphus, xxxix, 150; 
Klever, xlii, 222 ; Cap & Garot, xxvii, 
159 — olive oi), Cap & Garot, xxvii, 
159; Pettenkofer, xxxii, 185 — water, 
Schwabe, xxxiii, 174; Sestini, xli, 
330 — proposed mbttituted by arsenious 
acid, Turner, xxxiii, 556-by cinchonia, 
Daniell, xxxv,333 -by tannin, Leriche, 
XXXV, 512 — f(^5^5, (compare behavior; 

<!INCHONA BARKS, ALKALOlDS)-- (chrom- 

«te of potassa and sulphuric acid), Eb- 
<)li,xxix,369 — Fliickiger (chlorine and 
ferridcyanide of potassium, xxxiii, 
410 — Kerner (ammonia), xxxiv, 422, 
425 — Leube (chlorine and ferrocyan- 
ide of potassium), xxxiii, 410 — Pag- 
Jiari (heating), xxvi, 280 -Stokes 
(fluorescence), xxx, 241— Vogel (de- 
tails of ferrocyanide test), xxv, 516 
— found in urine, Landerer, xiv, 352 
~ — yield from diiferent kinds of barks, 
see these — table of yield, Delondre, 
xxvii, 90 — Guillermcnd, xxxvi, 16. 

AMORPHOUS, compare Quinoidin. — 

Bullock, xix, 46— Liebig (W, & B., 
1317, note), xviii, 181 — Natorrs, xviii, 
189— Winckler, xx, 238. 

ANiSEED-oiL compound, Hesse, xxxv, 

57 ; xxxvi, 20. 

artificial, prize question, xxii, 159 

— unsuccessful attempt, Strecker, 
xxxv, 58, 511 ; xxxvi, 359. 

EXTRACT, Farr, Prel. No. 43. 

ACETAS, Maisch (Parrish, 644), xxx, 

385. 

ACHiLLKATB, Zauon, xix, 59. 

ANTiMONiAS, as intermittent, La Cam- 
era, xxvii, 318. 

ARSENiAS, Bourieres, xvii, 158 — me- 
dicinal value, Haselden, xxix, 346. 

BiCHLORAS, Diehl, xl, 102. 

BiTANNAs, Henry, vii, 230, 

CAMPHORATE, Marietta, xxxvii, 254. 

CARBOLAS, Bernatzik, xl, 449. 

CAUBONAs, Langlois, xxvi, 238 — 

Thompson, xxxiii, 268. 

CHLORAS, Diehl, xl, 101 — Serullas, ii, 

305 — Tichborne, xxxviii, 474. 



• ciTRAs, Galvani, vii, 86. 

•, ETHYL-. See Ethyl quinia. 

• PERROCYANATE, Bertozzi (W. & B., 
287), vi, 28 ; viii, 82 ; xii, 350— Diehl, 
xl, 104. 

■ et HYDRARGYRI CHLORIDI, McDcrmott, 

xvi, 156. 

■ HYDROCYANAS, Pessiua, V, 81. 

- HYDROFLUORATE, Scrullas, ii, 307. 

- HYPOPHogpHiTB, Lawrcuce Smith, 
(W. & B., 288), xxxi, 285 ; xxxii, 410.' 

- lODAS, Serullas, ii, 301. 

- IODIDE, ix, 267 — Husband ; Lewis, 

xvi, 21 — Righini, ix, 353 — Winckler, 

xxiii, 356; xxv, 126. 

- lODO-suLPHAS, Herapath (W. & B., 
1319, note), xxv, 136 — optical proper- 
ties, Herapath, xxvi, 18 ; Gregory's 
Chemistry, xxix, 91. 

- KiNATE, Henry and Plisson (W. & B., 
293), ii, 231— Thomson, viii, 350. 

- KiNovATE, Howard, xxxvii, 347. 

MAGNESIvfC RT FERRI SULPHAS, FergUS, 

(Parrish, 644), xxxiii, 238. 

■ MURiAs, Ph. Dublin (50), xxiii, 10 — 
medicinal value, Spielman, viii, 264 — 
solubility in chloroform, Schlimper, 
xxxii, 160. 

- OLEATE, Attfield, xxxv, 250 — Her- 
mite, xxvii, 73. 

■ PHOSPHAS, medicinal value, Harless, 
ii, 254— preparation, Winckler, viii, 
12. 

PYROOALLAS, de Luyucs and Bgpan- 
dieu, xxxviii, 23. 

- SANTONAs, Pavesi, xxx, 374. 

- SULPHAS. Compare Quinia. 
ADULTERATIONS and their de- 
tection {muriate of cinchonia), Xxxv, 
475 ; xlii, 249 — [sulphate of cinchonia), 
Calvert^W. & B., 1321), xv, 199; 
Henry (W. & B., 1321, note), xx, 231 ; 
Kindt, vi, 83; Soubeiran, xxiv, 166 — 
(cAaZA), xxiii, 58 — [sulphate of quinidia), 
xxv, 470; Zimmer (Parrish, 649), 

xxiv, 266; de Vrij, xxxvii, 45 — [sali- 
cin), V, 293 ; ixiii, 85 ; Parrot, xli, 
299; Pelletier (W. & B., 1231), xvii, 
155; Procter, jr., xviii, 257 — [stearic 
and margaric acid), Smith, xxii, 96 — 
[sugar of milk), xxiii, 85 — Delondre' s 
quini.Ti sulphas (with lime, magnesia, 
etc.), Farr, vii, 300 — reply by Delon- 
dre, viii, 187, compare tests. 

■ administration, and bitter taste 

concealed (aromatic powder), ii, 254 
— Candidus (elixir taraxaci compos- 
itus), xlii, 71 — Edwards (mucilage of 
slippery elm), xxvii, 21 — Harrop 
(fluid extract of liquorice), xli, 117 — 
Kemble (syrup of chocolate), xl, 517 
— Pierquin (carbonate of magnesia), 

xvii, 51 — Quevenne (coffee), xx, 154 
— Pvighini (tartaric acid), xxiv, 169 — 



194 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



QtJINIA {Continued). 

Stearns! (mixed untriturated with su- 
gar), xxix, 519 — Thomas (tannin), 
xxii, 360 — behavior to ammonia, Ker- 
Her, xxxiv, 423 — to carbonate of am- 
monia in pills, Maisch (W. & B., 101), 
xxviii, 309 — to infusum rosr*, Ram- 
say, xiv, 176 — to iodohydrargyrate of 
potassa, Mayer (W. & B., 1542), xxxv, 
23 — to tinctura cinchona? composita, 
Donovan, xiv, 176 — conmmption in 
France, Prel. No. 98 — in United States, 
xxviii, 367 — Howard, xxvi, 309 — Cole, j 
xxvi, 454 — in effervescing powder, Mei- 
rieu, xxix, 5l~influence on \h^hmlih \^ 
of workmen, Chevallier, xxiii, 276;jQU 
xxx, 569 — for the hospital (partially j 
purified), Herring, xxv, 84 — incompat \ 
ihility ^'lih acetates, Maisch, xxrii, 97|QL' 
— poisoning of rabbits, Desiderio, xii, I 
\*12— preparation : first in Philadel-j 
phia. 1823, Farr, Prel. No. 43— De- 
londre, viii, 188 — Herring (without! 
alcohol, Parrish, 642), xxvi, 10— Pel- j 
letier and Despretz (W. & B., 1316), | 
rii, 81; xxvi, 458 — Thwaites andj 
Herapath (fusel oil, W. & B., 1315), 

xxvi, 455— PA Dublin (26), iii, 338— 
Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix, 313 — -so/?/- | 
bilityxn alcohol. Cap and Garot, xxvii, 
159 — ^^Guibourt and Bussy, xxv, 454 — 
— chloroform, Schlimper, xxxii, 160 
— glycerin, Adolphus, xxxix, 150; 
Blockey, xxix, 556 ; Cap and Garot, 

xxvii, 159, 160 — in water, Cap Hodi 
Garot, xxvii, 159 — statiatica, see con-\ 
sumption — proposed substituted by gen- I 
tianin, Kiichenraeister, xxiv, 170 — ' 
tests (compare quinia ; and quinia sul- 
phas adulterations and their detec- 

; tion), Kern«r (W. k B., 1321, note; 
Parrish, 650), xxxiv, 417 — Kletzinsky, 
xxvi, 472 — Nevius, xvii, 319 (unre- 
liable, Mowbray, xviii, 72) — Phillips, 
. i. 28— Stoddart (W. & B., 1320, note), 
xxxvi, 532; xxxvii. 41 — Vogel, jr. 
(W. & B., 1320), xxii,' 273— variability 
in water of hydration (W. & B , 1320), 
Millon and Commailles, xxxv, 153 — 
yield of barks from New Granada, 
Procter, jr. (W. & B., 280, note), xxv, 
306, 308, (compare quinia yield). 

, Squibb versus Powers and 

Weightman, xxvii, 300, 395, 404, 479, 
505, 508. 

IMPUEUS, Ph. U. S. (30), Wood 

(W. & B., 1317, note), iii, 297. 

LIGHT, examined, Strehl (=mu- 

riate of cinchonia), xlii, 249. 

SULPHIODIDE. See QUINT.K lODOSUL- 

PHAS. 

SULPH0-CARB0LA8, Procter, jr., xlii, 

136 — Radeniaker (crystallized), xlii, 
506. 



- SULPHO-CYANIDB uuder the micro- 
scope, Stoddart, xxxvii, 44. 

- supEiiKiNATE, Pelleticr and Caveotou.. 
xl, 323. 

- TANNAS, preparation^ Buchner, xxr^ 
464 — Smedt, xxxvi, 17 — solubility in 
alcohol, Cap and Garot, xxvii, 159 — 
in glycerin. Cap k Garot, xxvii, ISgj- 
— Klever, xlii, 222. 

- TARTRA8, Arppe, xxiv, 156. 

- URATE, Perayre f W. & B., 288), xxxiL. 
221. 

- vALEKiANAs, adulteration, Bell, xxi^. 
324 — prcparalion, Devay, xvii, 68 — 
Wittstein, xviii, 196. 

JNICIA, Gregory, xxix, 92 — Pasteur 
(W. & B., 291), xxv, b35—polarizin(f- 
power, Howard, xxxviii, 419. 

INIDIA, behavior to bichromate of po- 
tassa test, Jenkins, xxxiii, 528 — ta 
iodide of cadmium and potassium,. 
Marm^$, xli, 18— ^to iodo-hydrargyrate- 
of potassa, Mayer (VV. & B., 1542),. 
xxxv, 21, 23—co7nposition, Leers (W^ 
& B., 291), xxv, 161; xxvi, 185— 
Gregory, xxix, 92 — polarising power^ 
Howard, xxxviii, 419 — properties, Bai- 
ley, xxv, 77 — Howard, xxiv, 264 — 
Henry and Delondre (W. & IB., 283. 
284), vi, 129— Kent (disproves Hen- 
ry's assertion that quinidia is hydrate 
of quinia) XXV, 317 — K«^rner, xxxiv,. 
419— Leers, xxv, 161— de Vrij (W. k 
B., 290), xxix, 233 — solubility in alco- 
hol, Guibourt and Bussy, xxv, 454 — - 
in oil, Attfield, xxxv, 250 — proposed 
.substitute for quinia, Pennsylvania 
hospital, xxvii, 573 — te^ts, Kernery.. 
xxxiv, 419 — Stoddart (review of eill 
tests), xxxvii, 42 — Zimmer (Parrish... 
649), xxiv, 266— de Vrij, xxx, 242. 

-, Pasteur (W. & B., 290), xxv, 535. 

-, Serturner, vi, 131. 

- ACETATE, Leers, xxv, 168. 

- BDTYRATB, LecrS, XXV, 169. 

- CHLORATE, Diehl, xl, 103 — Leers, xxr,. 
168. 

- CITRATE, Leers, xxv, 169. 

- KLUORATE, Lcers, xxv, 168. 

- FORMIATE, Leers, xxv, 169. 

- HippuRATE, Leers, xxv, 170. 

- HYURiODATE, dc Vrij, xxix, 234. 

- HYPOSULPHITE, Lcers, xxv, 168. 

- lODOSULPHATE. See Quinidia 8Ul~ 

PHIODIDE.- 

- KiNATE, Leers, xxv, 170. 

- and MERCURY, chloride. Leers, xxr.. 
167. 

- MURIATE, Leers, xxv, K-6. 

- NITRATE, Leers, xxv, 168. 

- OXALATE, Leers, xxv, 169. 

-and PLATINUM CHLORIDE, Leers, xxv. 
167. 

' SULPHATE, xxv, 356 — behavior to am- 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



195 



QUINipiA {Continued). 

juonia, Kerner, xxxiv, 423 — to iodo- 
hydrargyrate of potassa, Mayer (W. 
& B., 1542), XXXV, 23 — m inter mittents^ 
Cullen, xxvii, 108 — optical properties, 
Herapath, xxvi, 18 — properties^ Leers, 
XXV, 165 — therapeutical use-, Peppers, 
xxvi, 505. 

SULPHOCTANIDE, Stoddard, xxxvii, 4 i. 

— '■ — suLPHiODiDB, optical character, He- 
rapath (W. & B., 290 & 1319, note), 
xxix, 245. 

TARTRATE, Leers, XXV, 169. 

VALERIANATE, LeerS, XXV, 170. 

QUININE GREEN (Parrish, 643) xxxiii, 
407. 

, SWEET, Procter, jr., xli, 186, 302. 

QUINIO, Batka (W. & B., 1317, note, sec- 
ond paragraph) xxxii, 222. 
. QUINIOIDtN. See Quinoidia. 

^QUINISMUS, Chevallier, xxiii, 276 ; xxx, 
569. 

QUINIUM, Labarraque (W. & B., 1092, 
note), xli, 123. 

,ETHYL0-; -,METHTL0-; SCeETHYLO- 

QUiNiUM ; Mkthyloquinium. 

IODIDE, Manlius Smith, xxiv, 304. 

and POTASSIUM, iodide, Maiilius 

Smith, xxiv, 305. 

QUINO-coLORANTATE, Henry, jr., andPIis- 
son, iii, 306. 

QUINOIDIA. Compare Qdinia, amor- 
phous — behavior to sulphuric acid, 
Guy, xxxiii, 526 — crystallized (xli, 
421), see CoNCHiNiN — existence ^^.mt^, 
• Henry, jr., and Delondre (W. & B., 
1317), ii, formation prevented, 

Pasteur, XXV, 537 — observations^Win^- 
ler, XX, 33 — Redwood, xix, 41 — (Proc- 
ter, jr., xix, 44, note)— preparation, 



Serturner, i, 316— piirificaiion, Bul- 
lock (alkaline carbonate), xix, 45 — 
de Vrij (oxalate of ammonia), xxxix, 
272— Williams (benzole), xxvi, 339— 
guinia obtained from it, Roder, xxi, 
49 — solubility in chloroform, Schlim- 
per, xxxii, 160 — proposed for 
quinia, xxvii, 573. 
QUINOLEIN, Liebig (W. & B., 290, note), 
xviii, 183. 

QUINOLIN, blue color, Williams, xxxii, 
179 — from cinchonia series distinct 
from that from coal tar, Williams, 
xxxii, 178. 

QUINOMETRY, Henry, vii, 46. 

QUINONE See Kinone. 

QUINQUINA {d'Antioguia, xxii, 41 ; 

blanc de Loxa, xi, 327 ; brun de 

Loza, iii, 108; — — calisaya, xi, 321 ; 

camielle,' xxii, 41 ; — ■■ — caqueta, 

xxv, 357; Carfhayena, brun, xi,328; 

Carthagena, jaune, xi, 328 ; 

•de Colombie, xxii, 41 ; de Colombie 

ligneuz, xi, 328; xxii, 41 ; Con- 

damine, xxxviii, 423 ; gris jin de 

Lima, iii, 109; gris de Loza, iii, 

108 ; gros de Lima, iii, 109 ; 

Jaca, xii, 332 ; Jaune royal, iii, 

110; xi, 320; Zma blanc, iii, 109; 

de Loza, ii, 237; de Mara- 

caibo, xxii, 42 ; noueuz, xxxviii, 

425 ; nova, xi, 325, 329 ; xxix, 37 ; 

orangi, xi, 322 ; Pltou ii, 292 ; 

Remijo, ii, 290; rouge, x\, 

330 ; rouge non verruqueux, iii, 

114; xi, 324; rouge verruqueux^ 

iii, 114;xi, 324; St. i/Mcm, ii, 292.) 

Compare Quina. 

QUISQUALIS iNDiCA, seeds as vermifuge, 
viii, 264. 



RABBITS not poisoned by atropia, Ogle, 
xl, 83. 

RADEMACHIA Integra, xxxvi, 293. 
RADIATION (invisible) of electric light, 

Tyndall, xxxvii, 216. 
, TERRESTRIAL, effect ou Vegetation, 

Murray, ix, 52. 
RADICALS, organic, history, Cahoura, 

XXXV, 1, 102, 213, 304. 

, OROANO-METALLIO, XXXV, 105. 

RAGS, yield of prussiate of potash, xx, 
172. 

RAIN, equivalent to an inch, xxxvii, 311. 
Compare Water, rain. 

RAKY of the Tartars, xxviii, 369. 

RANCIDITY of fats. See Fats, rancid- 
ity. 

RANDNCULACE^], proximate principles, 
F. F. Mayer, xxxv, 97. 



RANUNCULUS acris, as emetic, iv, 277. 

aquatilis, contains iodine, McAdam. 

xxv, 67. 

BULBosus, as emetic, iv, 277. 

DBMissus, xli, 434. 

PLAMMULA, as cmctic, iv, 277 — cou- 

tains iodine, Overbeck, xxvi, 439. 
sceleratus, acrid principle, Erd- 

mann, xxxi, 440. 
RAPE SEED, cultivation, Hagner, vi, 56. 
RAPHANUS sativus, yields blue color 

vi, 73. 
RAPHIDES, xxxvii, 31. 
RASPBERRIES, analysis of fruit, Bley, 

X, 254. See Essence, Oleum, etc. 
RAT poison (carbonate of baryta), xxxvi, 

21 (squills), xxix, 83; xli, 352. 

Compare Phosphorus paste ; Plasma 

PHOSPHORI. 



196 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



RATANHIA brasilibnsis = Para rhatany, 
xlii, 329. Compare Krambria ; Rha- 
tany. 

RATTLESNAKE poison and antidote, 
Brainard, xxvii, 182 — influence of its 
poison on plants, Salisbury, xxvii, 
153. 

REAGENTS and their use, Duhamel, xiii, 
92 ; Virey, i, 51 — limits of action, 
Hastings, xiii, 200. 

REALGAR, artificial, xxiii, 74. 

RED color of azotized bodies by nitrates of 
mercury, Lassaigne, iv, 175 — of fruits, 
Berzelius, xi, 31 — leaves, Ber?.elius, 
xi, 33— from quercetic acid, Hlasiwetz, 
xxxii, 444 — for wall-paper, etc. (red 
chloride of chromium), xxiii, 90 — by 
partial dehydrogenation of alcohol, 
sugar, starch, etc., Rouchas, iv, 241. 

' , Baden-, Winter, xxxiv, 3 7. 

' , carmine, Hlasiwetz and Grabowsky, 

xxxviii, 504. 

, CHROME. See Chrome red. 

, vegetable Indian = Pelletier's san- 

talin, xxxii, 9. 

, IODINE, Heller, xvi, 155. 

from Peru, Virey (seeds of a Malpig- 

hia), iii, 265. 

REDDISH blue, from decomposition of 
oscillarias, Ne«s d'Esenbeck, viii, 
334. 

REFRACTING power of saline solutions, 
Reichert, xxxviii, 567. 

REMELINA scopulorum contains no io- 
dine, Dickie, xxvi, 439. 

REMIJIA, ii, 290; iii, 24; vii, 334; xi, 
247. 

ferruginea; Hilarii; panicu- 

lata ; Vellozia, xvii, 85. 

RENNET. Compare GA8TRIC JUICE ; Pep- 
sin. 

composition, Deschamps, xii, 197 — 

preparation, Bourgarel, xxvii, 456 — 
properties, Deschamps, xii, 194. 

LIQUID, Dorvault, xxxv, 37 — Procter, 

jr., xxxv, 36 — Soubeiran, xxxv, 37. 

wine. See Wine, rennet. 

REPERCOLATION. See Percolation, 

FRACTIONAL. 

REPORT about application to the Agri- 
cultural Bureau, xxx, 491. 

of the Royal College of Physicians 

of Edinburgh on adulteration of drugs, 
X, 114. 

of Committee on Patent Medicines, New 

York, vi, 60. 

. See under the respective headings. 

REPTILES, action of carbolic acid, Fay- 

rer, xii, 414. 
RESEDA luteola contains quercitrin, 

Hlasiwetz, xxxii, 222, 444. 
RESEDACEJE, dehiscence of pollen, Ald^ 

ridge, xiii, 216. 
RESIN, products of distillation, Scheil, ' 



xxxiii, 240 — as preservative of fattt/ 
substances, Olmstead, xxii, 325 — ren- 
ders lard semifluid, Olmstead, xxii, 
325 — solubility in chloroform, Lepage, 
xxiv, 147. 

SPIRIT, igniting point of vapor. Hut- 
ton, xii, 254. 

, VIRGIN, Hunt and Pochin, xxxii, 

333. 

RESINS of commerce, Simmonds, xxix, 71, 
134, 225, 377, 465— Vaughan, xxr, 
230, 333 — emulsions, Constantin (W. 
& B., 902), xxvii, 61 — of the isomeric 
essential oils, Hy. Rose, viii, 44 — col- 
ored resins from action of sulphuric 
acid on essential oils. Hare, ix, 210 — 
Procter, jr., x, 23 — solubility in differ- 
ent menstrua, Sacc, xlii, 242. 

RESIN, hemlock, Chas. Ellis, ii, 18 — col- 
lection in Michigan, Stearns, xxxi, 
29. 

RESINA d'angelim pedra (from Ferreira 
spectabilis), Peckolt, xii, 300. 

jALAPiE (compare Jalap resin), adul- 
teration, Daenen (aloes), xxxviii, 375 
— behavior to sulphuric acid. Kaiser 
(W. & B., 1326), xvii, 23— ckaracteri^n 
tics, Bullock and Parrish, xxxiv, 113 
— chemical history. Kaiser, xvii, 23 — 
detection of scammony, resina podo- 
phylli, gamboge. Bullock and Par- 
rish, xxxiv, 117 — of guaiac, Smedt, 
(chlorinated soda W. & B., 1326), 
xix, 238 — preparation, Nativelle, xv, 
33— Planche, vii, 284— Ph. Britannica 
(64), remarks, Haselden, xxxvii, 273 

soft resin as energetic as hard. 

Long xxxiii, 487 — solubility, Bullock 
and Parrish, xxxiv, 113— test for pu- 
rity, Buchner (W. & B., 1326), xxvi, 
446 — yield compared with price, Sou- 
thall, xl, 62. 

of the larch PINE, Guibourt, xii, 

133. 

, NiTRO-siNAPYLic, Hubatka, xvi, 76. 

. poDOPHYLLi (compare Podophyllin, 

Podophyllum, resin), preparaiton, Par- 
rish, xxxiv, 133— Procter, jr., xxxii, 
210— Squibb, xl, I, 1— solubility. Bul- 
lock and Parrish, xxxiv, 114 — yield 
and medical properties, W. G. Parrish, 
xxxii, 208— Procter, jr., xxxii, 210, 
note. 

scAMMONii. Compare Scammonium, — 

detection of guaiac, Boudet (W. & B., 
1326), xix, 238— of gamboge, podo- 
phyllin, resina jalap». Bullock and 
Parrish, xxxiv, 117 — solubility, Bul- 
lock and Parrish, xxxiv, 115 — in chlo- 
roform, Lepage, xxiv, 147 — test for 
purity, Buchner, xxvi, 447. 

RESINEIN, P^raire, xvii, 213. 

RESINEONE, P^raire, xvii, 212. 



PRErARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



197 



ilESINOIDS, Abernethy, xxxiii, 299— Til- 
den, XXX, 270, compare Eclectic, 

PHARMACY, etc. 

RESPIRATOR, charcoal, Darby, xxvii, 
431— Stenhouse ( W. & B , 2 15), xxvi, 
356— xxvii, 169. 
RESPIR ATORY organs, action of carbo- 
lic acid, Lemaire, xxxv, 555. 
HEVENUE, INTERNAL, xxxiv, 382 ; xxxvi, 
181 ; xxxvii, 315, 440 ; xxxviii, 92, 282. 
REVIEWS. 

botany and pharmacology : 

Botany of the Northern and Middle 

States, Lewis C. Beck, v, 315. 
Botany, medical, of the Confederate 
States, Fr. P. Porcher, xxxvii, 318. 
Journal of botanical excursions, F. 

Pursh, xlii, 90. 
Herbarium, medical, T. F. Allen, xlii, 
575. 

Monographic der China, H. v. Bergen, 

Prel. No. 87. 
Quinologie, Delondre and Bouchar- 
dat, xxvii, 89. 
•^chemistry, 
general : 

Abel, F. A. and Bloxam, X., Handbook 
of Chemistry, xxvi, 567. 

Booth, Jas. C. and Morfit, C, Ency- 
clopedia of Chemistry, xxii, 3^0. 

Bowman, J., Introduction to Chemis- 
try, xxi, 132. 

Brande, W. Th. and Taylor, A. S., 
Chemistry, xxxv, 285 ; xxxix, 573. 

Fownes, G., Elementary Chemistry, 
xvii, 166 ; xix, 258 ; xli, 478. 

Francis, G., Chemical Experiments, 

xxiii, 95. 

{jrmelin, L , Handbook of Chemistry, 

xxiv, 284 ; xxv, 477. 
Graham, Thos., Elements of Chemis- 
try, XV, 193; xxiv, 290; xxx, 285. 

Gregory, W , Outlines of Chemistry, 

xxiv, 9 1 — Chemistry, inorganic and 
organic, xxix, 89. 

Murphy, John Review of Chem- 
istry, xxiii, 96. 

Odling, W., Course of Practical Chem- 
istry, xli, 575. 

Regnault, V., Elements of Chemistry, 

xxv, 381. 

Roscoe, II. E., Elementary Chemistrv, 
xl, 478. 

Chemical JVew-s, American edition, 

xxxix, 574. 
American Chemist, Ch. F. and W. H, 

Chandler, xlii, 478. 

analytical : 

Ca'n^elmmn, A,, Analysis of urine, 
xlii, 317. 

Noad, H. M., and MorfU, C, Qualita- 
tive and quantitative analysis, xxi, 
227. 

[14] 



Rochlcder, F., Analysis of plants, 
xxxiv, 492. 

Storer, F. II., Cyclopedia of quanti- 
tative chemical analysis, xlii, 574. 

Will, H., Chemical analysis, xxvii, 
191. 

MISCELLANEOUS : 

Attfield, J., iMedical and pharmaceu- 
tical chemistry, xl, 190; xlii, 186. 

Boivman, J., Medical chemistry, xxxv, 
383. 

Dragendorff, G., Monographic des In- 
ulins, xlii, 316. 

Dujlos ', Ad., Erkennung der chem- 
ischen Arzneimitteln und Gifte, 
xxiv, 320. 

Dussance, B., Industrial chemist, 
xxxiv, 383. 

Eliot, C. W., and Storer, F. H., Man- 
uel of inorganic chemistry, xl, 189. 

Funke, 0., Atlas of physiological 
chemistry, xxv, 477, 480. 

Gibbs, W., and Genth^ F. A., Ammo- 
nio-cobaltic bases, xxix, 191. 

Ilusemann, Aug., Pflanzenstoffe in 
chemischer, etc., physiologischer, 
etc., Bezlehung, xlii, 315. 

Lehmann, C. G., Physiological chem- 
istry, xxiv, 286; xxv, 477, 478. 

Liebig, J., Organic chemistry; and 
chemistry in its application to 
agriculture, etc., xv, 180. 

Loiwig, C, Organic and physiological 
chemistry, xxv, 376. 

Miahle, Chimie appliquee a la physio- 
logic and the-apie, xxviii, 189. 

Morfit, C, Chemical and pharmaceu- 
tical manipulations, xxi, 102; xxix, 
17, 94. 

Rand, R. II., Outlines of medical 
chemistry, xxvii, 384. 

, Elements of medical chemistry, 

xxxviii, 575. 

Reene, J. J., Detection of strychnia, 
and influence of morphia on color- 
tests, xxxiii, 576. 

Storer, F. II., Dictionary of solubili- 
ties, xxxv, 189, 573; xxxvi, 463. 

Wor)nley Th. G., Micro-chemistry of 
poisons, xxxi!x, 470. 

dispensatoriks: 

Edinburgh new dispensatory, 1830, 
Andr. Duncan, iii, 250. 

Dispensary and commentary on the 
pharmacopooas of Great Britain 
and the I'nited States, R. Christi- 
son and R. E. Griffith, xx, 198. 

Dispensatory and therai)eutica] re- 
membrancer, J. Mayne and R. E. 
Griffith, XX, 198. 

Eclectic dispensatory, .1. King, xxvi, 
567 ; wvi, 285, 384. 



198 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



REVIEWS {Continued). 

DISPENSATORIES : 

Dispensatory of the United States, 

G. B. Wood and F. Bache, iv, 297— 
V, 309— vi, 76— XV, I7(~xvii, 170 
— xxiii, 389— xxvi, 480— xxx, 284 
— xxxvii, 234— xlii, 284, 

formularies: compare Pharmaco- 
poeias, miacellaneoufi. 
Bendey, IJ., Receipt-book, xxii, 287. 

, Pocket-formulary, xxiv, 190. 

Bouchardat, A., Annuaire, xl, 192, 
379. 

DorvauU, L'ofiicine, xxiii, 321. 

Ellis, Bn\j , Medical formulary, xxvi, 
173— xxxvi, 93— xli, 90. 

Green^ H ^ Selections from favorite 
prescriptions from living American 
practitioners, xxxi, 93. 

Griffith^ R. E.^ Universal formulary, 
xxii, 191 — xxvi, 479. 

Hance^ E, R., Phyaician's compen- 
dium, xli, 93. 

Reese, J. ./., American medical form- 
ulary, xxii, 192. 

Tilden's formulary, xxx, 471. 

Druggists' manual, Prel. No. 93. 

MATERIA MEDIOA : 

Beck, J. p., Lectures on materia me- 
dica, etc., xxviii, 574. 

Biddle, J. B., Materia medica, xxxvii, 
495— xl, 478. 

JJunfflison, R., New remedies, xxiii, 
298— xxix, 88. 

Edwards, H. M., and Vavasseur, P., 
Davies, J., Manual of materia me- 
dica, etc , iii, 246. 

Garrod, A. B., Materia medica, xxxvii, 
319. 

Kost, J., Eclectic materia medica, etc., 
xxx, 186. 

Pereira, J., Materia medica, xxiv, 94 ; 
xxvi, |93, 176— Abridgment by J. 
Farr ; R. Bentley ; R. Warrington ; 

H. Wood, jr., xxxix, 90. 

Royle, J. F., Materia medica, xviii, 
261. 

Siill4, A., Therapeutics and materia 
medica, xxxii, 188 ; xxxvi, 542 ; xl, 
380. 

Tally, W., Materia medica, xxv, 91 ; 
xxvi, 575 ; xxviii, 288, 382. 
Medicine : 

Abortion, criminal, F. H. Storer and 
F. F. Heard, xli, 91. 

Malpractice and medical evidence, J. 
Elwell, xxxii, 285. 

Address, Philadelphia County Medi- 
cal Society, B. H. Coates, xxxii, 
287, 378 — address at centennial 
celebration of Pennsylvania Hos- 
pital, G. B. Wood, xxxii, 190. 



Ansesthesia, modern, inquiry into the 

origin, T. Smith, xxxix, 382. 
New antesthetical agent in surgery 

and midwifery (chloroform), J. V. 

Simpson, xx, 26. 
Etherization, trials of a public bene- 
factor, N. P. Rice, xxxi, 287. 
Cell Doctrine, J. Tyson, xlii, 186. 
Dictionary. See Lexicon. 
Dissection, manual, L. Holden and E. 

Mason, xl, 380. 
Electro-physiology and therapeutics, A. 

C. Garratt, xxxii, 478. 
Hygiene, female, and elements of 

health, E. J. Tilt, xxv, 286. 
Lexicon, medical, R. Dunglison, xxx, 

94 ; xxxvii, 237. 
Lexicon, medical, pronouncing, C. H. 

Cleaveland, xxviii, 94; xli, 190. 
Lexicon, medical, pronouncing,Thom- 

as, xxxvii, 75. 
Medicine, action, F. W. Headland, xxv, 

384 ; xxxi, 487 ; xxxv, 93 ; xxxix, 

287. 

Medicine, principles and practice, A. 

Flint, xli, 91. 
Medicine, principles and practice, H» 

Hartshorne, xli, 191. 
Medicine, history. V. Renouard, xxviii, 

91. 

Medicine, rational, and paradise of 

doctors, J. Bigelow, xxxi, 94. 
Medical department of University of 

Pennsylvania, ^J. Carson, xli, 188. 
Opthahnology, Archiv. Knapp and 

Moos, xlii, 478. 
Opium and its alkaloids, effects, S. 

W. Mitchell, xlii, 188, 
Plastics, D. Prince, xl, 191. 
Poiso7is, 0. H. Costill, xxi, 133. 
Poisons, memoranda. Ph. H. Tanner, 

xxxvi, 463. 

Prescription book, physician's (terms, 

etc.), xxiii, 297. 
Stimulants and narcotics, F.E. Anstie, 

xxxvii, 495. 

Strychnia, A. P. Reid, xxxi, 92. 
Surgery, minor, F. W. Sargent, xxxiv, 
383." 

Therapeutics and materia medica, A. 
Slille, xxxii, 188 ; xxxvi, 542 ; xl, 
380. 

Therapeutics, E. J. Waring, xxxix, 
92. 

Toxicology, J. T. Ducatel, v, 310. 

Veratrum viride and veratria, R. Ar- 
mory and S. G. Webber, xlii, 91. 

Viridin, veratroidia, etc., H. C. Wood, 
jr., xlii, 189. 

MiSCELhAMEOUS : 

Half-yearly compendium of medical 
sciences, Butler and Brinton, xl, 
476. 



* 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 199 



REVIEWS (Continued). j 
M?:dicine, Miscellaneous : i 
Conspectus of medical sciences, 

Hartshorne, xli, 190. 
Medical times, xlii, 573. 
Nature and art in curing diseases, J. 

Forbes, xxx, 579. 
Family adviser and guide, H. Harts- 
horne, xl, 477. 
Physical basis of life, T. H. Huxley,, 

xlii, 286. I 
Positive medicinal agents, Keith, i 

xxvii, 93. 1 
Medical microscopy, J. G. Richard- j 

son, xlii, 575. 
Proceedings of the State medical so- j 

ciety, Michigan, xli, 381. 
Transactions of the American medi-: 

cal association, xxvii, 91. 
Pacific medical and surgical journal.; 

xxx, 192. ; 
Peninsular and independent medical J 

journal, xxx, 191. ' 
Pharmacopojias. Compare Pharmaco-| 

PCEIAS, page 173. i 

Briiuh (64), xxxvi, 285. ! 

Dublin ( ISO! ),F. Barker and W. F, ; 
Montgomery, iii, 32'2. I 

(50), xxiii, 6. [ 

Gallica (Codex, 1837), x, 285. ! 

Helvetica (65,) xxxix, 207, 312. 529. j 

London (36), ix, 319. j 

Suecica (69), xlii, 87. 

0'nitedStrites{30),u,3l6-iu,ei—-{40), 
xiv, 179— (50), xxiii, 292 ; xxviii, 
191— (60), XXXV, 401 ; xxxvi, 209, 
298, 393 ; xxxvii, 326. ; 

Veterinary, R. N. Tuson, xlii, 91. | 

^ Miscellaneous i 

(Compare Formularies). 
Gray's supplement (47), Redwood, 
XX. 20. 

Prescribers' pharmacopoeia, xxv. 575. 
Practioners' pharraacopceia, John 

Foote, xxviii, 383. i 
Pharmacy : I 
^4ZMm;?7' association Philadelphia col-{ 

lege of pharmacy, report, xxxvii, j 

238 ; xxxix, 380 ; xl, 286. 
American pharmaceuticil association.! 

proceedings : xxix, 93 ; xxx, 90 ; 

xxxi, 88 ; xxxii, 90, 57 , xxxv, 92 : 
xxxvi, 182; xxxvii, 159; xxxviii, 190; 
xxxix, 188; xl, 90; xli, 189; xlii, 183. 

Britiuli pharmaceutical conference, 

proceedings, xli, 92; xlii, 90. j 
California pharmaceutical society,} 

proceedings, xlii, 187. j 
Chemis^t and druggist.^ xlii, 474. | 
Con^rr^s' gene rale dts pharmaciens, xi,| 

90 ' 1 
Congres pharmaceutique, coniptes! 

rendus, xl, 382. 



Drogues^ falsification , dc, A. Bussy and 
A F. Boutron — Charlard, ii, 154, 
242. 

Druggiiit''s circular and chemical gaz- 
ette, xxix, 191. 

Fluid extracts, Sam. Rotton. xxx, 287. 

Thayer's catalogue, xxxviii, 

287. 

Journal of materia medica and for- 
mulary, Tilden & Co., xxx, 473. 

Journal, pharmaceutical, Canada, xl, 
575. 

Journal and transactions Maryland 
college of pharmacy, xxxi, 287. 

PhoTmacint, Chicago, xl, 476, 574 ; 
xli, 471. 

Pharmacy, historical sketch of pro- 
gress, J. Bell, XX, 265. 

Pharmacy, practical, E. Parrish, * 
xxvii, 574; xxviii, 10; xxxi, 585; 
xxxvi, 188. 

Pharmacy, practical, Mohr, Redwood, 
Procter, jr., xxi, 96. 120, 213. 

Miscellaneous : 
Calendar, pharmaceutical society,. 

Great Britain, xl, 92. 
Revista farraaceutica, xxxviii, 102. 
Tratado de farraacia y farmacogno- 

sia, etc., C. Murray, xxxviii, 412. 
Utility of colleges of pharmacy, L. 

Steiner, xxix, 192. 
Miscellaneous : 

Academy of natural sciences, Phila- 
delphia, origin and progress, 

Ruschenberger, xxiv, 189. 
Address of Geo. Benthara. etc.. G, 

Busk, xl, 93. 
Adulterations, manual, L. C. Beck, xix., 

266. 

, dictionnaire, A. Chevallier, 

xxiii, 95 ; xxiv, 291. 

Agriculture, manual of scientific and 
practical, L. Campbell, xxxi, 585. 

, report of commissioners, xl, 

382 ; xli, 288. 

Amazon and Atlantic slopes of Soutb 
America, M. F. Maury, xxv, 374. 

, explorations, Herndon k Gib- 
bon, xxvi, 173. 

American philosophical society ^ proceed- 
ings, xlii, 185. 

Cavendish, life, Wilson, xxiv, 289. 

Dalion, John, memoirs, Ch. Henry\ 
xxvii, 380. 

Geology, elements of chemical and. 
physical, G. Bischotf, xxvii, 287. 

Hints on various subjects, etc., A. J„ 
Matthews Co.,x.\viii, 480. 

Industrie, Dictionnaire del', etc., v,316. 

/??.Pfr/eA/Y//ffl, American, investigations, 
J. Jones, xxix, :!81. 

[ron monger^i' and racial trades' ad- 
vertiser, xxxii, 480. 



200 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



REVIEWS {Continued). 
Miscellaneous : 

Is it U H. R. Storer, xxxix, 574. 
Lardners handbooks of natural phil- 
osophy and astronomy, xxv, 285. 
Michigan University, xli, 287 ; xlii, 
285. 

Jlicroscojnst' s companion, J. King, 

xxxi, 391. 
Mind and matter, B. Brodie, xxx, 577. 
Mineral resources of United States, 

J. R. Brown & Taylor, xli, 88. 
Naluralist, American, xxxix, 573. 
Patent^ report of commissioners, xxxv, 

191. 

Perfumery^ S. Piesse, xxviii, 383 : 

xxxix, 384. 
Phantom bouquet, E. Parrish, xxxiv, 

492. 

Plants illustrating the organic life of 
animals, H. Coultas, xxix, 380. 

Reveiiue commission. United States, 
xxxviii, 282. , 

Rogers, Jus. B., life, J. Carson, xxv, 
92. 

Smithsonian Institution, report, xl 

383 ; xlii, 89. 
Soap making, A. Ott, xxxix, 383. 
Sunbeam 9iX\d. spectroscope, Townsend. 

xxxv, 287. 
Technology^ chemical, F. Knapp, xx, 

280; xxi, 299. 
Tree, what may be learned from a, 

H. Coultas, xxxi, 392. 
Vinegar, manufacture, Ch. M. Weth- 

erill, xxxii, 478. 
Why not ? H. R. Storer, xxxix, 382. 
War department, circular no. 6. 
xxxviii, 287. 

RHABARBERIN, Caventou, i, 147. 

RHABARBIN, Cobb, xxiii, 244. 

RHAMNETIN, Stein, xli, 331. 

RHAMNIN, preparation, etc.. Stein, xli. 
331 — Winkler, xxv. 526 — converted 
by ripening into cathartin and grape- 
sugar, Winkler, xxv, 527.[ 

FERMENT, Stein, xli, 331. 

GUM, Stein, xli, 331. 

RHAMNOTANNIN, Stein, xli, 331. 

RHAMNUS CATHAKTicus as cathartic, v, 
207 — coloring principle of berries. 
Stein, xli, 331 — green dye from bark, 
Cbarvin, xxxiii, 378 — berries contain 
quercetin, Bolley, xxxiii, 219. 

LOTUS, of ancient Egypt, v, 142. 

RHAPONTIC of the mountain (Rumex 
alpinus), i, 142. 

NOSTRAS (Centaurea centaurium), i, 

142. 

. Compare Rheum ; Rhubarb. 

RHATANY. Compare ' Khameria ; Ra- 

TANHIA, 

Savanilla, Hanbury, xxxvii, 193. 

RHEIN, viii. 284. 289 — behavior to bi- 



chromate of potassa test, Jenkins, 

xxxiii, 528. 
RHEUM. Compare Rhapontic ; Rhubarb. 
AUSTRALE, Prel. No. 78 — analysis, 

Henry, viii, 282, 289, 290. 

COMPACTUM, i, 143 ; viii, 282. 

Emodi, Prel. No. 78; x, 108; xviii, 

68. 

humile, properties, Webster, vii, 115^ 

leucorrhizum, X, 107. 

moorcroftianum, X. 108. 

NAXUM, X, 107. 

nostras, i, 142. 

palmatum, i, 142 ; viii, 282. 

RHAPONTicuM, i, 143; viii. 282 — cul- 
tivated in England, xix, 200. 

RIBKS, X, 108. 

KOSSICUM, i, 140. 

SIBERK'UM, X, 107. 

SINENSE, i, 140. 

SPiciFORME, X, 108: xviii, 68. 

tartaricum, i, 140. 

TURCICUM, i, 140. 

UMMJLATUM, i, 143: viii, 282; x. 107: 

xviii, 64. 

! VERUM, i, 140. 

Webbianum, xviii, 6S, 

RHEUMATISM, remedies (ereasote pills), 
Reich, viii, 88 ; (silicate and benzoate 
of soda; W. & B, 1471, IGOO), Soc- 
j quet k Bonjean, xxix, 314. 
jKHIGOLENE, its explosive character de- 
j nied, JdcksQn, xl, 349 — properties and 
j use, Bigelow, xxxviii, 363 — volatili- 
I zation prevented. Kraeko\v!zer, xl, 
350. 

RHINANTHIN, Ludwig, xlii. 403. 

RHINANTHOGENIN, Ludwig, xlii, 403. 

RHIXANTHUS alectorolophus, chemical 
examination, Ludwig, xlii, 403. 

RHIZOBOLUS saouvari. xxxvi, 295. 

RHIZOCTONIA crocorum (fungus on bulb 
of saffron), xxi, 41. 

RFIIZOPHORA GYMXORHiZA, its bark sup- 
posed to be monesia, xiii, 152. 

mangle. See Mangrove. 

RHODEORETIN, analysis. Kaiser (W. & 
B., 489j, xvii, 25— Mayer, xxv, 353 — 
preparation, etc.. Kaiser, xvii, 23 — 
Mayer, xxv, 353. 

RHODEORETINOLE, Kaiser (W. k B., 
489), xvii, 23, 29. 

RHODIUM, from ore of platinum, Fremy, 
xxviii, 186. 

RHCEADINA, Hesse, xxxviii, 568; xxxix, 
122 ; xlii, 396. 

RHCEAGENINA, xxxix, 123; xlii. 396. 

RHCEAS, flowers analysed, Maier ( W. & B., 
710), xviii, 211 — percolation with 
water, packing, Soubeiran, viii, 226. 

RHUBARB. Compare Rheum ; Rhapon- 

TIO. 

, accmnt, Benj. Ellis, i, 139 — adultera- 
tion with domestic rhubarb detected 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



201 



RHUBARB {Continued). 

Billot (W. & B., 706, note), xxxii, 224, 
433 — analysis, Brande, Henry, Peretti, 

i, 148; Herbero^er, xviii, 125 — behav 
ior to nitric acid, Garod, xxii, 242 — 
botanical notice, Prel. No. 76, Carson, 
X, 107 — commercial varieties, i, 139 — 
constituents^ de la Rue and Miiller, 
XXX, 366, 442 — crystals (oxalate of 
lime), xxxvii, 32 — entitled to entry^ 
xxiv, 25 ; xxv, 303 — volatile o«7, Bo- 
nastre, iii, 143 — percolation with 
water, packing^ Soubeiran, viii, 226 — 
powder., adulterated (colombo ; gam- 
boge ; Peruvian bark), vii, 11 — infe- 
rior root, X, 276 — (flour, turmeric) 
xi, 169 — (biscuits), xxxi, 511 — pow- 
dering, loss, 1, 138 — Covell, xxxix, 
116 — Redwood, xxi, 31 — proportion 
of soluble matter in different kinds, i, 
149 — acid of stalks, L^incaster, xxxi, 
193 — varieties, i, 139 — distinguished 
by ioduretted hydriodic acid, Geiger, 

ii, 338. 

of the Alps (Rumex alpinus), i, 150. 

Banbury, xxvi, 182. 

of the BEGGARS (Thalictrum flavum), 

i, 150. 

, BucHARiAN, analysis, Herberger, 

xviii, 125 — note, Pereira (W. & B., 
706, note), xviii, 64, 124 — description, 
Fero, xxxix, 218. 

— — , Canton (stick), Pereira (W. & B., 
704), xviii, 63 — description, Fero, xxxix, 
215. 

, Chinese, analysis, Herberger, xviii, 

125 — description, i, 140; Fero, xxxix, 
216, 217 — growth and preparation, 
Farre, xxxviii, 153 — spurious, xv, 16 
— yield of watery and alcoholic ex- 
tract, i, 149. 

, English, Bigg, xix, 199 — Usher, 

xxxix, 550 — comparison with Russian 
rhubarb, Michaelis, xxiii, 179. 

, European, description, i, 142. 

, FALSE (Thalictrum flavum), i, 150. 

, French, description, i, 142 — yield 

watery and alcoholic extract, i, 149. 

, Himalayan, Pereira (W. & B., 706, 

note), xviii, 68. 

, IMPERIAL, Walpers (supposed to be 

mythical), xxv, 471. 

of the MONKS (Rumex alpinum), i, 

142. 

, MUSCoviTic, description, Fero, xxxix, 

216. 

of the PEASANTS (black alder), i, 150. 

, rhapontic, i, 141. 

, Russian, analysis, Herberger, xviii, 

155 — description, i, 140 ; Fero, xxxix, 
212 — comparison with English rhu- 
barb, Michaelis, xxiii, 179 — yield of 
alcoholic and watery extract, i, 149, 

from Sandwich Islands, xxvii, 2tO. 



, Siberian (rhapoatic), analysis, Her- 
berger, xviii, 125 — description. Bell, 
xxvi, 120— Pereira (VV. & B., 706, 
note), xviii, 66, 123. 

, Taschkent, Pereira (W. & B , 704), 

xviii, 124. 

Turkey, i, 140 — Maisch, xxxix, 216, 

note. 

, white, Walpers (supposed to bo 

mythical), xxv, 471, 
RHUS coPALLiNUM, acid of the berries, 
Rogers, vii, 56. 

coRiARiA, berries for obtaining malic 

acid, Trommsdorff ( W. & B., 7 1 1, note), 
vii, 148. 

GLABRUM. See Sumach. 

MBTOPiUM, medicinal properties, Des- 

courtilz, viii, 104 — Hamilton, xviii, 
44. 

MOLLIS, yields blue color, vi, 73. 

oxycantha, V, 350. 

RADicANS, yellow dye, Sella, viii, 175 

— percolation with water, packing, 
Soubeiran, viii, 225.' 

succedaneum, source of Japan wax, 

xxxi, 562 ; xxxv, 559. 

TOXICODENDRON. See Toxicodendron. 

RICE, amount of starch, Dragendorff, 

xxxv, 139 — detection of potato starch, 
Scharling (W. & B., 537), xv, 76. 

RICHARDSONIA brasiliensis, iii, 196. 

emetica, iii, 196. 

rosea, iii, 195. 

scabra, analysis, Pelletier (W. & B., 

483, note), iii, 191. 
RICIXIN, Tuson (W. & B., 593, note), 

xxxvi, 423. 
RICINUS apricanus, xxvii, 339. 
communis, analysis, Bower (W. & B., 

593), xxvi, 207— Tuson, xxxvi, 423 — 
as cathartic, v, 207 — cultivation in Cali- 
fornia, xl, 185 — in Illinois, Procter, 
jr., xxvii, 99 — in Italy, Groves, xxxix, 
57 — in Sandwich Islands, xxvii, 239 
— leaves as galactogogue, McWilliara 

(W. & B., 592), xxiii, 176 seeds, 

emetic properties (W. & B., 598), Cal- 
loud, xxi, 270 — as purgative, Mialhe, 
xvii, 77 — properties, Scattergood (W. 
& B , 593), xxviii, 206. 
RIGA BALSAM. See Balsam, Riga. 
RINGS of nobili. See Nobili. 

RIPIPHORUS bimaculatus; flahdla- 

tus are destitute of activity; sub^ 

dipterus is slightly epispastic, Farines, 
ii, 166. 

RISH-E-TAFT, Schroff, xxxiv, 334. 
ROAN (leather), preparation, Calvert, 

xxxvi, 407. 
ROB de Lafkecteur, Prel. No, 124, 126, 
127. 

suDORiFious, (Smith) : Beral, ii, 68. 

ROBINIA CARAGANA, yields blue color, vi, 
72. 



202 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



ROBINIA PSKUD-ACACiA, contains aspara- 

gin, Hlasiwetz, xxvii, 528 — as emetic, 

iv, 279 — properties, vi, 284. 
ROBININ, relation to rutin and quercitrin, 

Zwenger and Dronke, xxxv, 32, 
ROCCELLA FDCiFORMis (Orchella from 

Aden), xxv, 336. 

TINCTORIA, iv, 346. 

ROCK OIL. See Petroleum. 

SALT. See Salt, Rock. 

ROHUN bark, ix, 345. Compare Swik- 

TENIA FEBRIFUGA. 

ROOTS , absorbing power, Jessen, xxxiv,155 
— collection, proper time, Buchner, xv, 
141 — Kittel, i, 230— preservation, Enz, 
xxxii, 556. 

ROSA centifolia, analysis of tincture, 
Enz, xl, 32. 

GALLiCA, atiah/sis, Filhol (W. k B., 

712), xxxv, 315 — percolating with 
w liter, packing, Soubeiran, viii, 226 — 
amount of tannin, Bowman, xli, 194, 

ROSACE^E, dehiscence of pollen, Ald- 
ridge, xiii, 216. 

ROSANILIN, compare Fuchsin — assay, 
Mayer, xxxv, 401 — as test for free 
fatty acids, Jacobsen, xl, 336. 

, MURIATE. Fuchsin. 

ROSE BLOOM, Lavel's, composition, Chan- 
dler, xlii, 369. 

COLOR for cotton and silk, Malegue, 

xxvii, 84. 

ROSEIX (Hoffmann s Rosanilin), Nichol- 
son, xxxv, 342. 

ROSES, cultivation in India, Jackson, xii, 
250 — at Mitcham, Bell, xxiii, 34 — how 
to obtain large heads, ix, 88 — preser- 
vation (salt), Martin, xxxi, 258. 

ROSE GERANIUM. See Pelargonium odor- 

ATISSIMUM. 

wood, charcoal, absorption of am- 
monia, Smith, xxxv, 563. 

ROSIN. See Resin. 

ROSOLIS, xxvii. 372. 

ROTTENSTONE, origin, xxxii, 463— John- 
ston, xxvi, 78, 

ROTTLERA schimpkri. See Musenna. 

TINCTORIA. See Kameela. 

ROTTLERIN, Anderson, xxxii, 325. 

ROUGE, Chinese card-, xxvi, 183. 

, LIQUID, xxvi, 190. 

, polishing, Vogel, jr, xxix, 69. 

, TOILET, Piesse, xxviii, 273. 

RUBBER. India, fc'ee Caoutchouc. 

, 'Hard, dentist's, composition. Wild- 
man, xxxviii, 185. 

RUBIACEyE, composition of acids found 



in various plants, xxiii, 355 — constitu^ 
ents, Rochleder, xxv, 243. 

RUBIA TINCTORIA, constituents, Rochleder, 
xxv, 242, 243 — crystals (oxalate of 
lime), xxxvii, 32. 

RUBIAN (of Schunk),^is impure rubery- 
thric acid, Mayer, xxxv, 100, note. 

RUBIDIUM, Bunsen, xxxiii, 571 ; xxxiv, 
67 ; xxxv, 430 — Boettger (from mother 
liquor of table salt), xxxvi, 108 — m 
beetroot, coffee, grapes, tea and to- 
bacco, Grandeau, xxxiv, 440 — in 
Quillaya, xxxvii, 32. 

PLATiNO-CHLORiDE^solubiIity,Crookes, 

xxxvi, 144, 

bicarbonate ; carbonate ; ni~ 

trate; hydrate; sulphate; 

chloride, Bunsen, xxxiv, 67, 68. 

RUBUS c^sius, yields blue color, vi, 72. 

iD.iius. See Raspberries. 

viLLOSus, amount of tannin, Bowman, 

xli, 194. 

RULES for young experimenters, Fara- 
day, i, 125. 

RUM, igniting point of vapor. Hutton, xli, 
254. 

RUMEX ALPiNus (sometimes substituted 
for rhubarb), i, 142. 

CRispus, comparison of products by 

maceration and percolation, Boullay 
and Guillermond, x, 10. 

RUMICIN, composition, Thann, xxxi, 154 

identical wilh chrysophanic acid, 

Thann, xxxi, 152 — preparation, Geiger, 
xxxi, 153 — Riegel, xxxi, 153. 

RUNNET. See Rennet. 

RUSHES (Juncus) for paper making, 
xxviii, 170. 

RUSMA, Piesse, xxviii, 270. 

RUSPINI'S styptic, iii, 77. 

RUST. See Iron ; Steel. 

from LINEN, Runge, xxix, 454. 

RUTA, influence of drying, Schoonbroodt, 
xli, 322~contain3 quercitrin, Weiss 
and Kummel, xxxii, 444. 

RUTACEtE, dehiscence of pollen, Al- 
dridge, xiii, 216. 

RUTILIN, Braconnot, iii, 263. 

RUTIN, relation to robinin and quercit- 
rin, Zwenger and Dronke, xxxv, 32. 

RYE, analysis of ashes, Schrader, xxxir, 
92 — impurities, xlii, 403 — carbonized as 
tooth powder, xxxiv, 92 — starch, mi- 
croscopically examined, Raspail, xi, 
21, 27 — amount, Dragendorff, xxxv, 
139 — reaction with tincture of guaiu" 
cum, xxiii, 185. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



203 



SAB A.DILL A, adulteraied with capsules of 

Chelone carapanulata and gen- 

tianoides, Shatfner xxxviii, 500 — ori- 

gin (Asagraea officinalis), Guibourt, 

xxxviii, 498. 
SABADILLIN, Hubschraann (W. k B., 

1431), XXV, 133. 
SABBATIA ANGULARis, description and 

properties, D. B. Smith, ii, 213 — as 

tonic, V, 290. 
SABINA, analysis, Needles (W. & B., 723), 

xiii, 11, 15 influence of drying, 

Schoonbroodt, xli, 322. 
SACCHARATBS, Beral, iii, 177. 
SACCHARIDE of carragheen, Mouchon, 

xvii, 190. 

SACCE^ARIiNE substances of acid fruits, 

Buignet, xxxiii, 213. 
liquids clarified, Leplay and Cuisi- 

nier (W. & B., 1035, note), xxxiv, 551 

— precipitation of lime by bone-black, 

Anthon, xxxiii, 570. 
• matters, combination with tartaric 

acid, Berthelot, xxx, 154. 
SACCHARO-CHIRETTIN, Kemp, xlii, 

534. 

SACCHAROLE, haschicin, Laneau, xxviii, 
364. 

SACCHARUM. See Sugab,. 

AROMATfouM, Turner, xli, 118. 

SACHETS, Piesse, xxvii (au Chypre, 'iVl— 
a la Frangipanni, 372 — a V heliotrope, 
372 — lavender, 372 — a la rnarichale, 

372 — millefleurs, 372 — a la mousselaine, 
312— pate houly, 31 "i— Portugal, 373— 
rose, 373 — sans nom, 373 — santalwood, 

373 — vervaine, 373 — vetivert, 373 — vio- 
let, 374). 

SACRED BARK, Mayer, xxxvii, 179. 
SAFFLOWER (Spain; Egypt; India), vii, 
345. 

SAFFRON. See Crocus. 

, BASTARD. See Safflowbr. 

SAFREN (hydrocarbon of oil of sassa- 
fras), Grimaux and Ruotte, xli, 430 — 
xlii, 176. 

SAFROL (from oil of sassafras). Grimaux 
and Riiotte, xli, 43:)— xlii, 176. 

SAGAPENUM, account, Cooley, xvi, 230 
— analysis, Brandes, Pelletier (W. «& 
B., 1594), xvi, 230 — behavior to cam- 
phor, Planche, x, 214, 215 — entitled 
to entry, xxv, 303 — purification, Mou- 
chon, jr., vii, 49 — Proctor (W. & B., 
147, note), xxxv, 356. 

, ABTiFioiAL, Cooley, xvi, 231. 

SAGITTARIA sagittipolia, properties, 
vi, 286. 

SAGO cultivation in the East, i, 31 — com- 
mercial history, Planche, ix, 214 — 



Hamilton, Hooker, vii, 188 — properties^ 
Guibourt, ii, 48 — micro.vco;??ca^ exami- 
nation, Raspail, xi, 17, 18, 27 — ought 
to be substituted by potato starch, 
Raspail, v, 345. 

from Malaccas (white, red, blue), 

composition, xli, 432, 

SAGUS farinaria, ii, 48 ; farinifera^ 

vii, 189; genuina, \\\, 189; 

inermis, vii, 189; Poitei, ix, 214; 

Rumphii, vii, 189. 

SALAD PASTK, Groves, xl, 56. 

SALAMANDER'S blood (= fuming nitric 
acid), xxxvii, 355. 

SALEP, analysis, de Dombasle, Guibourt, 
Vauquelin, Caventou, xii, 25, 26, 27 
— description, etc., Duhamel, xii, 23 — 
Guibourt, ii, 49— Landerer (W. & B., 
1594), xxii, 231 — starch, under the 
microscope, Raspail, xi, 26, 28. 

, French, xxx, 401. 

, German, Barnickel, xxxiii, 404. 

, ROYAL, Hanbury, xx.ci, 361. 

SALICARIA, dehiscence of pollen, Ald- 
ridge, xiii, 216. 

SALICIDSS, Piria, xl, 142. 

SALICIN, behavior to acids, Peschier, iiij 
60 — Braconnot, Piria, xi, 158, 159 — 
to bichromate of potassa test, Jen- 
kins, xxxiii, 528 — to bromine, Blen- 
gini, vi, 334 — to chlorine, Piria, xi, 
160 — to oxidating bodies, Piria, xi, 
135 — to ozone, Gorup-Besanez, xxxvi, 
168 — to reagents, Fresenius, xxxviii, 
554 — to sulphuric acid (and with per- 
manganate of potassa), Guy, xxxiii, 
526 — constitution (a glucoside), Gay- 
Lussac and Magendie, ii, 248 — Gay- 
Lussac and Pelouze, ii, 337 ; xi, 135 
— Tyson and Fisher, iii, 213 — Pesch- 
ier (alkaline), iii, 60 — Piria, xi, 135 
— conversion into rutilin, Braconnot, 
iii, 263 — derivates, Piria, xi, 133 — dia- 
Zysfrf, Graham, xxxiv, 315 — in inter- 
mittent Jever, Fioris, xi, 83 — as 
source of Jormic acid, Doebereiner, 
vi, 172 — preparation, Braconnot (W. 
& B., 736), iii, 174— Duflos, v, 350— 
Tyson and Fisher, iii, 213 — Leroux, 
ii, 248 — Peschier, ii, 337 — properties, 
Gay-Lussac and Pelouze, ii, 337 — 
Herberger, iii, 235 — solubility in gly- 
cerin, Blockey, xxix, 556 — Adolphus, 
xxxix, 150 — in Spiracece, Wicke, xxvi, 
60 — passes unchanged into the urme, 
Landerer, xxxvi, 336. 

SALICINEii^], dehiscence of pollen, Ald- 
dridge, xiii, 216. 

SALICON (= carbolic acid), xxxv, 552. 

SALIC YLE, composition, etc. ,Piria,xi,l36. 



204 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



SALICYLE, BROMIDE, Piria, xi, 151— be- 
havior to ammonia, Piria, xi, 157. 

, CHLORIDE, Piria, xi, 149 — behavior 

to ammonia. Piria, xi, 151. 

HYDRUBET, Piria, xi, 137, 140. 

, OXIDE. See Acid, salicylic. 

SALIGENTN from salicylous acid, lleincke 
and Beilstein, xxxvi, 110. 

SALINE solutions, f reezing, Rndor , xxxv, 
69 — yT/'ra(7/??^power,Reichert, xxxviii. 
567. 

SALIRETLV, Piria, xi, 159, 160. 
SALISBURIA ADiANTHiFOLiA, Hanburj, 

xxxiii, 502. 

SALIVA, human, composition of ashes, 
xvii, 240, 

SALIX, tannin yields sugar, Stenhouse, 

xxxiv, 254. 

SALSEPARIN, identity with smilacin 
(Folchi), pariglin (Palotta), parillinic 
acid (Batka), Poggiale, vii, 36, 38 — 
with kinovic bitter, Winkler, viii, 207 
— preparation^ Thubeuf (W. & B.. 753), 
V, 174— Boral, xii, 245. 

. Compare Acid parillinic ; Parig- 
lin; Smilacin. 

SALSOLA kali contains no iodine, Fyfe, 
Sarphati, Dickie, xxvi, 439, 

TRAGUS, analysis of ashes, Guibourt, 

xii, 264. 

SALT. Compare Saline ; Sodu chlori- 

DUM. 

, adulteration.^ Chevallier, xvi, 287 — 

manufacture from mother-liquor of 
salt-marshes and muriatic acid, Mar- 
gueritte, xxix, 45 — poison to plants, 
Randall, xxi, 73 — statistics, xxxix, 256. 

from Cape Verde Islands, Morgan, 

xxiii, 127 — Idaho, xxxviii, 330 — Lou- 
isiana (Vermillion mine, Petite Anse), 

XXXV, 557 ; xxxviii, 328 Nevada, 

xxxviii, 330 — Pennsylvania (analysis 
by Booth and Garrett), xxv, 366 — 
Saginaw Valley, Garrigues, xxxr, 257 
Sandwich Islands, xxvii, 237 — St. Do- 
mingo, xxxvii, 395. 

Crab-orchard, analysis, Peter, xxxii, 

238. 

, ice-, xxxvi, 108. 

RADICAL theory, refuted, Hare, xv, 

101, 201. 

Rock, formation, Margueritte, xxix, 

351 — near Berlin (Prussia), xii, 336 
— Louisiana (Petite Anse), xxxviii, 
328 ; analysis, Riddell, xxxviii, 329. 

of Derosne (Narcotia), vii, 125. 

, Saratoga, Hodgson, jr , xxvii, 502. 

of Sbguin (morphia), vii, 125. 

SALTS, AMPHiDE, Hare, xv, 101, 201. 
, constitution, Graham, x, 346. 

DELIQUESCENT, to keep (oil of tur- 
pentine), Druchar, viii, 87. 

' insoluble, in analvsis, Demarcaj, vii, 

73. 



METALLIC, precipitated by animal 

charcoal, Weppen, xviii, 204. 
, MINERAL (insoluble), in plants ren- 
dered soluble by organic matter, 
Terreil, xxxiv, 508. 

(soluble) MUTUAL ACTION without and 

within the body, Melsens, xxxviii, 521. 

, Prkston, Mounsey, xxvi, 301 — 

Piesse, xxvii, 79. Compare Salts, 

SMELLING. 

RocHELLE. See Potass^] et &oy>m 

tartras. 

, SMELLING, Allchin (Parrish, 388), 

xxxiii, 351 — Piesse, xxvii, 78. Com- 
pare Salts. Preston. 

SOLUTION, reduction of iernperalurt^ 

Hanamann, xxxvi, 104 — Rudorff, xli^ 
425 — of small quantities, Ebert, xlii, 
542. 

VOLATILITY of fixed salts in vapor of 

water, Larocque, xxi, 256, 
SALTPETRE. See Potass^ nitras. 

, Chili. See Sod.e nitras. 

SALVE. See Ointment; Ceratum ; Un- 
guentum. 

SALVIA HisPANicA, Guibourt, Mexico,. 

xxxviii, 502. 
SAMADERA indica, analysis, Blume, 

xxxi, 342. 
SAMADERIN, Blume, xxxi, 342. 
SAMBUCUS canadensis as cathartic, v, 
208. 

nigra, analysis of bark, Kramer, (W.. 

& B., 739), xviii, 214, 217 activt 

principle, Simon (W & B., 739), xii, 
250 — blue color, vi, 72 — for dropsy, 
Solon, V, 176 — flowers in perfumery^ 
Piesse, xxvi, 367. 
SAMPHIRE, See Crithmum. 

oil. See Olkum, samphire. 

SAND, green. See Marl. 

, iron, from New Zealand, analysed,. 

Mushet, xxxiii, 330. 
SANDARAC, account, Simmonds, xxix,. 
229 — behavior to camphor, Planche,. 
(W. & B., 195, note), x, 214, 215— 
detection in mastic by camphor,. 
Planche, x, 216 — solubility in chloro- 
form, Lepage, xxiv, 147 — in various 
menstrua, Sacc, xlii, 242. 
SANDALWOOD, origin, vii, 280. Com- 
pare Santalum. 
SANDWICH ISLANDS, materia medica, 

Gulick, xxvii, 234. 
SANGUINARIA canadensis, analysis, Lee, 
vii, 32 ; NewboId,xxxviii,496— contains 
puccina, Wayne (W. & B., 741),xxviii, 
523 — as cathartic, v, 205 — description,. 
etc, D. B. Smith, iii, 93— has the 
virtues of scilla ; senega; digitalis; 
guaiacum ; ammoniacum, Tally, iii^ 
96. 

SANGUINARINA, behavior to bichromate 
of potassft test, Jenkins, xxxiii, 538 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 205' 



SANGUINARINA {Continued) 

— to nitric acid and to sulph\iric acid, 
Gu}'-, xxxiii, 526 — composition^ Shiel 
(W. & B., 740), xxviii, 42— Naschold, 
xlii, 322 — identity with chelerythrina, 
Shiel (W. & B., 740), xxviii, 41— 
preparation^ Dana (W. & B., 740), iii, 
95; xxxvi, 134— Lee, vii, 32 — Shiel, 

xxviii, 42 — therapeutical properties, 
Thomas (W. & B., 742), xxxvi, 134. 

, ACETATE, Thomas, xxxvi, 140. 

, CHELiDONATE, Wavne, xxviii, 523. 

, SULPHATE, assay, Mayer, xxxv, 401 

— therapeutical properties, Thomas, 

xxxvi, 139. 

TARTRATE, Tully, xxxvi, 135. 

(eclectic), Parrish, xxiii, 335. 

SANGUIS DRACONis. See Blood, dragon's 
SANGUISUGA medicinalis; offici- 
nalis, iv, 268. Compare Leeches. 
SANITARY museum (American) at Paris, 

xxxviii, 382. 
SANTALIN, Dussance, xxxii, 9— Plum 

mer, xxvii, 1 15. 
SANTALUM acuminatum (Australian 

peach), xxxv, 453. 

album, vii, 280. 

freycinetianum, vii, 280. 

lanceolatum, xxviii, 74. 

, analysis^ Dussance, xxxii, 6 — on its 

coZor, Plummer, xxvii, 115 — dyeing^ 

Winner, xxiv, 374. 
SANTONIN, aniAeZmm^?c properties. Perry, 

xxix, 368 — behavior to bichromate of 
potassa test, Jenkins, xxxiii, 528 — to 
beat, Guy, xxxiii, 526 — to light, Ses- 
tini (W. & B., 1330), xxxvi, 527— to 
sulphuric acid, (and with permanga- 
nate of potassa), Guy, xxxiii, 526 — 
composition, Liebig, vi, 173 — prepara- 
tion : GaWon^^ XV, 278 — Guillemette, 
xii, 247— Koehler, iii, 174; xii, 247— 
Merck, vi, 172; xii, 247— Wittstein, 

xxx, 124 — solubility in glycerin, Adol- 
phus, xxxix, 150 — Blockey, xxix, 556 
— in chloroform, Schlimper, xxxii, 
160 — prevention of mistakes {strych- 
nia)^ recommends only the yellow to 
be used, Henkel, xxxiii, 404 — tasteless 
in unbroken crystals, Dannecy, xl, 
330 — yellow color not due to oxygen, 
Zantedeschi, xvii, 211. 

SAORIA, vermifuge from Abyssinia, xxvii, 

474 — contains boracic acid, Wittstein; 

Apoiger, xxx, 159. 
SAOURI glabra, xxxvi, 295. 
SAP, ascent, depends on capillarity, Ja- 

min, xxxii, 352. 
SAPANWOOD, charcoal, absorption of 

ammonia and carbonic acid. Smith, 

xxxv, 563. 

SAPHORA JAPONICA contains quercitrin, 

Stein, xxxii, 444. 
SAPINDUS EDULis, xxxvi, 295. 



laurifolius ; rigidus ; sapo- 

naria, contain saponin, xii, 215, note. 

SAPO. Compare Soap. 

GUAJACINUS, Plenk, ii, 342. 

jALAPiNus, Plenk, ii, 342. 

S APONARI A, time for collecting, Nentwich, 
XV, 142 — crystals (oxalate of lime),. 

xxxvii, 32 influence of drying, 

Schoonbroodt, xii, 322 — comparison 
of products from maceration and per- 
colation, Boullay & Gnillermond, x, 
10 — petals for adulterating saffron, 

xxxviii, 226. 

SAPONIN, composition, Buzzy, xii, 215, 
note — identical with senegin, BoUey 
(W. & B., 767), xxvii, 43— found in 
various plants (see xii, 215, note;, 
xxxv, 98, 99) — properties, Bussy, xii^ 
215, note. 

(for cleaning kid gloves), Duvignau,. 

xix, 237. 

SAPROCHROME color from decomposi- 
SAPOTA MUELLERi yields balata, xlii, 178,. 
tion of oscillaria, Nees d'Esenbeck, 
viii, 336. • 
SAPROCYANIN, color from decompo- 
sition of oscillaria, Nees d' Esenbeck, 
viii, 336. 

SARATOGA water. See under Water. 
SARCODE, xxxiii, 333. 
SARKOSINA, formation, Volhard, xxxv, 
33. 

SARRACENIA flava, in diarrhoea. Palm- 
er, xii, 292, 396. 

PURPUREA, in small-pox. Miles (W. & 

B., 1596), xxxiv, 91 — Morris, xxxiv, 
362 — Logic and Dudfield, xxxv, 47* 
— Millington, xxxviii, 308. 

SARSAPARILLA, active principle. Pal- 
lota, i, 156 (compare Salseparin) — 
analysis, Batka (W. &B., 752), vi, 174 
— Soubeiran, xv, 11 — aromatic princi- 
ple, Thubeuf, ii, 248 — comparison be- 
tween diflferent varieties, Marquart, 
XV, 232 — crystals (oxalate of lime), 
xxxvii, 32 — yield of extract from dif- 
ferent varieties, Thubeuf, iii, 46; iv, 
343 — Ruscheuberger, xviii, 259 — con- 
contains iodine, Guillermond, xxiii, 
277 — denied by Versmann, xxxiii, 315 
— origin, Martius, v, 259 — Seemann, 
xxvi, 256 — percolation with water, 
paclcvng, Soubeiran, viii, 225 — pharma- 
ceutically considered, Hancock, i, 295; 
ii, 37 ; x, 325 — powdering, loss, Co- 
vell, xxxix, 116 — Redwood, xxi, 31 — 
preparations, Beral, ii, 64 (see differ- 
ent headings) — contains amorphous 
starch, xxvi, 180 — therapeutic proper- 
ties, Bocker, xxxi, 568. 

, BOURBON, Virey, vii, 84. 

, BRAZIL, Richard, xv, 276. 

, cochin china, Martius, v, 259. 

, HONDURAS, Martius, v, 269. 



^06 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



SARSAPARILLA, Indian. See Hemides- 

MUS INDICUS. 

, PERU, Martius, v, 259. 

, RED, Carson, xxi, 296. 

, RIO NEGRO, X, 325. 

, SOUTH AMERICA, Mai'tius, V, 259. 

, TAMPico, Martius, r, 259 — Virej, ix, 

206. 

, TEXAS, Thomas (W. & B., 1515), 

xxvii, 7. 

, VERA CRUZ, Martius, v, 259. 

. Compare Smilax. 

SARSAPARILLTN. See Salseparin. 

SASSA GUM. See Gum, sassa. 

SASSAFRAS tree, Australia, see Ather- 
osperma moschata. 

chemical history, Procter, jr., xxxviii, 

489 — essay ^ Procter, jr., xxxviii, 481 
— root bark^ analysis, Reinsch (W. & 
B. 755), xviii, 159; xxxviii, 489— 
pith^ time of collecting, Procter, jr., 

xxviii, 412 — account, Procter, jr., 
xxxviii, 483 — Patrick versus Merrill 
& Co., xxxix, 372 — wood, Procter, jr., 
xxxviii, 487. 

SASSAFREIN, Hare, ix, 157. 

SASSAFRID, properties, Reinsch, xviii, 
159 — Procter, jr., xxxviii, 489. 

SASSARUBRIN, Hare, ix, 210. 

SASSY BARK, analysis, Santos (W. & B., 
1597), xxi, 97— Procter, jr., (W. & B., 
1596), ;^xxiii, 301, 310— about Proc- 
ter's 7?ame (Erythrophleum judiciale), 
Lindley (W. & B., 1597), xxix, 114. 
Compare Erythrophleum. 

SAUCY BARK, See Sassy bark. 

SAURURUS cernuus (superior to buchu), 
Phares, xxxix, 468. 

SAWDUST, yield of oxalic acid by po- 
tassa, Possoz, xxx, 552. 

SAW PALMETTO, starch, as food, Smith, 
x, 256. 

SAXIFRAGA virginica, xli, 437. 

SAXIFRAGE^E, dehiscence of pollen, 
Aldridge, xiii, 216. 

SCABIES. See Itch. 

SCALES for tarring vessels, Gu^rin and 
Renou, xxvi, 15. 

SCAMMONIA syriaca, xx, 2. 

SCAMMONY, account, Carson, xx, 1 — 
adulterations, ix, 59; x, 123; xi, 169; 
xxxi, 511 ; xxxiv, 330, (compare 
Scammony, vKQTiTio\j^)— analysis. Bull, 
{ W. & B., 759), xxiv, 350— Carson, xx, 
10, 11, 12 — Christison, xx, 7 — Gui- 
bourt, X, 8, 9 — Johnston, xvii, 31 — 
Keller, xxx, 256 ; xxxi, 574 — Spir- 
gaiis, xxxi, 377 ; xxxiii, 430 — assay, 
Squibb, XXXV, 50 — c.o?istitution, see 
analysis — products of decomposition, 
see analysis, Keller ; Spirgatis — en- 
titled to e7itry, xxv, 303 ; xxiv, 24 — 
&nd Jalap identity of active principle, 
Osborne, xv, 26 — powderinq loss, i. 



138 — Covell, xxxix, 116 — Redwood, 
xxi, 31 — preparation, Landerer (W. & 
B , 756) xxxiii, 216 — statistics, Squibb, 
xxxv, 49 — proposed substituted by po- 
dophyllin, Bannvart, xxxi, 30 — value, 
Audouard, xxxviii, 208 — varieties, xxiv, 
162 — Carson, xx, 1. 

. Compare Resina scammonii. 

factitious xxx, 473. 

SMYRNA, Hanbury, xxvi, 146 — Mal- 

tass (W. & B., 756, note), xxvi, 139. 

(from W. McAndrew), Garrod, xxxi, 

274. 

SCAPHIUM scAPHiGERUM, Hanbury, xxxiv, 
548. 

SCAPTIN (in digitalis) Radig, xxxv, 292. 

SCHINUS MOLLE, xvi, 151 — Guibourt, 
xxxviii, 503 — contains piperin, Lan- 
derer, xxxv, 157. 

SCHLEICHERA trijuga, xxix, 378. 

SCHffiNOCAULON officinale, source of 
sabadilla, Guibourt, xxxviii, 499. 

SCHOOL, high-, and laboratory of Sa- 
bonne, Paris, xli, 413. 

, polytechnic at Aix-la-Chapelle, xlii, 

476. 

SCHOTIA sPBCiosA, source of African 

guaiacum, vii, 115. 
SCHOUSBCE A coccinea, account, Griffith, 

iv, 187. 

SCIENTIFIC MEN not liable to be suhpec- 
naed in England, xxx, 461. 

SCILLA maritima, for making alcohol, 
Dumas ; Fee, xxvii, 377 — analysis, 
Marais (W. k B., 771), xxix, 361— 
Tilloy, xxvi, 84 — crystals (phosphate 
and oxalate of lime), Pereira, xxvi, 
180 — (oxalate of lime), xxxvii, 32 — 
(citrate of lime), Tilloy, xxvi, ISO— 
as emetic, iv, 286 — powder, Stabler, 
xxiii, 121 — potoderinq, loss, i, 138 — 
— Covell, xxxix, 116 — Redwood, xxi, 
31 — as rat poison, xxix, 83— xli, 352. 

SCILLITIN, preparation, Bley (W. & B., 
762), xxiii, 83 — Lebourdais (charcoal, 
W.&B.,762),xxi, 89— Marais,xxix,361. 

SCITAMINE^, aromatic roots and seeds, 
Guibourt, v, 321. 

SCLEROTIUM CLAvus,xi,121 SeeERGOTA. 

SCOLOPENDRA heros, effects of bite 
and antidote (Tephrosia Virginia), 
Wood, jr., xxxviii, 561. 

SCOPARIUS. See Cytisus scoparius. 

SCORZONERA hispanica contains man- 
nite, Witting, xxxiii, 318. 

Lawrencii, xxviii, 74. 

SCROPHULARIACE^, chemical notices, 
F. F. Mayer, xxxv, 289. 

SCROPHULARIN, Walz, xxxv, 295. • 

SCROPHULAROSMIN, Walz, xxxv, 295. 

SCUTELLARIA lateriflora, medical 
properties, Cleaveland (W. & B., 765), 
xxiii, 370 — in neuralgia, Stabler, xxiv, 
12. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER 



THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



207 



SCUTELLARIA prima ; secunda ; 

TERTIA, XXXvi, 291. 

"SCYMMUS NiCBENSis, fat contains valeri- 
anic acid, Berthelot, xxvii, 375. 

S€YT ALI A CHiNENsis; Loacax, xxxvi, 

295, note. 

^EA-GRAf'S. See ZosTERA MARINA. 

SEALLN(}-WAX. See Wax, sealing. 

^EA- WEEDS contain mannite, Stenhouse, 
xvi, 237. 

SEBAMIUE, Carlet, xxv, 553, 554. 
vSEBINE, Berthelot, xxv, 359. 
SEBUM. See Suet : Tallow. 
SECALE coRNUTUM. See Ergota. 
■SECALIA, preparation, etc., Procter, jr. 

(W. & B , 368), xxix, 540. 
, ERGOTATE, in sporous mafs of Lyco- 

perdon cervinum, Winckler, xxv, 

414. 

MECKEL PEAR, sugar, Brazier, iii, 277. 

SECRETS, MEDICATED, Parrish (Parrish, 
280), xxviii, 18. 

SEDRA CALiFORNiCA, cffccts similar to 
poison oak, Precht, xxviii, 51. 

^EEDS, cultivation, Hagner, vi, 56 — decor- 
ticated chemically, Lemoine, xxxv, 
225 — preserved, Enz, xxxii, 556 — spe- 
cific gravity, Schubler and Renz, iv, 
258 — tenacity of life. Brewer, xxxviii, 
318 — vitality, when transported by 
marine currents, Martins, xxx, 146. 

-SEGARS, HYOSCYAMUS, Seifert, xxvii, 20. 

. Compare Cigarettes. 

SEGUIN'S salt (morphia), vii, 125. 

^EL DE vinaigre (= sulphate of potassa), 
xxvii, 80. 

SELENALDIX, Woehler and Liebig, xix, 
237. 

SELENIUM, preparation, Phipson, xxxiv, 
443 — subliminy temperature, Guy, xl, 
249. 

- — - and AMMONIA, Fluckiger, xxxvi, 28. 

and BROMINE, Loewig, ii, 102. 

<SEMARILLARIA subrotunda, xii, 341. 
SEMECARPUS obovatus, its resin, Sim- 

monds, xxix, 230. 
JSEMPERVIVUM tectorum, juice for warts, 

Codman, xxviii, 367. 
SENECIO doronica, flowers as adulterant 

of arnica, xxxiv, 395. 
hieracifolia. See Erechthites hie- 

RACIPOLIA. 

SENEGA, active principle, Peschier. i, 156 
— adulteration (cypripedium), Fiiicki- 
ger, xli, 20— (giilenia), Duhamel and 
Procter, jr., xv, 256 — analysis, Que- 
venne (W. & B., 766), xxxii, 149— 

Price, viii, 92 Feneulle, Dulong, 

Folki (W. & B., 766), ii, 107— as ca- 
ihartic, v, 207 — description and proper- 
ties, D. B. Smith, ii, 105 — as emetic, 
Iv, 281 — action on the heart, Lom- 
Ibard, ix, 262 — preparations, Procter, 
jr., xvii, 247. 



SENEGIN (identity with saponin W. k 
B., 767), Bolley, xxvii, 43 — separation 
from tincture, Procter, jr., xvi, 71. 
Compare Acid, polygalic. 

SENNA. Compare Cassia (senna). 

, active principle (cathartic acid), 

Dragendorff and Kubly, xxxviii, 374 — 
Groves, xli, 65 — (sennin),Rau, xxxviii. 
193,200; xli,67-(cathartic compound), 
T. and H. Smith, xli, 270 — adulteration 
(Cynanchum), Bell, xiv,323 — analysis^ 
Bley and Diesel (W. & B , 772), xxii, 
67— Rau, xxxviii, 193, 200— boiling 
said to be injurious, Arabian physi- 
cians, xli, 66 — botanical history, Bat- 
ka, xxi, 358— Carson, viii, 177, 266; 
X, 105 — entitled to entry, xxv, 303 — 
griping principle not removed by al- 
cohol, Heberlein, xxi, 184 — volatile 
oil, Bonastre, iii, 143 — comparison 
between maceration and percolation, 
Boullay and Guillermond, x, 10 — 
pharmacological history. Fee, iii, 223 
— Landerer, xviii, 74 (compare bota- 
nical history) — powdering, loss. Red- 
wood, xxi, 31 — tasteless infusion, Bau- 
delocque (coffee), viii, 350 — Bran- 
deis (cold water), xxvii, 375 — rela- 
tive medicinal va/we of different kinds, 
Procter, jr., xvi, 311. 

acdtifolia, xxi, 367. 

from Aden, Vaughan, xxv, 230. 

, African, Bentley, xxx, 360. 

, Alexandria, Fee, iii, 224. 

, American. See Cassia Maryland- 

ICA. 

angustifolia, xxi, 366. 

, Indian, Carson, x, 105 — Royle, xxii, 

137. 

guebelly, viii, 184. 

Italica, viii, 185. 

MOKKA, Fee, iii, 226. 

OBOVATA, xxi, 366. 

ORiENTALis, viii, 184. 

tomentosa, xxi, 367. 

, Tripoli, Fee, iii, 224. 

, wild (Globularia alypum), Martius, 

xxix, 230. 

and prunes, Griffith, viii, 13. 

SENNIN, Rau, xxxviii, 193, 200; xli, 67. 

SEPIA moschata, beaks found in amber- 
gris, Pavne, xv, 296. 

SEPOMETEk (blood ; or permanganate of 
soda). Smith, xxxi, 182. 

SERICOGRAPHIS mohitli, Thomas, 
xxxviii, 302. 

SERPENTS. Compare Snakes. 

bite, antidote (carbonate of ammo- 
nia), Payen, xxxi, 184 — venom, its na- 
ture, Gilman, xxvi, 241. 

, Pharaoh's. See Pharaoh's sbb- 

PENT. 

SERPENTARIA, analysis, Bucholz (W. & 
B., 776), i, 267; xvi, 12— Cherallier 



208 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



SERPENTARIA {Continued). 

(W. & B., 776), xvi, 13— (compare Wie- 
gand on Aristolochia reticulata) 
— commercial source, Bridges, xiv, 118 
— description, preparations and prop- 
erties, I). B. Smith, i, 262 — as sup- 
posed emetic, iv, 278 — as tonic, v, 286. 

SESBANIA CANNABINA, for paper-making, 
xxvii. 42. 

SESQUlBROMO-CmCHONIA, Gregory, 
xxix, 93. 

SESQUISTANMETHYL, xxxv, 214, 215. 

feEVUM. See Suet ; Tallow. 

SHAD, introduction into Southern rivers, 
Daniell, xxxviii, 565. 

SHARON SPRINGS (chalybeate water), 
analysis, Maisch, xxxiii, 105. 

SHELLAC, adulteration detected, Ober- 
doerffer (W. & B., 1544), xxxiii, 313 
— bleaching, Kastner, iii, 264 — Saur- 
wein, xxxv, 21 A:— wlubility in chloro- 
form, Lepage, xxiv, 147 — behavior to 
various solvents, Sace, xlii, 242. 

. Compare Lac. 

vAENiSH, substituted for collodion 

(W. & B., 1545), Mellez, xxiii, 376. 

SHENNEH from Aden (Orchella weed), 
xxv, 336. 

SHERBETS of the East, Landerer, xxiv, 
271. 

SHERRY. See Wine, sherry. 
SHIP'S BOTTOM, coating for iron, xxviii, 
371. 

SHOREA ROBDSTA (= Dryobalanops cam- 
phora), V, 176; xvii, 219; xxiv, 334. 

SHOW BOTTLE colors, xxiii, 87. 

SIALOGOGUES, enumeration, Wright, 
xiv, 351. 

SIDA TiLiAFOLiA for paper-making, xxvii, 
41. 

SIEGENITE (= nickel Linnaeite) xlii, 357. 
SIENNA, American (near Whately), 

xxxvii, 491. 
SIEVES, Harris ( W. & B., 878), xxiv, 314 ; 

xxv, 31. 

, WIRE-, mended with gutta percha. 

Barling, xxvi, 83. 
SILEX, under the microscope, Turpin, 

ix, 263. 

SILICA, hydrated, Liebig, xxviii, 47 — in 
blood of fowls, Henneberg, xix, 153 
— in the higher plants, xxxv, 163 — 
volatilization, Deville, xxv, 363. 

SILICATES as antidotes, Ellis, xxxvi, 432. 

SILICATIZATION, Kuhlmann, xxvii, 523. 

SILICEOUS mineral, soluble in water at 
high temperature, Jeffreys, xiii, 227. 

SILICON (Silicium), electro-chemical beha- 
vior, Becquerel, xxxv, 431 — electro- 
plating with it, Junot, xxv, 319 — 
evolved from fluo silicic acid gas; ap- 
paratus, Hare, v, 243 — in iron, Rich- 
ter, xxxv, 184 — Woehler, xxxiii, 115 
properties, Deville, xxvii, 440. 



SILK, flfC2c?stains removed, xxxvi, 320 — col- 
ored red by nitrates of mercury, Las- 
saigne,iv,175 — ^zWe(/,Pouilly,xxvi,37T 
— ^^raymetallic dye, Robiquet, iv, 173 
— produce of Algeria, xxvii, 107 — rose 
and purple dyed, Malegue, xxvii, 84 
— yield of oxalic acid by potassa. Pes- 
soz, XXX, 552 — behavior to chloride of 
zinc, Persoz, jr., xxxv, 426 ; xxxix,, 
182. 

COLLODION, Persoz, jr., xxxix, 182. 

MOTH, xxxv, 472. Compare Silk- 

WORM. 

, OILED, smell removed (chlorine)^ 

Chevallier, iv, 83 — substituted by 
oiled paper, McGhie (W. & B , 58a,, 
note), xxxi, 272. 

, WATERPROOF (collodiou and fixe<l 

oil), Barnwell and RoUason, xxxii, 
236. 

WORM, account, Guerin-Meneville,. 

xxxi, J 85 — culture and disease, Pas- 
teur, xlii, 462 — from India, xxvii^^ 
110. Compare BoMBYX Cynthia. 

SILPHIUM LACiNiATUM (compass plant),. 
Hill, xxxvi, 37. 

SILURUS GLANis furnishes isinglass, iii,, 
20 ; xviii, 55. 

SILVER, compare Argentum— arfAes/on to 
mercury, Guyton, vi, 360 — cleaning,. 
xxxviii, 475 — Boettger, xxx, 86 — esii- 
mation, Fellenberg, xxxiii, 110 — 
Loewe, xxxii, 44 — hardness, cause,. 
Mathey, xxxviii, 568 — detection of 
lead, Eliot and Storer, xxxiii, 335 — - 
Pisani, xxix, 224 — amount in photo- 
graphs, Pohl, xxxiv, 33 — purification^. 
Berlandt, xxxiii, 318 — Stas, xxxix,. 
166, 246— Wicke, xxviii, 444— limit 
of reaction, Hastings, xiii, 204 — 
Reinsch, xi, 217 — reduction, see Ab- 
genti CHLORiDUM — salts, behavioF to 
alkaline poly-sulphides, Schiff, xxxiii^ 
264 — substituted by aluminium, Reg- 
nault, xxviii, 220 — by alloy, Traluc.. 
xxxiv, 377 — yield, xli, 89. 

coin, detection of lead, Eliot and 

Storer, xxxiii, 335 — Pisani, xxix, 224. 

engraving, Poitevin, xx, 251. 

, fulminating (formed in indelible- 
ink). Burgess, xiv, 160— preparation^ 
Bertholet, xiv, 163. 

, GERMAN (=Packfong; British plate; 

Argentan), xlii, 358. 

iRiDiscENT, Brockelsby, xviii, 50. 

WARE, protected by collodion, Strol- 

berger, xli, 370. 

SILVERING, ELECTRO-, Ruolz, xv, 63. 

GLASS. See Glass, silvering. 

SIMABA CBDRON, Hooker (W. & B., 1489)„ 
xxiii, 184 — Purple, xxvi, 509. 

SIMARUBA, crystals (oxalate of lime)^ 
xxxvii, 32 — account, Griffith, viii, 2K 
Compare Qdassia. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



209 



^SIMARUBA AMARA, viii, 22. 

EXCELSA, XXi, 1. 

GUAYANENSis, viii, 22. 

OFFICINALIS, viii, 22. 

SINAPIS. See Mustard. 

SINAPISM (Lebaique's), Wittstein, xli, 
417. Compare Mustard PAPER ; Mus- 
tard PLASTER. 

SINGAPORE, natural history, Yvan, xvii, 
215. 

SIPEERINA, Mclagan and Tilley (W. & B., 

560), xix, 115. 
SIPHON. See Syphon. 
SIPHONIA BREViFOLiA, xxvii, 546. 

CAHUCHu, iii, 292. 

ELASTiCA, iii, 293; xxvii, 238 (in 

Sandwich Islands.) 

LUTEA, xxvii, 546. 

SPRUCEANA, xxvii, 574. 

. Compare Caoutchouc. 

SIREX gigas (its larva excavates lead), 

xxxvii, 72. 

SIROP DE cuisiNiER. See Rok de cuisi- 

NIER. 

. See Syrupus. 

.SISYRINCHIUM tinctorium, yields blue 

color, vi, 72, 
SITODIUM cauliflorum, xxxvi, 293, note. 
SITOLADON (empyreumatic grain oil), 

Landerer, xxxiii, 110. 
SIZE, for painting in water colors, viii, 173. 
SKATING POND in summer, Bujac, xlii. 

105. 

SKELETONIZING leaves, xxxiii, 551. 

SKIN, discoloration from internal use of 
nitrate of silver prevented, by substi- 
tuting iodide of silver, Patterson, 
(W. & B., 1538), xiv, 328— action of 
carbolic acid, Lemaire, xxxv, 554 — 
bleached, Calvert, xxxvi, 411 — pre- 
served, Wicke, xxvi, 279. 

SKIVERS (Ifather), preparation, Calvert, 
xxxvi, 407. 

SKUNK, oil examined, Swartz, xxxv, 81. 

SMALLPOX. See Sarracenia purpurea. 

SMALT, preparation in Sweden, vii, 173. 

SMEGMADERMOS emarginata (= Quil- 
laya), xii, 210, note. 

SMELLING salts. See Salts, smelling. 

SMILACEJE, dehiscence of pollen, Al- 
dridge, xiii, 216. 

SMILACHIN (from Smilax Chiaa), 
Reinsch, xxxv, 291. 

SMILACIN, Folchi, vii, 36. Compare 
Salseparin. 

SMILAX aspera, vi, 202; xr, 298— bor- 
honica, vii, 84 — brasiliensis, xv, 277 — 
glauca, v, 259 — japicanga, xr, 277 — 
officinalis, xv, 277 — papyracea, xv, 277 
— perfoliata, v, 259 — syphilitica, xv, 277 
— syringoides, xv, 277. 

. Compare Sarsaparilla, 

SMITHSONIAN institution, xxv, 372— 
xxxv, 182, 



SNAKES, antipathy io garlic and tobacco, 
Landerer, xxxiii, 223 — (snake) bile 
antidote to snake bites, Higgins, xlii, 
453. Compare Rattlesnake; Ser- 
pent. 

SNUFF, manufacture, xli, 555 — contains 

copper, Hirschberg, xxxiii, 215. 
SOAP, compare Sapo — alumina as an in- 
gredient, Bonnamy, xxxviii, 85 — 
technical analysis, xvii, 109 — Bolley, 
xxv, 234 — Tissandier, xlii, 353 — co- 
lored, xxvii, 564 — composition of vari- 
ous kinds, Tissandier, xlii, 355 — free 
fat estimated, Bolley, xli, 22— fatty 
acids estimated, Tissandier, xlii, 353 

glycerin estimated, Tissandier, xlii, 

354 — manufacture in Glasgow, xiii, 
214 — loss \n powdering, Covell, xxxix, 
1 16— Remington, xxxix, 396 — resin 
estimated, Sutherland, xxxix, 76 — 
scented, Piesse, xxvii, 558, 563 — for 
soap liniment. Wood, xlii, 268 (re- 
marks, Procter, jr., xlii, 270, note) — 
relative value of diff't rent kinds, 
Graf^ger, xxxiii, 354. 

, ALMOND, i, 236 — Piesse, xxvii, 561 — 

Wood, xlii, 269 — (remarks by Proc- 
ter, jr., xlii, 270). 

bubbles, Procter, jr., xxxviii, 101. 

CAMPHOR, Piesse, xxvii, 561. 

Castile, xxvii, 559 adulteration. 

Maisch (animal soap and soluble 
glass), xxxvi, 102. 

castor oil (as purgative), Stuncke, 
xxv, 128. 
citron, Piesse, xxvii, 564. 
coal-tar, Demeaux, xxxiii, 212. 
flint, viii, 262. Compare Soap, 
glass. 

Frangipanni, Piesse, xxvii, 564. 
glass, Storer, xxxv, 466. Compare 
Soap, flint. 
HONEY, Piesse, xxvii, 562. 
juniper-tar (W. & B., 1568), xxr, 
367. 

liquid, Vogel, jr., xxxix, 415, 
MARINE, xxvii, 559. 
MUSK, Piesse, xxvii, 564, 
Naples, analysis, Faiszt, xxv, 367. 
OIL, xxvii, 559. 

orange-flower, Piesse, xxvii, 564. 
PALM, Piesse, xxvii, 559, 
PATCHOULY, Piesse, xxvii, 564. 
potash, Wittstein, xxv, 270. 
RHYPOPHAGON, Picssc, xxvii, 565. 
rose, Piesse, xxvii, 564. 
SAND, Piesse, xxvii, 562J. 
SANTAL-wooD, Picssc, xxvii, 564. 
SOFT, Wittstein, xxv, 270. 
SPERMACETI, Piesse, xxvii, 564. 
TAR [coal-), Demeaux, xxxiii, 212 — 
{juniper-, W. & B., 1568), xxv, 367. 

, TRANSPARENT (hard and soft), Piesse, 

xxvii, 565. 



210 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATH? NAME OF BASE ; 



SOAP, VEGETABLE (=: cold prepared ex- 
tract of quillaja), xxxii, 243. 

. Windsor (brown and white), Piesse, 

xxvii, 562. 

, YELLOW, xxvii, 5.'9. 

BAKK. fcee QUILLAYA. 

POWDER, Piesse, xxvii, 565. 

SOCCUS ARBOREUS, xxxvi, 293, note. 

SOCIETY, Cavendish, xxiii, 30C)— xxvi, 

567 — xxvii, 185 xxx, 283 xxxii, 

284, 382— xxxiii, 191~xxxiv, 287— 
xxxviii, 189, 291. , | 

, Entomological, Philadelphia,! 

xxxviii, 90. i 

, Medico-botanical, London, i, 26. j 

, Sydenham, xxx, 283. j 

, United, of Chemists and Druggists, I 

Great Britain, xxxiii, 91. } 

, Zeta-Phi, Philadelphia, xxxvi, 180. | 

SODA (vE). Compare Sodium. 

(caustica), compare SoD.ii cabbonas 

— in coal, Wayne, xxxv, 19 — estimation 
ill the soil. Potter, xiv, 317 — in pres- 
ence of magnesia and potassa, Schee- 
rer, xxxii, 445 — manufacture, from cry- 
olite, xxxvii. 468 — Bing, xxxv, 255 — 
E. T. Ellis, xl, 72— Simes, xl, 195— 
Thomsen, xxxv, 245 — from aodium, 
xlii, 510 — from soda .saltn : Bizio, xvii, 

77 Hunter, xxxviii, 172 Pauli, 

xxxiv, 431 — Wfiebler, xxxiv, 526 — 
separation from potassa, Serullas (per- 
chloric acid), iii, 264; iv, 86 — limit 
of reaction on test-paper, Hastings, 
xiii, 203 — aa solvent for various resins 
and gum resins, Sacc, xlii, 243 — volu- 
metric solution. Ph. Britanuica (64). 
Tichborne, xxxvii, 266, note. 

acrtas, crystallized, Reiscbauer, 

xxxiii, 220 — manufacture of commer- 
cial, Bell, xxiii, 146 — Halliday, xxiii, 
148 — Mitscheriich, xxiii, 149. 

-, achilleatk, Zanon. xix, 59. 

ET ARGENT] HYPOS ULI'HIS. DelioUX 

(W. & B., 1532), XXV, 367. 

ARSENIAS, solubility in glycerin, 

Adolphus, xxxix, 150 — Klever, xlii, 
222. 

ASH, manufacture in Glasgow, xiii. 

210. 

BBNzoAS. in gout and rheumatism, 

Socquet and Bonjean (W. & B., 1471), 
xxix, 314 — preparation, Maisch, xxxii, 
205. 

BiCARBONAS, adulteration, Scattergood, 

viii, 114 — test, Procter, jr., xxiii, 5 — 
manufacture, xxiii, 344 — Duhamel, xii, 
182— Newton, xxvi, 47— F. R. Smiih, 
i, 93— Ph. Dublin (50), xxiii, 1 \—solu- 
hility in glycerin, Klever, xlii, 222 — 
yield from cryolite, E. T. Ellis, xl, 72. 

BisuLPHAS, as substitute for alum and 

cream of tartar in dyeing, xx-^ i, 471. 

~ — BisuLPHis, use, Polli. xxxiv, 44 7, 



bitartras, Diehl, jr., xl, 103. 

BORAS. See Borax. 

and BROMixE, Lee wig, ii, 174. 

et CALCis BORAS (= tiukalzitc), xxxi-s^ . 

60, 61. 

CARBONAS, compare Soda (caustica) 

Sod^j sesquicarbonas adulteration^ \ 

test, Procter, jr., xxiii, 6 — contains^ 
arsenic, Fresenius, xlii, 79 — causticity^ 
estimated, Barreswil, xvii, 315 — cokt 
prodrced by solution, Rudorff, xli,. 
426 — commercial (English), estimation 
basf-d upon incorrect equivalent, Pat- 
tinson, xlii, 447 — decolcriziny power 
of charcoal (by phosphorus), Bussy. 
i, 238 — glass vessels, attacked, Emmer- 
ling, xli, 428 — manufacture : history 
Dumas, xxviii, 424 Gossage (sili- 
cate of soda), xli, 1 11 — Kopp (W. 
B., 789), xxviii, 121 — Leblanc, xxviii^ 

425 Malherbe, xxviii, 425 de la 

Metherie. xxviii, 425 — Newton, xxvi^ 

46 Prukuer, vii, 176 Schlcesing 

(salt), xxx, 403— Tilghman, xx, 194 
—Ph. Lo' don (24), Prel. No 19— Ph. 
U. S (3 ). ii, 332 — purification, Ga\- 
Lussac, vi, 350 — Jordan, xxxiii, 404 
— Lienau, xxxiii, 317 — Margueritte^ 
xxix, 46 — sulubil ty in glycerin, Adol -. 
phus, xxxix, 150 — Klever, xlii, 222 — 
statistics, xxxiii, 569 — contains sulpliu- 
rtt of sodium, Fifher. viii, 108 — yield' 
from cryolite, E. T. Ellis, xl, 72. 

exsiccatus, Draper (from bicar>-. 

bonate), xxxiii. 531. 

, NATIVE, Aden, Haines, xxxt» 

442 Hungary, Werner, xii, 174 — 

Sz:ibo, xxiv, 166 Nizam {India)„ 

Bradley, xxv, 350. 
CHLORAS, behavior t© nitric acid. Pen- 
ny, xiii, 226— preparation, Bussy and 
others (Parrish. 374), xxxv, 509 — 
Diehl, jr., xl, 103 — Wittstein, xvii,, 
200 — solubility in glycerin, Klever xlii^ 
222 — as substitute for chlorate of pot- 
assa Gueneau, xxx, 569. 
— — CHLORiNATA. See Liquor iiODM 

CHLORINAT-?': 

ciTRAS, Guichou (W. & B., 1496^^^ 

xxiii, 180. 
, DiGiTALATE, Moriu, xviii, 183. 

, FEBROCYAXATE. See SODIUM, FERKO^- 

CYAXIDE. 

FOUNTAIN, atmospheric, Swan, ix,. 

183. Compare Water, Soda. 

HYPOCHLORITE, xxxvii, 288. 

HYPOPHosPHis, Procter, jr. (W. k B., 

1531), xxx, 120 — explosion, Tromms- 
dortt" (W. B., 1531), xxxii, 87. 

HYPOsuLPHis in analysis as substitute 

for sulphuretted hydrogen, Vohl. 
xxviii, 466 — cold by solution, Rudortf» 
xli, 426 — as test for cyanides, Froehde, 
xxxvi, 125 — pr'^pnrotion: Anthoii, xxj,. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



211 



BOD A (Continued). 

239— Berzelius, xiii, 103; xiv, 351 — 
Duhamei, xiii, 102 — Faget, xxii, 42 — 
Legrip, xviii, 78 — Moachon, xvii, 292 
— Walchner (W. & B., 791), xv, 223 
— purification, Faget, xxii, 43 — use, 
Polli, xxxiv, 447. 

lODATE, aciioii of nitric acid, Penny, 

xiii, 226. 

, WITH IODIDE of SODIUM, Penny, 

xiii, 224. 

LIME, Procter, jr., xxxiii, 270, note. 

MINT, xli, 90. 

NITRAS, contains bromine, xxvi, 161 

— cold produced by eolation, Hana- 
raan, xxxvi, 104, 105 — Rudorff, xli, 
426 — commercial analysis, LeCanu, iv, 
234 — iodine detected. Stein (tin and 
bisulphide of carbon, W. & B., 49), 
xxxi, 170 — native, Brazil, xxxiii, 502 
— Peru, xxiv, 225 ; xxxiv, 263. 

NiTRis, Warrington, xxxvii, 360. 

NITRO-PRUSSIATE. See SoDIUM, NITRO- 

PRUSSIDE. 

OLKATE, Procter, jr., xxxviii, 101. 

PHOSPHAS, action upon fluorspar, 

Briegleb, xxviii, 529 — cold produced 
by solution, Rudorff, xli, 426 — attacks 
glass vessels, Emmerling, xli, 428 — man- 
ufacture: (with boiling-solutions), xvii, 
145 — Boblique (from coprolithes), 
xxxviii, 184— Jean, xl, 372— Ph. Hel- 
vetica (65), xxxix, 315 — limit of re- 
action with magnesia, Hastings, xiii, 
203. 

PHOSPHO-MESiTYLATB, Kane X, 208. 

PiPERATE, Bubo and Keller, xxx, 140. 

PLUMBATE, xl, 277. 

ETPOTASS/E CARBONAS, Fehling,xxxvi, 

419. 

TARTRAS. See POTASS-*: ET 

TARTRAS. 

PYBOPHOSPHAS, Squibb, xxxii, 36. 

SAL.ERATUS, XXvi, 47. 

SCAMMONOLATE, Spirgatis, xxxiii, 432. 

SBSQDiCARBONATE, Hermann, xv, 143. 

, SILICATE, compare Glass, Soluble 

— application, Edwards, xxx, 336 — 
manufacture, Gossage, xli. 111 — in 
gout and rheumatism, Socquet and 
Bonjean (W. & B., 1600), xxix, 314. 

SULPHAS, presence in the air, Gernez, 

xxxvii, 379 — cold produced by solu- 
tion, Rudorff, xli, 426 — IJanamann, 
xxxvi, 104, 105 — anhydrous crgstals, 
iii, 267 — attacks glass vessels, Emmer- 
ling, xli, 428 — manufacture from sea 
water, D. B. Smith "(W. k B., 793), 
Prel., No. 7 ; iv, 188 — native, Arkan- 
sas river, Procter, jr. (W. & B , 793), 
xii, 110 — \\m\t of reaction with baryta, 
Hastings, xiii, 203 — in solution, Birotli, 
xl, 546. 

suL\nim, -Aii nntidote to mercury, As-i 



tri^, xxvii, 531— preparation, Koechlin, 

xxviii, 328 — use, Polli, xxxiv, 447. 
, sulphite-sulphuret, Mouchon, xvii, 

292. See Sod^ hyposulphis. 
sulpho-carbolas, preparation, Guy, 

xiii, 211 — Procter, jr., xiii, 134 — San- 

som, xli, 445. 
tartro-citras, xxx, 89. Compare 

Lemonade, tartro-citrate. 
, tunustate, as test for lime, Son- 

stadt, xxxix, 416. 

, urate, Baumgarten, xxxiii, 402. 

, valerianas, Ph. Dublin (50), xxiii, 

16. 

WATER. See Water, Soda. 

SODIUM (II). Compare Soda. 

catastrophe^ xl, 274 — crystals, Becque- 

rel, iv, 348 — manufacture, Beatson, 
xxviii, 57 — Deville, xxviii, 417, 419 — 
as snbstiivite for phosphur us in match- 
es. Fleck. 

amalgam, xxxv, 185. 

ET ANTiMONii lODiDUM, Sch8effer,xxxii, 

559. 

and BROMINE, Loewig, ii, 174— Castel- 

haz, xiii, 509. 

chloridum, compare salt — behavior 

to animal charcoal, Graham, iii, 150 
— cold produced by solution, Rudorff,. 
xli, 426 — Hanamann, xxxvi, 104, 105 
— in dialyser, Graham, xxxiv, 315 — 
contains iodine, Barruel, i, 154 — 
in needles, Tuson, xxxii, 545 — limit of 
reaction with silver, Hastings, xiii, 205 
— solubility in glycerin, Adolphus, 
xxxix, 150 — in water, Fehling (W. k 
B., 796). XXV, 81 — amount dissolved 
in saturated solution of bicarbonate of 
soda, Anthon, xvi, 208. 

cyanidum, Laming, xviii, 277. 

FERROCYANiDUM, Laming, xviii, 277 

— Newton, xvii, 231. 

, FLUORIDE, Jean, xl, 372. 

lODiDUM, preparation, Guyot, ix, 80 

—Mayer, xxxiv, 293— Procter, jr. (W. 
& B.,'l297), xxvi, 305. 

with lODATE OF SODA, Penny, 

xiii, 224. 

NiTRO-PRUSSiDE, as test for alkaloids, 

Horsley, xxxiv, 433 — behavior to per- 
manganate of potassa, Cloez and 
Guignet, xxxi, 151 — preparation, Ha- 
dow, xxxix, 235— Overbeck (W. & B.. 
1565), XXV, 415. 

SULPHOCYANIDE, Froehdc, xxxvi, 125. 

SULPHIDUM, proparation, Markoe, 

xxxix, 142 solubility in glycerin, 

Adolphus, xxxix, 150. 

SODOM'S APPLE, xxi, 267. 

SOIL, action on carbonic acid, v. d. Brock, 
xxxiii, 464 — effect on active principle!' 
of ])lants, W^arren, xxxviii, 45 — rela- 
tion between nitrification and fertiliza- 
tion, Kuhlraann, xix, 71 — nutriiiii 



212 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



«OIL {Continued). 

power, Mulder, xvii, 40 — estimation 
of potassa and soda^ Potter, xiv, 317 
— relation to vegetation^ Boussingaalt, 
xxxi, 468. 

SOLANIA, behavior to bichromate of po- 
tassa test, Jenkins, xxxiii, 528 — to 
sulphuric acid, Guj, xxxiii, 526 — 
composition, Blanchet; Henry; Moi- 
tessier (differs, according to the plant, 
W. & B , 359, note), xxix, 328— c?e- 
composilion, Zwenger and Kind (W. & 
B., 359, note), XXXV, 34 — is a fflucos- 
ide, Gmelin, xxxi, 417 — physiological 
properties, Otto, vi, 34:8— preparation^ 
Henrj, v, 176 — remarks, Baumana, 
xvi, IQO— solubility in oil, Attfield, 

XXXV, 250 subliming temperature, 

Guy, xl, 247— Helwig, xxxvii, 29; 
xxxix, 540. 

, AMYL-. See Amyl-sola\ia. 

, ETHYL-. See Ethyl-solania. 

■ , ETHYLAMYL-. See Ethylamyl-sola- 

NIA. 

SOLANIDIA., Zwenger and Kind (W. & 
B., 359, note), xxxv, 34. 

SOLANUManthropophagorum,xxxv, 350. 

dulcamara. See Dulcamara. 

LYCOPERSicuM, Iv, 224. — xxiii, 165. 

See Tomato. 

MELONGENA, snpposcd source of So- 
dom's apple, Hasselquist, xxi, 267. 

PSEUDO capsicum, poisonous alkaloid, 

Maisch, xxxvi, 99. 

TUBEROSUM, xl, 16. See Potato. 

SOLDERS, and their fusing point, xxxv, 
428. 

SOLIDAGO adora, as tonic, v, 289. 
SOLUTIO Compare Liquor. 

ACONITI RADICIS NORMALIS, PrOCtcr, 

jr., xxxiii, 103. 

ALOES ET SOD^. See SOLUTIO MET- 

TAUER. 

ALUMiNis ACETATis, Hager, xli, 405. 

ANTiSYPHiLiTiCA, Wemeck, viii, 87. 

ATR0PL15, Wilde, xix, 95. 

GLYCERiNATA, Tichbome, xxxiii, 

64. 

Barresewil's, xxvii, 72. 

for the DISPENSER, Biroth, xl, 544 

(ammoniae murias ; argenti nitras ; 

extracta aconiti, belladounae, hyos- 

cyami, opii; magnesiae sulphas; qui- 

nife sulphas). 
Donovan. See Liquor arsenici et 

HYDRARGYRI lODIDI. 

DovERi, Bonsall, xxvi, 220. 

FERRi lODiDi. See Liquor and Syr- 

UPUS FERRI lODIDI. 

Mettaubr, xxiv, 174 — Plummer, 

xxxi, 309 — Procter, xxxi, 310, note. 
opii Jeremii. 

Pearson's. See Liquor sod/B arse- 

NITIS. 



sarsaparill^:, aqueous, alcoholic, 

vinous, Beral, ii, 65, 66. 

SOD^ SULPHITIS, xxix, 107. 

SOLUTIONS of SALTS, reduction in tern- 
perature, Rudorff, xli, 425 — Hana- 
raann, xxxvi, 104 — supersaturated^ 
crystallized, Gernez, xxxvii, 379 — 
freezing, Rudorff, xxxv, 69. 

SOOT against ringworms, vi, 324 — ecze- 
ma, xxix, 313. 

SORBIN, Pelouze, xxiv, 373 — combina 
tion with tartaric acid^ Berthelot, xxx, 
154. 

SORBUS AucuPARiA, berries yield alcohol, 

ii, 253 — flowers contain propylamine 

Wittstein, xxvii, 110. 
SORES, dressed with fine clay, Schreber, 

xxxvi, 272. 
SORGHUM, account, xxvii, 182— Lover- 

ing, xxx, 105 — yields a dye, Hetet, 

xxx, 397. 

SOUARI NUTS, F. F. Mayer, xxxvi, 294. 
SOUNDINGS, deep-sea, Denham, xxv 
465. 

SOUP for children, Liebig, xxxvii, 226. 
SOY (salt water infusion of cockroaches), 

Webster, vii, 171. 
SOYMEDA FEBRiFUGA, xxix, 77. 
SPARGANCIN, Ileinsch, xlii, 371. 
SPATULA, gas-, Bogget, xxvi, lb— heat 
regulating, Stockton's (W. & B,, 1064, 
note), xxv, 29 — of vjhalebone, Tustin, 

xxii, 191. 

SPECIALTIES, French, Kemp and Bail- 
don, xxix, 347. 

SPECIES, St. Germain, Procter, jr. (Par- 
rish, 85), xxxii, 312. 

SPECIFIC gravity, apparatus, Abraham, 

xxiii, 175 — Eckfeldt and Dubois, xxix, 
173 — and Baumes hydrometer, Pem- 
berton, xxiv, 1 — without calculation, 
Spacowsky, xxxi, 135 — of powders, in- 
soluble in water (W. k B., 877), iv, 
203. 

SPECTRUM analysis, Bunsen and Kirch- 

hoff, xxxiii, 162, 224. 
SPERMACETI. See Cetaceum. 
SPERMACOCE ferruginea ; hexan- 

dra ; poaya; vbrticillata, iii, 

195, 196. 

SPERMCEDIA clavus, xi, 121, 240. See 
Ergota. 

SPHACELIA segetum, xi, 121. See Er- 
gota. 

SPH^ROCOCCUS CRisPi7s,vi, 204 ; viii, 
336 — contains iodine, Sarphati, xxvi, 
438. Compare Chondrus crispus. 

helmintochorton, contains iodine, 

Straub; Happ ; Gaultier, xxvi, 439. 

SPICES, adulteration of powdered, de- 
tected by the microscope, Schroeder, 
xxxvi, 106. 

SPIDER'S WRB as styptic, Robertson, 
xxxix, 67. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESP CTIVE CLASS. 213 



SPIGELIA AMERICANA, iv, 2. 

ANTHELMiNTiCA, iv, 4 — properties and 

use, Noverre, vi, 2(30. 

LAMELLOIDES, iv, 4. 

LONICERA, iv, 2. 

MARiLANDiCA, description and prop- 
erties, Griffith, iv, 1 — as adulterant of 
serpentaria, Wiegand,xvi,l 1 — analysis, 
Feneulle (W. <fc B., 799), iv, 9— Sta- 
bler (W. & B, 799), xxix, 511— as 
cathartic, v, 209. 

' JELLY, Bonnewin, xxviii, 182. 

OPPOSITIFOLIA, iv, 2 ; PEDCNCU- 

LARIS ; SPECIOSA, iv, 4. 

SPIKENARD of the ancients, vi, 21. 
SPTLANTHES oleracea, analysis, Las- 

saigne, vi, 285 — yields blue color, vi, 

73. 

SPIR^ACE.E, physiology, Wicke, xxvi, 60 
- — herbaceous contain salicin (Spirfea 
digitata ; lobata; filipendula; ul- 
maria), Wicke, xxvi, 61 — shrubby i^on 
tain amygdalin (Spiraea aruncus ; 
sorbifolid ; japonica), Wicke, xxvi, 

61 the following contain neither 

amygdalin nor salicin (Spiraea levi- 
gata ; acutifolia ; ulmifolia; spuli- 
folia)) Wicke, xxvi, 61. 

SPIR^A TRiFOLiATA (= Gillcnia trifoli- 
ata), iv, 178. 

ULMARiA contains salicin, Buchner, 

xxvi, 59 — yields oil of winter-green, 
iii, 199. 

SPIRITS, consumption in Great Britain, 

xxiii, 81 — contaminated by copper, 
lead, tin, Hayes, xxxiii, 504. 

'SPIRITUS. Compare TiNCTURA ; etc. 
/ETKERis ACETici, detection of methyl. 

Young, xxxviii, 60. 
CHLORATi preparation, Schaer, 

xl, 393. 

' COMPOSITUS, drops in drachm, 

Bernouilly, xxxi, 441 commercial 

varies from standard, Procter, jr., 

xxiv, 2U—Fh. Dublin (50), xxiii, II 
— remarks, Squibb, xxix, 193 — Taylor, 
xxxv, 411. Compare sul- 

PHURICI. 

MURiATici, drops in drachm, 

Bernouilly, xxxi, 441. 

NiTROST, deprived of acid (by 

bicarbonate of po assa), Harvey (W. 
& B., 1534), xiv, 88 ; xlii, UQ— adul- 
teration (alcohol), Christison, x, 119; 
Hodgson, jr., x, 26 — test for alclehyd, 
Golding Bird (W k B., 1343), x, 355 
— behavior to bicarbonatt of potassa, 
Rademaker, xlii, 106 — critic, Redwood, 
xxxix, 321 — drops and minims, Ber- j 
nouilly, xxxi, 441 ; Proctor, xxxv, 
248 — history, Warrington, xxxvii, 354 
— hydrocyanic acid formed during pre- 
paration, Bastick (W. & B., 1345) xv', 
41; Dalpaiz, xvi, 115 — preparation: 



Bates (A. D. 1700), xxxvii, 355 — 
Brown, xxviii, 248 — Carter (W. & B., 
1342), i, 305, 308— Feldhaus, xxxvi, 
312— Hare, ix, 28— Kopp, xxxix, 327 
—Mill, xl, 539— Mohr, xxvii, 59— 
Moith, xl, 73 — Redwood, xxxix, 330 
— Squibb, xxviii, 289 — Warrington, 
xxxvii, 358 — Ph. Dublin (26), xxxvii, 
356— Ph. Edinburgli (39), xxxvii, 357 
—Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix, 535— Ph. 
London (1746, 1809, 1824, 1851), 
xxxix, 321— Ph. U. S. (30), iii, 81. 

oleosus, Ph. Dublin (50), xxiii, 

11. 

SULPHURIC!, Ph. Helvetica (65), 

xxxix, 535. Compare com- 

POSITUS. 

AMiMONiA: AROMATicus, Tichbotne, 

xxxi, 466. 

BATHING, Freeman's, White, xv, 317. 

■ camphor;e, Ph. Gallica (26), Prel. 

No. 102 — Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix, 
535 — drops in drachm, Bernouilly, 
xxxi, 441. 

ciNNAMOMi, Ph. London (24), PreL 

No. 22. 

coLCHici AMMOXIATUS, Ph. Loudoa 

(24), Prel. No. 26. 

CUCUMBER, Mouchon, xxvi, 426. 

FORMiCARUM, extcmpore, xli, 405. 

Freeman's bathing, White, xv, 317. 

FRUMENTi. See Whiskey. 

HEDEOM.E, Ph. London (24), Prel. No. 

22. 

jUNiPERi, composition of stearopten, 

Wandsleben, xxxiv, 330. 

lavandulte. See Water, Lavender. 

coMPOSiTUS, Coggeshall, xxiv, 

221 — Thompson, xxxix, 512 (remarks 

by Procter, jr., xxxix, 512). 
MENTHyE piPERiT.B, Ph. Londou (24), 

Prel. No 22— Ph. U. S. (60), remarks, 

Taylor, xxxv, 411. 
viRiDis, Ph U.S. (60), remarks, 

Taylor, xxxv, 411. 
, METHYLATED, igniting point of vapor. 

Hution, xli, 254. 
MURiATico-.'HTHKREUs. See Spiritu>! 

;KTHERIS MURIATICI. 

PYRO-ACETious. See Acetone. 

PYROLiGNosus. See Spiritus pyr- 

OXYLICUS. 

PYUoxYLicus, distinction from ace- 
tone, Scanlan (W. & B., 1589), xxii, 
355 — boiling point, xxxvi, 153; Du- 
mas ; Mitscherlich ; Scanlan ; Ure, 
xxiii, 49 — co7)ipositiou, Ber/.elius; Du- 
mas ; Peligot, vii, 65 — detection, Rey- 
nolds (corrosive sublimate and caus- 
tic potassa), xxxvi, 157 — Lieben (io- 
doform test), xlii, 320 — Tuck (iodo- 
hydrargyrate of porassa), xxxvi, 531 
— (oxalic acid), xxxviii, 70 — Young 
(permanganate of potaasa), xxxviii, 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



SPIRITUS [Continued). 

59 — as fuel, compared to alcohol, Bol- 
ley, xxvii, 264 — behavior to heat, 
Kuhlmann, xiii, 45 — table of percent- 
age, Deville, xxiii, 49— Ure, xxiii, 48 
— prepuraliot}, Bell, xxiii, 46 — Ar- 
noult, xxvii, 106 — in Glasgow, xiii, 
213 — purijication, Eschwege, xxxv. 
150; xxxviii, 70— Liebig (W. & B 
803), V, 349— Woehler, xxv, 4i—spe- 
cijic gravity, Dumas : Mitscherlich ; 
Scanlan ; Ure, xxiii, 49 — contains 
sulphur, Phillips, xxiv, 326 — u.^e, Rey- 
nolds, xxxvi, 152 — Tuck, xxxviii,- 70 
— vapor, density, Dumas, xxiii. 49 — 
igniting point, Button, xli, 253. 

ROSMARiNi, Ph. London (24), Prel. 

No. 22. 

SAPONATUS, Ph. Helvetica, xxxix, 

535. Compare Linimkxtum saponis 

CAMPHORATUM. 

siNAPis, Barbet (W. & B , 783), xxxv, 

313; xxxvi, 113— Ph. Helvetica (65), 
xxxix, 535. 

suLPHURico-.ETHEREUs. See Spiritus 

.liTHERIS COMPOSITUS. 
MARTIATUS. See TiNCTURA 

Bestucheffi. 

viNi GALLicj. See Braxdy. 

, WOOD. See Spiritus pyroxylicus, 

SPIROIL, Loewig, xiv, 211. 

SPONGES, account, xxxiii, 332 — accli7nat- 
ization, Lamiral, xxxv, 58 — bleaching, 
Boettger, xxxiii, 224 — burnt, Guibourt 
(W. & B., 1604), iv, 88— on their ova, 
Grant, Prel. No. 29 — contain phos- 
phorus and iodine, Ph. U. S. (30), ii, 
323 — varieties, Baudrimont, vii, 318. 

DIVERS of Calymnos, xxxvii, 60. 

FISHING, of Bahamas, Simmonds, 

xxxiii, 356 — of Ottoman Archipelago, 
Simmonds, xxxiii, 28. 

, GRECIAN. Landerer, xxiv, 259. 

TENTS, Ph. Gallica (28), (W. & B., 

1604), i, 221 — Bryant (mucilage and 
carbolic acid), xli, 27 — Hough (strong 
alcohol), xli, 446 — Nott (alum ; ace- 
tate of lead, etc.), xli, 28 — Simpson 
(mucilage), xli, 28. 

with WAX, Ph. Gallica (28), i, 222. 

SPONGIO-PILIN, xxix, 527. 

SPONTANEOUS generation. Child, 

xxxvii, 492 Pasteur (versus Pou- 

chet), xxxiii, 341. 

SPUNK. See Agaric. 

SPYROL (= carbolic acid), xxxv, 552. 

STAINS, blood (optical properties), Gui- 
bourt, xxxiii, 438 — grease, removed, 
Lenormand, vii, 345 — indelible ink, 
removed, iv, 123; v, 259; vi, 264— 
nitric acid, removed, xxxiii, 111 — ni- 
trate of silver, Deleschamps. iii, 356 — 
J paint, removed. Groves, xxxviii, 
183— for wood, xxxvi, 313, 379. 



STALAGMITES cambogioiues, ix, 50; xiii^ 
19; XX, 126 Compare Gamboge. 
, STANNETHYL, xxxv, 109, 213, 215. 
■ STANNUM. See Tin. 
i STAPHISAGRIA. See Delphinium sta- 

PHISAGRIA. 

STARCH (fecula), memoir, Guibourt, 
208; ii, 46 — adulterations, CheYa,\UeYy 
xvi, 289 — amorphous, xxvi, 180 — ab- 
sorbent power for anilin colors, 
Young, xxxvi, 126 — behavior to va- 
rious acids, Bechamp, xxvii, 139 — to 
chalk. Bechamp, xxxix, 55 — to dias- 
tase, Payen, xxxvii, 336 — to bichlor- 
ide of tin, Payr, xxix, 455 — to water 
at high temperature, Lcew, xxxix, 335 
— conversion into dextrine and glu- 
cose, Musculus, xxxii, 423 — decoloriz- 
ing power of charcoal (with potash), 
Bussy, i, 238 — quantitative examina-- 
tion, Dragendorff, xxxv, 136 — detec- 
tion of Jiour, ix, 353 — 'n\ fruits, Schu- 
bert, xvii, 237 — Buignet, xxxiii, 213 
— structure of grains, Bentley, xxvii, 
138— Field (W. & B., 112), xxvii, 134 
— isolated for the microscope, Dragen- 
dorff, xxxv, 137 — under the micro- 
scope (different kinds of starch), Ras- 
pail, xi, 16, 27— its nature (W. & B., 
112), Biot : Caventou ; Chevreul ; 
Guibourt; Raspail, xi, 265, 266 — es- 
sential oil, Payen, xix, 136 — yield of 
oxalic acid by potassa, Possoz, xxx, 
652— purification, Maiche, xxxix, 460 
— soluble, distinction from dextrine, 
Bechamp, xxvii, 141 — solubility in 
diluted alcohol, Laidley, xxvi, 103, 
note — in glycerin. Cap & Garot, xxvii, 

160 Vogel, xli, 16 cold water, 

Fliickiger, xxxiii, 318— solution for 
volumetric analysis, Mohr, xxxiii, 312 
— tests, remarks on iodine, W. R. 
Fisher, i, 29, note — yield from various 
seeds, Dragendorff, xxxv, 138. 

, glycerolate. See Plasma. 

, iodide, action upon various salts, 

Pisani, xxix, 223 — constitution, Lang- 
lois, vi, 263 — decomposed by animal 
fluids, (W. & B., 1539), Dalton, xxviii, 
261 — dialysed, Guichard, xl, 439 — 
preparation, Buchanan (W. & B., 
1539), ix, 177 — soluble, Duboys, xxiv, 
169 — Quesneville, xl, 402— influence 
of temperature, Lassaigne, vi, 350. 

, sugar See Glucose. 

STATICE ARMERiA contains iodine, 
Dickie, xxvi, 439. 

caroliniana, analysis, E. Parrish 

(W. & B., 806), xiv. Ill, 116— aniount 
tannin, Bowman, xli, 194. 

CORIARIA, xxxiv, 550. 

gmelinii, xiv. 111. 

' latifolia, Hanbury, xxxiv, 550. 

LIMONIUM, xiv, 111. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



215 



STATISTICAL ciRCULAii from Philadel- 
phia Colle^je of Pharmacy, xxv, 371. 

STEAM, corroding effect on lead, Lermer, 
XXXV, 507 — superheated^ its use (Tilgh- 
man's pateut), Procter, jr., xx, 184. 

STEARIN, effect of pressure on fuaivg 
point, Hopkins, xxvii, 107 — as sub- 
stitute for waz^ Proctor, xxxv, 527. 
Compare Acid, stearic. 

STEEL, behavior to weak alkaline solu-j 
tions, Vogel, xi, 81 — broioning, Sau- j 



Schooubroodt, xli, 320 — poisoning by 
smoking, x, 266 — percolation with 
wsiter, packing ^ Soubeiran, viii, 225 — 
influence of soil and cultivation, War- 
ren, xxxviii, 52. 

— JUiCR, assay^ Mayer, xxxv, 26 — dial- 
gsed, Attfield, xxxvi, 530; xxxvii, 208. 

— HEfiDS, amount of active principle be- 
fore and after change of color, War- 
ren, xxxviii, 48 — j>oisoniiig. Sherwoodf 
xxviii. 266. 



ervvein, xxxv, 251 — manufacture with- j STRAW, conVd'ms b iri/ta, Saha-llorstmar^ 



out fuel, Bessemer ( W. & B., 390). 
xxviii, 561 — improved by letting rust 
in the earth. Weiss, v, 88 — rust re- 
moved, iv, 352 — Vogel, xxxiii, 319 — 
Stenhouse, xxxv. 320. 

STEER'S Opodeldoc,' V, 28. 

STEFFENSIA adunca', Bentley, xxxvi, 
118. Compare Matico. 

STELLAT.E, characteristic constitueuts, 
liochleder, xxv, 245. 

STENANTHUM frigidum, xxxviii, 500. 

STERCULIA ACUMixATA See Kola nuts. 

tragacantha (source of African tra- 

gacanth), Fiiickiger, xli, 439. 

URENS ; FoexiDA, yield spurious 

tragacanth, xxix, 80. 

STEWARD, Hospital. See Hospital, 
Steward. 

STIBIUM. See Antimonium. 

STICTA aurata, lichen ou Loxa bark. xi. 
252. 

STILL, pharmaceutical, Cur man, xli, 197 
— Neynaber, xxxvii, 166 — Procter, jr. 
(Parrish, 297), xxxvi, 12 — Wiegand, 

xxxvi, 22. 

STILL INGIA 8EBIFBRA. See Tallow, 
vegetable. 

sylvatica, description, etc., Frost 

(W. & B., 807), XX, 304. 

STOMACH PUMP, Goddard, vi, 169— sub- 
stitute, Hogden, xlii, 458. 

STOXE, artificial, Kuhlmann, xxvii, 523 — 
coloring, Kuhlmann, xxvii, 524 — de- 
struction of green mouldy Squibb, xli, 
263 — and iron cement, xxxix, 87. 

flour in China, Biot, xii, 161. 

WARE, chemical, manufacture. Cliff 

& Co 

STORAX. S?e Stvrax 
STOREKEEPERS, medical, Rittenhouse, t 

xxxvii, 87. 

STOPPER, how removed, Faraday, i, 46 
— cork, with wooden top, xxiv, 272 — ■ 
India ruobrr, xxxiv, 91. ! 

STRAGONOFF'S tincture. See Ttnctura, j 

SxRAaONOPF's. ' 

STRAMBOCARPA pubbscen.s, source of 
mezquite gum, xxvii, 17. j 

STRAMONIUM. Compare Datura 1 

leaves, ac/«ye principle destroyed by| 
caustic alkalies, Garrod ( W. & B., 809), ! 
XXX, 127, 228,545— infiuenceofrf?-,5/m^, i 



xxxiii, 406 — yield of oxalic acid by po- 
tassa, Possoz, xxx, 552 — fjr paper- 
\ making, xxviii, 169. 
STRAWBERRY tea, Kletzinsky, xxviii, 
1 14. 

STRONTIA, behavior to antimoniate of 
potassa, Wackenroder, xvi, 37 — dis- 
tinction from salts of baryta, Moretti^ 
Prel. No. 32 — detection in lin>.estone^ 
Andrews, vi, 81 — Engelbach, xxxv^ 
33 — water of crystallization, Phillips^ 
vii, 158. 

— , carbonate, solubility in water, Fre- 

senius, xix, 51. 
, suLPH.'iTE, solubility in sulphuric 

acid, Struve, xlii, 319 — in water, Fre- 

senius, xix, 51. 
STRONTIUM, properties, Bunsen, xxvii, 

359. 

, CHLORIDE, solubility iu alcohol, Fre- 

seriius, xix, 53. 

, IODIDE, Henry, iv, 263. 

STRUTHIIN, Bley. xxvii, 43. 

STRYCHN ACE.*:,' active principles, Mar-^ 
er, xxxvi, 215. 

STRYCHNIA, adulteration, Robiquet, iii, 
175 — Christison, x, 121 — Wayne and 
Reakirt (oxalic acid), xxviii, 24 — an- 
tidote (hydrocyanic acid), Reid, xxxi,. 
92 — (chloralhydrat), Liebreich, xlii,, 
248 — (iodine and chlorine), Donne^ 
vi, 264 — (tannin ; iodine, etc., W. k 
B., 1356), Bellini, xxxvi, 128— (nut- 
galls), Guibourt, ii, 83 — (kermes min- 
eral, W. & B., 1356), Thorel, xxiii, 
84 — (lard), Pindell, xxvii, 555 — (iodu- 
retted iodide of potassium, W. & B., 
1356), Bouchardat and Gobley, xxiii, 
84 — (Valeriana), Palmer, xli, 119— in 
beer, etc., detected, Graham and Hoff- 
mann, XXV, 172 — behavior to reagents^ 
Fresenins, xxxviii, 547 — to bichro- 
mate of potassa test, Jenkins, xxxiii,, 
528 — to bromine, Blengini, vi, 334 — 
to chlorine, Pelletier, x, 160 — to chlo- 
rine and ammonia, Andre, viii, 213 — 
to chromate of potassa and sulphuric 
acid, Eboli, xxix, 369 — to iodide of 
cadmium and potassium, Marmd, xli» 
18 — to iodohydrargyrate of potassa, 
.Mayer (W. & B., 1542), xxxv, 21, 23. 
— to nitric acid. Caventou, i, 75 — 



216 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



STRYCHNIA {Continued). , 
Guj, xxxiii, 526 — to nascent oxygen,! 
Marchand, xvi, 201 — to pentachloiide i 
of antimony and phosphoric acid. 
Schulze, xxxii, 137, 235 — to perchlo- 
ric acid. Bullock, xxxvi, 31 — to soda 
bicarbonate in presence of tartaric 
acid, Oppermann, xvii, 298 — to sul- 
phuric acid: (and with permanganate 
of potassa), Guy, xxxiii, 526— to tan- 
nic and gallic acids, Henry, vii, 228 — 
composition. Regnault, xi, 219 — detec- 
tion: Bert (carbolic acid), xxxix, 180 
— Erdmann (fusel oil), xxxi\^, 354 ; 
XXXV, 30 — Hat{en (in pres»^nce of tar-j 
trates ; W. & B , 1355, note),) xxx, 59;! 
xxxiii, 218 — Marshall Hall (physio- 
logical test on frogs, W. & B., 1355, 
note), xxviil, 25Y — Rodgers and Gird- 
wood (W. & B., 1354, note), xxix, 355 
Schachtrupp (fu?el oil), xli, 205 — 
!Stas (W & B., 1233, note), xxix, 267 
— Vogel (in saccharine powders). 

xxvi, 471 — de Vrij and v. d. Burg; 
(Stas' method), xxix, 267 (compare 
texts)— \\Qro\(i doses in chronic diar- 
rhoea^ Kendall, xxxix, 438 — estimation 
(iodohygrargyrate of potassa), INlayer. 
xxxvi, 217 — phynological action mod- 
ified by iodide of methyl. Crura;! 
Brown; Frazer, xl, 442 — poiHoniny.^ 
X, 82 ; xvi, ,154; xxv, 462 ; xxvi, 295; 
xxviii, 244; xxix, 317, 318; xxx, | 
470; xxxii, 42; xxxvi, 502, 510; 
xxxix, 254; xli, 125; xlii, 309; see 
Mistakes — preparation: Bert (carbolic 
acid), xxxix, 180 — Caldwell (from St. 
Ignatius bean), xxix, 295 — Henry, 
(tannin), vii, 233 — Horsley (without 
alcohol, W. & B., 1352, note), xxviii 
553 — Lebourdais (charcoal), xxi, 91 
— Molyn (fermentation, W. & B., 1352, 
note), xix, 98 — Williams (benzole, 
W. & B., 1353, note), xxvi, 339— on 
pure and impure, Robiquet, vi, 232 — 
salts, separated from solution by car- 
bolic acid, Bert, xxxix, 180 — sohibiliii/ 
in alcohol, Cap and Garot, xxvii, 159 : 
Flumrner and Kelly (W. & B., 1353)^ 

xxxi, 24, 408 — in chloroform, Lepage, 
xxiv, 148 ; Pettenkofer, xxxi, 232 ; 
Schlimper, xxxii, 160 — in glycerin, 
Adolphus, xxxix, 150; Blockey, xxix, 
556; Cap and Garot, xxvii, 159; 
Klever, xlii, 222 — in olive oil. Cap 
and Garot, xxvii, 159; Pettenkofer, 

xxxii, 185 — in water. Cap and Garot, 

xxvii, 159 ; Plummer and Kelly, xxxi, 
24, 408 — subliming temperature, Guy, 
xl, 247 — Helwig, xxxvii, 29 ; xxxix, 
539. 

TESTS (compare detection)^ bichromate 

of potassa^ Bingley (in presence of 
artar emetic, etc., W. & B., 1355. 



note), xxviii, 474 — Brieger (in pres- 
ence of sugar, morphia, quinia). xxiii, 
82 — Copney (details; and sequence of 
colors, W. & B , 1354), xxviii, 458— 
Guy (details), xxxiii, 517 — (sulphuric 
acid must be applied cold), Guy, 
xxxiii, 518 — Hagen (in presence of 
tartaric acid, etc., W. & B., 1355, 
note), xxx, 59; xxxiii, 218 — Horsley 
(minutire and precautions), xxviii, 
549; xxxiv, 432— Lefort. xxv, 414— 
Otto (W. & B , 1354), xix, 77— Reese 
(in presence of morphia), xxxiv, 212 
— Thomas (versus Reese, W. k B., 
1355), xxxiv, 227 chlorate of po- 
tassa, Slater, xxviii. 368 Copney, 

xxviii, 460 fervid-cyanide of potas- 
sium. Davy (W. k B., 1354), xxv, 414— 
iodic acid., Landerer (W. k B., 1354), 

xxxiii, 1 10 nitro-prnsside of sodiuni, 

Horsley, xxxiv, 400, 432, 433— Rod- 
gers, xxxiv, 400 — permangniiate of pot- 
assa., Wenzell, xlii, SHb— peroxide of 
lead, Marchand (W. k B.. 1353), xv, 
300 — peroxtde of manganese. Mack, xix, 
76 — limit of different tests, Wenzell, 
xlii, 387 — de Vrij and v. d. Burg, xxix., 
268. 

, DILUTED, Biroth. xl. 545. 

ARSKXiTE, Warner, xxx, 315 — Cere- 
soli, xxxvii, 353. 

, B1N0XY-. See F3lN0XV-SH;Y(M:I-MA. 

, BiTANNATR, Henry, vii, 231. 

, BITAUTKATE, ArppC, XXIN , 156. 

, CHLOKATK, Sorulias, ii, 305. 

, CHLORIDE, Pelleiier, x. 160. 

, FORMiATE, Fell, xxx, 220. 

, lODATE, Serullas, ii, 301. 

, METHYL-. See MeTHYL-3TI!YCHX1A. 

, NITRATE, solubility in alcohol. Cap 

and Garot xxvii, 159 — m chloroform, 
Schlimper, xxxii. 160 — in glycerin, 
Adolphus, xxxix, 150 ; Klever, xlii, 
222; Cap and Garot, xxvii, 159 — in 
olive oil: in water, Cap and Garot, 
xxvii, 159. 

, OLEATE, Attfield, XXXV, 250 — Lher- 

raite, xxvii, 73. - 

, oxy-. See Oxystkychnia. 

, SULPHATE, solubility in glycerin, 

Adolphus, xxxix, 150; Klever, xlii, 
222. 

, tartrate, Arppe, xxiv, 156. 

STRYCHNOS Abyssinica, xxv, 234, note. 

ignatia. See Ignatia. 

Nux vomica, bark identical with false 

Angostura., O'Shaugbnessy (W. & B , 
118), X, 144 — crystals (oxalate of lime), 

xxxvii, 32. Compare Nux vomica. 
potatorum, xxii, 253 — Pereira. xxvi, 

182. 

tieute, i, 115 — contains more strych- 
nia than nux vomica, Bernelot-Moens, 

xxxviii, 506. Compare Upas. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



217 



STUDY (what may be accomplished with 
perseverance), Ince, xxvi, 529. 

STYPTIC, compare Haemostatic (glycerin 
and tannin), Bayes (W. & B., 942), 

xxviii, 443 — (sjiider's web), Robert- 
son, xxxix, 67 — Ruspini's, iii, 177. 

STYRACIN, Bonastre, iv, 211—composi- 
tion^ Henry, iv, 216 — Strecker, xxiii, 
82 — in Peru baham. Kraut, xlii, 237— 
solubility in chloroform, Lepage, xxiv, 
148. 

STYRAX (compare Liquidambar), bark^ 
Hanbury, xxvi, 448 — balsam^ v, 260 — 

Dioscorides, xxix, 250 Hanbury 

{histori/). xxix, 249 ; xxxv, 436 — Lan- 
derer, xxix, 255 — Pliny, xxix, 251 — 
analysis^ Bonastre, iv, 217 — collection^ 
Maltass; Campbell (W. & B., 811), 

xxix, 258 — in perfumery^ Piesse, xxvi, 
276, 556. 

of Bogota analysis, Bonastre, ii, 163. 

rubra, xxvi, 4t8. 

from LiQuiDAMBAR STYRACiPLUA, ex- 
amined, Creecy (W. & B., 1549), 
xxxii, 197. 

SUBJ5A ALBiDiFLORA, xxviii, 73. 

ovATA, xxviii, 73. 

SUBLLMATE, corrosive, antidotes: (proto- 
sulphate of iron), Mialhe, xiv, 309 — 
Wallace, xiv, 332 — (gold dust and 
iron filings). Buckler, xi, 331 — con- 
version into calomel by various syrups 
(W. & B., 1154, 1377), Lepage, xvii, 
255 — decomposed by vegetable bodies, 
Fabian, i, 320 — behavior to extract of 

opium, Caillot, vi, 243 poisoning, 

xxiv, 183 (compare mistakes, fatal) 
— preparation, Fleck, xxxix, 41 6 — Wal- 
ter, xix, 232 — solubility in alcohol. 
Cap «nd Garot, xxvii, 159 — in alcohol 
and ether increased by camphor,. 
Karls, i, 158 — in chloroform, Lepage, 

xxiv, 148 in glycerin, Adolphus, 

xxxix, 150; Cap and Garot, xxvii. 
159; Klever, xlii, 222 — in water. Cap 
and Garot, xxvii, 159 — subliming tern- j 
perature, Guy, xl, 246 — test for purity, ! 
Procter, jr , xxiii, 106, [ 

SUBSIGNARIN, Shrvock, xl, 307. \ 

SUBSTITUTION theory, originated with 
Dumas, xxx, 86. 

, CHEMICAL, Bache, xxxii, 387, 

, heavy fine in fifteenth century, xlii, 

165— in France, xlii, 284. 

SUCCI BXPRRSSi, Gray's supplement, xx, 
25 (compare Juices) — preservation^ 
Etiis, xxxii, 555. 

SUCCLNUM. See Amber. 

SUCCUS coNii, Ph. British (64), is no act- 
ive preparation, Harley, xxxix, 362, 

— taraxaci I'ARATus, Procter, jr. (W. & 
B., 1359, note), xxv, 408 — preservation, 
Donovan (W. Ifc B , 1358, note), xxiv. i 
64. : 



SUCROSE (= cane sugar), xl, 530, 

SUDIS GiGAS, xii, 342 — (source of false 
isinglass of Para), xxv, 144, 

SUET (compare Tallow), inodorous^ 
Piesse (alum and salt, W. & B., 68), 

xxviii, 176 -fusing and congealing 

point, Wimmell, xli, 22, 431, 

SUGAR (compare Molasses^ Saccharine 
SUBSTANCES, ctc), general properties^ 
researches^ etc., Bouchardat, viii, 
115 — behavior to acids, Bouchardat, 
viii, 122 ; Malaguti, vii, 350— to arse- 
nic acid (rose color), iii, 174 — to tar- 
taric acid, Bouchardat, xxi, 348 — to 
alkalies, Bouchardat, viii, 119 — to 
water at elevated temperature, Loew, 

xxxix, 334 distinction of different 

kinds of sugar, by the polariscope, 
Biot, vi, 51 — action on the teeth, La- 
rez, xxviii, 221 — test for sugar in ani- 
mal fluids, Donaldson (W. & B,, 730), 
xxiv, 79, Compare the different kinds 
of sugar, see below, 

from Arenga saccharifera, de Vrij, 

xxxvii, 153, 

, ARO.MATic, Turner, xli, 118. 

, BEET-, statistics from France, viii. 84 ; 

xxxviii, 507— Germany, xxxviii, 507 — 
purification ]\ncQ, Pelletan, viii; 151. 

from BoRASSus flabellipormis, de 

Vrij, xxxvii, 153. 

, Braiiee-, xxxviii, 383. 

, cane-, behavior Xo brain, Bouchardat, 

xvi, 226 — to chalk, B^champ, xxxix, 

55 to chlorine, bromine, iodine, 

Fougera, xxxvi, 3o7 — to fused ahhy- 
rate of potassa, Boettger, xxx, 70 — to 
Lubin's iodoform test, Hager, xlii, 
399 — to ozone, Gorup-Besanez, xxxvi, 
167 — to Avater at elevated tempera- 
ture, Loew, xxxix, 334 — decolorized 
(cotton, siarch, chalk), Steinkamp, 
xxi, 237 (compare r^^/im^',- saccharine 
matters) — in dialyser, Graham, xxxiv, 
315 — estimation in mixtures of glucose 
and dextrine, Gentele (W, & B , ,731, 
note), xxxii, 81 — conversion into glu- 
cose by syrups of iodide and nitrate 
of iron, Wayne, xxvii, 393 — by being 
kept for a long time in solution, Mau- 
raen^; Procter, jr (W. & B.. 1366), 
xxvii, 430 — detection, Reich (nitrate 
of cobalt), XX, 43 — Schmidt (acetate 
of lead), xxxiv, 32 (compare glucose, 
test) — estimation, Midi, xlii, 526 — 
power to protect solution of iodide of 
iron, Procter, jr , xii, 15 — influence 
on viagnesia as an antidote. Carles, 
xlii, 516 — conversion into mannite 
(sodium amal^jam), Linnemann, xxxv, 
32 — manufacture. Fryer (rapid evapo- 
ration), xxxvii, 361— in Barbadoes, 
Fownes, xxi, b'i— microscopic vegeta- 
tion, Payen, xxiv, 146 — effect of pow- 



218 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



SUGAR {Continufd). 

dering^ Doi vault, xxv, 80 — refining : 
Basset (soap), xxx, 264 — Bobierre 
(charcoal and blood), xxx, 134— Cal- 
vert (sulphurous acid), xxx, 375 — 
Garcia (soap), xxx, 264 — Melsens (bi- 
sulphite of lime, W. & B., 728), xxii, 
52, 163 — Monnier (sulphurous acid), 
xl, 456 — Oxland (acetate of alumina, 
W. & B., 728), xxii, 167— Reynoso 
(sulphurous acid), xxxv, 432 — Kous- 
seaii (plaster of Paris ; peroxide of 
iron, W. & B. 728), xxxiii, 460 ; xxxiv, 
461— Scoflfern (acetate of lead, W. & 
B., 727), xxii, 50 — solubility in gly- 
cerin, Cap and Garot, xxvii, 160 — 
Vogel, xli, 16 — specific gravity, W. H. 
Pile, jr., xxxiii, 197 — combination 
with tartaric acid. Berth elot, xxx, 154 
— test, Pettenkofer (bile and sulphur- 
ic acid, Parrish, 516), xvii, 114 — 
lioewe (substitutes glycerin for tar- 
taric acid in the alkaline copper £olu- 
tion), xlii, 549. 

from ciDEK, Berthelot, xxviii, 158. 

from CORN (Indian), Pallas, viii, 262. 

DIABETIC-, composition and properties, 

Thomson, x, 354 — secreted most abun- 
dantly after meals, Baudimont, xxviii, 
221 — detection (alkaline copper solu- 
tion), Cappezuoli, xvi, 324 — Horsley 
(chromate of potassa, W. k B., 730) 

xxvii. 111 Maumene (chlorine, 

Parrish, 516), xxii, 233. 

' , FRUIT-. 8ee Glucose. 

■ of the FUTURE (from Arenga saccha- 

rifera), de Vrij, xxxvii, 153. 

of GELATINE See Glvcocoll. 

, GRAPE-. See Glucose. 

, IODIDE, Fougt^ra, xxxii, 25 re- 
marks, Procter, jr., xxxii, 25, note, 

, MAPLE-, of United States, Avequin, 

xxx, 72. 

, MILK, heJiavior to water at elevated 

temperature, Loew, xxxix, 335 — com- 
.positio7i, Guerin, iv. 163 — in dialyser, 
Graham, xxxiv, 315 — estimation in 
milk, Poggiale, xxi, 370 — fermentation, 
Luboldt, xxxiii, 409 — power to pro- 
tect solution of iodide of iron, Proc- 
ter, jr., xii, 15 — converted into oxalic 
■acid, Rimmington, xxxiv, 445 — powder- 
ing, Itiss, Covell, xxxix, 116 — prepara- 
tion in Bavaria, xxvi, 449 — combina- 
tion with tartaric acid, Berthelot, xxx, 
154. 

— in MUSCLE, Ranke, xxxix, 469. 

of MUSHROOMS (is ma Unite), Bussy : 

Malagutti, ix, 81. 
, PALM-, manufacture, Stevens (W. & 

B., 726), xviii, 52. 
from Seckrl pear, Brazier, iii, 217 

— report, Diirand and Scattergood, 

iii, 279. 



, POTATO-. See Glucose. 

, STARCH'. See Glucose. 

-CANE, in Lovisiana, Avequin. xxx, 

129 — for paper-making, xxviii, 170. 

SULPHAS BiziNcicus and quadri-zinci- 
cus, Schindler, vii, 82, 83. 

SULPHATES, purification, Wurtz (iron re- 
moved by deutoxide of lead and car- 
bonpte of baryta), xxxi, 67 — solubility 
in sulphuric acid, Struve, xlii, 319. 

SULPH-HYDROMETER, Dupasquier, xiii, 
82. 

SULPHUrES and their use, Polli, xxxiv, 
446. 

SULPHOCYANIDES, behavior to perman- 
ganate of potassa, Cloez and Guig- 
net, xxxi, 151 — preparation, Frcehde, 
xxxvi, 126. 

SULPHOCYANOGEN, xxxi, 151. 

SULPHOGLYCERATES, Pelou/e, xxr, 
358. 

SULPHOPICRAMYL, xvii, 265. 
SULPHOSINAPISIN, Henry and Garot 

(W. & B., 782), iv, 319. 
SULPHOVINATES, constitution, Liebig, 

viii, 215. 

SULPHUR, compare Pyrites — action on 
ammonia, Fliickiger, xxxvi, 23 ; 

Maisch, xxxvi, 27, note adhes^ive 

force, Draper, vi, 293 — as antiseptic, 
Crookes, xxxviii, 432 — beh&vior to 
fused chlorate of potassa, Boettger, 
xxx, 7C — to permanganate of potas- 
sa, Cloez and Guignet, xxxi, 78 — 
constitution, D. B. Smith (a compound 
of hydrogen and an unknown radi- 
cal), iv, 121 — Doebereiner, ii, 41 — 
converted into sulphuric acid by per- 
manganate of potassa, Cloez and 
Guignet, xxxi, 78 — crystallized, Schiit- 
zenberger, xl, 371 — influence on fer- 
mentation, Leuchs, xxxiv, 90 — effects 
of pressure on fusing point, Hopkins, 
xxvii, 107 — amount in /^^/r and horny 
substances, Bihra, xxix, 148 — con- 
tains iodine, Chatin, xxvi, 441 — origin, 
Bischoff (organic kingdom), xxvii, 
287 — Geraellaro (decomposition of 
naked molluscoe), vii, 260 — in pyroxy- 
lie spirit, Philli[)S, xxiv, ?j2G~regenera- 
fion from alkali waste of soda works, 
Schaffner, xli, 545 — salts, theory on 
constitution, Berzelius, vi, 3b—solu- • 
bility in benzole, Mansfield, xxi 330 
— in bichloride of tin, Gerardin. 
xxxiii, 214 — in chloroform, Lepage, 
xxiv, 147 — glycerin, Adolphus, xxxix. 
150; Klever, xlii, 222 ; Cap and Garot, 
xxvii, 159 — in liquid anhydrous sul- 
phuric acid, Sestini, xli, 328 — sources. 
xxxvi, 14 L ; xl, 4rZ\—test, Bailey (ni- 
troprusside of sodium), xxiv, 81 — 
Schoenn (potassium ; sodium), xli, 
298 — vapor, specific gravity, Dumas ; 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



219 



SULPHUR {Continued). 

Gay-Lussac ; Davy ; Thomson ; Mit- 
scherlich, x, 343 — vapor of water de- 
composed in presence of porous 
bodie, Corenwinder, xxxiv, 92. 

— in California, xxxiv, 176; xxxix, 155 

— Italy^ xxxiv, 443; xxxvi, 412; xl, 
68, 433 — Louisiana, xli, 449 — N'apa 

Valley, Macgowan, xxxix, 155 

Saba (West Indies), xlii, A'i^i— Sicily, 
xl, 433 — Sol/atara, analysis, Phipson, 
xxxiv, 443. 

AURATUM ANTIMONII. See AnTIMO- 

NIUM SULPHURATUM (pR^^CIPITATUm). 

— and brominp:, Loewig, ii, 102. 

, CARBURET. See Carbon, bisulphide. 

, CHLORIDE, Dumas, V, 85. 

, GOLDEN. See AnTIMONIUM SULPHUR- 
ATUM (pr^cipitatum). 

— , IODIDE, decomposed by alcohol. Cap 

k Garot, xxvii, 159 preparation, 

Henry, i, 200 — solubility in glycerin, 
Adolphus, xxxix, 150 — Cap & Garot, 
xxvii, 159 — in oil. Cap & Garot, xxvii, 
159. 

and PHOSPHORUS, iii, 178. 

— pr.^:cipitatum, adulteraiioji, xi, 169, 

186; xvi, 184; xix, 307: xli, 248— 
decolorizing power, Filhol, xxiv, 239 — 
preparaiion, Otto (W. k B., 1360), 
xvii, 120. 

— ■■ — stibiatum rubrdm. See Antimonii 

OXYSULPHURETUM ; KeRMES. 

SULPHUROUS powders (for artificial 
sulphur water), Pouillet, xxxiii, 214. 

SUMACH BA.RK, analysis, Watson (W. & 
B., 710), XXV, 193 — dyeing, capability 
increased by sulphuric acid, Schlum- 
berger, xxix, 354 — amount of tannm, 
Bowman, xli, 195 Mittentzwey, 

xxxvi, 317 — Miiller, xxxi, 429 — prop- 
erties of tannin, Stenhouse (W, & B., 
710), xxxiv, 252. 

' BERRIES, preparation of malic acid, 

Rogers, vii, 56 — analysis, Watson fW. 
k B., 711), XXV, 196." 

SUMACIN, Schlumberger, xxix. 354. 

SUMBUL. analysis, Reinsch k Buchner 
(W. k B., 1608), xvi. 119. 120— ^e- 
scription, xxiii, 223. 

Indian, xxiv, 174. 

SUNDAY CLOsiNc. See Pharmacy, re- 
spective states. 

SUNSTROKE, (lemon-juice), xlii, 514. 

SUPPLY TABLE, United States army, 

xxxvii, 93, 111 ; xxxviii, 271. 
SUPPOSITER (W. k B., 1362, note), Tay- 
lor, xxxiii, 202. 

SUPPOSITORIES, discussion in Ameri- 
can Pharmaceutical Association, 
xxxvii, 4'i9 — Duhamel (equal parts 
butter of cocoa and suet), xiii, 18 — 
Ebcrle (cools by means of atomizer), 
xU, 53 — Moore (details of manipula- 



tion), xl, 223— Pfeiffer (medicine in 
the base, W. & B., 1362), xxxi, 232 ; 
xxxiii, 115 — Taylor (cocoa butter, 
W. k B., 1361), xxiv, 211; (supposi- 
ter, W. k B., 1362, note) xxxiii, 202 
—Wright (details), xlii, 197 — mean- 
ing of numbers, Bakes, xxxv, 229. 

MOULDS, Bakes (Parrish, 810), xxxv, 

228— Bullock k Crenshaw, xxxix, 121 
— Koch (wax paper), xlii, 296 — Par- 
rish k Bakes (glazed paper), xxxiii, 5 
—Proctor (tinfoil), xl, 52— Reynolds 
(tinfoil), xlii, 392. 

for urethra, Procter, jr., xlii, 198. 

assaf(ETId;b, Fairthorne, xl, 115 — 

Moore, xl, 387. 

BSLLAD0NN,i5. Ph. Haunoveraua, xxv, 

472. 

MORPHINE, Simpson, xxix, 315. 

SURENUS (=:3Cedrela febrifuga), x, 71. 
5VAPNIA, Procter, jr., xli, 186, 222— 

Bigelow, xli, 224. 
SWAIM'S Panacea due to Drs. McNevin 

and Quackenboss, Prel. No. 123 — 

mercury found in it by R. Hare, i, 

239. 

SWERTIA chirayita (is Gentiana chi- 
rayta), xii, 20. 

DiFFORMis (is Frasera Walter!), iii, 

269. 

SWIETEN, van. Liquor. See Liquor, 

van Swieten. 
SWIETENIA FEBRIFUGA. ix. 346; x, 72, 

145. 

MAHOGANY, X, 72 ; xxi, 135. 

SENEGAL, crystals in bark (oxalate of 

lime), xxxvii, 32. 
SYLVIA RUBRICAPILLA ; atricapilla ; 

RUBICOLA, XXX, 321. 

SYMBOLS, ARBITRARY, Berzelius, vi, 41. 
SYMPLOCARPUS p(etidus. See Dra- 

CONTIUM F(ETIDUM. 

SYNTONIN, estimation. Boedeker, xxxii, 
444. 

SYPHON medicine glasses, Proctor, xl, 
534. 

, improved. Hare, v, 92, 338 — as sub- 

stiiute \ov stomach-pump, Hodgen,xlii, 
548 — rate flow of liquids, Galletly, 
xxxvii, 376. 

SYRIA (color) (residue of Kermes ani- 
mals), Virey. xii, 175. 

, flora. Post, xli, 433. 

SYRINGA VULGARIS, active principle. 
Meillet (W\ k B. 1609), xiv, 139— 
leaves contain mannite, Roussin, xxiv, 
170. 

SYRUPS, clarified, Guibourt (aerated 
water), xii, 260 — (albumen, W. k 6., 
1366), xii, 256— </t7?.s/7;</, Guibourt, xii, 
256 — -fermentation prevented (bottling 
hot), ix, 178 — Durand (Hoffmann's 
anodyne, W. k B., 1365), xiii, 185— 
Menigaut (mouldiness), vii, 277 — 



220 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



SYRUPS {Continued). 

sugar in ftart substituted by glycerin. 
Moore, xlii, 131 — preservation^ Enz 
(Appert's metbod), xxxii, 553 — gen- 
eral remarks. Laidle}'-, xxvi, 100. 

FEU1T-, preparation, Jessler (fer- 
menting), xxxix, 317 — irreiservation., 
Hodgson, jr., xxx, 114. 

— — , MKDiCATED, Durand (with diluted 
alcohol). V, 31 — Laidlej, xxvi^ 100 — 
Deschanips (diluted alcohol), vii, 338 
— Procter, jr. (use of saccharomeier 
insisted upon), xiii, 187 

for SODA WATKR, Shinn, xxxiii, 300, 

311 — Ambrose Smith, xxii, 212 — ren- 
dered /ro//.-?/, xlii, 209. 

SYRUPUS (simplex), absorbing power for 
carbonic acid, Saussure, xxxi, 116 — 
drops in drachm, Bernouilly, xxxi, 
441 — formation of grojic sugar, Mau- 
menc; Procter, jr. (W. & B., 1366), 
xxvii, 430 — preparation in France. 
xxxi, 214 — action on linen^ Dorat, 
XXXV, 313 — solvent power, Bill, xxx, 
289 — specific gravity^ Pile, jr., xxxiii, 
197 — snbstititted by glyceratus sim- 
plex. Bond, xlii, 177. 

ACACiyE, Ph, U. S. (30), iii, 84— Du- 

hamel, xiv, 282. 

AciDi ciTRici, l*h. Dublin (50), xxiii, 

15— Ph. U. S. (60), improved, Har- 
rop, xli, 293 — Lillard,* xlii, 508 — 
Maisch, xxx, 14. 

HYDRiODici, Murdoch, xxvii, 

410. 

poLVGALici, Procter, jr , xvii. 

250. 

^THERis, Paton, X, 87 — Ph. Helveti- 
ca (65), xxxix, 536. 

ALLii, D. B. Smith, Prel. No. 49— 

Ph. U. S. (30), iii, 84. 

of ANGR^OUM FRAGRAKS, Driot, viii, 

195. 

ANTHEMiDis, Heintzelman, xxxiii, 391 

— Parrish (Parrish, 251), xvi, 18. 
ANTiPHLOGiSTicus, viii, 172. 

APIOLI, XXXV, 85. 

ARMORACivE lODURATUS (Lancelot), 

Fougera, xxxix, 311. 

ARSENICALIS, Bill, XXX 292. 

ASPARAGi, Griffith, viii, 197 — Latour 

de Roziers, vi, 122. 

— — AtSAF(ETiD^, Heintzelmann, xxxiii, 
211— Peltz (W. & B, 1229, note), 
xxiv, 313, 

ATROPINE, Bouchardat, xxii, 88. 

AUEANTii coRTicis, Duraod, V, 31 — 

Laidley, xxvi, 105 — Mercein, xxx, 103 
— Procter, jr., xix, 96; xxvi, 298. | 
Compare , orangr. j 

FLORUM, Moore, xlii, 193 j 

BALSAMi PERU, Procter, jr., xxxii, 219. | 

of BARK. See SVRUPUS CINCHONiE. | 

of BLACKBERRIES, A. Smith, xxii, 21*7. ! 



- of BLACKBERRY ROOT. See SyRUI'US 
RUBI AROMATICUS. 

- BISMUTH! TRISNITRATIS, Bill, XXX> 

295. 

- BORACis. Trousseau, xxx, 33. 

- BUCKU, Duhamel ; Procter, jr., xi. 
197. 

- of BUTTER OF CACAO, Duhamcl, xiiij 
18. 

- CAFFE.T.*:. See , coffee. 

coMPOSiTUS, Severin, xl, 332. 

- CAFFKiNyE ciTRATis, Hanuou, xxiii, 
159. 

- CALAMI, Maisch (W. & B., 182, note),, 
xxxii, 113. 

- CALCis, Beral (W. & B, 1197), xiii, 
74— Bill, xxx, 291— Cleland (Parrish, 
400), xxxii, 167 — Peligot [percentage 
table), xxiv, 81 — Squibb, xxxix, 335; 
xl, 158. Compare Calx sacchara- 

TUS. 

HVPOPHospHiTis, Procter, jr. 

(W. k B., 1532) xxx, 122. 

HYPOSULPHiTis, Laneau (W. & 

B.. 1532), XXXV, 224. 

i'HOSPHATis, A. B. Durand (Par- 
rish, 397), XXV, 411— Wiegand (W. & 
B., 1033, note), xxvi, 296. 

- CAPSiCE, Plummer, xxvii, 306 — Proc- 
ter, jr., xxxii, 219 — (for soda water, 
Parrish, 262), A. Smith, xxii, 214. 

- carragheen, Mouchon, xvii, 190. 

- castorei, Lebron, xxvi, 83. 

- of CHAMOMILE. See ANTHEMIDIS. 

- CHIMAPHIL^. See PIPSISSEWA^ 

- CHiNyE,Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix, 536. 
Compare ciNCHON.a;. 

- CHLOROFORMi, Groves, xxxvi, 444. 

- of CHOCOLATE, Kembls, xl, 517. 

- ciNCHON.i^;, Donovan, xvii, 49 ; xxiii^ 
218 — Duhamel and Procter, jr., xi, 
197. Compare CHiNiE. 

NORMALis, Guillermond, xxxvi, 

16. 

FERBATU8, Mayct and Lefort, 

xxxvii, 333. 

■ CITRI. See LEMON. 

- coDEjyE, Cap, ix, 352. 

- of coD-LivEK OIL, Duclon, xi, 82. 

- of COFFEE, Dorvault, xxviii, 372 — - 
Ferrari (Parrish, 265), vi, 347. 

- coPAiByK, Dumay, xxxv, 508 — Mou- 
chon, xi, 264 — Puche, xi, 264 — Tri- 
deau, xxxviii, 375. 

-, Coxe's hive. See scill^ 

COMPOSITUS. 

-, CREAM (for soda water), Hubbell 
(W. k B., 1373, note), xxvii, 408-^ 
Ritter, xxvii, 500 — Taylor (Parrish, 
266), xxvii, 407. 

-, , FACTITIOUS, Hubbell, xxvii, 

409 Warner (Parrish, 266), xxx^ 

316. 

-, , NECTAR, Hubbell, xxvii, 409. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



221 



SYRUPUS, CREAM, ORANGE, Hubbell, 
xxvii, 408. 

, , VANILLA, Taylor (W. & B., 

1373, note), xxvii, 407. 
CUBEB^, Labelonye, viii, 318 — Puche, 

xiii, 78 — Trideau, xxxviii, 375. 
CuisiNiER, Prel. No. 124, 126— Beral, 

ii, 67. 

DEPDRATivus, Deverglc, vii, 34 7. 

DiACODii, Ph. Austriaca, Siersch, xli, 

300. Compare papaverts. 

DiALYTicus, Socquet and Bonjean, 

xxix, 314. 

for DiARRHOiA, Majet, xxxix, 418. 

DIGITALIS, Dubamel, x, 279 — Duha- 

mel and Procter, jr., xi, 197. 

of ELDER-BERRIES. See SAM- 

BUCI. 

of ETHER. See ^:theris. 

EUPATORii, Dubamel and Procter, jr., 

xi, 197. 

FERRi (tartarized sulphate of iron), 

Aikin, iii, 320. 

ET ammonia: phosphatis, Rob- 
erts (Parrish, 424), xxx, 370. 

BROMiDi, Thompson, xlii, 31. 

bt calcis phosphatis, Wiegand 

(W. & B., 1143, note), xxvii, 105. 

CARBONATis, Dannecj, xxx, 495 

— Draper, xxxv, 171. 

CHLORiDi, Procter, jr., xxxvii, 

327 — Pile, xxxiv, 21 — Duroy, xxxii, 
318. 

ET lODiDi, Battley, xix, 64 

— Procter, jr., xix, 66. 

ciTRATis, Parrish, xx, 253 — Liv- 

ermore, xxiii, 315. 

HYPOPHosPHiTis, Thompson, 

xlii, 32— Wood, xl, 342. 

coMPOSiTua, Thompson 

(Parrish, 429), xxx, 319, 320. 

lODiDi (compare Liquor ferri 

lODiDi), Beral, xiii, 74 — Dupasquier, 
xiii, 119— Jeannel, xli, 16— Ph. Dub- 
lin (50), xxiii, 15 — Ph. Helvetica (65), 
xxxix, 536 — Ph. Britannica (64), im- 
proved. Groves (diluted phosphoric 
acid), xl, 265 — Hughes (more concen- 
trated, caps with parchment paper), 
xli, 14— F/i. U. S. (60), improved, 
Lewellen (glvcerin), xl, 108; remarks 
by Procter, jr., xl, 108 — Squibb (hy- 
posulphite of soda), xl, 99 — (anterior 
to Ph. U. S. (60) See Liquor ferri 

lODIDI.) 

iodohydrargyratis, Chamoun 

(Parrish, 484), xxxii, 317. 
LACTATia, Cap (W. & B., 1138), 

xii, 228. 

ET MAGNESI.^i CITRATIS, V. d. 

Corput, xxii, 314. 

■ ET MANGANESII lODIOI, Buriu, 

XXV, 175— Procter, jr. (W. & B., 1553), 
XXV, 198. 



LACTATis, Burin, xxVj 

175. 

NiTRATis, (pROTO-,) Lancaster 

(W. k B., 1199, note), xxvi, 401 — 
Procter, jr. (W. & B., 1199, note), 

xxiii, 315 — Tozier (glucose formed), 
XXV, 455 — Wayne (formation of glu- 
cose), xxvii, 393. 

■ NITRATIS (sESQUi-), Duhamcl, 

xvii, 93— Laidley (AV. & B., 1199, 
note), XXV, 97. 

ET POTASSiE ALBUMINATIS, Smithy 

XXXV, 212. 

POTASSIO-CITRATIS, Todd, XV^ 

159. 

ET POTASSir lODiDi, LahachCj 

xlii, 513. 

POTASS^ IODOHYDRARGY- 
RATIS, Young (Parrish, 485), xxx^ 
iOD. 

PHOSPHATIS, Maisch, xxxi, 411 

— Procter, jr., xxxi, 413 — Wiegand 
(W. & B., 1143, note), xxvii, 104. 

coMPosiTus, Wiegand (W.. 

& B., 1143, note), xxvi, 111. Com- 
pare PHOSPHATIS COMPOSITUS. 

PYROPHosPHATis, Robiquct, xxix,, 

4@l — Procter, jr., xxix, 404 — Soubei- 
ran (W. & B., 1144, note), xxv, 214 — 
Squibb (W. & B., 1144, note), xxxii^ 
40. 

QUIMyE ET STRYCHNIA PHOSPHA- 
TIS, Aitken, xxxix, 177 Bullock, 

xxxix, 179, note Diehl, jr., xxxix, 

386— A. S., xl, 322. 

SOD.E ET POTASS^ ALBUMINATIS, 

Smith, xxxv, 212. 
ET soDii CHLORIDI, Cochrane, 

xxiv, 140. 

ET SOD.*; PHOSPHATIS, Proctcr, 

jr., xxvi, 113. 

TANNATis, Beral, xiii, 73. 

Fuscus. See Molasses. 

GALLyE AROMATicus, J. Parrish (W. k 

B., 4f^5, note), xxvii, 416. 

GENTiAN.E, Tauvcl, xvi, 78. 

GRANATi (root bark), Dublanc, vii, 

84. 

, GRAPE (for soda vrater), Shinn,, 

xxxiii, 310. 

GUAiACi, Mouchon, xxvii, 316. 

GUMMOSUS, Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix, 

536. 

HASCHiciNi, Laneau, xxviii, 364. 

HEMiDESMi, Ph. Dublin (50), xxiii,, 

15. 

HIVE. See scilla: compositus. 

of HORSERADISH, lODURKTTED. See 

SyRUPUS ARMORAOI.'E ioduratus. 

HYPOPHosPHiTUM COMPOSITUS, Maisch, 

xxx, 313 — Procter, jr. (Parrish, 430)^ 
xxx, 122, 226, 311. 

IODIDE OF STARCH, XXiv, 170. 

IODURATUS, Bochet, xvii, 317. 



222 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



SYRUPUS ipkcacuanhte, Ph. Helvetica 
(65), xxxix, 536— PA. U. S. (30), Du- 
hamel,x,284-P;i.f/.AS.(50),Coggesball, 
xxiv,2'22 — Grahame, xxxi,l43 — Hodg- 
son, jr. (acetic acid), XXX, 113 — Laid- 
lej, xxvi, 103 — Procter, jr., xxxiv, 28 
— P/i. U. S. (60), Moore (glycerin), 
xlii, 127— Taylor, xxxv, 411'. ' 

ET SENECiiE coMPOsiTus, Steams , 

xxviii, 205. 

jALAPyE, Viel, xxiv, 169. 

■ , Johnson's, xiii, 174. 

■ Krameri.e, Dubamel and Procter, jr., 

xi, 196. 

LACTUCARii, Aubergier, xvii, 240 ; 

xxxii, 218; improved by Procte^j jr., 
xxxviii, 293 — Mouchon, xviii, 68 — 
Parrish and Bakes (Parrisb, 257), 
xxxii, 230 — Procter, jr., xxxii, 218; 
xxxviii, 293 — Wiegand, xxv,515 — Fh. 
U. S. (60), Bedford, xli, 48— Fair- 
tborne, xl, 114 — Kenwortby, xl, 113. 

opiATUS, Aubergier, xxxvi, 213. 

" of LEMON, Timbale Lagrave, xxxvi, 17 

— (for soda water), A. Smith, xxii, 213 
— artificial, viii, 171. 

■ of LIME. See CALCIS. 

lobelIjT<:, Procter, jr., xiv, 109 ; xxiv, 

208. 

MANGANESii lODiDi, Livcrmorc, xxiv, 

11 — Procter, jr., xxii, 300. 
PHOsPHATis, Wiegand (Parrish, 

443), xxvi, 297. 

TAXNATis, Marietta, xxxvii, 337. 

MANN/E, Duhamel, xvi, 72. 

MONESi^:, Derosne, xiii. 163. 

COMPOSITUS, Derosne, xiii, 163. 

■ MORPHIA ACETATis, Ph. DubHn (50), 

xxiii, 16. 

. — — MUBiATis, Ph. Dublin (50). xxiii, 

16. 

8ULPHATIS, DuhameL xii, 187. 

COMPOSITUS, Pluminer, 

xxvii, 305. 

NECTAl?. (UlEAM. See CREAM, 

Nectar. 

NURSING, Wheeler s, Morse, xlii, 314 

olei morrhu.*:, Duclon, xi, 82. 

THE015R0M.E, Duhamcl, xiii, lj8. 

■ of ORANGE (for soda water), A. Smith 

(Parrish, 261), xxii, 211 — artificial, 

viii, 171. Compare aura-ntii: 

Cream, Orange. 

orgeat, vii, 261 — Blondeau, vi, 353 

— Capdeville, xxvii, 450 — (for soda 
water), A Smith, xxii. 215. 

• , Osborne"s, Saunders, xxx, 228. 

, papaveris, Epting, xxviii, 399 — Sou- 

thall (W. & B , 1374), XV, 140. Com- 
pare DIACODII. 

pareir.^ brav.e, Duhamel and Proc- 
ter, jr., xi, 197. 

paullinivi;, Gavrelle. xii, 208 — Des- 

chastelles, xiii, 54. 



, pectoral (Jackson's), Taylor (Par- 
rish, 256). xxiv, 35 — Stearns, xxviii, 
2f5. 

pepsini, Boisliniere, xxxix, 184. 

with BITTER ORANGE, Besson, 

xxxviii, 376. 
PHOSPHATIS COMPOSITUS, Parrish (W. 

& B., 1143), xxix, 572— Richardson, 

xxx, 19— Scheffer (Parrish, 426), xxx, 
224. Compare ferri phos- 

PHATIS COMPOSITUS. 

PHOSPHATES, UNDISSOLVED, Procter, 

jr. (Parrish, 426), xxvi, 114. 

PHYTOLACC^E COMPOSITUS (eclectic), 

xxvi, 110. 

PIC18, Lancaster (W. & B., 653, note), 

xxxi, 555 — Moore, xli, 6. 

PINE-APPLE (for soda water, Parrish, 

265), A. Smith, xxii, 217. 
piPSissEWA, Procter, jr. (W. & B., 

248), XV, 70. 
of POPPIES. See papaveris; 

DIACODII. 

POTASS^ ET FERRI lODOHYDRARGYRA- 

Tis, Young (Parrish, 485), xxx, 105. 
Compare ferri bt potass^ (po- 

TASSIl). 

PRUNi VIRGINIAN.?-:, Jones, xvii, 161 — 

Figueroa, xxx, 304— W. Pile, jr., 
xxxiii, 200— Procter, jr., and Turn- 
penny, xiv, 217 — (eclectic), xxxi, 390. 

COMPOSITUS, Goddard, xli, 

391. 

of PUNCH, viii. 174. 

QUININE, Ph. U. S. r30), ii, 332. 

of raspberries, Blondeau (by fer- 
mentation), vi, 177 — (for soda Waaler), 
A. Smith (Parrish, 264), xxii, 216. 

RHEi, Ph. U. S. (30), Duhamel and 

Procter, jr., xi, 197— PA. U. S. (50), 
Maisch, xxxi, 550— PA U. S. (60), 
Taylor, xxxv, 411. 

aromaticus, Ph. U. S. (30), iii, 

84 — Duhamel and Procter, jr., xi, 197 
— Durand, ii, 218— Wood, iii, 299— 
PA. U. S. (50), Maisch, xxxi, 551 — 
Thompson, xxix,, 476; xxxii, 329 — 
Ph. U. S. (60), Bond, xlii, 142. 

ET SENN/E, Ph. U. S. (30), Du- 
rand, v, 31 — Stewart, v, 33. 

Ros^, Procter, jr., xxxv. 111. 

BUBI. See , BLACKBERRY. 

AROMATICUS, Maisch (W. k B., 

718, note), xxxi, 552. 

SAMBuci, Stratton, xxvi, 244. 

COMPOSITUS, Worthington, xxvi, 

245. 

SANGCiNARiiK, Wiegand (W. & B., 741, 

note), xxvi, 108— Thomas, xxxvi, 140. 

sANTONiNi, Lafargue, xxxiii, 320. 

SABSAPARiLL/E, Ph. Londou ( 24),PreL 

No. 26— Beral, ii, 66. 

COMPOSITUS, Ph. Helvetica (65), 

xxxix, 535— /'A. V. S. (30), iii, 84— 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 228 



^SYRUPUS {Continued). 

Duhamel and Procter, jr.. xi, 197 — 
Hodgson, jr., ii, 282— Wood, iii, 302 
—Ph. U.'S. (40), XV, 6 (report, XV, 11) 
~Ph. U. S. (50), Worihington (pro- 
poses substituted by Syrupus sambu- 
ci), xxvi, 244, 245 — for soda water, A 
Smith (Parrish, 262), xxii, 214— War- 
ner, XXX, 317 — Lepage proposes iodo- 
hydrargyrate of potassa for corrosive 
sublimate (W. & B.. 1377), xvii, 257. 

^ sciLLyB. Conrad, xxxii, 258 — Ph. Sue- 

cica (69), xlii, 88. 

coMPOsiTL'S, D. B. Smith, ii, 1 1 1 : 

iv, 202— W. S.,iv, 191— Ph. U,S. (30),' 
Duhamel and Procter, jr., xi, 197 — 
Procter, jr., xiii, 86— /^A. U.S. (40), 
Ecky, xvi, 249— Ph. U. S. (50), Cog- 
geshall, xxiv, 223 — Cummings (W. & 
B., 1378, note), xxviii, 397— Hodg- 
son, jr. (acetic acid), xxx, 113 — Laid- 
3ey, xxvi, 104— Sharp (W. & B., 1378, 
note), xxvii, 219— PA. U.S. (60), Gil- 
lespie (dialysis), xxxix, 127; (remarks 
by Procter, jr., xxxix, 51 1 : Riederer, 
xxxix, 509). 

SENEG.^:, Ph. U. S. (30), Durand, v, 

31 — Duhamel and Procter, jr , xi. 177 
—Ph. U.S. (50), Hodgson, jr. (acetic 
acid), xxs, 113 — Laidley, xxvi, 104 — i 
Procter, jr. (cloudiness removed by 
bicarbonate of potassa). xxxiv, 136 — 
Ph. D S. (60), Diehl, jr., xl, 44— 
Moore, xlii, 229, 302— A. A. K., xlii, 
203— Ph. Borussica (13); Ph. Han- 
noverana (19) ; van Mons (21), ii, 109. 
Compare acidi polygalici. 

ET IPECACUANHA COMPOSITES, 

Stearns, xxviii, 205. 

SENN^, Laidley, xxvi, 105 — Groves 

(fermentation prevented by chloro- 
form), xh, 74. 

SODA HYPOSULPHiTis, Mouchou, xvii, 

292. 

SPIGELIA, Cadet dc Gassicourt, iv, 7. 

STARCH, IODIDE. See •. IODIDE 

OP STARCH. 



STILLINOT/E COMPOSITIIS, FrOSt, XX, 308 

— Heintzelman, xxxiv, 206; (remarks. 
Procter, jr., xxxiv, 207, note). 

of STRAWBERRIES, Parisian method, v, 

350 — Martin, xxvii, 313 — (for soda 
water), Shinn, xxxiii, 311 — A.Smith, 
xxii, 216. 

suDORiFicus, Prel. No. 121, 126— Bd- 

ral, ii, 67. 

SWEET GUM, Wright (VA'. & B., 1549). 

xxviii, 414. 

TARAXACr COMPOSITUS, XXX, 93. 

TEETHING, Delabarrc, xxxix, 418. 

in TixRA CAPITIS, Zollikoffer, vi, 5. 

TOLUTANUS, Guibourt, xiv, 345 — Ph. 

U. S. (40), Finley (magnesia), xxiii, 
219 — Laidley, xxvi, 105 — Procter, jr., 
xxvi, 299— FA. U. S. (' 0), xlii, 504— 
Alaisch (the resin ought not to be 
separated), xxxii, 113. 

TONIC, COMPOUND, Bourgeois, xxviii, 

181. 

TRAGACANTHA, Mouchou, jr., ii, 168. 

VYM URSi, Duhamel and Procter, jr. 

(Parrish, 251), xi, 196. 

VALERIANA, Procter, jr., and Turn- 
penny, xiv, 28 — Soubeiran, xiv, 28. 

VANILLA, Procter, jr. (W. & B , 850. 

note), xxvi, 301 — (for soda water), A. 
Smith (Parrish, 265), xxii, 217. Com- 
pare CREAM, VANILLA. 

viOLARUM, limit of reaction with sul- 
phuric acid, Hastings, xiii, 201. 

Wheeler's nursing, Morse, xlii, 314. 

yellow DOCK and sarsaparilla, 

Stearns, xxx, 415. 

ziNci lODiDi, Taylor (W. & B., 1540). 

xxiv, 33 — Thomson, xiv, 60, 

ziNGiBERis, Ph. U. S. (20), Bring- 

hurst, Prel. No. 17— PA. U. S. (50), 
Finley (magnesia), xxiii, 219 — Laid- 
ley, xxvi, 105 — Procter, jr., xxvi, 300 
—Ph. U. S. (60), xlii, 505— Maisch 
(the resin ought not to be separated), 
xxxii, 113 — (iov soda water). A. Smith 
(Parrish, 261), xxii, 213. 



TABACUM. LEAVEti, analysiis^ Conwell, i, 
104 — antidote to arsenic^ Emerson, 
viii, 346 — influence of drying, Schoon- 
broodt, xli, 321 — as emetic, iv, 284 — 
hydrocyanic acid in smoke, Vogel and 
Reischauer, xxxi, 76 — injiiriovs effects 
prevented by oil of sassafras, Shelby, 
xli, 451 — keeping in leaden boxes dan- 
gerous, xxvii, 472 — deprived of nico- 
tia, Ferrier (by passing the smoke 
through cotton soaked in tannin), 
XXXV, 240 — pre-exists in green leaves 



and in the seeds, Mayer, xxxvii, 209 
— Procter, jr., xxx, 5«2 — physiological 
experiments. Turnpenny, v, 198 — con- 
tain rubidium, Grandeau, xxxiv, 440 
— sassafras oil prevents injurious ef- 
fects Shelby, xli, 451 — amount of 
silica, Fresenius and Will, xxxv, 164 
— smoke, contains sulphuretted hy- 
drogen and hydrocj'anic acid, Vogel 
and Reischauer, xxxi, 76 — antipathy 
of snakes, Landerer, xxxiii, 223. 
, Greek, its smoke yields neither sul- 



224 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



TAP5ACUM [Contiaued). 

})buretted hydrogen nor hydrocyanic 
acid, Landerer, xxxiii, 313. 

SEEDS, anah/xis, Brandt, xxxvi, 422 — 

contain nicotia^ Mayer, xxxvii, 209 — 
Procter, jr., xxx, 502. 

STALKS, yield of oxalic acid by po- 

tassa, Possoz, xxx, 552. 

. Compare Nicotiana tabacum. 

TABERN^EMONTANA utilis (milk tree), 

ii. 313 ; vii, 116. 
TABLE-FURNACE. See Furnace. 
TABLES : 

Acid^ arsenious^Wm'M oi reactions, Las- 1 
saigne, xii, 284. i 

, hydrocyanic^ density^ of mixtures} 

with water, ii, 157. | 

. muctc, yield from different spe- | 

cies of gums, by nitric acid, Guerin, i 
iv, 165. ' I 

, 7)iuria(ic, quantity of muriatic: 

acid gas and of chlorine, Ure (W.i 
& B., 42), iii, 289. 

, oxalic, and carbonic, yield from 

sugar by nitric acid, Thompson, 
xxi, 65. 

, sulphurous, percentage, Murray, 

xli, 245. 

, valerianic, specific gravity and 

boiling point, Masgiller, xli, 35. 

Alcohol, specific gravity, Baumhauer, 
xxxii, 349 — Beasley, xiv, 321 — I 
FoAvnes, xx, 11©— D. B. Smith (at 
ditlerent degrees of temperature), 
Prcl. No. 15, 33 ; ii, 14, 16. 

Baum^'s scale, true value, D. B. Smith, i 
ii, 288— Peraberton ( W. & B.,1643), ' 
xxiv, 7. 

Capillarity, relative height of differ- 
ent liquids in a capillary tube, ' 
Frankenheim, xxxv, 248. 

Charcoal, relative decolorizing power, 
Bussy (W. & B., 212), i, 238. 

Chloroform, quantity of vapor taken! 
up by the air at different tempera- j 
tures. Snow, xx, 99. 

Cinchona barks, proportion of alka- 
loids, Delondre, xxvii, 90 — Guiller- 
mond, xxxvi, 16 — percolate, Squibb, 

xxxviii, 125 ; xxxix, 402. 
Colchicum, percolate, Squibb, xxxviii, 

119, 127. 

Collodion, Musgiller, xlii. 147. ; 
Colocynth, yield of extract, Squibb, | 

xxxix, 16. 

Drops, Bernouilly, xxxi, 441 — E. Du- 
rand (W. & B., 1638), i, 169— B. S. 
Proctor, xxxii, 349. 

Electuary (confection), requisite quan- 
tity of syrup, Baum6, ii, 341. 

^x^r-flc^s,Vielguth and Nentwich, xxxi, 
237. 

Fats, fusing and congealing points, 
Wimmel, xli, 22, 430. 



Fecula, dimensions, Raspail, xi, 27. 
Fluid extracts, doses, Sargent, xlii, 342^'. 
Hydrargyrum cum creta, Remington,. 
xli, 46. 

Hyoscyamia and nitrate of potassa 
from hyoscyamus, Thorey, xlii, 324^ 

Igniting point of various vapors, Hut- 
ton, xli, 253. 

Iron, perchloride, in solution, GobJey.. 
xxvii, 66. 

Lemon-juice, commercial, Stoddart,. 
xli, 80. 

Lime, per centage in syrup of lime,. 
Peligot, xxiv, 82. 

Mercury and its salts, atomic weighty 
Allinson, jr., i, 86. 

Minims, and fluid-drachm, B. S. Proc- 
tor, xxxv, 248. 

Oils, essential, optical behavior, Mayer, 
xxxvii, 340 — specific gravity, Mar- 
tins, V, 60 — yield, Recluz, i, 132. 

Oleum cethereuin, Diehl, jr., xxxvii... 
102, 128, 130. 

Opium, Indiag, analysis, O'Shaugh- 
nessy, xii, ^45. 

Petroleum, products of distillatiors 
Wayne, xxxii, 452. 

L'ercolation, Squibb, xxxviii, 127 — 
maceration, decoction, Duhamel, x 
10. 

Pihdae hydrargyri, per centage of 
mercury, xvi, 6. 

Podophyllum., percolate, Squibb, xl,5'. 

Potasste carbonas, detection of soda,, 
Anthon, xvi, 220. 

Powder, loss, i, 138 — Covell, xxxix^ 
116 — Redwood, xxi, 31. 

Quinia, see Cinchona. 

Rhubarb, exotic and indigenous, an- 
alysis, Henry, viii, 289. 

ScammoTiy, assay, Squibb, xxxv, 51. 

Spiritus pyroxylicus, per centage, De- 
ville, xxiii, 49 — Ure, xxiii, 48. 

Supply, of United States Army,xxxviiy 
93," 111. 

Syrup, specific gravity, W . H. Pile, jr.,. 

xxxiii, 199. 
Tallow and wax mixture, raeltlBg; 

point, Lepage; Legrip, xxxi, 42i. 
Tannin, yield from various plants,. 

Bowman, xli, 194. 
Tincture opii, Christison, x, 128. 
Unguentum hydrargyri, per centage ol 

mercury, xvi, 5 — G. Pile, xxxviii, 

203. 

Water, specific gravity at different 
temperatures. Pile, xxxii, 145. 

Weight, French and English, Fesquet^ 
xl, 446. 

Wine, alcohol strength, Christison,, 
xi, 303. 

Zincichloridi, percentage in solutioxi.^ 

Bullock, xl, 396. 
5LETS. See Trociiisci. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



225 



TABLETS CARRAGHKKN, MouchoD, jr., ' 

xvii, 190. 

TACAMAHACA, behavior to camphor, 
Planche (W. & B., 195, note), x, 214, 
215. 

TACCA OCEANIOA. xxvii, 237— NiUtall, ix, 
305. 

PiNNATiFJDA, V. 173, 348; xxvii. 237 

— description, etc.. Carson, ix, 307. 

TACCACEtE, Carson, ix, 3o6. 

TAFFETAS, cAXTHAiiii>ATED, Oettinger, 
xxii, 228. Compare Vesicating ; 
Blister ; * tc. 

TAFT ROOT, Schoff, xxxiv, 334. 

TALLICOONAH oil. See Oleum, talli- 

COONAH. 

TALLOW, compare Suet, blenching [chxo- 
mic acid), Watt, xx, 341 — fnmu] and 
congealing point, AVimmel, xli, 22, 
431 — purified (sulphuric acid), Wig- 
gin, XXV, 461 — (steam) Cassgrand 
(VV. & b!, 238, note), xxvi, 524— 
solubility m chloroform. Lepage, xxiv, 
147 — detection in icax. See Wax. 

MAPURRA, Pimentel and Bonis (W. & 

B., 604), xxviii, 163. 

VEGETABLE, xxxii, 466 — Rawes, xx, 

73. 

TREE, Rawes, xx, 73. 

TAMAIUNDS, in Virginia, xxvii, 565; 
xxviii, 370 — in Arabia, Landerer, 

xviii, l^ — crt/stals (tartrate of lime), 
Fliickiger, xxxvi, 110; xxxvii, 32. 

TAMPICIN, Spirgatis, xlii. 514. 

TANACETUM, influence of drying, 
Schooubroodt, xli, 321. 

TANGHIN, Henry, jr. viii, 102. 

TANGHINIA venkniflua, poisonous pro- 
perties. Hooker, xi, 35. Compare 
Cerbera tanghix. 

TANKS, DEODORIZING, in Glasgow, xxix, 
185. 

TANNIN. See Acid, tannic. 

TAPEWORM, breeding, Kiichenmeister, 
xxxiii, 224 — case, xxx, 574 — remedies: 
musenna bark, xxiv, 169 — oleoresin of 
male fern, Christison, xxvi, 303 — 
pumpkin-seed, Ingalls, xxxvi, 428. 

TAPIOCA, microscopical examination, 
Raspail, xi, 24, 28 — properties, Gui- 
bourt, ii, 47 — statistics, Perrine, vii, 172. 

. Compare Cassava ; Manioc. 

TAQUA plant (vegetable ivory), descrip- 
tion, Smith, XV, 37. 

TAR, against itch, vi, 374 — action of aro- 
matic principles on phosphorus, Des- 
champs, xxxiii, 412 — products, Shand 
and McLean, xxvi, 124. Compare 
Goal tar. 

from peat, Paul, xxx, 532. 

springs in California, xxvii, 377. 

and copaiba, Ricord, xxxiii, 381. 

and glycerin, Cap & Garot, xxvii, 160. 

BEER. See Beke, tar-; Vinum picis. 



TARAXACUM, proper time of collection, 
Bentley (March), xxxii, 337— Nent- 
wich (autumn), xv, 142 — Procter 
(October), xxviii, 412— intercellular 
substance consists of pectose, Vohl, 
xxxviii, 473 — contains mannite, T. & 
H. Smith (W. & B., 827), xxxii, 340— 
preservation of juice. See Succus 

TARAXACI. 

TARTAR, American (Ohio), Gordon, 
XXXV, 175 — Procter, jr., xxvi, 413 — 
Wayne, xxvii, 494— statistics, xxv, 
496. 

, CREAM OF. See Potass.!-: bitartras. 

, soluble cream of. Cambornac, xv, 

152_Vogel (W. & B., 786), iii, 312. 
Compare Boron et potass-^-: tartras ; 
Tartarus boraxatus. 
emetic, comparative activiti/ as pre- 
pared by diiferent formulas, Henry, i, 
71 — as anthehnintic. Palmer, xlii, 505 
— antidote (nut-galls), Caventou, ii, 
83, compare antimonium, antidote — 
prohibited in the U. S. army, Ham- 
mond, XXXV, 329 — detection of arse- 
nic. Rump, xlii, Id—tehavior to fer- 
roso-ferric oxide, Schober, xlii, 402 
— to charcoal, Graham, iii, 151 — com- 
position, Berzelius; Tnomson, i, 287 — 
jJrandes ; Wardenberg, v, 68 — Rich- 
ardson, ix, 44 — discovered by Mynsicht, 
i, 287— in fine powder, Griffith, iv, 199 
— Wiegand (W. & B., 978, note), xxx, 
407 — poisoning, see Mistakes — prepa- 
ration : Chevallier, i, 288 — French 
Codex (18), i, 288— Henry (W. & B., 
977), i, 292— Philip, i, 290— Ph. Lon- 
don (24), Prel. No. 19 — pyrophorus, 
Xviii, 78 — limit of reaction with sul- 
phuretted hydrogen, Reinsch, xi, 217 
— solubility in glycerin. Cap & Garot, 
xxvii, 159 ; Klever, xlii, 222 — water. 
Cap k Garot, xxvii, 159 — subliming 
temperature, Guy, xl, 249 — ^cs^ (liquor, 
fern perchloridi), Clans, xxxvii, 32. 

, diluted, Biroth, xl, 546. 

TARTARUS boraxatus, Ph. Helvetica 
(65), xxxix, 315. Compare Tartar, 

SOLUBLE cream OF ; BORON ET POTASS^E 

tartras. 

DEPURATus. See PoTASSyti bitartras. 

FERRATUS. See FeRRI ET POTASS^ 

TARTRAS. 

martiatus. See Ferri bt potasS/*: 

TARTRAS. 

TARTROGLYCERATES, Berzelius, xxv, 
358, note. 

TARTROMEL ferri iodidi, Horncastle 

(Parrish, 258), xxxi, 64. 
TASMANIA aromatica, xxviii, 72. 
TATULA TURCARUM [— Datura stramoni- 
um)^ xxx, 542. 
TATZE (Abyssinian vermifuge), xxvii, 
475. 



226 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN N^ME OF BASE; 



TAURIN, in muscles of mollusca, Va- 
lenciennes and Fremy, xxviii, 348. 

, ARTIFICIAL, Strecker, xxvii, 21. 

TAX, PATENT MEDICINE, xxii, 287 — Tajloi', 
xxili, 186. Compare Revenue, In- 
ternal. 

TAXODIUM distichum, twist of fibres, 
Braun, xxviii, 67. 

TAXUS BA,ccATA, poisonous property of 
leaves, xxvii, 536; xxxi, 479. 

TEA, 7neinoi.r (preparation; different kinds, 
etc.), Pigou and Chereau, vii, 151 — 
adidteratioti, Chevallier, xvi, 294 — be- 
havior to fused chlorate of potassa, 
Bwttger, XXX, 71 — culture in Brazil, 
xxiii, 275 — in India, xxxii, 183— in 
Tennessee, xlii, 468 — contains 7iian- 
ganese, Botittger, xxx, 71 — oil, fixed, 
Thompson, x, 85 — preparation^ See- 
man, xxiv, 174; Pigou and Chereau, 
vii, 151 — contains qaercetin, Hlasiwetz 
and Molin, xxxix, 320 — rubidium, 



TEPHROSIA APOLLiNEA, leaves, adulter- 
ant of senna, xxi, 364. 

TiNCTORiA, yields blue color, vi, 72. 

viRGiNiANA, antidote to bites of cen- 
tipedes. Wood, jr., xxxviii, 562. 

TEREBINTQINA. See Tdrpentink. 

CANADENSIS. See Balsam fir. 

TEREBINTHUS Americana polyphylla, 
viii, 22. 

TRRMINALIA chebcla, 
of fruitL-i, yields no 
house, xxxiv. 2 54. 

TERPIN, Brandes, x, 1 79— Wiggers, xviii, 
286 — native crystals, Johnson, xxxix, 
223. 

TERRA CAKio-HA. See Rottenstone. 

jAPONicA. See Catechu. 

TEST-TUBES, use at prescription coun- 
ter, Ebert, xlii, 540. 

TETAXIN (irr- Strychnia), Magendie,xxxvi., 
215. 

TETRADENIA zeylaxica, xii, 221. 



vii. 192 — tannin 
rallic acid, Sten- 



Grandeau. 



440 — scenting, Chi- 1 TETRAGONELLA implexicoma, xxviii, 14. 



nese method, xxvii, 529 — statistics 
(China), vii, 157 — tamiin (VV. & B., 
1612), Stenhouse, xxxiv 254 — yield, 
Bowman, xli, 194 — introduction into 
ihe United States^ xxxii. 252. Com- 
pare Theina. 

, beef. See Beef tea. 

, New Jersey. See Ceanothus amer- 

ICANUS. 

, orchid (Angra3cum fragrans), Jack- 
son, xxxviii, 441. 
, Paraciuay. S^^e Ilex paraguaven- 

SIS. 

, strawbebry, Kletzinsky, xxviii, 114. 

TEAKS of fir, Guibourt, xii, 71. 

TEETH, amalgam, Rogers, xxii, 262— cari- 
ous, v'n, 87 — cement, xxx, 182; Oster- 
mayer, xvi, 158 — action of sugar, La- 
rez, xxviii, 221. Compare Tooth. 

TEL.'E.SCIN, Rochleder, xxxv, 290, note. 

TELEGRAPHIC development in 1853,xxv, 
469 ; xxvi, 79. 

TELEGRAPHS in Germany, xxiii, 178— 
in Switzerland, xxviii, 468. 

electric copying, Bakewell, xxiii, 

383. 

WIRES, underground, xxviii, 371. 

TELEOXIDIC constituents. Rose, xxiii, 
365. 

TELLURIUM, subliming temperature, Guy, 
xl, 249. 

and AMMONIA, Fliickiger, xxxvi, 28. 

TEMPERATURE, high, production, Deville, 

xxviii, 447 — Schloessing, xxxviii, 257 

— in stoneware vessels [by paratSn bath), 

Coflfey, xlii, 463. 
REDUCED by solutions of salts, Hana- 

mann, xxxvi, 10 t — Rudorff, xli, 425. 

Compare Cold; Freezing mixture. 
TENNANT'S chemical works, Glasgow, 

Parrish, xxxi, 110. 



TETRAM, Redwood, xli. 380. 
TET R A M ET H Y L A M MO N lUM-io didb, xx v , 
90. 

TETRAONYX, Burmeister, xxxvii. 269. 

TETRASTANNETHYL, xxxv, 219. 

TEUCRIU.VI scoRODONiA yields succiait- 
acid, Walz, xxxiv, 329. 

THALICTRUM flavum, root is rhubarb 
of the beggars, i, 1 50. 

THALLiU detection in bi.vmuth, Bird 

Heraputh, xxxv, 147 extraction, 

Crookes, xxxiii, 362; xxxvi, 42 — in 
furnace products, Roeppert, xxxv, 348 
— poisonous properties, Lamy, xxxvi^ 
77--general properties, Lauay, xxxiv, 
403 — from mother liquor of table salt, 
Boettger, xxxvi, 108 — solubility of salts^ 
Crookes, xxxvi, 144 {^hinoxalate ; car- 
bonate ; iodide ; nitrate ; oxalate ; phos- 
phate ; platinochloride : p/rotochloride ; 
sesquichloride; sulpjhate ; terchr ornate. 

and magnesium alloy, Mellor, xxxix,. 

442 

THAMES, autumn on, xxxii, 563. 

THEA. See Tea. 

THEBAIA. See Paramorphia. 

, methyl-. See Methyl thebaia. 

THEBAICIN, Hesse, xlii, 396. 

THEBENIN, Hesse, xlii. 395. 

THEINA, behax ior to bichromate of potfts- 
sa test, Jenkins, xxxiii, 528 — to sul- 
phuric acid and permangauate.of po- 
tassa, Guy, xxxiii, 526 — in dialysis, 
Graham, xxxiv, 315 — in ,c/wa/-owt/, Sten- 
house (W. & B., 1578), xxix, 68— phy- 
siological action, Albers, xxvii, 108 — 
Leven, xl, 448. 

. Compare Caffbina. 

THEOBROMA bicolor, xiii, 16. 



- CACAO, Vlll, 

Cacao. 



280; xiii. 16. Compare 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



227 



THEOBROMIiVA, behavior to bichromate 
of potassa test, Jenkins, xxxiii, 528 — 
to pentachloride of antimony and 
phosphoric acid, Schulze, xxxii, 138, 
properties, Keller (\¥. & B.,604), 
xxvii, 150 — conversion into cajfeina, 
Strecker (Parrish, 640), xxxiii, 
406. 

THEODORA speciosa, source of African 

guaiacum. vii, 1 15. 
THERMOMETERS, alteration of freezing- 

poimt^ Joule, xxxix, 420. 
— — , SENSITIVE, affected by the moon. 

Joule, XXXV, 336. 
, STANDARD (about crrors acquired 

some time after manufacture), xxxix, 

255. 

THERMOSTAT, Kemp, xxix, 20. 
THESES, Inaugural. See Inaugural 

THESES. 

THEVERESIN, Bias, xli, 310. 

THEVETIA NERiiKOLiA, xli, 310. 

THEVBTINA, Bias, xli, 310. 

THIALDLV, Woehler and Liebig, xix, 237. 

THIBET, tableland, Hooker, xxii, 351. 

THLASPIS RUDERALis, used in Dalmatia 
as insecticide, xxxvi, 66. 

THRIDACE, definition of term, Chevallier, 
v, 66 ; ix, 209 — contains glucose, La- 
hens, xxvii, 71. Compare Lactuca- 

RIUM. 

THUJA articulata, source of sandarac, 
xxix, 229. 

occidentalls, contains quercitrin, 

Hlasiwetz, xxxii, 444. 
THUNDER, theory, Jobert, xxx, 87. 
THUS JUD/EORUM, xxvi, 448. 
THYMENB, Lallemand, xxvi, 282. 
THYMOL, Lallemand, xxvi, 281. 
TIGER LILY, pollen poisonous, Warren, 

xxxv, 79. 

TIKIMMA, description, Griffith, iv, 186. 

TILIA EUROPytJA for paper-making, xxvii, 
42 ; xxviii, 169. 

TIMA. See Crescentia edulis. 

TIMBER, incombustible, Blockey, xxx, 323 
— injurious eff"ects of chemical works, 
XXV, 39 — preservation, Hevcso'.i, xxxi, 
174. Compare Wood. 

TIMOTHY-SEED, amount of starch, Dra- 
gendorft', xxv, 139. 

TIN, account, xxiii, 147 — adhesion to mer- 
cury, Guyton, vi, 306 — behavior to 
weak alkaline solutions, Vogel, xi, 82 
— to fused chlorate of potassa, Boett- 
ger, .^xx, 70 — separation from bismuth, 
Woehler, xxxix, 440 — crystallized from 
Boluiion, Mather, vii, 88 — in proto- 
sulphate of iron, Sirzeau, x, 66 — ac- 
tion on iodides of methyl and ethyl, 
xxxv, 106 — native (in platinum ore), 
Phipson, xxxiv, 543 —ore from Du- 
rango, analysis. Chandler, xxxvii, 
295 — oxide, temperature of reduction 



by hydrogen, Miiller, xxvii, 527; pre- 
paration, Liebife-, xxvii, 527 -linait of 
reaction, Reinsch, xi, 217 — titration, 

Stroraeyer, xxxiii, 405 volatility^ 

Rierasdyck, xli, 424. 

bichloride, behavior to alkaline po- 

lysulphides, Schiff", xxxiii, 265 — as 
solvent for bromine ; iodine ; phos- 
phorus; sulphur, Gerardin, xxxiii, 
214. 

and rromixe, Loewig, ii, 180. 

— cauminate, Luckow, xxxvii, 277. 

FOIL, adulteration, Baldock, xxxiv, 

257 — Vogel, xlii, 402 — preserve.^' 
against influence from the atmos- 
phere, Baudrimont, xlii, 434. 

HYDROCHLORATB as autisepticum , 

Taulfier, vi, 265. 

LACKER, viii, 83. 

LACTATE, Briining, xxx, 423. 

and manganese alloy, Prieger, 

xxxviii, 377, 

and PLATINUM compounds, Kane, 

viii, 81. 

protochloride, behavior to alkaline 

polysulphides, Schiff", xxxiii, 265 — to 
ferroso-ferric oxide, Schober, xlii, 402 
— preparation, Noellner, xx, 40. 

SALT, for cochineal dying, Malegue, 

xxvii, 84. 

TETRACHLORIDE, XXXV, 219. 

TINCTURES, ALCOHOLIC, essay, Personne 
(Compare Parrish, 140; W. & B , 1382), 
xviii, 21, 103 — assay, (yield of alka- 
loids), Gundermann, xxxiii, 216 — dete- 
rioration, Procter, jr., xxxvi, 381 — • 
Bastick (W. & B., 1381, note), xx, 47— 
extemporaneous. Powers, v, 111 — Stab- 
ler, xxi, 5 — maceration and percolation, 
Filhol, xxxi, 251. 

by CIRCULATORY DISPLACEMENT, Bur- 

ton (W. & B., 1382), xxii, 380. 

from JUICES of the plants, iii, 90. 

OFFICINAL (U. S. Ph. (30) ), exam- 
ined, Bringhurst, v, 19. 

. Compare Spiritus. 

Ph. Gallica (26), Prel. No. 67, 100 

— Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix, 529, 
536. 

SATURATED, Stearns, xxix, 526. 

TINCTURA Compare Spiritus. 

ABSiNTHii, Ph. Gallica (26), Prel. No. 

100— Personne, xviii, 106, 121. 

AFJSiNTHii coMPOsiTA, Ph. GalHca 

(26), Prel. No. 102. 

ACONiTi vohii, poisoning, see Mistakes 

— preparation, Soubeiran (fresh plant), 
vi, 134 — Personne, xviii, 110, 122. 

ACONITI RADicis, Procter, jr. [concen- 
trated) XX, 88; xxxiii, 103, 104— 
Fleming (W. & B., 1385, note), xxvi, 
189; xxxiii, 104 — normalis, Procter, 
jr., xxxiii, 103 — Fh. Britannica (64), 
xxxvi, 382. 



228 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE ; 



TINCTURA ALOES, Pb. U. S. (30), yield of 
dry extract^ Bringhurst, v, 20 — Ph. 
Gallica (26), Prel. No. 10— (hops- in 
drachm, Bernouillj, xxxi, 441. 

ALOES COMPOSITA, Ph. Helvetica (65), 

xxxix, 537. 

AMBR.E, Ph. Gallica (26), Prel. No. 71. 

ARNic.fi, Procter, jr., xxxiii, ] 1 — j>oi- 

soninff, see Mistakes. 

• AROMATiOA ACiDA, Ph. Gallica (26), 

Prel. No. 104. Compare Elixir vi- 

TRIOLI MY.NSICHTI ; AuiDUM SULPHURI- 
CUM AROMATICUM. 

ASARi, Ph. Gallica (26), Prel. No.Vl 

Personne, xviii, 111, 114, 122. 

ASPARAGi, Jeaffreson (W. & B., 1468), 

xxvii, 557. 

ASSAFoeTiD.E, drops in fluid drachm, 

Durand, i, 169— Ph. Gallica (26), 
Prel. No. 71. 

ATROPINE, Bouchardat, xxii, 88. 

BALSAMi, Ph. Gallica (26), Prel. No. 

102. 

' BELLADONNy^:, assay, Mayer, xxxv, 28 

— Persenne, xviii, 108, 122. 

BENZOES, Ph. Gallica (26), Prel, No. 

70. 

BBNzoiNi COMPOSITA. See Balsam, 

Turlington. 

Bestuchbpp, Cushman (W. & B., 

1396, note), xxix, 460 ; (correction, 
Tbuja, XXX, 283) — Ph. Borussica, 
xiv, 228— Mayer (W. & B., 1395, note), 
xxiv, 324. 

BUCHU, Ph. Dublin (26), iii, 335. 

CALABAR BEANS. See TlXCTURA PHY- 

sostigmatis. 

CALISAY.-E AROMATICA, SpCUCe, XXX, 46. 

CALUMB^, Ph. U. S (30), ii, 333. 

CANNABIS INDICE, Ph. Dublin (50), 

xxiii, 16 — Hodgson, jr. (with puri- 
fied extract W. & B., 507, note),) xxx, 
115— PA. U. S. (60), remarks, Taylor, 
xxxv, 412. 

cantharidis, yield of dry extract, 

Bringhurst, v, 20— Ph. Gallica (26), 
Prel. No. 101 — Personne, xviii, 118, 
122 — drops in fluid drachm, Durand, 
i, 169. 

ACETiCA, Young, viii, 257. 

^therea, Mettauer (Parrish, 

156), xxvi, 67, note. 
• CAPSici, on deposit, Plummer, xxiv, 

32. 

concentrata, Turnbull, xxii, 

183. 

CARBONis BisuLPHiDi, Wcrtzer, iv, 86. 

CARYOPHYLLi, Ph. GalUca (26), Prel. 

No. 71. 

CASCARiLL^, Ph. Gallica (26) Prel. 

No. 71. 

CASTORBi, drops in drachm, Bernouil- 

ly, xxxi, 441— Ph. Gallica (26), Prel. 
No. 71 — Personne, xviii, 118, 121. 



CATECHU, Ph. Gallica (26), Prel. No. 

101. 

CHBLiDONii, Rademacher, xxiii, 11. 

CIMIClFUGyE ACETICA, Kffihler (W. & 

B., 252), xxxi, 483. 

chloropormi, xxx, 94, is chloroform 

PAREGORIC, Hartshorne, which see. 

ciNCHONyE, Ph. GalHca (26), Prel. No. 

100— Personne, xviii, 29, 30, 121— 
Ph. Dublin (50), xxiii, 16— yield of 
drt/ extract^ Bringhurst, v, 20 — deposit, 
Maisch, xxxiii, 193 — addition of gly- 
cerin, Taylor, xxxviii, 328. 

ACiDULATA, Taylor, xxxvii, 52. 

COMPOSITA, drops in drachm, 

Bernouilly, xxxi, 441— PA. U.S. (60), 
Kenned}^ (wants santalum left out), 
xlii, 303 — Squibb, substitute, see 
Fluid extractum cixcHONiE rubr.k 

compositum Taylor (glycerin), 

xxxviii, 328. 

PERRATA, Thompson, 

xxxi, 187 — Washington formulas, xl, 
238, note. 

PERRATA [deposit), Maisch, xxxiii, 

193— preparation, Parrish (Parrish, 
730), xxviii, 18— Siraes (W. & B., 

1391) , XXV, 402— Taylor, xxv, 294— 
Washington formulas, xl, 238, note. 

FOLK, de Vrij, xxxvi, 427 ; 

xxxvii, 253. 
BT QUASsiyE COMPOSITA, Parrish, 

xxviii, 18. 

cinnamomi. Ph. Gallica (26), Prel. 

No. 71— Personne, xviii, 116, 121. 

COCHLEARI^ COMPOSITA, depOSitS 

crystals of sulphur, xiii, 349. 

, COFFEE, RAW, Langeuschwartz, xxix, 

399. 

coLCHici florum, Luskind (W. & B., 

314, note), xxvi, 280. 
RADicis, Personne. xviii, 111, 

122. 

SEMiNis, drops and minims, Du- 
rand, i, 169 — poisoning, Casper, xxvii, 
539 — Roux, xxviii, 322 — preparation : 
Ph. Dublin (26), iii, 331— Bonnevvyn 
(seeds must be bruised), xxvi, 120 — 
(bruising of seeds),, Maisch (W. & B., 

1392) , xxviii, 514. 
iETHEREA, MettaucF (Par- 
rish, 157), xxvi, 68, note. 

coLUMBO. See Tinctura calumb^:. 

coNii FOLii, Ph. Britannica (64), (is 

inert), Harley, xxxix, 360 — Personne, 

xviii, 109, 122. 
fructus, Ph. Britannica (64), 

(is inert), Harley, xxxix, 272. 
CONTRAYBRV^, i'h. Gallica (26), Prel. 

No. 71— Personne, xviii, 115, 122. 

coPAiB.t;, viii, 258. 

CROCi, Ph. Gallica (26), Prel. No. 71 

— Personne, xviii, 117, 121. 
cuBEByE, Ph. Dublin (26), iii, 332. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



229 



TINOTURA cdbebjE ^therea, Mettauer 
(Parrish, 156), xxvi, 68, note. 

cupRi ACETATis, Radcmacher, xxviii, 

120. 

DIGITALIS FOLii, Ph. Gallica (26), 

Prel. No. 71 — Personne, xviii, 107, 

121 preparation^ Donovan (fresh 

leaves), xi, 204, 213 — yield of dry ex- 
tract, Bringhurst, v, 20 — drops and 
minims, Durand, i, 169. 

y^rrHEREA, Mettaucr, xxvi, 

70, note. 

SEMiNis, Broussard, xxx, 398. 

DULCis, Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix, 

536. 

ergots:, Dewees, ix, 291. 

^THEREA, Mettauer, xxvi, 69, 

note. 

FERRI ACETATIS yETHEREA, Ph. BorUS- 

sica (29), xiv, 229— (46), xxxix, 10. 

FERRI CHLORIDI (cOmpare TiNCTURA 

FERRI PROTOCHLORiDi), drops aqd min- 
ims, Durand, i, 169— P/^. U. S. (30), 

Hopkins, viii, 98 Ph. U. S. (50), 

Caldwell, xxvii, 211 (remarks by 
Procter, jr., xxvii, 212, note) — Cum- 
mings, xxviii, 398 (remarks by Proc- 
ter, jr.. xxviii, 398, note) Fuller, 

xxvii, 212, note — Lemberger, xxxiv, 
191 — Pile, xxxiv, 17 — Sharp, xxvii, 
103, 212, note— Squibb, xxix, 289— 
Thompson, xxix, 299— /'A. U S. (60), 
deposit, Battey, xlii, 207 — Wharton, 
xlii, 107, 301 — preparation, Diehl, jr., 
xxxix, 140 — Mill, xli,457 — Procterjr., 
xxxvii, 327 — Wharton, xxxvii, 446. 

CHLORIDI yETHERBA. See TlNC- 

TUKA BeSTUCHEFP. 

lODiDi, Calloud, xviii, 172 

Pierquin, vi, 178. 
Klaprothi. See Tinctura 

FERRI ACETATIS vETHEREA. 

POMATA, drops in drachm, Ber- 

nouilly, xxxi, 441 preparation, 

Maisch, xxxi, 27. 

PROTOCHLORIDI, Amslcr (sugar), 

xxxiii, 11— Procter, jr. (honey), x, 
274— Stabler (honey), xviii, 122. 

GALL/1-:, limit of reaction with iron 

salts, Hastings, xiii, 204. 

GENTIANS, Ph. Gallica (26), Prel. 

No. 100— Personne, xviii, 106, 121. 

GOSSYPII HERBAGE^:, ShaW (W. & B., 

425), xxvii, 422. 

TETHEREA, Wcttauer, xxvi, 69, 

note. 

GUAiAci (resin), behavior to animal 

charcoal, Weppen, xviii, 203 — drops 
and minims, Durand, i, 169 — yield of 
dry extract, Bringhurst, v, 19 — reac- 
tions, Schiff, xxxii, 442 — action on 
vegetable substances, v. d. Broek, 
xxiii, 185— FA. Gallica (26), Prel. No. 
70— Ph. U. S. (30), ii, 333. 

[1 



(resin) ^thbrea, Mettauer 

(Parrish, 157), xxvi, 68, note. 

(resin) ammoniata, drops and 

minims, Durand, i, 169. 

(wood), Ph. Gallica (26), Prel. 

No. 100. 

haschicin, Laneau, xxviii, 363. 

jetherea, Laneau, xxviii, 363. 

hellbbori albi, Personne, xviii, 112, 

122. 

NiGRi, Ph. Gallica (26), Prel. 

No. 71— Personne, xviii, 113, 122. 
— — HUMULi, Maisch (ground with sand), 
xxx, 14. 

HYDRASTIS COMPOSITA (cclcctic), 

xxvi, 110. 

HYOSCYAMI, Personne, xviii, 109, 122. 

iGNATiy« AMARyE, agaiust cholera in 

India, iii, 266 — preparation, Procter, 
jr. (W. & B., 466), xxix, 109. 

lODiNii, alteration prevented, Dropet, 

xxxiv, 368— Guibourt (W. & B., 1399), 
xix, 54, 56 — drops in drachm, Ber- 
nouilly, xxxi, 441 — for warts, Monelle, 
XXX, 391— PA. Dublin (26), iii, 337— 
Ph. U. S. (30), iii, 85— Ph. Helvetica 
(65), xxxix, 536— Coindet, i, 87— Ma- 
^ gendie, i, 87 — Fahnestock, i, 88. 

DECOLORATA, Curtmau, xli, 345. 

iPECAcuANHyE, Ph. GalHca (26), Prel. 

No. 100 — Personne, xviii, 104, 121. 

^THEREA, Mettauer, xxvi, 69, 

note. 

jALAP^j, behavior to animal charcoal, 

Weppen, xviii, 203 — yield of dry ex- 
tract, Bringhurst, v, 20 — Ph. Gallica 
(26), Prel. No. 100 — Personne, xviii, 
104, 121. 

KALMi^ LATiPOLi^, Stabler, xvi, 245. 

KAMEEL^, xxxii, 325. 

KINO, drops and minims, Durand, i, 

169 — gelatinization prevented, iii, 198, 
291 — Canavan, xxi, 297 — Duhamel, 
xi, 187 — Haselden (glycerin), xxxiii, 
161 — Redwood, xiv, 259 — Ritter, xii, 
94 — Shepherd, xii, 96 — Stabler, xxiii, 
123. 

COMPOSITA, Procter, jr., xli, 389. 

LACTUCARii, Parrish and Bakes, 

xxxii, 229. 

LOBELIA COMPOSITA (eclcctic), xxvi, 

110. 

■ LUPULiNi, Ph. U. S. (30), ii, 333 ; iii, 

85 — yield of dry extract, Bringhurst, 
V, 20. 

AMMONIATA, Duckworth, xli, 

415, 

LYcoPERDi, Cramer, xxxix, 113. 

MATico, Ph. Dublin (50), xxiii, 16. 

MONESivH, Derosne, xiii, 163. 

MoscHi, Ph. Gallica (26), Prel. No. 

71. 

MYRRH^:, ]*h. Gallica (26), Prel. No. 

71 — Personne, xviii, 119, 121 — Ph. 

5] 







230 



SALTS, SEE UNDEK LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



TINCTURA [Continued) 

London (24), Prel. No. 22— Ph. U. 

(30), ii, 333 yield of dry extract^ - 

Bringhurst, v, 20. 
MYRRH/ii and HORAX (by means of - 

glycerin), Baden Benger, xxxvi, 

530. 

, FRAGRANT, xxix, 184. 

NERviNA Bestucheff. See Tinctura - 

Bestucheff. 

Klaprothii. See Tinctura 

PERRi ACETATis ostherea. 

Nucis voMiOyK, Pb. Dublin (26), iii, 

332— Ph. Gallica (26), Prel. No. 101 - 
— Personne, xviii, 103, 121 — prepara- 
tion, Shepherd, xii, 96— F/i. U. S. - 
(60), assay, Mayer, xxxvi, 219 — depo- 
sit, Kennedy, xlii, 298, 392. 

^THERBA, Mettauer, xxvi, 

70, note. 

OPii (simplex), assoj/, Mayer, xxxv, 

398 — dre^jfs, treated with tartaric acid, 
Boswell and Twining, vi, 175 — drop^i 
and minims, Bernouilly, xxxi, 441 ; . 
Durand, i, 169 — yield of dry extract, . 
Bringhurst, v. 20— of different phar- 
macopoeias, Griffith, viii, 112— poison- . 
ing (see Mistakes) — variable strength, 
Christison, x, 127, 128; Southall, 
xxxix, 559 — Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix, 
536— Ph. U. S., Maisch (by percola- 
tion), XXX, 12 — Gross (proposes halt 
alcohol substituted by water), xxxvii, 
249 (remarks by Procter, jr., xxxvii, 
250, note) — Moore (different manipu- 
lation), xli, 406. 

bxtracti, Ph. Gallica (26) 

Prel. No. 101. 

acetata preparation, Thos. 

Evans, Prel. No. 60 Hartshorne, 

Prel. No. 58 ; ii, 334— (by percola- 
tion), Maisch, xxx, \'i—Ph. Gallica 
(37), X, 290— Ph. U. S. (30), ii, 334; 
iii, 85. 

AROMATiCA, Thos. Evaus 

Prel. No. 60. 

AMMONiATA, Ph. Edinburgh 

(30) (contains no morphia,) Gilbert, 
xiii, 263 ; xiv, 177 — (precipitation of 
morphia may be prevented by alco- 
hol), Reinsch, xvi, 235. 

BENzoiCA, Ph. Helvetica (65), 

xxxix, 536. 

CAMPHORATA, Fh. U. S. (40), 

Duhamel, xiv, 283— PA. U. S. (60), 
Moore, xlii, 61— Wharton, xli, 392. 

CROCATA. See Laudanum liqui- 

DUM Sydenhami. 

, denarcotized. Hare, Prel. No. 

86 — Duhamel, xviii, 16. 

DEODORATA, assay, Mayer, xxxv, 

399 preparation, Ebert (benzin), 

xxxix, 193, 196 — Milleman, xli, 4. 

puRiFicATA, Ebert, xxxix, 196. 



PAULLINI7E, Gavrelle, xii, 209 — Des- 

chasteles, xiii, 54. 

PHYsosTiGMATis, Proctcr, jr., xl, 520. 

POLYGAL^], Personne, xviii, 115, 122. 

poTASSii lODiDi, drops and minims, 

Durand, i, 169. 

PRUNi viRGiNiANyqi, Flgucroa, xxx, 

305. 

PYRETHRi, Personne, xviii, 115, 121. 

uosEi (against mosquitoes), Ja- 

ger, xli, 15 — its application followed 
by vesicular eruption, Maisch, xli, 
128. 

QUASSivK, yield of dry extract, Bring- 
hurst, V, 20. 
RHEi, Personne, xviii, 105, 121 — de- 
posit, de la Rue and Miiller (W. & B., 
1407), xxx, 366— FA. U. S. (60), King, 
xlii, 148. 

AQuosA, preparation, Ph. Bo- 

russica (62), xlii, 400— preservation, 
Enz (Appen's method), xxxii, 556 — 
Baumann (sand), xlii, 401. 

DULCis, XXV, 90 — xli, 388. 

viNOSA, drops in drachm, Ber- 
nouilly, xxxi, 441. 
Ros^;, analysis, Enz, xl, 32 — prepa- 
ration. Squire, xxix, 313. 

ROTTLERiTS. See TiNOTURA KAMEKLi^S. 

SABBATIC, D. B. Smith, ii, 215. 

SANGDINARI.1*: .^iTHEREA, MettaUCr, 

xxvi, 69. 

SAPONIS CAMPHORATA. See LlNIMEN- 

TUM SAPONIS OAMPHORATIJM. 

scAMMONii, Ph. Gallica (26), Prel. 

No. 71. 

scn.L.E, Ph. Gallica (26), Prel No. 

101 — Personne, xviii, 113, 122 — yield 
of dry extract, Bringhurst, v, 20. 

^THKREA, Mettauer, xxvi, 69. 

SENEG^E, Ph. Hanoverana (19), ii, 108 

—V. Mons (21), ii, 108. 

SENN^, Personne, xviii, 110, 122. 

SERPENTARLi-J, yield of dry extract, 

Bringhurst, v, 20-Ph. U. S. (20), i, 
269. 

siNAPis, Barbet. See Spiritus sin- 
apis. 

of SOOT, COMPOUND, Duvillard, vi, 325. 

SPiGELi^, yield of dry extract, Bring- 
hurst, V, 20. 

stagonoff, xxvii, 22. 

STRAMONii FOLii, assay, Mayer, xxxv, 

27— Personne, xviii, 108, 122. 

STRAMONII SEMiNis, assay, Mayer, 

xxxv, 27. 

succiNi, Ph. Gallica (26), Prel. No. 

69. 

SUMBUL. 

TOLU, Ph. Gallica (26), Prel. No. 70. 

TONIC. See Tinctura cinchon.e et 

QUASSlv*: COMPOSITA. 

VALERIANJ5, Ph. Gallica (26), Prel. 

No. 100— Personne, xviii, 112, 122— 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 



231 



TINCTURA [Continued). 

drops and minims, Durand, i, 169 — 
yield of dry extract, Bringhurst, v, 20. 

yETHEREA, drops in drachm, 

Bernouillj, xxxi, 441. 

AMMONiATA, drops and minims, 

Durand, i, 169. 

VANILLA, Ph. Batavia (12), xiii, 194. 

VEBATRi^E, Duhamel, ix, 188. 

VERATRi viRiDis, Norwood (W. & B., 

853), xxT, 112— Maryland College of 
Pharmacy, xxix, 474. 

of VIRGIN BALSAM. See Balsamito. 

VULNERARIA ACiDA, Ph. Helvetica, 

xxxix, 537. 

ziNGiBKRis, Ph. London (24), Prel. 

No. 22— Personne, xviii, 116, 122. 

TINKALZITE (4/nca),composition, Kletz- 
insky, xxxiv, 61 — [Peru], composi- 
tion, Phipson, xxxiv, 60, 61. 

TINNING, Weil, xxxviii, 176— Roseleur 
and Boucher, xxvii, 268 — Ruolz,xv,64. 

; of SAUCEPANS, Gobley, xli, 142. 

TISANE PORTABLE DE SALSEPAREILLE, Bc- 

ral, ii, 67. 

TISSUE, agglutinative. Fort, xxxvii, 254. 

TITANIUM, properties, Deville, xxvii, 440 
— electroplating, Junot, xxv, 319. 

and ALUMINIUM, crystallized com- 
pound, Michel, xxxiii, 220. 

AMMONio-iODiDE, Reade, xsx, 58. 

TITLES, Parrish, xxxix, 239— Harrop, xli, 
221— Procter, jr., xli, 221. 

TOAD, African, its poison, xxix, 85. 

TOBACCO. See Tabacum ; Niootiana ta- 

BACUM. 

TODDALIA LANCEOLATA (African cubebs). 
Archer, xxxvii, 188. 

TOLENE, Kopp (W. & B., 157), xx, 118. 

TOLU. See Balsamum tolu. 

TOLUIDIN (from coal tar), xxxiii, 41— 
(from nitro-benzoine), Muspratt and 
Hoffmann, xx, 118 — boiling point and 
specific gravity, Depoully, xxxviii, 544. 

TOLUOL (from coal tar), xxxiii, 41 — boil- 
ing point, Depoully, xxxviii, 544. 

TOMATO, its acid, Lancaster, xxxi, 196— 
analysis of juice, Enz, xxxiv, 515 — of 
leaves and juice, Fodere and Heckt, 
iv, 224 — Plummer, xxiii, 165. 

TOMMON, V, 325. 

TONICS, vegetable, of the United States, 
Griffith, V, 232. 

TONKA, in whooping cough, Cooper, xli, 
27 — origin, vii, 118 — in perfumery, 
Piesse, xxvi, 558. 

TOOT-POISON of New Zealand, Lindsay 
(W. & B., 1504), xxxvi, 257. 

TOOTH-ACiiE, remedies (atropine sulphas), 
Percy, xli, 127, 203— (gelatinized 
chloroform (W. & B., 963), xxxiii, 
338 — (morphia in nitric acid), Calvy, 
xxxiii, 474 — (conia), Rcid, xxx, 400 
— (sulphate of alumina and nitric 



ether), xli, 405 — (friction with salts 
of morphia), Ehrard, xviii, 235 — 
(root of Medicago sativa), iv, 350 — 
(oil of turpentine), Whipple, xxvi, 
302 — (chloride of zinc), Stanelli, xvi, 
79. 

BRUSH (Medicago sativa), iv, 350. 

cement. See Cement. 

PASTE (oxide and chloride of zinc), 

xxxi, 478 (odontine), Winckler, 

xxxiv, 333. 

POWDER, Beaumer, xxxviii, 538 — De- 

nique, xxxi, 232 — Francis, xxxviii, 
537, 540 — Hainaut, xxv, 213 — Hippo- 
crates (charcoal and chalk), xxxviii, 
538 — Hufeland, xxxviii, 538 — Maisch. 
(calamus), xxxii, 115 — Maury, xxxviii, 
538— Mialhe (Parrish, 3'.9), xvii, 79 — 
Pelletier, ii, 342 —(carbonized rye), 
xxxiv, 92 — (kaolin and tannin), xxxvi, 
312. 

TOPINAMBOURS blancs, xxxii, 291. 

TORMENTILLA, analysis, Rembold, xl, 
311 — loss in powdering, Redwood, xxi, 
31 — amount o^ tannin. Bowman, xxvii, 
54— Muller, xxxi, 429. 

TORREYA CALiFORNicA (California nut- 
meg), Carson, xxvi, 500 — Torrey, 
xxvi, 248. 

MUCIFEBA, xxvi, 248. 

TAXiFOLiA, xxvi, 247. 

TOSTAO HERVA, Carson, xvii, 82. 

TOULOUCOUNIN, Caventou, xxxi, 231. 

TOURMALINE, artificial. Young, xxxv, 
135. 

TOW, absorbing power for water, Rusch- 
enberger, xxxv, 161. 

TOXICODENDRON, active principle, 
Maisch, xxxviii, 4 — ajialysis of leaves, 
Khittel (W. & B., 838), xxx, 542— its 
antidote, Canfield (W. & B., 838), 

xxxii, 412 — influence of drying, 
Schoonbroodt, xli, 322 — poisoning, 
Procter, jr., (W. &B., 837), xxxv, 506; 
Moorman, xxxviii, 322 

TOXICOLOGY, contributions, Maisch, 
commenced, xxvii, 533 — as a branch 
of pharmaceutical education, Pharma- 
ceutical Society, London, xiv, 85 — 
set at naught by hypodermic injections, 
Duffield, xxxix, 39. 

TRACHYLOBIUM mossambicense yields 
copal. Kirk, xli, 441. 

TRAGACANTII, account, Siminonds, xxix, 
79 — adulterations, Maltass, xxvii, 423 
— composition, Bucholz; Guerin (W. 
&B, 840), iv, 161, 164; Fliickiger, 
xli, 441 — nature (transformed cell), 
Kiitzing, xxv, 37; Mohl (W. & B, 
840), xxxi, 461 — yield of mucic acid, 
Guerin, iv, 165 — powder, adulteration, 
ii, 247 — loss, i, 138; Covell, xxxix, 
116; Redwood, xxi, 31 — properties^ 
Guibourt, vi, 43. 



232 



SALTS, SEE UNDER LATIN NAME OF BASE; 



TRAGACANTH, Afkican, Fluckiger, xli, 
439. 

, FALSE. See Gum Caramania. 

, PSBUDO-, Guibourt, ri, 45. Com- 
pare Gum sassa. 

PASTE. See Paste. 

. Compare Astragalus. 

TRAGACANTHIN, Guibourt, vi, 44. Com- 
pare Bassorin ; Cerasin. 
TRAUMATICIN, Eulenburg, xxvii, 314. 
TRAVELS, pharmaceutical notes, Farrish, 

xxxi, 1, 97, 209— Procter, jr., xl, 17, 

177, 518 ; xli, 8, 108. 
TREES, DWARF, Chinese, xxxvi, 323. 
, MAMMOTH, California, xxvi, 470 — 

Australia, Miiller, xl, 49. 

twist of FIBRE, etc., Braun, xxviii, 66. 

protected against rabbits, mice, etc., 

with blood, xxxii, 275, 
TREHALOSE, distinction from melezi- 

tose, Berthelot, xxxi, 62, 
TRICHILIA moschata, v, 145. 
TRICHINA spiralis, Bocking, xlii, 213. 
TRICHLORACETAL, composition, etc., 

Martins and Mendelsohn-Bartholdy, 

xlii, 455, 456. 
TRICHLORACETYL-oxYDHYDRAT=Chlo- 

ral hydrat, xlii, 73. 
TRICHLORACETOXYL-wasserstoff = 

Chloral hydrat, xlii, 73. 
TRICHLORMETHYL-hydrocarbonoxyd 

zi= Chloral hydrat, xlii, 73. 
TRIETHYLAMIN (in beet root molasses), 

Nickles, xxxviii, 506. 
TRIETHYL-PHOSPHINE, XXXV, 12. 
TRIFOLIUM. See Menyanthes trifoli- 
ata. 

TRIGLA LYRA, iii, 18. 
TRIGONELLA suaviss[ma, xxviii, 74. 
TRIGONOTHECA serrata, xxv, 233, note. 
TRILLIUM, analysis, Wayne (W. & B., 

1616), xxviii. 512. 
TRIMETHYLAMIN, behavior to iodohy- 

drargyrate of potassa, and nitrate of 

silver, Mayer, xxxvii, 211 — in wine, 

Ludwig, xl, 333. 
TRIMETHYLPHOSPHINE, xxxv, 12. 
TRINIDAD, oil lake, xxxvi, 332. 
TRINITROCUMOL, xxxvii, 312. 
TRIOSTEUM PERFOLiATUM, as cathartic, 

V, 208. 

TRISTANNETHYL, xxxv, 219. 
TRITICUM sativum. See Wheat. 
TROCHISCI. Compare Lozenges ; Pas- 
tilles. 

acacia, Schmitz, xvi, 239. 

ACiDi lactici, Magendie, vii, 263. 

altHvE^, Schmitz, xvi, 239. 

ASPARAGi, Latour and Roziers, vi, 

125. 

Bechici, Schmitz, xvi, 239. 

calami, Maisch, xxxii, 114. 

calcis hyposulphitis, Laneau, xxxv, 

225. 



CATECHU (Parrish, 279), xiii, 104. 

cachou. See Cachou. 

cinchona, Schmitz, xvi, 240. 

CUBEBIN, Labelonye, viii, 317, 318. 

EFFERVESCBNTES, Schmitz, xvl, 240. 

FERRi carbonatis, Duhamcl, xiv, 100. 

lODiDi, Dupasquier, xiii, 121 — 

Pierquin, vi, 178, 
LACTATis, xiii, 105 — Cap (W. & 

B., 1138), xii, 228. 

ET MANGANBSII LACTATIS, Burin, 

XXV, 175. 

ET MAGNESIA CITRATIS, V. d. 

Corput, xxii, 314. 
ipecacuanhjE, Vandamme, viii, 337 

Schmitz, xvi, 240. 
PAULLiNiyE, Gavrelle, xii, 208 — De- 

chasteles, xiii, 54. 
rhei, Schmitz, xvi, 240. 

SANGUINARI^E CANADENSIS, XXX, 93. 

SANTONiNi, XXX, 124 — Daunecy, xl, 

330. 

coMPOSiTi, Fougera, xxxvi, 100. 

STRUMALES, Schmitz, xvi, 240. 

VANILLA, Soubeiran, xiii, 194. 

Vichy, Schmitz, xvi, 240. 

TROPHIS ANTHROPOPHAGORUM, XXXV, 350. 

TROPIA, Kraut, xxxvi, 232 — Mayer, xxxvi, 
234— Pfeiffer, xxxvi, 229. 

ATROPiATE, Kraut, xxxvi, 233. 

TRUMPET PLANT (Sarracenia flava) in 
diarrhoia. Palmer, xli, 292, 396. 

TUBES, COPPER, made by galvanic pro- 
cess, xxxii, 464. 

, PAPER, bitumenized, Jaloureau, xxxii, 

276. 

TUBERCULOSIS and hypophosphites, 

Churchill, xxx, 143, 462. 
TUNGSTEN (Wolframium) metallic^ 

xxxvii, 465 — electroplating, Junot, xxv, 
318. 

and ALUMINIUM, crystallized com- 
pound, Michel, xxxiii, 220. 
TURBITH ROOT, analysis, Andouard, 

xxxviii, 209 — its resin, a glucoside, 
Spirgatis, xxxi, 379. 

TURBITH, NITROUS, mineral (bibasic ni- 
trate of mercury), Aentle, xxx, 394. 

TURLINGTON'S balsam. See Balsam, 
Turlington. 

TURNIPS, leaves, amount of silica, Ander- 
son, xxxv, 163 — Teltow, amount of 
starch, DragendorfF, xxxv, 139. 

TURPENTINE, origin and distinctive char- 
acters of different kinds, Guibourt, 
xii, QQ—selidified, Faure (W. & B., 
834), ii, 168; iii, 42 — yields acetic acid 
by dry distillation, Grimm, xxxiii, 
113 — camphor, see Terpin. 

, Alsace, Guibourt, xii, 126. 

, Bordeaux, Guibourt, xii, 74,135,137. 

, Boston, Guibourt, xii, 136. 

, Chian, Guibourt, xii, 67, 136— Mal- 

tass, xxx, 321 — Siramonds, xxix, 136. 



PREPARATIONS, UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE CLASS. 233 



TURPENTINE, citron, Guibourt, xii, 74, 
126. 

, COMMON, Guibourt, xii, 74. 

of Epicia, Guibourt, xii, 137. 

of FIR. See Balsam of Canada. 

of LARCH, Guibourt, xii, 70, 136. 

, Strassburg, Guibourt, xii, 74. 

, Venice, Guibourt, xii, 72, 126. 

TURPETHUM. See Turbith root. 



TURTLE, composition of Carapace, Fre- 
my, xxxvii, 256. 

TUTTY, PREPARED, adulteration, Hodg- 
son, jr., vi, 6. 

TUTU. See Tootoo. 

TYPHA AROMATiCA (= Acorus calamus), 
V, 265. 

TYPHUS, due to a peculiar fungus, Hal- 
lier, xii, 143. 



UCIA canescens, xii, 434. 

ULMARIA MAJOR TRiFOLiA (= Gillenia 
trifoliata), iv, 177. 

ULMUS CAMPESTRis, yields kinone, Sten- 
house, xxvi, 252. 

FULVA, time of collection^ Procter, jr., 

xxviii, 412 in Michigan^ Stearns, 

xxxi, 32 prevents rancidity of fat, 

Wright (W. & B., 843), xxiv, 180. 

ULTRAMARIN (true), blue coloring mat- 
ter, Schweigger-Seidel, ii, 136. 

, ARTIFICIAL, composition^ etc., Robi- 

quet, xix, 105 — preparation (W. & B., 
1617), ii, 142— Gentele, xxx, 162— (in 
Nuremberg), xxviii, 416 — Robiquet, 
xix, 106 — Kublmann (with baryta in- 
stead of soda), xxxi, 139— purified, 
Chevallier, xix, 320 — test for purity, 
Bernheim, xxv, 463. 

, GREEN, Gentele, xxx, 160. 

VLYAlactuca ; umbilicalis, percentage 

of iodine, Meyer, xxvi, 439. 

linza ; pavonia, contain iodine, 

Sarphati, Davy, Balard, xxvi, 439. 

UMBELLIFERON (in mezereon), Zwen- 
ger, xxxiii, 327. 

UNCARIA GAMBiR, ir, 54 — xxiv, 377. 
Compare Catechlt. 

UNGUENTA, Ph. Helvetica (65), xxxix, 
537. 

UNGUENTUM. Compare Ceratum, Oint- 
ment. 

AciDi sulphurici, Ph. Dublin (26), 

iii, 333. 

AC'ONiTi^, Purrish (Parrish, 767), 

xxviii, 19 — Procter, jr., xxxiii, 102 — 
TurnbuU, vii, 146. 

ACONiTi, Ambr. Smith, xxviii, 20. 

AMMONiACALB, Gondrct (W. & B., 99), 

xviii, 160. 

AMMONii lODiDi, Chs. Ellis, vii, 284. 

CONTRA ALOPECIAM. See PoMATUM, 

FALLING OUT OP HAIR. 

ANTiMONii, Griffith, iv, 199. 

ANTIPERIODIOUM, XVl, 238. 

AQUvE See (^OLD CREAM. 

ARGENTF NiTRATis, Guthric, vii, 347. 

BELLADONNyE, Ph. Helvetica (65), 

xxxix, 537. 



BENzoiNATUM, Dcschamps, XV, 260 — 

Eberle, xxxix, 349 — Doliber, xxxix, 
63; xl, 33 — Procter, jr., xxxv, 114. 

CADMii lODiDi, Heinitsh (Parrish, 

455), xxxiv, 382. 

CAMPHORS (W. & B., 197, note), 

xxxiii, 381. 

CANTHA